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All over the world there are countries where the native language is English. You can look the list here The English language is almost the same, If you understand English from London, You can understand the English of Australian native speaker too (and everyone speaks English). There are a bit of differences in every type of English, like slang, accent ...


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One's country of origin has less to do today with the language one is brought up to speak as one's first language than ever before in history. Thus, if one is brought up to speak English as one's first language, then that person is a native speaker of English -- with all of its wonderful regional variants.


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It's certainly true that a lot of (well-educated) people wrote in that style: not just in novels but in letters to one another, which, even now, tend to be more formal, correct and "flowery" than spoken language. This is partly due to expectations of "how one is supposed to write a letter", but also due to the fact that letters aren't extemporary - one has ...


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The dialogue definitely is embellished for better reading. Austen was innovative in using far more dialogue than contemporaries. Dialogue is pivotal for her stories and is tuned to the character speaking in a very exact way. Dialogue is narrated as people would love to have sounded, and loved to read about. "Then," observed Elizabeth, "you must ...


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Be clear as to who is speaking and who is being spoken to (see for example The Elements of Style by Strunk and White). Your options are the following: Chappo's suggestion. You could just write to who is addressed. For example (using Chappo's sentence): She turned to Beth. "Can you pass me the hammer?" she asked. Spinning around, she asked Ian, "...


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The superlative has not gone out of style in speech. In fact, superlative constructions like "one of his best" still outperform non-superlative constructions like "one of his better" in speech. Here is some data from the Corpus of Contemporary American English, covering the period from 1990-2015. First, compare occurrences in speech of "one of the more" ...


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There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


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The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...



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