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The word "see" fits in semantically with your example: I would really like to see what you have to say about X. This has a nice two-fold meaning, as Cambridge dictionary includes a meaning of "to understand" under the entry for "see": [transitive verb]: to understand, know, or realize and you would also literally use your eyes to see (read) the ...


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Writing encompasses the larger image, and typing is merely one of the activities involved. Writing includes planning, drafting, own proofreading and editing - while typing doesn't imply creative activity. You may be typing columns of numbers into a spreadsheet, or typing the text your boss is dictating, and it doesn't constitute writing. And contrarily, you ...


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Some alternatives are learn, find out, or know, for instance: I would really like to find out what you think about X. I like these because they work in any medium (speech, text, etc.). If it's a context where a direct question is acceptable, you could also just say: What do you think about X? (P.S. I'm very new around here, so please be patient ...


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You ask: Is there a style guide (preferably for Australia or the UK) that addresses this? Or is it just an overlook on Word's part? Consider the (Australian) Monash University style guide on Dashes (dots inserted here primarily for formatting): At Monash, we use en dashes ( – ) rather than em dashes (—). ... En dashes within sentences have one ...


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I will quote sections from the Chicago Manual of Style (13th edition). This is an American source. Em dash (—) is used: for a break in thought (§ 5.83) for an element added to give emphasis or explanation (§ 5.84) for a defining or enumerating complementary element (“He could forgive every insult but the last—the snub by his ...


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Scope and Summary The question concerns the punctuation ‘rules’ for insertion of spaces at the either sides of em-dashes, and in particular whether adjacent quotation marks influence this. Australian or British usage is requested. Valid criticism of my initial answer provoked me to survey the different typographic styles of dashes employed as pauses in ...


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I would really like to know what you have to say about X. Do I even dare define that. You know when you see it. You know when you hear it. You know when you touch it.


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The English verb write has three* basic meanings: to draw the shape of letters to record words using written (as opposed to spoken or sign) language to compose a text The second meaning encompasses writing by hand, typing into a computer, as well as writing words using the exhaust fumes of an airplane. The third meaning encompasses thinking about what ...


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Try this: Here I sit in my room in a house that is all mine and only mine.


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Sorry if this is a bad answer since I'm new here, I personally think that it's how much emphasis you put onto it, if it's like shouting like in AAAAAAAAAAAlllen! it would be like that, but if it's something like Ch-ch-ch-ch-ch , it would have lowercase letters. I don't really have any references though, just my opinion. Here's the difference between one ...


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You can write: I would really like to learn what you have to say about X. It is a little more formal and has the connotation of getting actually new information on a subject matter and not just an opinion.


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Honestly, most of English grammar is subjective. The choice to put a definition in parenthesis is perfectly valid - at most it is a stylistic choice. Despite this, it is generally more widely accepted to offset a definition using an appositive phrase than to awkwardly integrate it into a sentence using parenthesis.


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Generally I would have said no, but I’ve noticed that the extensive use of ellipses was a distinctive feature of middlebrow historian Bruce Catton’s work. See, for example, page 26 of this best-seller of the 1950s, where he begins a paragraph(!) with them. So maybe I would say, use them, if you have a distinctive narrative style.


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Thanks for this question. I sometimes wonder and would sometimes want reliable references for some language styles. I saw an article Possessive with Two Nouns which says-- "The possessive case can be confusing, especially when two nouns are doing the possessing. Fortunately, The Chicago Manual of Style sheds light on this conundrum. [emphasis mine] ...



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