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And is reduced in speech to a simple nasal, sometimes syllabic, usually assimilated to what follows. The full pronunciation /ænd/ occurs only when stressed and emphatic. So, yes, you can say N instead of AND. In formal and informal speech. Just don't write it.


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Not if you want to be formally correct in speech, no. In spoken English, some dialects/accents have a tendency to merge together sounds, and so you move between the sounds of: Apples and pears Apples an' pears Apples 'n' pears ... but the word remains and. If you were writing to convey a particular style of speech, then you could use the ...


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Quotation marks should not be used for emphasis, only to indicate something that is spoken or quoted.


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As a transcriptionist, I would prefer to use [sic] for misspoken words. The use of [sic] would be commonly recognized for what it is by an attorney or judge if the transcript was introduced in court.


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If you say "The shopping is sometimes is done by him", it's a simple statement of fact. Let's say that there's a "him" and a "her" in this situation. Sometimes he does it, sometimes she does it. Simple. However, if you say "The shopping sometimes is done by him" it moves the focus onto the word "is", which in turn implies that it has previously been ...


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For ‘put up’, the Oxford Dictionary gives ‘’Take or provide with accommodation (friends put me up for the night)’. In British-English ‘putting up’ in the sense of providing overnight accommodation is in current use. The ‘taking accommodation’ usage is more dated. I can imagine some hearty fellow in a 1920s novel declaring that he was ‘putting up at the ...


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I have heard the phrase "where are you putting up?" but only, if I remember rightly, in an old film. This Google ngram shows that the phrase has cropped up in written English from time to time, but almost never compared to "where are you staying?" although it did enjoy a brief period of popularity in the very early 20th Century. Personally I would avoid ...


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You are being put up That is, someone else is putting you up by providing the accommodation. You might ask Please could you put me up for the night? So you, the guest, do not "put up", rather you are "being put up" by the host. Staying has a more general application, covering both visiting as a guest and also paying a hotel for a room, possibly ...


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"as of now", simply means now, which still is redundant. Verbs have tenses to inform when: past; present; future. If the verb is present tense, the verb means "now" or "as of now"...neither needs to be said (or written). Example: The temperature is 57 degrees F. You don't need to say (or write) "As of now, the temperature is 57 degrees F." The verb tense ...


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With regard to the concept of 'correctness' of individual language elements, there are two competing views and these two views will affect how to differentiate varieties. There is describing scientifically what is out there, what people actually say and how their individual way of speaking can be categorized with others, and then there is systematizing ...



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