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3

Of course I owe this to the good people above Martin Krzywinski & Hot Licks: nothing wrong with " Regards from Italy, Bob." I am reminded with the famous Bond's movie From Russia with Love which became a famous saying ( I mean: From...with love) in press and literature. It can be of course written: with love from...; regards from.


-1

Don't write it, show it, were Francine Prose's words, I believe (albeit regarding prose writing). However, if your argument form isn't the focus, then perhaps, by clearly describing the premise-consequence relationship in terms of the material itself, when possible, may help to engage the reader and keep them there.


6

In addition to the methods presented in RegDwigнt's answer — using synonyms and simply removing the words — two other techniques for avoiding such repetition come to mind. Replacing "thus" or "therefore" in the conclusion with "since" or "because" in the clause presenting the evidence is perhaps the most straightforward. This technique works better with ...


2

Later in life, neural responses to sensory input become highly differentiated, as do overt reactions. Because of this increased differentiation, it can be assumed that neurons adapt their responses mediated by experience... Or Later in life, neural responses to sensory input become highly differentiated, as do overt reactions. This increased ...


19

There are many synonyms that a thesaurus of your choice will be quick to provide. However, consider this: There is no reason to have the thuses in there in the first place. Remove them completely, and you're still conveying the same information. It is quite obvious that each of the sentences logically flows from the previous one. Later in life, neural ...


2

According to Otto Santa Ana (Brown Tide Rising: Metaphors of Latinos in Contemporary American Public ...) For alternative views of nation, the FABRIC metaphor, such as 'the intricate weave of American peoples into the national fabric', may be considered. Textile invokes often complex warps and weaves which can be associated with patterns of ...


0

A lot of American's have commented that these informal words are in widespread use. I'd certainly agree that's the case in the U.S., but it is not so in the U.K. in my experience (in and around London, the South and South East) where such speech (particularly dropping 't' sounds) is often reprimanded as slovenly in schools and certainly not used in formal ...


0

Every publishing house has is a category of specific prohibitions populated by words and forms of usage whose only offense is to run afoul of the idiosyncrasies of one or more people who rank high enough in the organization to transform their personal language foibles into house policy. The proscribing of "Fig. X depicts" is exactly that type of rule. ...


0

I think it's a mistake to characterize as "a spelling error" a decision that I may happen to disagree with about whether to hyphenate, leave open, or close up a term such as record keeping. The dispute is over the style of presentation of the term, no its spelling; and the preference of the author or publishing house is about as deep as you can fruitfully go ...


1

In each of the OP's listed examples involving then or so— And then that's when you went to the store? Then at McDonald's you were only there for a year, year and a half? So, if we talk over each other, it won't be clear. So, the last seven years you worked for Dollar General, correct? —ElendilTheTall's comment (above) that including ...


5

In The company's 2005 revenue exceeds that of 2004, that is a demonstrative pronoun with 'that of 2004' standing for 'The company's 2004 revenue'. In My new jacket is better than that one I bought three years ago, that is a determiner, 'singling out' (ie pointing to) the [rest of the] noun clause/group. It is no longer 'stand-alone'. Using 'that one' ...


1

Best to find an author whose style and subject matter closely matches what you wish to achieve, and immerse yourself in that style, noticing the lexis used, the way sentences are structured and the way in which formality differs from today's norms.


2

I don't see any advantage in putting a colon after "that is" in the first example. A colon or semicolon generally indicates a more-significant break in the flow of a sentence than a comma does, but in that first example the biggest break in continuity occurs just before "that is," not just after—and since you've relied on a comma there, it doesn't make much ...


0

The reason that they look the same to you is because they are: But one is plain English, whereas the other is Latin. "i.e." is an abbreviation for "id est", literally "it is". English has quite a few Latin abbreviations still in use. Other examples are e.g. (exemplia gratia / sometimes: exemplum gratum = "for (the sake of the) example", lit. "free ...


4

There's a slight difference in meaning. must be accepted because it cannot be changed means that this is the reason it must be accepted. must be accepted: it cannot be changed is making two related statements: it must be accepted and it cannot be changed. But no causal relationship is directly stated, although it might be inferred from the logic. There are ...


1

If find the Oxford comma to give fair representation to how people speak. When listing items in speech, equal pause is given between each item. For me, the Oxford comma emphasizes that there is, indeed, a pause before the 'and' preceding the last item of the list. I think the Oxford comma also indicates the direction of the sentence -- it makes it clear ...


1

This reminded me of the Genesis, the part where God, after finding out Eve gave the apple to Adam, says to her: "... with painful labor you will give birth to children." Reason: I was always taught that the personal pronoun "she" comes after the first occurrence of the noun it points to, not the other way around. (Note also the removal of the extra "He". ...


1

While both are grammatical, it's easier to read if the pronoun is used after the person is named, as in the first version. When you're scanning the second version, and come across the pronoun she, your mind will automatically try to determine the antecedent, and consider what has gone before, not realizing that the answer is forthcoming. This will slow down ...


0

Upkeeping, goalkeeping, housekeeping, recordkeeping. Seems like the precedent has been set. I can't think of any type of "keeping" that is stand-alone, or has an adjective independent from the noun "keeping" that can't be combined to form one word.


3

I'm a native speaker. There's no universal application for the writing rules in Vietnamese, as the written way has changed time to time. To answer your questions, at least based on my and many others' perspectives: As without diacritics, Vietnam, Hanoi, Danang, Nhatrang, Buonmethuot, Dalat, Daklak, etc. are totally fine, even preferred. The places' names ...


2

"You're" is definitely more conversational and less formal than "you are", so it's a tough call. "You are" is always correct in written English. I'd definitely use it when you want to emphasize that "you ARE ready to use [product name]!" but if you're addressing the user directly with "you" you're being conversational (and the exclamation point implies that ...


1

I would offer an expansion on those answers concluding that it is not forbidden to start a sentence with "And." The examples thus far are all short sentences which are arguably suited to merging into a single sentence per Chris Browne, excepting the strong emphasis example offered by Sunshine. My own frequent usage of "And" is associated with two contexts. ...


1

The approach you take to introducing and punctuating a numbered list is purely a style decision. The style that I see used most often is the one endorsed by the Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), which discusses both numbered lists (of the type you use) and unnumbered lists (of the same type) under the category name "vertical lists": ...


1

What you have is the colon being used in two entirely different ways, and, together, they will seem a bit odd to some people (though I don't find the combo that upsetting). Colon can be used a the end of an introductory sentence or phrase to mark the end of that and the start of the thing being introduced. (Eg, "I have a question: What the heck were you ...


1

There is nothing wrong with the "three colon" usage in most cases, although it might not conform to the style guide of some particular organization. It's largely a matter of personal preference, though I must confess it's not my personal preference, particularly in the use of the colon after the numbers in the numbered list. There my preference would be to ...


1

Wikipedia has some great examples. Look on Wikipedia:Template messages/Cleanup#Style of writing for links to lists of articles that have been marked as (in various ways) lacking. E.g. In need of copy edit In need of cleanup / rewrite



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