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2

Oh man! You have touched on one of my greatest bugbears concerning the comprehensibility of speech in films and TV, partly because so many of the problems are avoidable if only the makers would pay proper attention to what they are doing. These are the factors I have identified as making it hard to understand speech, in no particular order: Mumbling or ...


2

In English swearwords aren't cut and dried at all, some can be used as terms of endearment (which I'll explain after the ranking). When used as swearwords, to offend, in the UK, I'd rank them in this order less offensive to most. stupid idiot jerk (English = w*nker would be about 7 in the list) b*itch f*ggot (English = "homo") *sshole sl*t b*stard wh*re ...


1

This is one of those questions that is almost impossible to answer, because the acceptability of any given term will vary according to the context, the degree of emotion being expressed, the demographic characteristics of the person using a given term, and the characteristics of the intended audience. (For instance, faggot would probably be perfectly ...


3

relishing is a colourful and appropriate synonym for liking, but I would say it's only really appropriate to use to describe an action, not an object. verb to savour or enjoy (an experience) to the full to anticipate eagerly; look forward to to enjoy the taste or flavour of (food, etc); savour to give appetizing taste or flavour to (food), ...


1

"I'll get free" usually implies that some action will have to be taken in order to achieve freedom. So a slave might say "I'll get free by the end of the month", or someone in a meeting will say "I'll get free in time to come to the other meeting", both implying they will have to do something to achieve it. "I'll be free" implies that this is something that ...


1

The two mean almost the same thing, in that you're expressing the fact that you'll be free soon. However, "get" means "obtain", so "I'll get free" means "I'll obtain freedom". This implies that you aren't currently free, but you will be after some amount of time. On the other hand "I'll be free" doesn't imply that you aren't free now. The addition of the ...


1

Anglocentric does work for it being an English-based bias. But, if you feel the the use of an "easier spelling" of the word is also a type of cultural/language laziness, it could be considered ethnocentric.



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