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1

No “final intention” is not perissological. The words do indicate all of his other intentions were a horme to this final purpose


4

Not necessarily. His initial intention may be to create a large flying city, but his final intention may be to fill that city with giant man-eating grasshoppers. So final intention may not be a pleonasm.


1

The positioning of now depends on what you want to stress in the sentence, Another alternative is: Now she is writing a letter; here Now is the word you want to emphasise, unlike in your first sentence. Your second example is more neutral with respect to the adverb of time.


-1

I think Govt. is more appropriate. There is a scale to denote the justice or balance or end.


1

The choice between Title Case and Sentence case ought perhaps be driven by your intended audience. In general, Title Case is preferred in the US, Sentence case elsewhere. You just need to look at home-grown newspapers. Try UK's The Guardian versus US's The Wall Street Journal. The predominance of Title Case in some software applications may be attributed to ...


2

Blackberry Best Practices specifically recommends Title Case for menu items. Android Best Practices doesn't have a specific recommendation, but the examples in their Menu guide use "Compose email" and "Reply all" which suggests a preference for Sentence Case. I cannot find a (relevant) best practices document or webpage for iOS or Windows Phone. (Most deal ...


1

You're finding out that English is not a 'rule-constrained' language. Whatever rules there are have lots of exceptions. There are only rules for when you must capitalize, but not for when you must not. Most people that use title casing (what you're describing) use it just because they think it looks better. I experienced the opposite. We were translating ...


3

While I'm typing this in the Safari browser, I had a quick look at the menus, and everything is capitalised except the words "and", "as", "in" and "to". So while I can't say whether your translator is right or wrong, he or she is in good company. And what's good for a MacOS X application written by Apple is probably good for an iOS application. For Android, ...


2

As an alternative to the other answers, it is possible that your translator is considering things like "Data", "Folder", and "Screen Lock" to be proper nouns. This is certainly not necessary, as data, folders, and screen locks are generic, but it's fine stylistically.


12

I think your translator is correct. Most app development guidelines state that Labels and the like should be capitalized. An example - OS X interface guideline. But since they are just guidelines, you are not forced to follow them, even though it would be a good idea to do so.


22

Using Title Case (e.g. Export Data to Folder) rather than Sentence Case (e.g. Export data to folder) usually depends on the style of your organisation. There are many guides about when to use it e.g. MLA, APA, and AP. However, as it's a style thing, there may be no set rule for your app, so whichever you prefer will be perfectly acceptable.


1

Note: I have only minimal experience with most of the languages below: I find the ideas behind them fascinating, but claim no expertise in them, so please point out any corrections and errors. In the original example (pre-edit), the second colon is used wrongly, and should be replaced by either a full-stop/period or a semi-colon. Note: I have only ...


0

It sounds to me like you are saying you prefer to word things in a lengthy and descriptive, round about way. This is often considered "fluff" and it not generally considered a quality writing style. If you are writing using a higher vocabulary and exercising your freedom of language, that's great, but in an essay for school this writing style tends to fill ...


0

Eloquent text (clear and effective) is never poor style. Verbose text (wordiness) is. Writing with a certain "aesthetic quality", I suppose here you are reffering to eloquent, can be considered verbose and laborious to read when the message is being lost due to all the extra fluff that is added without it adding anything meaningful.


0

Merriam-Webster defines el·o·quent adjective \ˈe-lə-kwənt\ : having or showing the ability to use language clearly and effectively You may be confusing verbosity with eloquence. See Wikihow When it comes to sounding eloquent, less is more. A wordy explanation is not more eloquent than a simple and clear explanation, if they both accomplish the ...


4

It is correct, it's even so correct that it can confuse people. However, database people tend to want to be quite precise in what they say, write and measure. Count can be a verb. You can count things. You can count the apples in this bag. You can also count the number of times I use the letter E in this answer. Count can also be a noun. Actually, the ...


2

The reason "maybe" sounds awkward when followed by "be" or "is" or similar is that we semi-consciously perceive that the "maybe" wasn't needed in the first place. Your first example, "maybe he is in the office today”, is colloquial, but it would be more economical to say, "he may be in the office today". In the other case, "This maybe is an interesting ...


0

Grammar books - and most people - use the comparative for two and the superlative for three or more. The superlative would be understood for two, but it is not considered to be good written English.


6

Weird. Here's a typical usage chart for XXXer / XXXest of the two with heavier/heaviest... The same general pattern shows with older/oldest, larger/largest, etc. At some point in early C19, the superlative -est form starts to fall out of favour. Although it doesn't sound terrible to my modern ear, apparently these days we don't normally say something is ...


4

"Bigger" would be natural when comparing only two, "biggest" when the set is larger. Likewise for the "more difficult/most difficult" case.



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