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15

Slinging = selling drugs Mad volume = a crazy amount Fat stacking = creating large stacks of Benjies = $100 bills (which feature Benjamin Franklin) Thus: I am selling a crazy amount of drugs and making a ton of money.


4

Word lengthening: Linguist Michael Erard told The Atlantic that word lengthening, also referred to as expressive lengthening, stems from a desire to incorporate verbal speech in digital communication. “When people talk, they use intonation in a number of varied and subtle ways … There’s a lot of emotional nuance that can be conveyed that you can’t do ...


4

The Dude, in the context you've taken this from, is Gustavo Dudamel. As he has a reputation for being quite cool, charismatic and youthful. He is also appears to be sponsored by Rolex. The Berlin Philharmonic is rated as one of the best in Europe, if not the world, and is traditionally one of the most appealing for exciting conductors. Hence, the ...


3

Using the phrase is unladylike. Semantically, it means the same thing (regardless of gender); but historically is only used by males due to its vulgar undertones. Therefore, excluding the affiliated taboo, there's nothing wrong with a woman using the phrase.


3

The quoted language comes from Mencken's "The Professions," first published in The Smart Set (January 1922). According to The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994), one meaning of fan as a slang term is "to beat or strike." That meaning goes back more than two centuries and was certainly in active use in the early 1900s: fan v. ...


2

If someone told you it is a racist derogatory term, they are probably referring to red-haired-individuals. In some countries like the UK, ginga (pronnounced jin-ja, not gin-ga) is a slang form of "Ginger". See Urban Dictionary Ginga Slang U.K Ginger See Wikipedia Red Hair - Modern-day discrimination In British English, the words "ginger" or ...


2

Are women allowed to "take a leak" ? take a leak tv: to urinate. (Crude. Often objectionable. Usually in reference to a male. Leak is the mildest and piss is the strongest.) "I gotta go take a leak. Back in a minute."; "We stopped at a rest area so old Harry could take a piss." See, the Free Dictionary, Idioms and Phrases “take a leak” definition from, ...


2

crash, bass, sausage and mash, two kippers and a bonbon is just a more florid way of saying crash, bang, wallop meaning after a short (often unexpected) period of tumult. I've heard many variants over the years, never this exact combination, but each of the components. There is no internal syntax to the phrase, it's justified by its semblance to the crash, ...


2

Are you possibly mishearing "chibi"? (Urban Dict.) (I don't have enough rep to comment, or I would have :/ )


1

I'm not British, so I haven't got the foggiest notion about those expressions - save one: "A little dab'll do ya," is from the advertising jingle for Brylcreem - a men's hair pomade. (1950's) The product was originally British, but it was world-renowned. (As was the jingle)


1

You would probably say "like likes," with the initial like functioning as sort of an adverbial modifier rather than as a true verb. But odds are you wouldn't want to use the phrase at all, unless you want to sound like you're 12 years old. Like like (which would typically be formatted as "like like") is an informal phrase that typically indicates that the ...


1

"represent" is (perhaps 'was' is more accurate) a trendy slang term in the US, particularly from rap music. You can find endless examples of usage by googling rap lyrics (including various product simply called "represent"). (I wouldn't say it's "fashionable" any more - it's out of date.) I'm sure the first usages of this could be traced, but you're asking ...


1

One way to understand the word nailed in this context is as a short form of the idiom "nailed [one's] hide to the wall." Here's the entry for that idiom from The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997): nail (someone's) hide {or (vulgar) ass} to the wall {or barn door} to punish or otherwise put a finish to (someone). [First ...


1

Being of the right age and birthplace I always assumed it was short for a person who was divergent from the name caller. Could mean anything the caller wanted and that was the most annoying thing about being called a divi.


1

I had this situation recently. It was so embarrassing when the saleslady told her co-workers about what I said. I asked her to give me one half kilo (1/2 kilo) of prawns and 3 pieces of fish. She ended up giving me one and one half kilo of prawns. When she asked for the payments and I asked the amount, i freaked out. I was not expecting that she actually ...


1

My Italian father, from New York, used this expression as early as 1950. Simply means: lousy, bad, it sucked.



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