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16

From Tony Thorne, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (1990): bog-standard adj British totally unexceptional, normal and unremarkable. Bog here is used as an otherwise meaningless intensifier. From Paul Beal, Partridge's Concise Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1989): bog-standard. Standard, straight from a factory, with no ...


7

From A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages Pucca or pukka comes from Hindi pakka, "cooked, ripe," from Sanskrit pakva-, from pacati, "he cooks." Pukka therefore means cooked, ripe, matured etc. in that sense. Pukka may also mean solid, permanent, confirmed in Hindi just like concrete is used for that purpose in English, as in "I have ...


7

Quit talking smack yo. Smack talk is also a slang term used in sports. It refers to inflammatory comments made by a person or team in order to insult, anger, annoy or be boisterous towards your opponents. Although it began as a term used by sports fans and athletes, it has spread to all areas of culture where competition takes place. In the United ...


6

What are you blabbering on for? to talk foolishly or excessively blather "he just blathered on and on" "she began blathering on about spirituality and life after death" synonyms: prattle, chatter, twitter,prate, gabble, jabber, go on, run on, rattle on/away, yap, jibber-jabber, patter, blether, blither, maunder, ramble, drivel informal yak, ...


5

You could say that they talk a lot of hogwash if you mean talking shit in the sense of being nonsensical meaningless or insincere talk, writing, etc.; nonsense; bunk.


5

Klinger is striving for a Section 8 because being booted out of the Army for any reason is still preferable in his mind to the alternative of getting shot and killed in Korea. "Bucking for" is not solely a negative expression. A young person could be working very hard to get straight A's and could be said to be "bucking for" straight A's on his/her ...


5

Both spellings are used: Sus, also suss: (noun) Suspicion of having committed a crime; suspicious behaviour; often in phr. on sus. 1936–. (Oxford Dictionary of modern slang) Sus or suss: (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) Suspicious. 2001, Mo Hayder, The Treatment, 2008, Bantam, UK, page 244, ‘Yes - OK, OK. Try not to ...


4

Based on the wikipedia entry that looks very much like the relevant part of the document you linked to, it is technically a conjoined twin and colloquially a navel. There is also some precedence for calling it a baby orange. The mutation caused the orange to develop a second fruit at its base, opposite the stem, as a conjoined twin in a set of smaller ...


4

Probably most British speakers of English would be familiar with the phrase; I have often heard it in the London area, and never thought about its origin. OED mentions the theories about the origin of the phrase given above, then says "The most commonly held view is that the transition from box to bog resulted from a mishearing or misunderstanding of ...


4

According to Collins Dictionary, since the early 2000s there has been a steady decrease in the usage of pukka in printed literature. Unfortunately, it's unknown if the data includes websites, online magazines and forums, but I suspect it doesn't. Taking at face value, it suggests that the term is falling out of favour particularly among British English ...


3

As a young Brit (early twenties), I have never used pukka to mean anything unless it was making fun of or doing an impersonation of Jamie Oliver, or telling someone the name of a pie.


3

OED Online suggests 'sprauncy' (slang) is "perhaps related to dialect sprouncey cheerful (Eng. Dial. Dict.)". The English Dialect Dictionary, in turn, gives a definition of 'sprouncey' garnered from The Ancient Language and Dialect of Cornwall (F.W.P. Jago, 1882): cheerful, jolly; slightly intoxicated. The phonetic resonance of 'sprouncey' in ...


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3

Although oranges present different sizes and shapes varying from spherical to oblong, it generally has ten segments (carpels) inside. A specificity of Navel oranges is the second cycle of carpels at the apex that leads to the apparition of a small orange inside the normal one. You may then use the expression secondary carpel(s) when you want to refer to ...


2

It would appear to be quite country wide rather than Local as both my wife , from London, England, and myself from Lancashire both remember our parents using oojacappivvy & oohjahmaflip. they were all born about 1904-1916 so the grandparents probably adopted the saying in WW1. But having been used by 3 generations I have never heard our children or ...


2

How about talking a lot of baloney? baloney Slang. foolishness; nonsense Origin of baloney: 1915-20, Americanism; alteration of bologna, with substitution of -ey for final schwa Random House a lot/load of baloney Falsehoods, nonsense, or foolishness. Baloney in this sense might have originated from the word "blarney," which means ...


2

No discussion of "pukka" is complete without mention of Only Fools and Horses. I can't vouch for the definitions on the page, but "pukka", "lovely jubbly" and "cushty" all have Del's voice in my head because of their prominence in the show. Even Jamie Oliver hasn't changed that.


1

No, because it has no disparaging connotations. Yankees are people from New England/northeast US, and also players on New York's American League baseball team (the team with the most World Series wins, by the way).


1

Looking at Google Books, I see proto-figurative uses of "for the birds" along the lines of: By sword and famine shall they be consumed that their carcase may become food for the birds of the heavens and the beast of the earth The implication here (and in several other similar cases) is not that the birds are feeding on horse shit, but rather on the ...


1

Parvenu. It means a person from usually a low social position who has recently or suddenly become wealthy, powerful, or successful but who is not accepted by other wealthy, powerful, and successful people.


1

From Wictionary: Most commonly accepted theory: late 19th century macaronic blend of simon ‎(“dollar”), from simon ‎(“sixpence coin”) (17th-century British slang), and Napoleon ‎(“French gold coin worth 20 francs, bearing the image of Napoleon III”). Perhaps from New Orleans [macaronic blend, from Wictionary] A word consisting of a mix of words of ...


1

Dictionary discussions of 'simoleon' and its variants Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this very brief entry for the word simoleon: simoleon n {origin unknown} (1896) slang : DOLLAR Milford Mathews, A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles (1951) has these relevant entries for simoleon and Simon: simoleon n. ...


1

If you are meaning to suggest it more as someone being relentlessly challenging or confrontational without merit, I first picture "raging on about ...". But though the Google results for it seem to return to a reasonable variety and depth of usage, including a Psychology Today column and a DailyMail "article"... I couldn't find anywhere to officially give ...


1

The origins of buck are generally Germanic. The word as a noun has referred to a deer, typically male. As a verb, it appears to have emerged metaphorically (in the 19th C?) to denote the kind of violently vertical leaping of an animal being pursued. To buck for something - say, status or rank - suggests striving or "leaping" to achieve it. To say that ...


1

"Bog-standard" means ordinary. Here's a link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/1728_uptodate/page25.shtml "Bog" is not a verb that means "to form"--"bog standard" is an adjective. There is no verb in the phrase "bog standard scoops of ice cream."


1

There is a common backronym for bog-standard: "British Or German Standard" - but as the answers above make clear that is very much post hoc. The phrase caused political controversy in 2001 when the UK Prime Minister's spokesman referred to "bog-standard comprehensive" schools - which was taken to be insulting by some (an interpretation strongly denied by ...


1

I've heard a couple of people calling them baby oranges as @Lawrence stated. Also, I heard a chef once calling them kisses, but it isn't a common term from what I've seen.



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