Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

This refers to something specific - this book is a good read this happiness I feel Such contextualises the 'something' with similar 'somethings' such books (i.e. books like this) always sell well before Christmas such anger (i.e. anger like this) will end badly


2

Well, the requested information sounds stilted to me (British English native speaker). I suggest: Open the email with a bit more than 'Hi'. E.g.: Hi, thanks for getting back to me. Rather than 'the requested information', use 'my phone number': My phone numbers are 0000000 (primary) and 0000000 (secondary). Conclude the email with a ...


2

The best way to write “nota bene” is Please Note:.


-4

If you are asking specifically about sans, yes it must be italicized. Using sans is, well, completely stupid: the only reason to do so is to be pretentious. It is worth, absolutely, reiterating that point: there is, precisely, one reason, -- exactly, absolutely, one (1) reason -- to use "sans" in a sentence. That reason is "to be pretentious". Given ...


3

I'd prefer it if you did, please, for two reasons: I know the word sans in French but not in English ... italicizing it in a sentence warns me that there's something unusual about the word. Normally when I read a sentence I scan the whole sentence, but italicizing a word is a cue for me to scan/read that word individually. It's normal to use 'punctuation' ...


1

Ideally ,in written communication if we want to express something that needs exceptional focus or try to indicate something without additionally mentioning it ,we usually do that by making those words bold or italics so as to make them catchy. This can be said as non-verbal part of written communication because that's a visual cue. Hence, whenever we use any ...


44

As a matter of style, many U.S. publishers follow the general rules given by the Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) at 7.51, 7.53, and 7.54 under the heading "FOREIGN WORDS": 7.51 Italics. Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers. [Examples omitted.] ... ...


5

Given that "sans" apparently entered early enough and/or become so much part of the language that it is primarily pronounced /sænz/ and not /sɒ̃/, then it is not required that you italicise. On the other hand, if you do prefer the latter pronunciation (as I do) i.e. you are borrowing from modern French, where you're using phonemes that aren't really used ...


16

"Sans" is a common enough word in English that I would not bother with italics. But I also think in your sentence that the word "without" scans better, and I'd use that instead of "sans" for esthetics reasons.


1

'Though' can be used to start a sentence, however the usage you have given isn't really acceptable because at the start of a sentence, 'though' usually operates as a conjunction and you haven't given another clause to be connected to 'I like red'. Though this is not correct, it would be acceptable if you added a section, eg: Though I like red, my favourite ...


1

As TRomano observes in a comment above, the simplest way to resolve an awkward sentence structure involving a passive construction is to put the wording into active voice. More often than not, doing so reduces the number of words in the sentence and brings the verb and its object closer together. In the OP's example, a number of verbs would work in the ...


0

Heart of Darkness is 30,000 words long. Pick something shorter. Although I rarely make this suggestion, read your Bible. Here's the beginning bit: 1 In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. 2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the ...


0

The relevant definition of inclusion in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) is this one: 2 something that is included, as a : a gaseous, liquid, or solid foreign body enclosed in a mass (as of a mineral) b : a passive usu. temporary product of cell activity (as a starch grain) within the cytoplasm or nucleus Neither specific meaning ...



Top 50 recent answers are included