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4

Where one number ends and the next begins is often ambiguous in English, so I would recommend being explicit with separators. For example, consider the ambiguity in distinguishing section 20.1 from section 21 without some word indicating the separator. The word you use -- "dot", "point", "mark", "sub", -- is a matter of personal taste or else institutional ...


1

'Droll' (adj) refers to unusual, often sarcastic or dry humor. An example of 'droll' is a wry and sarcastic yet funny comment (Yourdictionary.com). 'Drollerie' (n.) is the noun form. Here's an example from a movie: The British film version of Oscar Wilde's play 'An Ideal Husband'. Friend of the jilted Lord Goring: 'There are plenty of other fish in the sea.' ...


2

For standard speakers of English (AmE, BrE, AusE), there are 2 syllables /'say ens/ with an accent on the first syllable which rhymes by itself with the pronoun 'I'. For some varieties of English, for example Southern AmE, there is 1 syllable /sans/ because they tend to 'monophthongize' the /ay/ in the first syllable (turn a double vowel or ...


-2

It has two: sci-ence. Try clapping your hands while pronouncing the word, try multiply times and pick the one that sounds best!


1

I ran Google Books searches on “alls I know,” “alls I can,” and various related phrases—and I was surprised to see how recent the attested usage is. The first Google Books match is from 1958. From Reynolds Price, “A Chain of Love (Encounter, March 1958), reprinted in Light Blue Dark Blue: An Anthology of Recent Writing from Oxford and Cambridge Universities ...


0

The word 'all' is a pronoun and does not have a plural form or 'all' itself can be plural. Please take a look where 'all' as a pronoun is describes in the dictionary below. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/all?show=0&t=1409761685


6

Science has 1 strong and 1 weak syllable. They together result in its rhythm. The strong (— ) syllable: long & stressed , Weak (·) syllable: short. E.g. — · Science ( SAI-ens), — · table


4

"Alls" is always wrong, except perhaps in some dialectical phrases.


5

TL;DR: Science has two syllables compared with just one in signs, but phonologic factors like fast-speech rules and characteristics of Southeast Asian languages might make them sound alike you. When you ask “how many syllables” a word has, especially one like science, you open up an extremely broad question whose complete treatment is probably beyond the ...


2

Perhaps the people OP hears using as of yesterday/today/tomorrow/now/etc. misunderstand the significance of the as of part. From Cambridge Dictionaries online... as of/from - starting from a particular time or date: As of next month, all the airline's fares will be going up. Anyone with access to a suitable dictionary definition (as is now the case ...


2

Yes, you are right that the original phrase is the one with it. And yes, your friend is right that you can use the variant with this as well. As is often the case with language, there's more than one way to skin a cat. The actual usage stats from the Corpus of Contemporary American English and the British National Corpus look as follows: ...


0

They are both equally grammatically right, but "take [someone's] word for it" is a cliche and hence far more popular than its variant:


1

If there is no real need for them to be able to speak English perfectly, let them use these interesting titbits from other languages. As you said they are in a community where no one else speaks it - there is no reason for them to have perfect English, as long as they are understood by the people they are communicating with. For example (I forget which ...


0

A momentary action takes less time than a coffee break. In the work place, any momentary thing should be something that would go unnoticed by anyone currently taking a coffee break. Temporary is an arbitrary amount of time, and could even be used to replace momentary in many cases, but it does not give the implied connotation of quickness like momentary ...


3

Momentary means "just" touching -- as when a billiard ball bounces off another. {So, depending on the physics of the situation involved, it's "just" touching. So, two billiard balls "momentarily" touching is 0.1 seconds (or whatever that is - ask an engineer). Whereas - for example - imagine describing a naval collision during a battle: the two ships ...


4

Limited is very different to short. Momentary: Lasting for a very short time; brief. 1 Brief == not lasting for long. Temporary: Lasting for only a limited period of time; not permanent. 1 Limited == restricted in... amount (But has no defined amount of time it is limited for). Momentary is a very short period of time. Temporary means it can ...


1

I know xyz has water scarcity, but is abc having water scarcity too? This is the more correct usage. You can put too closer to the noun in certain cases, but it is limited and tends to sound more aloof. "abc too suffers from water scarcity." for example. In these cases also is more natural and understood.


1

Within mathematics, two numerics associated with an "and" indicates summation; the common usage is "two and two is four" (2+2=4). (Note that mathematial sentences can include multuple "and"s; eg two and two and two is six (2+2+2=6).) So "one-hundred and fifty" would be 100 + 50 where "one-hundred fifty" would be 150. That being said, "one-hundred and fifty ...


1

The date has already passed, or the past date. Past: Usage: The past participle of pass is sometimes wrongly spelt past: the time for recriminations has passed (not past) The word past has several meanings (usually related to time before the present or to indicate movement from one side of a reference point to the other side.) Past can be used as ...


1

The simple answer is, you read out "hyphen". Generally not "dash" or other options. So, that's the answer! em-dash would be "E M Hyphen D A S H". No mystery! Anglo-Saxon would be "A, N, G, L, O, hyphen, S, A, X, O, N" For comparison, "it's" would be "I, T, apostrophe, S". (Just for your information, almost nobody knows what an "em-dash" is: it is a ...



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