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5

My answer focuses on the header question about decades—which is the question that most readers will probably expect to find answers to here. With regard to decades expressed in numerals rather than spelled out in letters, some style guides recommend omitting an apostrophe, while others recommend including it. For example, from The Chicago Manual of Style, ...


4

When two words are frequently used together people might start to hyphenate them, and then some time later they might start to concatenate them. It's a question of you having a feel for the usage and seeing which you are most comfortable using and with what audience, e.g. 'blogpost' with Tumbloggers and 'blog post' with your parents. But maybe that's your ...


3

Whether to add a comma after viz.—or, for that matter, after e.g. or i.e.—is a style question that different style guides answer differently. For example, The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) has this: Do not confuse 'e.g.' (exempli gratia), meaning 'for example', with 'i.e.' (id est), meaning 'that is'. Compare hand tools, e.g. hammer and screwdriver with ...


3

References to dates are prevalent in computing. Besides building date validations in code, the working of a date field must be correctly referenced in system messages. It is always better to use descriptive statements (earlier/later) rather than quantifying it (lower/higher). Use later to indicate that event is happening subsequent to a reference date (date ...


2

It appears that in the British English corpus the hyphenated version, non-stop music (blue line), is much preferred. Whereas in American English, the spelling nonstop music (red line) is overwhelmingly preferred, and has been since the 1980s. Dictionary.com informs that nonstop (without a space) was first used between 1900 and 1905. Choose whichever ...


2

Some U.S. style guides recommend hyphenating a "more [adjective]" phrase when the writer's intention is to express more in its qualitative (rather than quantitative) sense. The first step in enforcing this distinction is to see whether the phrase without hyphenation could be read as using more in a quantitative sense. In the poster's example, the phrase ...


2

... in terms of English Language and Usage? Yes! That is perfectly comprehensible Does it match APA, Chicago, or other fetishistic style guides? No! If you expect that you will be judged according to a particular formal code then choose and follow a style guide (and know which one, since they contradict each other).


2

Probably the following saying suggests what you are referring to, but generally I'd say that "still" just suggest being immobile: Still as death: (Cliché) immobile; completely still. (The reference to death gives this expression ominous connotations. *Also: as ~.) George sat as still as death all afternoon. When the storm was over, ...


2

Yes, certainly. The roots are archaic, going back to the distinction of animate vs. inanimate or the quick vs. the dead. "Still" denotes motionless, but has, at the very least, poetic ties to death. I would not go so far as to say it has connotations of death without some sort of context indication like a reference to breath or body, or the addition of ...


1

"viewers can watch a more realistic 3D scene and interact..." "a more realistic" –Google, +20 million hits


1

I don't think hyphenation of more and realistic would be as much a solution as putting a comma or and between the two if you want more to modify scenes. Viewers can watch more, (or and) realistic 3D scenes and interact... There could ambiguity in your sentence where more could be seen modifying either realistic or scenes if you don't pay close ...


1

The hyphen is not appropriate. "More" in the sentence is functioning as an adverb which describes the word immediately following it, "realistic." If "more" were intended to describe the number of scenes, then it would function as an adjective. If it were an adjective, then it would need to be separated from the other adjectives preceding the noun by ...


1

As any speaker can tell you, the Sun in English is generally neuter. We call it an it rather than a he or a she. Granted, you might have people like J. R. R. Tolkein calling it female, but you also have him talking about magic rings, elves, and wizards. It's fiction. When English was more German based, the Sun was female. However, the Romans came and so ...


1

Sun and moon are neuter, in the ordinary fashion of English nouns. (As opposed to German or French, representing the two relevant traditions: germanic and romance). Any departure from that marks some degree of license. It is important to notice that grammatical gender was manifest in (early) Old English: sun was feminine. This is probably Tolkien's ...


1

The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) does a nice job of identifying where mainstream UK and U.S. style preferences tend to diverge on the issue of how to handle prefixes such as non-: 5.10.2 Prefixes and combining forms Words with prefixes are often set as one word, but use a hyphen to avoid confusion or mispronunciation, particularly where there is a ...



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