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I would expect vernacular Irish to be rather more 'colourful' than its English counterpart. Maybe RTE would have resources? Censorship history might also be useful for evaluating contemporary texts.


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More often than not, i.e. is used pretentiously and ironically incorrectly, but it doesn't mean "for example" nor is it a synonym for exampli grati (e.g.). It means "id est" or "that is" http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/d67.html which to remember I like to think of it as "in other words". So it's okay to use i.e. or e.g. in speech, just ...


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Since it takes no longer to say "that is" than it does to say "i.e", it makes no sense to use this written abbreviation for id est.


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The past continuous tense is used to describe an action that began in the past and ended in the past. The present perfect continuous is used to describe an action that began in the past but continues up till the point of speaking about it(the present). Considering the scenario that you've provided, if you reached your workplace and noticed that your ...


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In the case of the present perfect continuous, the action is still going on, but you consider the past portion of it. Example: Your colleague is on your computer doing something and you ask: ''What have you been doing here''? In the case of the past progressive, the action was going on in the past. Example: Your colleague is sitting on your workplace. He ...


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Traditional RP has 12 monophthongs: six short vowels—kit, put, dress, strut, trap, lot— five long vowels—fleece, goose, nurse, thought, start and the schwa—banana. According to this blog post, Modern RP has up to three more monophthongs—square, near, cure. These are essentially long versions of the short vowels dress, kit, ...


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Adding on to the examples everyone else was talking about, (this one drives me insane), when people say 'would of/could of' instead of 'would have/could have'. Speech patterns have embedded themselves within our brains, and so when people go to write something, the words on the paper are the same words coming out of their mouths.


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Contractions in spelling are just ways to replicate the way the words are spoken. This isn't really any different than using 甭 instead of 不用 or 若 in place or 如果. These cases were not thought out or planned, they were just ways of replicating commonly spoken forms of the words. One thing I learned while teaching English was that a lot of Chinese students do ...


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Speaking is articulation work, so it should not astonish that people everywhere in the world use contractions to speak faster and easier and save articulation work.


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Contractions aren't unique to English -- not even close. Even just looking at Wikipedia, we can see examples from English, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Norwegian, Latin, Japanese, Polish, and Uyghur. As @Daniel and @Robusto mention in comments, the construction of contractions doesn't appear to be a conscious decision, but ...


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Without stress, saying "I can go there" or "I could go there" means that going there is within your capability, and implies you probably will. With stress, saying "I can go there" or "I could go there" means that although going there is within your capability, you probably will choose to not exercise that option.


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Have a look at Basic English created by Ogden: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_english


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The inclusion of 'over' as a premodifier to the locatives / directionals 'here' or 'there' connotes the intervening area. It can be as small an area as [across] the table / road (regarded as the 2-D footprint) / room , or as large an area as the English Channel / Atlantic . The expression 'over there' was famously used in a 1910s song: "Over There" is a ...


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My personal sentiment is that much of the difference is merely cultural, such as the difference between you guys, you all, and y’all among American English speakers when addressing a group of people. However, there are some times where they are not interchangeable. It's very hard to make rules for these examples because there are parts to the rules. ...


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Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit is a superstitious wishing game: a common British superstition which states that a person should say or repeat the word "rabbit" or "rabbits", or "white rabbits", or some combination of these elements, out loud upon waking (or first moment) on the first day of the month, because doing so will ensure good luck for the ...


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"Red Hat" does not belong in quotations. The phrases: Red Hat's red hat red Red Hat hat Red Hat red hat are all perfectly grammatical. This is a case where English does not have strict word order rules, so you might convey slightly different shades of meaning depending on which you choose: Whose' red hat? Red Hat's red hat. Which of their hats? The red ...



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