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27

"Balls!", and the synonymous "Bollocks!" which is more common in this usage, are essentially just vulgar exclamations usually expressing annoyance regarding a situation, or rejection of something previously said. In my experience Americans 1 rarely use either of the above. In terms of "vulgarity" it probably falls somewhere between "Dammit!" and "Fuck ...


18

A clue is given in the text you quote: “Balls,” he repeated. As he's repeated that, there must have been a mention immediately before it. The line which refers to Richard saying something immediately prior to that is Richard swore uncharacteristically which gives some indication of the type of exclamation. One can then go to a dictionary. ...


10

No-show. Although the correct answer for the action is definitely "stand up". I can't believe it, he stood me up.


9

I read your post twice. I think what you're getting at is that in their (vampire) world/life[style], they talk about the nights as periods of activity the way we talk about days/daylight as being a period of activity, right? If so, then a lot of the usual terms non-vampires use still apply. I would think that even the word "day" would be appropriate, as ...


8

I think the best answer anyone can give here is: yes and no. First off, I would say that twink is more or less always used either by gay men or about gay men (or both). I have never, in my life, heard a (straight) girl refer to a straight guy as a twink (except perhaps if particularly discussing the notion of twinkhood, like we are now). I have heard ...


5

Balls: it is an exclamation of disappointment (interjection). Richard is disappointed by the fact that they can't defeat Thomas by acquiring 51% of the stock since he will issue 2 million new shares making it impossible to beat him. Oh balls!!! An expression of dissapointment and or frustration. "Oh balls, I lost my chemistry homework..." ...


5

The most common slang term I've heard for this is stood up. In 5 stages of dealing with being stood up (CNN), the opening lines are: Nobody likes to get stood up! But it does happen. And if you date long enough, it's bound to happen. It's so embarrassing. You get left at a restaurant, the dude never shows, the man of your dreams just doesn't call.


4

It is likely I'm really psyched Excited, pumped up


4

I have no good answer for 'next night', but I commend to you 'yestreen' -- a word meaning 'yesterday's evening', which was still in (possibly affected) use in the 19th century. That may be Scottish; a more English version is 'yester-even'. See also 'forenight'. The first use of 'yestreen' noted in the OED was 1400 -- not necessarily Old English, but ...


3

I belive that the correct term here would be flaker. Someone who does not show up when they had previously stated they will. Also, someone who has no intention of showing up, but acts like they will or want to show up only to mess with your feelings. ex: Tim is such a flaker. I can't believe that he bailed out the very last minute! I'm ...


3

"Garth Brooks" is a stand in for "I don't want to answer this question." I'd've used "undecided" or "fuzzy kitties" myself, but the later might have attracted too many votes from people who actually have an opinion on the desirability of getting married.


2

One of the meanings of the verb ream is [North American INFORMAL] Rebuke someone fiercely: the agent was reaming him out for walking away from the deal The gerund form, reaming, is used as a noun to mean a serious rebuke. Your phrase means to receive a very serious rebuke. As to its source, etymonline.com give a first use for this meaning as 1950, ...


2

I’ve divided my answer into three parts, addressing three epochs in the real or imagined life of the words grunge and grungy. In brief, the nineteenth-century usage of grunge seems to have evolved naturally from other, similar dialect words; but it appears to have no obvious connection to or influence on the later manifestations of grunge and grungy. The ...


2

Black on black adj: 1) (idiomatic) Something that is invisible or intentionally obfuscated, such as warnings or fine print. 2) A description of the colors of an automobile (e.g., all black rims, paint, and interior). 3) A reference to interactions between black people (e.g., "black-on-black crime"). Description n. 2 seems to fit the ...


2

In every survey, you will have people giving answers without any thinking. In this survey, they intentionally added a pointless answer that nobody would reasonably pick. The percentage of answers to this question gives you an estimate how many people have given pointless answers to any question. So if 1% check "Garth Brooks", you can reasonably estimate that ...


2

In Irish author James Joyce's Ulysses, written early in the 20th century, one character refers to another character's shoes as "kicks", so the term was familiar in Ireland at least that far back.


2

If such a person is actually part of the state, then they're a functionary or (more strongly) apparatchik. Allegorically, they are a drone or myrmidon, both words with connotations of insect colonies. Otherwise they would be a zealot, true believer, or partisan who had drunk the Kool-Aid (referring to the use of poisoned Kool-Aid (Flavor-Ade) in the ...


2

While not a noun, the term knee-jerk is often applied to the category descriptor to demonstrate blind allegiance (Of a person) responding in an automatic and unthinking way: knee-jerk radicals [ODO] Possibly partisan a person who takes the part of or strongly supports one side, party, or person; often, specif., an unreasoning, emotional ...


2

I just searched several paid and free databases of 1920s books, newspapers, and periodicals and was unable to find any examples of the word "grungy" meaning jealous or anything like that. It's possible that it was used orally in some areas, but even occasional slang would be expected to show up somewhere. My guess is that the sources that indicate it was ...


2

I know the question has been answered, but here are some additional ideas. On moonrise or tofnung (to as in tomorrow, fnung from ǣfnung, Old English for evening)


2

Ngram shows that the expression is used in the UK too also in the version 'kiss my arse' since the 40s. Kiss my arse! (British & Australian taboo!) also Kiss my ass! (American & Australian Taboo) something that you say in order to tell someone that you will not do what they want you to. He asked for money, and I told him he could ...


2

The way you have been using "I was like" means, in effect, "I said". So you just need to find some synonyms to replace this expression. The most obvious synonym is the one I've just mentioned ("I said"), but there are plenty of other ways to put across the same idea that you can vary according to the circumstances you are describing. For instance: I ...


2

There were geeks before there were computers...music geeks (guilty!), science geeks, history geeks, theater geeks - basically anyone, usually very intelligent, with a more-than-casual knowledge of a very narrow topic of interest. The 2nd definition of "geek" from MW-Online defines it well: 2) a person who is very interested in and knows a lot about a ...


2

Sense 2b of buster in the online OED is: b. A form of address to (or occas. a term for) a person, esp. a man, variously expressing affection, familiarity, disrespect, or hostility. Formerly freq. in old buster. First quoted: 1838 New Yorker 24 Mar. 4/1 That's generous, old buster. Sense 2a, dating from 1833, is: A person who or thing ...


1

Slang term coinage may describe what you are referring to: Coinage: A new word or phrase. The invention of new words. I think you may be also referring to : slang semantic change. Generally, slang terms undergo the same processes of semantic change that words in the regular lexicon do. Eric Partridge, cited as the first to report on ...


1

I grew up as a restaurant brat. I was told the expression came from the fact that most alcohol was 86 proof. A drunk patron was 86'd (cut off or removed from teh bar) when he was so drunk his blood was "86 proof".


1

In American usage, the "powder room" is a euphemism for the ladies lavatory, and the phrase "to powder one's nose" indicates the immediate exit of a lady toward this room. Thus, it is to leave, rather quickly, but with discretion, and without further comment. It appeared in movie and gangster novel lingo in the 1920's, meaning to depart hastily, in the ...


1

This 1889 book about dialect has a passage that translates "a grungy" (noun) in the Mid North Lowland dialect of Scotland into "a deep, revengeful, feeling" in standard English. But I wouldn't call it slang. I would call it a word used regionally in dialects of Scots.


1

I checked a number of reference works that focus on slang and didn't find anything in them related to the use of grunge or grungy before the 1960s. Both the Fifth Edition (1961) and the Eighth Edition (1984) of Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, have no entry for grunge or grungy; but Beale, Partridge's Concise Dictionary of Slang ...


1

OED's first citations for both grunge and grungy are both from The N.Y. Times in 1965, so I think there's little chance it was 1920s slang. Even if it did have limited currency with some similar meaning, most likely that would be an onomatopoeia-assisted fluke, not a continuously-preserved usage passing across the generations by word of mouth.



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