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1

I'm not going to do an exhaustive search of usage manuals -- and I don't think it's worth your while to either, because John and Jacks' house would mean the house belong to John and Jacks, where Jacks is the name of one person. (Perhaps it's a nickname.) So... nice idea, but I don't think it will fly.


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I think we just have to accept it. Example iPad Air is just 7.5 millimetres thin and weighs less than half a kilo. apple.com The problem would come if the name was all in lower case. Perhaps italics would be necessary.


0

For more on the Simpsons answer (unfortunately I do not have enough reputation to add to the comments), there was a forum for dedicated Simpsons fans called alt.tv.simpsons which may be the source of the multiple periods. One of the fans commented that one of the episodes was the worst episode ever. The writer David S. Cohen took that comment and used CBG as ...


0

I agree with you, that you should guide your students to say, "I am sorry to hear about Edna. She was a true friend and a guiding light to me." If we want to put in the stuff about the five years, things get more complicated. If you visit your boss on Edna's death bed: "Edna has been a true friend and guiding light for me, ever since I started working here ...


0

My choice would be past perfect in this context. I would write: "I am sorry to hear about Edna. She had been my friend for five years..." In other words, she had been my friend (for five years) until she passed away. This tense is appropriate to refer to an action, state, situation or condition which occurred or used to be before another such action or ...


0

Using the above example, and continuing, you would write like this: I am sorry to hear about Edna. She had been my friend for five years. During that time she had a positive effect on my thinking at work, and in fact was influential in my successes throughout my career. I will miss her very much, yet am grateful to have the memory of her friendship and ...


0

My opinion is that using the same written word twice, in close proximity, shows a lack of effort on the part of the writer. Regardless of the meanings of the two instances.


1

There is considerable disagreement among style guides on how to punctuate inclusive year ranges. Words Into Type, third edition (1974), for instance recommends using an en-dash and only the last two digits of the closing year of the range if it falls into the same century as the first year of the range: To represent to between figures or words an en dash ...


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I think there are too many. I suggest, We’re available 24/7, always on standby, and ready to answer calls.


1

That is better, yes. I would simply use: We’re available 24x7, ready to answer calls. or We’re always on standby, ready to answer calls This is because "available 24x7" and "always on standby" are redundant.


0

You might want to consult Bryan Garner's Modern American Usage. In that book, he writes about conventional words and spellings in American English and British English. (For example, if you read American newspapers, you'll rarely see the world "whilst." You'll see "while.")


1

I'm from the UK, but will use US spellings in some contexts. Programming languages generally use US spellings, the HTML center tag or the CSS color property for example, and it can be a bit jarring to write stuff like use color to set the colour. The other annoyance is that spell checkers are always either US or UK, so you end up with loads of red lines if ...


0

It all depends on your target audience, whether it is British or American. Using British spelling for an American audience, or vice-versa, does look odd to your audience and detracts from the message you are trying to put forth.


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Pick one and stick with it. Both are acceptable in just about any case, as long as you don't switch back and forth. The only time I could imagine it mattering is when submitting a literary or scientific piece that's required to be in a certain format.


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Do whatever is most prevalent in your target journal. This is a convention of academic publishing. For a while, two of the major competing medical journals, The Lancet and the BMJ, had different policies on title colons: one journal had colons in most of its titles; the other had colons in very few. If you submitted an article with a title containing a ...


3

This is strictly a matter of style—and one on which (as is so often the case) preferences vary. The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) lays out consistent approaches to both a "primary system" for handling punctuation and font issues, and a "more traditional system": 6.3 Punctuation and font: primary system. All punctuation marks should ...


-1

I regard the comma as merely defining the structure within which the thoughts are placed, so would not embolden it. Consider this example in which I use a (rather unnecessary) comma: Italics are for emphasis, and bold is for effect. How could one sensibly decide if the comma were to be bold or italic? One cannot, so it must remain plain.


1

The format "Broad title: more specific but not sub- title" is quite commonly used. The first part is normally worded to attract the attention of a broad field while the second gives some detail of what the paper (or equivalent) is about. There are a couple of reasons for doing this compared to an approach that would fit better in a normal sentence: It's ...


0

I may be wrong, but I think that the hidden point to the example might be that people accidentally change the meaning of the sentence when they try to "fix" split infinitives. Prof Nikolas Gisborne, from the same department, made the point when he showed how someone at the Guardian, by changing the headline "How to not raise a rapist" to "How not to raise a ...


3

All you have to do in a case like this is show the grammar police your poetic licence. Definition of poetic licence in English: noun [mass noun] The freedom to depart from the facts of a matter or from the conventional rules of language when speaking or writing in order to create an effect: ‘he used a little poetic licence to embroider a ...


1

In fiction, you can write what you like. My endeavor here is [to] build the momentum of the narration by using short crisp sentences. "Her beauty arises to action. Pierces my camera lens. Stabs the prism." does just that. Putting the verbs first stresses them in the way you're looking for ( also picking up the word "action"). We don't need the ...


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I've mostly found that books and journals use 'contents' . for instance, Discover magazine uses the phrase 'contents'.


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In U.S. publishing, the contents page is generally referred to internally (that is, within the publishing house) as the "Table of Contents" or "TOC"; but the reason for that designation, I think, is to maintain maximum clarity in markup, etc., given that the body copy is generally referred to as "content" (if not "body copy"). Nevertheless, the ...



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