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1

The first case, "once again", connotes a feeling of willingness to repeat the action with the hope of it being a final iteration. The second case, "again", lacks the connotation, leaving reiteration more open ( no specification of speaker's feeling about it ). Examples: "Once again, I let the dog out. I hoped it would be the last time today." ( first case ...


1

Since you're pointing to a specific thing on the page numbered 312, nothing else matters. That is, the total number of pages in the work is irrelevant since you're only talking about one thing on one of the pages. So the best way to say this is "the table on page 312."


0

There are several ways of paraphrasing that phrase, with subtle differences in each case: There is an improvement by a factor of two or three. This is improved twice or thrice. (if you want to be archaic...) This has improved twice or thrice. This has been improved twice or thrice. There is an improvement in the range of two or three ...


14

Since you ask about sentences that begin with a number, it seems relevant to note that many style guides advise against using a numeral at the beginning of a sentence. And if you spell out the opening number as a word, the question of whether the next word in the sentence should be capitalized doesn't come up. Here are some stylebook guidelines on this ...


1

In good-old-days of typewriters - the only way of highlighting anything in the paper was "CAPITALIZING", or Underlining or some special characters. In the modern times, when it is given that you are going to use some word software - styling can be done in many ways. In general, excessive underlining or CAPITALIZING is really not seen as good formatting. ...


0

Only the second is correct, as the elements in the list are separate/individualized and not a compound. Your sentence is not clear as to what "which" refers to. Fix: The assets of the thesis are the parser library, the tag library [,] and the external database, all of which can be used in other applications. Also, an Oxford comma is required in AmE before ...


1

The most extensive discussion of footnote capitalization that I've found is in Words Into Type, third edition (1974): Capitalization. Footnotes ordinarily begin with a capital and end with a period, but occasionally, in a book in which capitals are used sparingly, footnotes may begin with a lowercase letter. [Examples:] 1 p. 63 ...


4

Possible fixes: Blue data is better than red data. Standard algorithms, on the other hand, are all written with red data in mind and don't work on blue data. Violet algorithms handle blue data as well as red data, yet they are very slow. Blue-only algorithms can process blue data really fast, even though most blue data is mixed with a small percentage of ...


2

In many cases cases you use however improperly, and you refer to the wrong points. In addition to 'however' the formal writing connectors can be although whereas while whilst I rewrote your piece, with my suggestions in bold and unnecessary words in [brackets] Blue data is better than red data, although standard algorithms [, however,] are all ...


2

Yes, however is fine and extremely common in scientific writing. There's nothing wrong with but either, by the way. You can also use other alternatives. For example: Blue data is better than red data. Standard algorithms, however, are all written with red data in mind and don't work on blue data. Violet algorithms handle blue data as well as red data, ...


2

If you start the statement with "while" or "although" once in a while, you can cut out some of the "however's".


1

I have no sources for this, but it should either be capitalized, in which case the footnote is an incomplete sentence, because the subject (the word that Which refers to) is missing (In this case, the footnote number in the main sentence should come after the period: “[…] heterogeneous.1”, because the footnote is a sentence of its own, and having a full ...



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