Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

What you're talking about here is a compound adjective. The rules regarding hyphens in compound adjectives are these: If the compound adjective is right before the noun, use a hyphen: Built-in types A well-educated student The fast-moving river If the compound adjective directly follows a linking verb, don't use a hyphen: The types are built in. The ...


-1

Normally I see built-in as an adjective, whereas built in is used as a verb. ie: "the car has built-in air conditioning", and "the shelves are built into the wall"


1

Day 4 This usage presumes the existence of a schedule in which days are titled by number, perhaps escalating, perhaps not. The days might or might not be in a countdown to somebody's birthday, for example. This could cause confusion. The 5th week of pregnancy indicates that the foetus has been growing for 5 weeks, not that there are now only 5 weeks till ...


1

You mean you are going to mention the idiom, just as you did in the question? Style guides, recognized authorities, and professional writers, editors, etc. prescribe and proscribe a number of approaches for mentioning letters, words, and phrases, as distinct from using them. While the use of quotation marks remains perhaps the most common, italics is ...


-2

Quotes. Italics are for foreign language words in an English text. But you know, caveat emptor.


1

The original text contained a lot of clutter. I've simplified it as much as I can — partly by reorganizing it, partly by making substitutions that remove one unnecessary repetition of contact(s) and two of know. I've also eliminated me and reduced the counts of I and my to 2 and 1 respectively. Thank you for getting in touch, #PERSONNAME. Currently, I ...


2

There are many, many ways to avoid personal pronouns. One is the passive voice, but often there are simply alternative ways of phrasing. Thank you, #PERSONNAME for contacting me. Thank you, #PERSONNAME, for your enquiry. Thank you, #PERSONNAME, for getting in touch. Thank you, #PERSONNAME, for considering this firm/company/business I don't know ...


5

The easiest way to avoid the thicket of I's here is to let the other people or objects in your message shoulder the burden of some of the action. You can clear out two instances of I simply by shifting responsibility for some of the action in the third sentence of your example from yourself to your contacts. And since the second sentence "I do appreciate ...


1

Day 4 is a title (a name for that day). the fourth day is just a description. If you are just specifying which day, out of a sequence of days, something occurred- use the descriptive the fourth day. If you are referring to a named day (Day 4 on the trip itinerary) then use the name/title.


0

In formal writing, it's usually advised to spell out numbers, especially the one-word numbers one through twenty. So if you're writing formally, "the fourth day" would definitely be preferred. However, if you're writing informally, you could choose whichever one you wanted, as long as you stayed consistent (switching back and forth between "the xth day" and ...


1

The form illustrated is fairly well established in scientific and mathematical writing. While it usually is understandable it often is distracting and unclear. Frequently, rewriting the sentence to state the alternative elliptically is better. For example: The first month of Spring is March; of Summer, June. or The first month of Spring is March, ...


4

The example you give is perfectly clear and understandable, but I very much doubt any native speaker of English would ever use respectively in that manner. Therefore, I think it’s fair to say that it is at least unidiomatic, if perhaps not quite ungrammatical. The way you’ve used respectively here is very similar to how, for example, German can use ...


0

Mr. John s/o Mr. Wagner is correct. Whatever be the case, a child is never born of asexual reproduction.


2

Is a child always the child of Mr and Mrs X? What about unmarried couples, single mothers and cases where the wife does not take the husband's surname? At least in the west and other areas where these are not uncommon cases it is safer to be specific if there could be any doubt. I am also a little concerned about "Mr John" as, unless John is his surname, it ...


0

It is correct, as Nick2253 explains. But it can also sound awkward and (sound) wrong to the ear. Depending on the context it may be appropriate to choose a different word with a nicer plural. As long as it's not a legal deposition, the fact that it is an email may not be particularly significant and you can substitute messages, responses, transmissions, ...


0

Email is the medium of communication. Messages would be the plural of what you receive through said medium.


10

Dan Bron's comment (above) that e-mail/email at its inception was treated as a mass noun is correct—and so is Kristina Lopez's comment (above) that e-mail/email is widely applied today not just to the medium of electronic mail but to individual messages sent and received in that medium. For many years the technology magazines where I worked enforced a ...


3

Your peers are not wrong.Technically, email appears to be correct since the word e-mail stands for electronic mail. It can be used as a verb (meaning sent by email) or as a noun (meaning a message sent by email). To make the noun plural, some writers prefer to use the term “email messages.” However, I am going to say you are both correct.


20

Emails and email are both correct plurals, but each has its own context. It depends on whether or not you are using it as a countable or uncountable noun. Email You can use email as an uncountable noun, just like mail. For example, "I received lots of email today" or "John sends me too much stupid chain email". But, you cannot use email as a ...


0

There seems to be an art-blindness happening with the word "masterpiece" in that it originally was the work a graduating apprentice was expected to make that included all techniques learned and executed at a high level of skill in order to join a guild, i.e. to be acknowledged by peers. Genius for example, is hackneyed Perhaps "aura" is taking it to a ...


1

In your example, the noun itself is perfect: The masterpiece in the work lies in its...


1

You could use mastery, even though people's primary association is of a person's mastery of something. Mastery can still be used for the quality of the thing. Alternatively, you could try virtuosity, which at least covers the "great technical skill" part of masterpieceness and functions as a synonym of "mastery." And two other words that connote ...



Top 50 recent answers are included