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0

Units of Weight and Measure, International (Metric) and U.S. Customary, National Bureau of Standards Miscellaneous Publication 286, May 1967, page 10, says, "No period is used with symbols for units." The table of units that follows on that same page includes symbols for both SI (metric) and U.S. customary units without trailing periods, making it clear ...


2

Yes, certainly. The roots are archaic, going back to the distinction of animate vs. inanimate or the quick vs. the dead. "Still" denotes motionless, but has, at the very least, poetic ties to death. I would not go so far as to say it has connotations of death without some sort of context indication like a reference to breath or body, or the addition of ...


2

Probably the following saying suggests what you are referring to, but generally I'd say that "still" just suggest being immobile: Still as death: (Cliché) immobile; completely still. (The reference to death gives this expression ominous connotations. *Also: as ~.) George sat as still as death all afternoon. When the storm was over, ...


2

... in terms of English Language and Usage? Yes! That is perfectly comprehensible Does it match APA, Chicago, or other fetishistic style guides? No! If you expect that you will be judged according to a particular formal code then choose and follow a style guide (and know which one, since they contradict each other).


0

The advice about bracketing commas was poor, since the 'and' is introducing a clause so it deserves its own comma. Any adverbial clause can be marked by commas, but they can sometimes be omitted: your hypothetical 'therefore' is also adverbial and could be stated: ', therefore,'. 'I am good at reading, and writing' could mean: 'I am good at reading, and [I ...


3

Whether to add a comma after viz.—or, for that matter, after e.g. or i.e.—is a style question that different style guides answer differently. For example, The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) has this: Do not confuse 'e.g.' (exempli gratia), meaning 'for example', with 'i.e.' (id est), meaning 'that is'. Compare hand tools, e.g. hammer and screwdriver with ...


4

When two words are frequently used together people might start to hyphenate them, and then some time later they might start to concatenate them. It's a question of you having a feel for the usage and seeing which you are most comfortable using and with what audience, e.g. 'blogpost' with Tumbloggers and 'blog post' with your parents. But maybe that's your ...


0

All of these Latin abbreviations are used adverbially, so they should be followed by commas to mark them as such.


2

Some U.S. style guides recommend hyphenating a "more [adjective]" phrase when the writer's intention is to express more in its qualitative (rather than quantitative) sense. The first step in enforcing this distinction is to see whether the phrase without hyphenation could be read as using more in a quantitative sense. In the poster's example, the phrase ...


1

The hyphen is not appropriate. "More" in the sentence is functioning as an adverb which describes the word immediately following it, "realistic." If "more" were intended to describe the number of scenes, then it would function as an adjective. If it were an adjective, then it would need to be separated from the other adjectives preceding the noun by ...


1

I don't think hyphenation of more and realistic would be as much a solution as putting a comma or and between the two if you want more to modify scenes. Viewers can watch more, (or and) realistic 3D scenes and interact... There could ambiguity in your sentence where more could be seen modifying either realistic or scenes if you don't pay close ...


1

"viewers can watch a more realistic 3D scene and interact..." "a more realistic" –Google, +20 million hits


3

References to dates are prevalent in computing. Besides building date validations in code, the working of a date field must be correctly referenced in system messages. It is always better to use descriptive statements (earlier/later) rather than quantifying it (lower/higher). Use later to indicate that event is happening subsequent to a reference date (date ...


0

I would format and punctuate the quoted sentence as follows, based on your comment to Ant that the words "What do coffee pickers with burros think about all day?" represent the title of a book: What is the purpose of human existence, or is it meaningless? is the question asked by Juan Valdez in What Do Coffee Pickers with Burros Think About All Day? (p. ...


0

Punctuation is a matter of style, and as such you should be guided by your manual of style. I use the Chicago Manual of Style, which recommends that "interrogative elements" within a sentence should end with a question mark. Thus What is the purpose of human existence, or is it meaningless? is the question asked by Juan Valdez in What Do Coffee ...


0

The answer to your question depends in-part on what Valdez's text is. It looks like it's a book, so it ought to be italicised, or in single quotes, as I've done below: "What is the purpose of human existence, or is it meaningless?" is the question asked by Juan Valdez in, 'What do coffee pickers with burros think about all day' (p. 80).


0

If I was editing this sentence, I would change all of the punctuation. The part before the colon is its own sentence, and the part after the colon is punctuated like an itemized list, but it is not an itemized list. Where the semi-colons are is an “or,” not an “and.” The final word is also spelled incorrectly. I suggest this: I find an airplane’s ...


2

It appears that in the British English corpus the hyphenated version, non-stop music (blue line), is much preferred. Whereas in American English, the spelling nonstop music (red line) is overwhelmingly preferred, and has been since the 1980s. Dictionary.com informs that nonstop (without a space) was first used between 1900 and 1905. Choose whichever ...


1

The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) does a nice job of identifying where mainstream UK and U.S. style preferences tend to diverge on the issue of how to handle prefixes such as non-: 5.10.2 Prefixes and combining forms Words with prefixes are often set as one word, but use a hyphen to avoid confusion or mispronunciation, particularly where there is a ...


0

One has to differentiate between English in the traditional Oxford form or the Webster interpretation which is much more accepting of colloquialism. The correct Oxford English would be: non-stop


0

There is no such thing as proper spelling, only what is popular at the moment or idiomatic to a country or region. Consider that the taste of food is spelled either "flavor" or "flavour" and that "tomorrow" used to be spelled "to-morrow" (as was to-day) and I think you'll see that. Personally, I would opt for "non-stop" however I am sure there are many ...


0

Non is a prefix, so using non stop (two words) is incorrect. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/non- Both forms are used, but a Google search of non-stop yields 347,000,000 results, and a Google search on nonstop yields 83,800,000 results. So as far as usage, non-stop is used four times more often than nonstop.


-1

As has been stated, the sun is neuter, grammatically speaking. However, speaking literarily, the most common anthropomorphic usage nowadays seems to call the sun masculine and the moon feminine. This is probably a grossly sexist practice, referring to the sun as the primary power and the moon reflecting its' (his) light.


0

Neither CMOS, Grammarly Handbook, nor CCC give any indication that one would not italicize when within quotes. Quotation marks don't change the rules. As for italicizing tavern names, that's new to me. Or methinks maybe someone's been reading J. R. R. Tolkien.


1

Sun and moon are neuter, in the ordinary fashion of English nouns. (As opposed to German or French, representing the two relevant traditions: germanic and romance). Any departure from that marks some degree of license. It is important to notice that grammatical gender was manifest in (early) Old English: sun was feminine. This is probably Tolkien's ...


1

As any speaker can tell you, the Sun in English is generally neuter. We call it an it rather than a he or a she. Granted, you might have people like J. R. R. Tolkein calling it female, but you also have him talking about magic rings, elves, and wizards. It's fiction. When English was more German based, the Sun was female. However, the Romans came and so ...


0

I prefer to use 'its'. 'His' and 'her' may be used to create an impact as per the theme, or be used to implement personification


0

You would use quotation marks. You're reporting what it is "called." When you borrow a word or phrase from someone else as I just did from you, then that is precisely what quotation marks are for.


0

Putting quotes around something is called scare quotes. They are only used when: a) the term is being used in a non-standard way b) to mark off irony I assume that you are not using "bar" in an ironic context, so it boils down to a question: are you using "bar" in a non-standard way? For example, you wouldn't put quotes around the following: DNA is ...


5

My answer focuses on the header question about decades—which is the question that most readers will probably expect to find answers to here. With regard to decades expressed in numerals rather than spelled out in letters, some style guides recommend omitting an apostrophe, while others recommend including it. For example, from The Chicago Manual of Style, ...


2

When writing a letter, as a matter of style and etiquette, it is rarely necessary (or appropriate) to resort to the use of bold, italics or underlining. One should choose words and phrases carefully to clearly communicate your meaning instead of resorting to typographical emphasis. This is, of course, just my opinion. However, the use of bold and underlining ...


0

Yes, when is necessary to communicate that the statement applies at times when sport is "being done" (presumably by an individual). "...vital aspects doing sports" This would make aspects the subject, ie. you'd be stating that the "aspects" themselves are engaging in a sporting activity. This of course does not make sense.



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