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All you have to do in a case like this is show the grammar police your poetic licence. Definition of poetic licence in English: noun [mass noun] The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect: ‘he used a little poetic licence to embroider a ...


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In fiction, you can write what you like. My endeavor here is [to] build the momentum of the narration by using short crisp sentences. "Her beauty arises to action. Pierces my camera lens. Stabs the prism." does just that. Putting the verbs first stresses them in the way you're looking for ( also picking up the word "action"). We don't need the ...


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I've mostly found that books and journals use 'contents' . for instance, Discover magazine uses the phrase 'contents'.


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In U.S. publishing, the contents page is generally referred to internally (that is, within the publishing house) as the "Table of Contents" or "TOC"; but the reason for that designation, I think, is to maintain maximum clarity in markup, etc., given that the body copy is generally referred to as "content" (if not "body copy"). Nevertheless, the ...


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A. There is something missing from both sentences. The phrase "Please follow the instructions below..." is an imperative to the reader, which sets up an expectation that you will explain the purpose or what will happen or what the reader will achieve by following these instructions. Instead, you follow with "...for a sample of...", which lacks any ...


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I would intepret contractor to be a person, or persons, or a company of people. So you can treat it as a singular entity, and contactor's is the only possisve form of abbreviation. There must be many legal documents that would confirm this usage.


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I agree with what your dictionary tells you. As demonstrative pronouns, this and that allude to objects according to proximity: this thing close to me, that thing over by you. So think of this and that when they refer to ideas as metaphors for physical things: the closer idea gets a this and the farther idea gets a that. Sam: This is what they tell me: Keep ...


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"Quickly" is an adverb and as such is modifying either "leave" or "decided." Some adverbs can float around in a sentence and the meaning will stay intact, others need to stay rooted near the verbs they are modifying. The last example is bad writing because the adverb is far away from either verb and thus creates an ambiguity. Maybe this is solved by ...


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In the example you chose it becomes difficult to segregate a quick decision from the act of leaving the room. This is because the thought process and the action are closely related in time and speed. It is difficult to imagine someone making a quick decision to do something slowly, or vice versa. So the two inevitably become conflated. So why don't we think ...


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Firstly, many people, including myself, think it is fine to sometimes split infinitives. I agree, though, that the sentence did change there. The latter choice (to leave the room quickly) matches the original meaning, but I would agree that it loses a degree of the impact of the adverb by being left to the end of the sentence. Personally, I would stick ...


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It is a feature of American English to use the adjective form instead of an adverb with -ly, especially in spoken English. There might be some influence of German where the adjective form is also used as adverb of manner.


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This is probably in imitation of Shakespeare. For example, from Much Ado about Nothing, Act 3, Scene 4: God give me joy to wear it! for my heart is exceeding heavy. (Source: http://www.bartleby.com/70/1634.html) There is also this, from the opening of Henry V: The perilous narrow ocean parts asunder (Source: ...


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These two examples exhibit anacolouthon: "Neither I am,... " ought to be followed by "...nor he is, nor she is..." The result is broken English. These sentences might be workable in fiction, precisely to show that the speaker was very emotional and slightly incoherent. *Neither I am, nor ever was I, nor I ever will be [...] *Neither I am, nor ...


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I would say almost no difference in this case. The very small bit of difference is that (imo) the former sounds more concrete, whereas the latter sounds more reflecting. In other words, the first one had thought about it, and made an assessment of the experience: truly amazing. The sentence then relays that information to the listener. The second one is ...


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Neither is incorrect in the first sentence, as it means "not the one nor the other of two things", and in this case there are three. To correctly use neither in this way, you need to also invert the verb and subject in the first clause. Neither am I, nor will I ever be.


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I believe they're allowed, but should be used sparingly. This link explains it better than me: http://www.arcticllama.com/blog/writing-tips/grammar/etc-et-al-ap-style-writing/


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I would recommend switching it to "that". "this" is used for referring to something that is "close" figuratively, so is more often used in the present tense. "that" is used for when you want to refer to something "far away" figuratively.


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It doesn't sound like present tense. But it does seem to refer to the end of the week when the story is being told.


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It's a good observation. Once upon a time, before electronic amplification, speaking to a large number of people needed lots of volume. Speaking very loudly takes more air. When you use more air, you run out faster, so phrases must be shorter. At least, that's my theory. Also, you need to use hyperarticulated vowels and consonants, to compensate for the ...


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I think what you're referring to is "diction" - and the reason it's more apparent in old movies (and such) is because it used to actually be part of a child's education (public and private schools) to learn how to speak properly. Since the wealthier class was better educated,knowing how to express oneself gracefully was thought to be a way to bridge the gap ...


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Silver lining: a bright prospect


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From your initial characterization, a negative result precludes a positive result, since after proving there is no algorithm, you can't very well proceed to produce one. So it sounds to me like you're looking for a way to mislead readers. I think you ought not to be doing that.


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I understand the first example, and in that case you are looking for "Fortunately." Fortunately: 1. Bringing something good and unforeseen; auspicious. 2. Having unexpected good fortune; lucky. In the second example, I might need some more clarity on what you're looking for, as it seems you are going from negative to positive instead the other way ...


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You could say 'by contrast' or 'in contrast'. Contrast: distinction or emphasis of difference by comparison of opposite or dissimilar things, qualities, etc (esp in the phrases by contrast, in contrast to or with) CED as found at thefreedictionary.com The above theorem showed that an exact solution to problem X does not exist. In contrast, an ...


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Try: Linear and circular. Vertical works only if you have established a reasonably clear meaning for the up/down dimension.



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