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2

Lies at the basis is very widely used (Google Books search gives 1,420,00 results) so I wouldn't call it clumsy. Although this doesn't prove or disprove the nuances in meaning between the examples.


2

As JeffSahol pointed out in a comment, I think the principal confusion here is the difference between base and basis. base - the bottom or lowest part of something : the part on which something rests or is supported (M-W) basis - something (such as an idea or set of ideas) from which another thing develops or can develop (M-W) Base generally ...


1

There are several options, as have been mentioned in other answers, but I'd like to point out a couple of subtleties. If the alternative name name is a nickname, it's common to see it displayed in quotes between the two names; for example, Lt. Peter "Horse" Caulk was an instructor in the film Top Gun: However, this is only usual if the name is used often ...


2

There is no universal rule for formatting the entries in individual cells of a table; capitalization of those entries is strictly a style issue. I checked three widely respected style guides (Chicago Manual of Style, Oxford Style Manual, and Words Into Type), and none of them has anything to say on this particular point. At the magazines where I've worked, ...


1

World Wide Web, or WWW is capitalized, as is Internet, so I capitalize the abbreviation, Web, since it is one of the three capitalized words in the proper compound noun, World Wide Web. I have had no complaints from my Navy customers. Even if someone prefers Web not being capitalized, I can support my choice with logic.


2

My suggestion is by no means canonical. If you want a compound that seems analogous to hands-on---something that sounds kind of informal, maybe conversational, even hyphenated, why not try run-through, as in: The first part will be a run-through of the fundamentals, while the second will be hands-on, where you can actually play around with the devices ...


1

Lecture, talk, lesson, or presentation. The event involves a 1-hour lecture followed by a 2-hour hands-on practicum. Formal or professional term: didactic. The event will involve both a didactic and an experiential component.


0

I think it's up to a matter of preference and style more than anything. I tend to capitalise "true" and "false" to remain consistent with the answer choices (which are usually capitalised).


0

Assuming that the section on 'Asking a question' is about asking a question and that the section on 'Talking' is about talking, you have a couple of options. Option 1. Treat the section titles as titles. In this case, it appears that the section titles are run in sentence case (rather than in title case with initial caps for most words). In that situation, ...


0

This is primarily a style question. The wording "Answer True or False" often appears as a short form of the instruction Answer [each of the following questions by identifying the statement as] true or false: or of the instruction Answer [each of the following questions by appending the word] True or False [to the statement]: In the first ...


0

It should be yes or no and true or false. The only exception for the upper case would be proper nouns, proper acroymns, dates, and of course sentence starters. This being said, I can see why you would think Yes or No. I would recommend that if you are building a website or writing a poll.


0

No quotes, as it might seem ironical/sarcastic, except if you assume the reader isn't paying attention :-[, or if "asking the question" and "talking" have special meanings for this author, and you want to draw attention to them.


2

Let's consider some choices: Using quotes or italics to offset your words - Quotes usually serve to distance the writer from the words (scare quotes or literal quotations of speech/writing), and italics are usually reserved for foreign words. ... where I wanna be Using some kind of markup like a * or ? before the words. This would be tedious to ...


2

I don't know whether this will meet your purposes, but the only situation I know of where it is acceptable to misspell is when quoting someone else exactly. Publications do that, and if the quote contains an error, they include the word (sic) to show they know it is erroneous. As in: In the letter to parents it said: ‘The school is proud of it’s [sic] ...


1

There is no actual notation for slang that I know of. Quotation marks doesn't connotate the correct meaning. Quotations would suggest that you are being facetious and don't actually want to be in Tennessee. I would leave it as a regular part of your sentence.


1

As the others have said, the 1st sentence is correct. It is a form of indirect (a.k.a. reported) speech, where the inversion that occurred after a question-word in a direct question has to change back to statement word order. In direct speech you would have a question (inversion occurs): A: "What is this new plan?" B: "I have no idea." Now B ...


1

What this new plan was, I had no idea. This is a statement, and a common way to say this. "What was this new plan I had no idea." This is a question ("What was this new plan?") fused to a statement ("I had no idea."). It will be understood by most - along with the assumption that it comes from a non-native speaker. (US)


1

There is a new rule of grammar developing in English: never put adverbs or adverbial phrases between the verb and its direct object. See this web page and this question. The first one breaks this rule. A century or two ago, English writers had no qualms about putting adverbs in this position. For example, if you search Google books for "took gradually the", ...


1

The narrative flow /breaks/is suspended/ after "having shared" in the first case, and after "having" in the 2nd. The first suspends me in a better-known state — I know what follows after the auxiliary "having," i.e. "shared." The second suspends me in /lesser known/more indeterminate/ state — I do not know what follows after the auxiliary "having". As a ...


1

They are both correct, but they do not mean the same. I smiled, realizing that[, despite her craziness, I missed her]. Even though she's crazy, you missed her. I smiled, [realizing, despite her craziness,] that I missed her. Even though she's crazy, you realized something (that you missed her). In the second version, I would omit the second and ...


0

No, they are not grammatically wrong. The first two, especially, are just unclear and are confusing the reader. The logic of the actions is not transparent. E.g., we are not sure whether he still carries the cup of coffee in his hands while running for the bus. Or whether, alternatively, he stood up, took a last sip, placed the cup on the table (or threw ...


1

I, while accepting the idea of starting conjunctions, can't quite applaud your own sentences here. I'd say the suggested conjunctions are not optimal for the logical transitions at hand. Also, the first sentence needs a fix in terms of verb consistency. I'd suggest: "The organization should have taken the blame. /Otherwise/If not/, its leader should have ...


4

Coördinating conjunctions, such as and, or and but, can be used to begin a new sentence. This was already widely accepted in Fowler's time, and probably always. There is nothing wrong with the conjunctions in your examples. In general, though, you should apply this feature of our language judiciously: do not do it every other sentence. However, you should ...


2

In Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS) 6.70 Question marks in relation to surrounding text and punctuation A question mark should be placed inside quotation marks, parentheses, or brackets only when it is part of (i.e., applies to) the quoted or parenthetical matter. The ambassador asked, “Has the Marine Corps been alerted?” Why was ...


3

The best advice is: don't. Just leave it out. Readers do not like being constantly (or even repeatedly) reminded to pay attention. If it is a fact, state it as a fact. If it is an opinion, clarify that it is an opinion. If it is somehow related to other statements, use connectors to clarify or emphasize that relationship, such as however, moreover, ...


1

It's a little more informal, but you can use "Remember that" or "Keep in mind". Alternatively, you could just leave the leader off and say "Valid here only...".


2

It is to be observed that (/Please/One should/) Observe that (One should) Bear in mind that (One should) Keep in mind that


0

I don't know if there is an idiom that covers everything, but you may find use in these: few and far between (rare and difficult to find) very few; few and widely scattered. Get some gasoline now. Service stations on this highway are few and far between. Some people think that good movies are few and far between. scarce Insufficient to ...


2

Perhaps of interest: Studies in Early Modern English - Page 245 Dieter Kastovsky - 1994 They were: cruel vs. cruelly, exceeding vs. exceedingly, excellent vs. excellently, extraordinary vs. extraordinarily, full vs. fully, might vs. mightily, pure vs. purely, singular ... occur well before the introduction of normative grammars in the ...


-1

I would not say "He advanced to battle, full angry.". Rather I would say: "He advanced into battle, full of anger." I don't think I would ever say "He advanced to battle, fully angry." On the other hand I would say: "The man sat back in his chair, fully satisfied with his dinner." One way to see if something works is to replace the verb and preposition ...


1

Admittedly this is not precisely an answer to the question as asked, but be not too hasty to reject hidden gem as unsuitable for formal discourse. Formal discourse does not eschew idiom provided that the idiom in question is neither conspicuously vulgar nor excessively specific to a single region or social grouping; it aims at a certain universality. In ...


0

In the context of films, cult film, or cult classic are often used to describe hidden gems.


0

Possible choice underappreciated item/thing lucky find [in some contexts]


-1

She clenched her teeth... lightly. The radio blared softly. Nothing mugs your ears like elevator music does. Hungrily, passionately, lovingly, longingly, now, they did it. I mistakenly conflated academic English with proper English, and forceful verbs with forceful writing.


3

Your first question is: What is the problem with adverbs? There are in fact three main problems. The first problem is that they are often unnecessary. This is what Zinnser in On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction (p68) writes: Most adverbs are unnecessary. You will clutter your sentence and annoy your reader if you choose a verb ...


1

As per this study, it has been found that overuse of adverbs can distract the reader and detract academic writing. Another resource is this one. Here are 50 adverbs to avoid in academic writing. And here's a site showing examples of how you can replace adverbs with better words.


1

If a footnote or endnote reference pertains to every item in the column, you can put the superscript numbered after the column heading. If it applies only to some of the bulleted items, each item that it applies to should be tagged with the footnote's number, superscripted.


-1

Alright, the only things I think need improving are your use of punctuation and some minor additions to your writing. Other than that, I think you wrote it quite well. If I were to change it, I would write it as: I am writing to apply for the position of summer intern at the Boston Consulting Group. I have learned about the internship from a poster on ...


0

In the case of very short words or phrases that might otherwise appear as nested quotations (quotations within quotations), you have the option of italicizing the nested wording—at least in situations where such wording isn't a quotation at all but simply a word or phrase standing for itself. In your examples, this is how the treatment would look: “The ...


0

Salutations! or Greetings! I suppose you could also start with It was good to hear from you! or We were very glad to receive your email. or We appreciate your taking the time to write. Note, I am from the U.S. and can't really simulate a British style -- but hopefully these ideas will get you started.


2

How about a simple Hello? Or if the message is always in reply to some kind of request, you can start with Thank you for your request.. IMHO, you shouldn't waste time trying to make canned emails sound too natural or folksy. Everyone knows these are automated, and it will just seem disingenuous if you try to make it seem like it was written by a real ...


0

If you are dealing with someone within your own field (or engaged in a common project), you can say Dear Colleague, A person with whom one works in a profession or business Oxford Dictionaries Online While the term often applies to someone employed in the same organization, it is often used for others in your field at different institutions.


0

The other answers don't seem to explain that there are different (and conflicting) recommendations about the way to punctuate a list, which would seem to indicate that it is a misunderstanding to talk about the correct way. Grammar.CCC.com recommends that you use exactly the style of your example: If the explanatory statement coming after a colon ...


1

Commas Handbook of Parametric and Nonparametric Statistical ... - Page 95 David J. Sheskin - 2003 Specifically, if we designate the four students A, B, C, and D, the six ways are as follows: A and B, A and C, A and D, B and C, B and D, C and D. Commas, counted/indexed The Corsini Encyclopedia of Psychology - Volume 2 - Page 682 Irving ...


2

Finally, the goal is to determine x. The three ways of achieving this are the following: (1) the blue method involves tying your shoelaces; (2) the pink method requires you to first go to the shops and buy a bunch of bananas; (3) the purple method is really quite complicated and will take a long time to describe. To separate the listed items, you can ...



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