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I'm not a professional poetry-interpreter, but my understanding of it would be: "My cup is full" indicates that he thinks he has already led a full (and presumably happy) life, and "let it spill" extends that metaphor to indicate acceptance of dying (having that life spill out and vanish, possibly invoking imagery of blood draining away). Thus the whole ...


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How about Sacred Sunday, for sacred music: cantata, mass, hymn, oratorio, requiem, etc.


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It looks good to me that way. I would, however, get rid of all those extraneous uses of "or" to make: Even if I seem too busy, you made a mistake, someone we care about will be upset, or you feel embarrassed—if anything bothers you, I want to know. edit: even better, I'd swap the clauses: If anything bothers you, I want to know–even if I seem too ...


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That appears to be what we call a "typographical disaster". What looks like the lead paragraph (or lede paragraph) is probably supposed to be a call-out, but there isn't enough to differentiate it from the running text. Ordinarily, a call-out would have different margins, a significantly larger font size, a different typeface or style, borders, or a ...


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In academic and formal writing, I think it's a useful word, though I agree it's not so common. It's less wordy than some of the alternatives proposed here (e.g., "In a related vein"). And it means something slightly different from some of the alternatives proposed here (like "similarly" or "likewise"). For example: "Employees at company X have higher morale ...


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It is usually not recommended to mix up different dialects of a language in one text. If you are describing different characters that speak different dialects, of course, their speech can be in the appropriate dialect. Apart from that (direct speech), every style guide I have ever seen recommends that first and foremost, you must be consistent in your ...


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A few only with countable nouns. Generally a low quantity. A few people helped me finish. A bit of only with uncountable nouns. Low quantity. A bit of help goes a long way A lot of with either countable or uncountable nouns. High quantity. A lot of people know me! Now by adding quite to these, they reduce the idea of a lot, and they increase the ideas of ...


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It means, "Today isn't really soon enough." (If I could, I would turn back the clock to yesterday to have those reports delivered.)


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Also, I would probably say "There are quite a lot of words on the page", but "There are quite a few words on the page" also sounds correct. However, "quite a bit" doesn't work in the same context.


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Regarding the fact that I agree with you about the same meaning of quite a <COUNT-WORD> and many. I think these there have the exact same meaning but they better be used when they fit in the context of the sentence although they can be replace each other pretty freely. For example, I It's better to say "He wrote quite a few words about recent ...


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I don't have information about the history of this, so I'm just responding to the second part of your question. Why should there be no comma before 'and'? The answer is simple - there has never been a convention for adding a comma (as far as I know) for mentioning two items: I like apples and oranges or She doesn't mind running or swimming. The problem comes ...


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No, these differences are not strongly associated with any particular style. The "above-referenced" style is sometimes considered slightly more formal but that is a description of the style -- it isn't a specific style comes with its own term. It is completely possible that various styles do have a preference on which to use but I don't have a list of such ...


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Any of these forms would be correct: Inside the box there were five apples. Inside the box were five apples. There were five apples inside the box. Inside the box there are five apples. Inside the box are five apples. There are five apples inside the box. Examples (1-3) all mean the same thing. Examples (4-6) all mean the same thing. I'm pretty ...



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