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9

Ellipses have only one place in most formal writing: inside a direct quote. Then they have two uses: to reporting halting speech, and if you omit some words. But in the latter case they should be used only in non-controversial cases, as they can easily be used to subvert the original author/speaker's meaning (for example "these are... the droids you are ...


4

In a formal essay, you should not use ellipses. Ellipses are a form that is mostly used in fiction, as it implies a dramatic pause, would could both upset the serious tone of the essay and imply feelings towards the reader, which a formal essay is not intended to do. If you feel as if the ellipse is intended to provoke a feeling from the reader you should ...


3

While it's generally a good idea to avoid re-using the same word in one sentence or paragraph, I don't think that applies here. You have a parallel construction, you're talking about the same thing happening twice, and this is more clear if you use the same word. For example, consider this sentence: "When Tuesday arrived I arrived at home to find that a ...


2

If you look at the usage in context of the whole paragraph, it looks like the author used "among them, N, N, and N" as a style choice. The author is listing several items within different categories: Prince's songs that he himself performed that became hits, his songs with which other performers made hits, as well as movies, awards, albums, etc. There's ...


1

Your paragraph correctly punctuated: I find an airplane's symbolic freedom appealing - whether it is soaring through the sky, industriously filling and disgorging passengers(,) or exultantly defying gravity on take-off, it remains independent and far-reaching in all of its manoeuvres. In English, semi-colons are only used as a way to separate linked ...


1

Let's consider an example of a present-tense, first-person narration that considers a future action*: [1a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I will kill my wife because she cheated on me with my best friend. [2a] I sit in the dark, holding a pistol as I realize that I shall kill my wife because she cheated on me with my ...


1

I often see sentence structures like "..., among them N, N, and N." Can anyone explain what kind of grammatical rule is applied here? To my knowledge, there is no grammatical rule at play here so much as a common stylistic convention. If I recall correctly, classical Greek used elision far more elegantly than modern English, but it is the same ...


1

Generally I would have said no, but I’ve noticed that the extensive use of ellipses was a distinctive feature of middlebrow historian Bruce Catton’s work. See, for example, page 26 of this best-seller of the 1950s, where he begins a paragraph(!) with them. So maybe I would say, use them, if you have a distinctive narrative style.



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