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Quantitative measurements of pitch excursion in stressed vowels among speakers with high rising terminals suggest that even in Southern California the excursions for declarative sentences are smaller in magnitude than those for questions or requests for confirmation. (Google: high rising terminal excursion). In other words, distinguishing them is a matter ...


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I have never heard the expression "uptalk" but I know what you are talking about. In this country (UK) we associate this manner of speaking with Americans, especially American females under the age of say 30. British people do not use it, unless they are trying to sound American. The intonation is exactly as in a question, but it is distinguishable from a ...


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In that context, it means that the speaker wants sex, on the table. Urban Dictionary: "Meaning, have sex with me." In other contexts, it can me 'perform a service' in a more general way, such as asking a hairdresser 'Can you do me next?" in which case 'do me' means 'cut my hair'.


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I don't think either "spoken exam" or "speaking exam" is a commonly-used term. If I heard or read "speaking exam", I would understand this to mean a test of your ability to speak -- perhaps to speak a new language you are learning, or to have good poise and diction when speaking in general, or maybe testing how well you are overcoming a speech impediment ...


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A speaking exam is one in which you are required to speak your answers. This is also called an oral exam. Oral means 'relating to your mouth'. It also describes things that involve speaking rather than writing. i.e. "an oral test in German" On the other hand, a spoken exam is one in which the questions are spoken to you and must be received by ...


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Typically this would be an "oral" exam. The oral exam (also oral test or viva voce) is a practice in many schools and disciplines, where an examiner poses questions to the student in spoken form. The student has to answer the question in such a way as to demonstrate sufficient knowledge of the subject in order to pass the exam. ...


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You can use a positive sentence instead of a negative one. Examples are: I'm fine, thank you. or I got it, thanks. There are also responses that will signal to the salesperson that you will need their assistance soon: Not at the moment, thanks. If you are just browsing and not sure you want to buy anything you can say: I'm just ...


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You can say: "I'm just looking, thanks."


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They are both ok, and both give the same main idea: A sad event prevented you from becoming a father. "I would've been..." gives the meaning that if the accident had not happened, you would have had a child. "I should've been..." gives the same meaning but also gives the idea that someone or something (for example, "God", the Universe, or you yourself" ...


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First of all, condolences on your loss. The distinction between should have and would have is small but definite. Should have generally refers to a piece of advice, or something that was supposed to happen but did not against expectation (in a negative sense). You should have listened to me. Then you wouldn't have fallen down. My arm should have ...


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That very much depends on the person and can vary from day to day and language to language even for specific individuals, but generally the answer for most people is no, at least not completely. One very common phenomenon among non-native speakers of any language is called code-switching. Code-switching is when a speaker unintentionally switches between two ...


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Subscribe to a podcast that offers practice in English phonetics and pronunciation practice. Speakmoreclearly.com is a podcast I subscribe to although English is my first language. This website offers a choice of accents (British, American and Australian)


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I am from the UK, and I would just to clarify the reasoning why I would always use "One hundred and fifty". The "and" splits the 2 numbers to avoid confusion that the "one hundred" may affect the "fifty" as in meaning "one hundred fifties" or in other words 100 * 50. (This may be similar to the way I and other people from the UK pronounce "can't" as carnt ...


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As a native English speaker (albeit with a regional accent) I make the following suggestions based on my experiences with learning a little Polish, Japanese and Italian. The primary way of improving our pronunciation is to mix and speak with the people who speak as we aspire. Addition free methods that help Watch and speak with classical movies such as ...


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Nonconscious is a cognitive term, and is unawareness. Unconscious is a psychoanalytic-Freudian term, mainly emotional.



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