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72

Many analog gauges such as speedometers have a maximum marking which is technically not as high as you might be able to make the reading actually go. To prevent the indicator needle from going too far beyond that marking and possibly getting bent or otherwise damaged when it hits the casing, a small peg is placed at or slightly beyond the maximum marking. ...


9

If the lady in question is well past her forties, and used to be a highly attractive and courted woman in the past, she might dress provocatively and wear heavy makeup in order to recapture her former glory. Such a woman is often derogatorily called mutton dressed (up) as lamb. in British English. an offensive way of saying that a woman is dressed in a ...


8

No. You cannot use TL;DR in a formal email to a client.


7

The noun show-off refers to a person who likes to show off. The adjective ostentatious means showing off your money or possessions to make others notice.


7

I would suggest the adjective promiscuous, as OALD explains: having many sexual partners promiscuous behaviour a promiscuous lifestyle to be sexually promiscuous While the dictionary says the term is "disapproving," I believe it is the most neutral term you will find. It describes the behavior without explicitly approving ...


6

You can use the CONCEPT of a tl;dr in a formal mail. just don't NAME it that. Call it "summary" or a similar term. Clients will love a short and to the point conclusion, because it means they don't need to read a 50 line email if they can't or don't want to. If they want to know more, they can read the rest, but if they are preparing for a meeting or are ...


6

People in England know lots of meanings for the word cool. As a personality trait, it can mean aloof, trendy, laid-back, sound, or accomplished, and probably many more things too, even before you start thinking of its meaning more widely. Each of these meanings can be quite distinct from the others. If someone from the UK was asking you what you meant, they ...


5

Probably flashy may fit your description: ( from TFD) tastelessly showy. ostentatious and tasteless. also the expression bling-bling may fit the context: (Noun) ostentatious jewellery. Bling (or bling-bling) is a slang term popularized in hip hop culture, referring to flashy, ostentatious or elaborate jewelry and ornamented ...


5

Limp-dick (or limp dick) is the most common slang term. (at least in US English) noun An ineffectual man; an impotent man; wimp (1970s+) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/limp-dick There are a lot of entries in Urbandictionary also.


4

If you're delivering a speech or lecture and suspect that your audience might be uncomfortable with the word, you might consider first giving them advance warning that you're about to mention a controversial term, and then say it (or write it) at least once. After that, if you think it would make those in your audience feel better, the next time you mention ...


4

According to dictionary.com, the term "fresher" is British slang for a freshman. I assume that's why they're using it to describe themselves as beginners. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fresher


4

The reason why many fruit-related terms are associated with craziness is that most of these slang terms were previously related to homosexuality. In the early 20th century homosexuality was considered a mental illness, as a result this led to a shift in meaning that continued until the 1960s. By the 1930s both fruit and fruitcake terms are seen as not ...


3

It's often been said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. What one person finds trashy, slutty, tarty, cheap or tacky-looking in a woman; another sees a woman who oozes self-confidence, style, glamour and sex-appeal. A woman who has put on a gaudy outfit could be described as being dressed to the nines; gussied, fancied or dolled up; sassy; and ...


3

If I had an OED, I could be more specific, but the phrase rat-run is in the Oxford Online Dictionary: British informal A minor, typically residential street used by drivers during peak periods to avoid congestion on main roads: 'our road was used as a rat run between two main roads.' Etymonline lists rat-run from 1870 "in a literal sense", but doesn't ...


3

I imagine that my internet and email usage is significantly higher than for many of my generation but despite being familiar with most shorthand, I've not previously seen TL;DR . My point is simply that, in a formal letter, you probably want to be certain (not merely "reasonably sure") that the person to whom you are writing will know what you mean. And you ...


3

Here is an interesting explanation offered by Robert Hendrickson, The Facts on File Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins (1997): racket; racketeer. English pickpockets, once the best of the breed, invented the ploy of creating disturbances in the street to distract their victims while they emptied their pockets. This practice was so common that a law ...


2

Eskimo Brothers When two males acknowledge having been intimate with the same female and remain on good terms, the men are now bonded by having shared the same igloo at one time or another. This can lead to perks by making the information known to other males who you can network with. Male 1: "Yea man, I got us a hook up at the show tonight, ...


2

Consider hound dog (slang) A promiscuous man. [Wiktionary]


2

A pick up artist is someone who is intentionally and systematically approaching women with the intention of seducing them. A term for pursues intimate relationships with a lot of women is a womaniser or a casanova. A man who is good at chatting or flirting with woman, would be a charmer. This term tends to be a compliment, and charmer isn't necesserily ...


2

The closest I can think of is fellow Johns of (woman's name).


2

There's skirt-chaser, defined at freedictionary.com as a man who is aggressive in making amorous advances to women. Some examples: "Robinson was supposed to have been one of the most incorrigible skirt-chasers of his time." (oxforddictionaries.com) "Troy vows to relinquish the life of a skirt-chaser if only he can get Angel in his arms." ...


2

'Cool' is one of those words whose signification has shifted (in my (English) experience) more often than most. In the 1950s it meant Miles Davis and sharp suits. In the 60s this carried on into the mod image, but also came to be applied to anything from Che Guevara to patchouli oil. More lately, smartphones, tablets are all described as 'cool'. What does ...


2

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) offers this note distinguishing among various similar adjectives that might be applicable: GAUDY, TAWDRY, GARISH, FLASHY, MERETRICIOUS mean vulgarly or cheaply showy. GAUDY implies a tasteless use of overly bright, often clashing colors or excessive ornamentation {circus performers in gaudy ...


2

In the 1850's, Sir Richard Owen (the man who came up with the word "dinosaur") hired a sculptor named Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins to create the world's first life-sized dinosaur figures to display in the Crystal Palace. In 1953 while the Iguanadon model was still under construction, Hawkins hosted a New Years Eve gathering and a dinning area was set up ...


2

Put a bit on could/can colloquially also mean 'place a bet': almost certainly on a horse-race, so he's putting a bit on a horse (and facing the likely losses), and then coming to work and putting a bit (literally) on his cab-horse. I've no idea whether the pun was deliberate, either by Henley or by the wideboys (or whetever they were called in those days) ...


2

I note that the book of Henley's poetry that you link to was published in 1901. That would make the phrase "put a bit on" well matched to this entry in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961): bit on, (have) a. (To lay) a stake: racing : 1894, George Moore Henley is saying that the bus-driver sometimes ...


1

You might find Jezebel useful. From the Mac OS X dictionary: Jezebel |ˈdʒɛzəbɛl| ( fl. 9th century bc ), a Phoenician princess, traditionally the great-aunt of Dido and in the Bible the wife of Ahab king of Israel. She was denounced by Elijah for introducing the worship of Baal into Israel (1 Kings 16:31, 21:5–15, 2 Kings 9:30–7). Her use of make-up ...


1

If this person's gaudy outfits, garish make-up, and excessive jewellery are indicative of lower social class than the setting then they may be a "parvenue", a "social climber", or possibly one of the "nouveau riche". If they are just naturally ostentatious or vainglorious, regardless of social class, then they may be a "peacock" or "clotheshorse". Being ...


1

The noun "gimcrack" might fit. http://mnemonicdictionary.com/word/gimcrack (noun) ornamental objects of no great value (adj) tastelessly showy



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