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98

It means "if you couldn't be bothered to read the preceding material because it looked too long (and possibly boring), here is a summary for you". The meaning is quite close to 'executive summary'. tl;dr is used to call out another user on the length of their post. However, in cases of more courteous exchanges and serious discussions, tl;dr can be ...


23

The following, although not slang, may be relevant: • practical joker, “someone who instigates practical jokes” – wiktionary • prankster, “One who performs pranks” – wiktionary • trickster, “One who performs a trick”; also “A mythological figure responsible for teaching others through the use of guile and treason” – wiktionary Wikipedia's ...


17

The "summary" meaning has already been explained, but in a different usage (perhaps the original), it is meant as an insult. User A: [long impassioned explanation of his views on a particular issue] User B: tl;dr Here User B is saying to User A: "Your post was too long and I didn't read it". At best, this is a suggestion that User A is being too ...


15

This kind of user is called an ask-and-run. It is even mentioned on Meta Stack Overflow: Dealing with “ask-and-run” questioners Bonus: If we follow the same pattern, we can also come up with a specific term ask-and-idle for users who post a question but stay idle (but don't disappear/leave) without accepting an answer, commenting, replying to people, ...


8

The slang term troll seems to be acquiring this meaning. Troll has been used for a number of years to refer to a person who makes inflammatory posts in Internet forums for the purpose of annoying others or stirring up trouble. More recently, it seems to also refer to people who perpetrate real-life pranks for similar purposes. Troll seems to have a ...


7

Personally, I would call such an unofficial sexual partner a lover, no matter what the genders of the people involved. The online Merriam-Webster's dictionary's definition of lover includes the following meaning: someone with whom a married person is having a love affair So, while the word does not necessarily imply a man sleeping with a married woman, ...


6

You could figuratively call that person an imp. I would quote Wikipedia, which mentions imps' affinity for pranks, but the entry is not sourced well.


5

rascal (Merriam-Webster): a person and especially a young person who causes trouble or does things that annoy people


5

Limp-dick (or limp dick) is the most common slang term. (at least in US English) noun An ineffectual man; an impotent man; wimp (1970s+) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/limp-dick There are a lot of entries in Urbandictionary also.


5

These users appear for a short time before disappearing forever, resembling the behaviors of virtual particles in quantum field theory, and therefore I would like to nickname them Q&A fluctuation: the temporary appearance of contribution out of empty space.


4

Apart from containing bad grammar, yes, the two sentences illustrate a quirk in at least AE. Bad and good mean pretty much the same thing in your exemplars. (A special case, or exception, involves the use of bad to mean good, as in, "That's a bad pair of kicks you wearin.'") I'd summarize the slight differences between the two sentences as follows: ...


4

That would definitely be slang (slang that ignores the fact that words ending in -ess usually denote something feminine, for that matter). "Paramour" is more unisex and means something similar, though.


4

I have assumed that it now means something like “If you found the above too long and complicated, here is, in a nutshell, what I meant to say.” Your interpretation as just quoted may be what some writers mean tl;dr to stand for, and is in accord with the explanation from knowyourmeme mentioned in a previous answer. But note that the knowyourmeme entry ...


3

As J.A. said, "paramour" is a gender-neutral equivalent, and a good way to express a "male mistress", so long as there is a some gender-context provided for the reader/listener. But the question specifically asked for a male-equivalent, not a male-acceptable equivalent. Technically, Cicisbeo is the word you are looking for. However, I had not even heard of ...


3

Its usage seems to have been increasing since the 80's/90's mainly in Australia. Its origin is not clear, probably from 'crash' in the sense of 'extreme'. Crash hot (from wiktionary) (slang, Australia, New Zealand) Very good, excellent; very well. Well well well, don′t you look crash hot in your new sunnies! I'm sorry boss, I can′t come ...


3

Here is an interesting explanation offered by Robert Hendrickson, The Facts on File Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins (1997): racket; racketeer. English pickpockets, once the best of the breed, invented the ploy of creating disturbances in the street to distract their victims while they emptied their pockets. This practice was so common that a law ...


3

An old expression that predates mobile phones is: has a phone glued to his ear. A quick Google search seems to indicate the phrase is still being used, although sometimes ear is changed to hand, thanks to the advent of texting.


3

In that context, it means that the speaker wants sex, on the table. Urban Dictionary: "Meaning, have sex with me." In other contexts, it can me 'perform a service' in a more general way, such as asking a hairdresser 'Can you do me next?" in which case 'do me' means 'cut my hair'.


2

In the 1850's, Sir Richard Owen (the man who came up with the word "dinosaur") hired a sculptor named Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins to create the world's first life-sized dinosaur figures to display in the Crystal Palace. In 1953 while the Iguanadon model was still under construction, Hawkins hosted a New Years Eve gathering and a dinning area was set up ...


2

I note that the book of Henley's poetry that you link to was published in 1901. That would make the phrase "put a bit on" well matched to this entry in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961): bit on, (have) a. (To lay) a stake: racing : 1894, George Moore Henley is saying that the bus-driver sometimes ...


2

Put a bit on could/can colloquially also mean 'place a bet': almost certainly on a horse-race, so he's putting a bit on a horse (and facing the likely losses), and then coming to work and putting a bit (literally) on his cab-horse. I've no idea whether the pun was deliberate, either by Henley or by the wideboys (or whetever they were called in those days) ...


2

To answer number one: Steely Dan has a song on their album Pretzel Logic called Charlie Freak. The song revolves around a man who sells everything he owns for drugs. So, with this example, we see that the word was used beyond boarding schools. (The album was recorded in New York, 1974.) EDIT: Added year of song


2

Freak was common in the 70s and I was in public school. "Freak" in slang usage connotes sexual activity or kinky sex. Urban Dictionary


2

Here are different ways to express the concept: (AmE) 180 degrees shy of heaven and other curious expressions. (From ( Slightly Off: God, Sex and All Stops in Between) Another expression given by Urban Dict. is wet noodle .


2

Mischief Makers - from host of "Hobo Kelly" 1960s kids show on 13 KCOP. -- http://english.stackexchange.com/help/privileges/comment mentions "You Scallywag" as a non-helpful comment content.


2

Munge was around in Yorkshire before 1950s, and can be seen here recorded in 1876: Munge to chew eagerly, or munch. A person is said to munge, too, who murmurs surlily in an inarticulate manner. The second usage, the surly inarticulate murmur, seems to fit your imperfectly transformed data or mumble more than the chewing does.


2

From the OP's detailed description, I'm inclined to believe that these jokes contain an element of maliciousness, the type of practical jokes where the victim may not spontaneously burst out laughing. The OP suggests that we call the person who performs these jokes; a jerk, a s.o.b, a creep etc. Therefore I suggest the following term shenanigan ...


2

"Toilet" is the "official" US term for the thing upon which you sit, though occasionally "stool" is used. See, for example, this page selling toilets: http://www.homedepot.com/b/Bath-Toilets-Toilet-Seats-Bidets/N-5yc1vZbzae There are of course multiple slang terms -- John, throne, crapper, can,pot, etc. "Commode" is sometimes used but it is also the name ...


2

Commode: (from The American Heritage® Dictionary) A low cabinet or chest of drawers, often elaborately decorated and usually standing on legs or short feet. A movable stand or cupboard containing a washbowl. A toilet. Toilet vs commode: Why do some folks call the toilet a commode? At one point in history, the commode was a piece of ...


1

To mung: to spoil, ruin, or destroy (often followed by up). Computers : to make incremental changes to (a file, system, etc.), eventually ruining or destroying the original. to modify (an e-mail address) in an easily reversible way, to avoid spam. According to Wikipedia the term is also an acronym and it appears there is no relation to ...



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