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-1

It seems particularly difficult to establish 'rules' here as the examples above show. We could probably say, however (correct me if I am wrong) that if prerequisite is intended as an adjective, then the adjectival form is most commonly followed by 'to': e.g., The satisfactory completion of French I is prerequisite to enrolment in French II.


0

"To look into" is the phrasal verb meaning "to investigate". "To look in" would be to cast a look inside.


3

This is a style issue, and the appropriate style for you to use depends on which style guide you or your publisher or school generally follows and whether that guide specifies a rule for handling military (or other hierarchical) titles. The influential (in the United States) Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), lays out one approach: Titles ...


-3

All titles are capitalized. Verbs aren't. When using captain in sentences, capitalize it when referring to an individual, even if not by name. As @Oldcat suggested, you would capitalize in a sentence starting with "The Captain..." because you're referring to one person, who has the title of Captain. But when you're using the word to refer to captains ...


0

This is purely a matter of taste, with perhaps British speakers generally preferring the "would suggest" and Americans the "suggest". Pedantics might also propose "I (would) suggest that you go" or "I (would) suggestyour going"


0

Here's one more perspective. Turabian/Chicago (a very good style guide!) says: "Italicize isolated words and phrases in foreign languages likely to be unfamiliar to readers of English, and capitalize them as in their language. ... Do not italicize foreign terms familiar enough to appear in Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary." p. 312 --Now it gets ...


3

If you want a certain style guides opinion, then you italicize just the first occurrence: "7.49 Italics for unfamiliar foreign words and phrases Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers... If a foreign word becomes familiar through repeated use throughout a work, it need be ...


2

Italicize in all instances. For example see mise en abyme here. ...Also "unheimlich" here. EDIT: I want to hedge my original response by pointing out that both the MLA and Chicago style guides seem to disagree with me. Both argue that only the first instance should be italicized, unless there is a very long space of text between them. It's not clear ...


1

If you are under instructions not to use "for example" in a paper, I can't imagine that using e.g. (short for "exempli gratia," which in Latin—according to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary—means "for example") will take care of the problem—unless your adviser is easily bamboozled by abbreviations or really loves Latin. Like Drew in the ...


1

If there were no quotation marks in the message Imagine that the punctuation of the posted example had not included any quotation marks: You must post precautions for usage, etc. where applicable. In that case, adding a comma after etc. would be consistent with the style advice offered by Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Edition (2003): 6.22 "Etc. ...


0

I can't provide any sources (at least, not yet) but you might find this anecdote interesting. I can't vouch for its accuracy, but it does make sense. My wife is a hotelier, currently as a General Manager, and in that industry they often use persons. Naturally, I asked why. The answer I got is that persons is used for individuals. "Twenty persons" is twenty ...


2

Michael Swan (Practical English Usage, 2005.524) notes "Persons is sometimes used as a plural of person in official language" (my emphasis added). This supports my own view that we need never use persons in our own personal or business life. Leave it for the lawyers and law-makers to write such titles as The Value Added Tax (Vehicles Designed or Adapted for ...


-1

I am wondering if the capitalization is correct in this case because the "T" in "Tilt" in the second line is continuation of the first line. This looks like "Instruction manual English", judging by the way the sentence is formed. The capitalisation of 'T' in Tilt is almost certainly an error. As is common in this kind of text, the author's style ...


1

I could see several headings: possible next steps future lines of questioning potential directions interesting extensions where next quo vadis (if you want to be pretentious) ...



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