New answers tagged

-1

The phrase "shadows covered" is the only phrase that doesn't sound like typical English usage in that sentence. Perhaps: "I have also seen each city street corner covered in shadows" Shadows also loom, gather, hover, shroud...shadows are interesting. Shadows can also mean ghosts or memories. Given just the one sentence to go by, I'm not sure what the ...


-1

“And also I have seen shadows covered on each city street corner” English most naturally (since Shakespeare is the man of the month) falls into iambics: ti- tum ti- tum ti= tum. But try this line which is called an Alexandrine (7 beats) or, to be technical, iambic heptameter hypercatalectic. “And also I saw shadows covered on each city corner” (make ...


0

Depending on the rhythm of your music, maybe something like: Shadows hovering on every street corner


1

Generally I would have said no, but I’ve noticed that the extensive use of ellipses was a distinctive feature of middlebrow historian Bruce Catton’s work. See, for example, page 26 of this best-seller of the 1950s, where he begins a paragraph(!) with them. So maybe I would say, use them, if you have a distinctive narrative style.


0

Yes, to all of the above - in math and lists and proper direct quotation, etc., but thank you @Delta Escher: you clearly describe the "why" of not adding it. (I recently almost lost my marbles trying to study for an English test that included formal essays - the tutors I worked with all said ixnay on the "evocative" stuff.) To impart feelings to the reader ...


1

Your paragraph correctly punctuated: I find an airplane's symbolic freedom appealing - whether it is soaring through the sky, industriously filling and disgorging passengers(,) or exultantly defying gravity on take-off, it remains independent and far-reaching in all of its manoeuvres. In English, semi-colons are only used as a way to separate linked ...


9

Ellipses have only one place in most formal writing: inside a direct quote. Then they have two uses: to reporting halting speech, and if you omit some words. But in the latter case they should be used only in non-controversial cases, as they can easily be used to subvert the original author/speaker's meaning (for example "these are... the droids you are ...


4

In a formal essay, you should not use ellipses. Ellipses are a form that is mostly used in fiction, as it implies a dramatic pause, would could both upset the serious tone of the essay and imply feelings towards the reader, which a formal essay is not intended to do. If you feel as if the ellipse is intended to provoke a feeling from the reader you should ...


2

If you look at the usage in context of the whole paragraph, it looks like the author used "among them, N, N, and N" as a style choice. The author is listing several items within different categories: Prince's songs that he himself performed that became hits, his songs with which other performers made hits, as well as movies, awards, albums, etc. There's ...


1

I often see sentence structures like "..., among them N, N, and N." Can anyone explain what kind of grammatical rule is applied here? To my knowledge, there is no grammatical rule at play here so much as a common stylistic convention. If I recall correctly, classical Greek used elision far more elegantly than modern English, but it is the same ...


0

I would call this an appositive. There are certain words implied but omitted (perhaps the full clause would be 'and among them were'), and the noun phrase (a list of performers) is left in apposition to 'others'.


3

While it's generally a good idea to avoid re-using the same word in one sentence or paragraph, I don't think that applies here. You have a parallel construction, you're talking about the same thing happening twice, and this is more clear if you use the same word. For example, consider this sentence: "When Tuesday arrived I arrived at home to find that a ...


0

Yes. It generally is better to use a synonym rather than reusing the same word for the second independent clause. Therefore, I prefer the second and third sentences. The fourth seems to sound a little awkward and if I were to use it as such, I'd place it inside quotation marks as part of a dialog: "Nah, two letters on Monday, and a third on Wednesday ...


0

Yes, you can. If you mean an hour before midnight. This is definitely not a portmanteau-word.


0

Your question is still confusing from my perspective, but I feel the answer is similar in that we use a variation of to do +/- past perfect. Did Joe want to play soccer in the morning, or did he want to wait until later in the day? Had Joe waited until the morning to play soccer, then he wouldn't have sprained his ankle in the dark. In either case, you ...


1

Let's consider an example of a present-tense, first-person narration that considers a future action*: [1a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I will kill my wife because she cheated on me with my best friend. [2a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I shall kill my wife because she cheated on me with my ...


0

Here are some style recommendations from various more-or-less influential style guides. From The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style (2005): centuries Centuries may be expressed in words or numerals. [Examples:] words for the twenty-first {or 21st} century; seventeenth-century {or 17th-century} English literature From The Associated ...


0

Google ngram shows "twentieth century" - all lower case - is the most common, which is not, of course, the same as saying it is the best or most grammaritally correct.


0

You'd normally follow your organisation's style guide. Here's an excerpt from one I found on the internet: It is a common misconception that foregrounding the research requires using the passive voice ("Experiments have been conducted ..."). This is inaccurate. Rather, you would use pronouns in place of "experiments" ("We conducted experiments ..."). - ...



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