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Cactused: (from Your.dictionary) (Australia, slang) Broken; ruined; no longer working, more recently especially related to a technical system. My computer is cactused! Cactus: (from Wikipedia) a malfunctioning piece of equipment was "cactus" (originally 1940s RAAF slang, and briefly revived in the 1980s). The story appears to come ...


5

Calculus in the sense of "calculation" has appeared in editions of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary from the first one (published in 1898). In fact, this is the only mathematical definition of calculus in that dictionary: Any process of reasoning by the use of symbols ; any branch of mathematics that may involve calculation. However, the ...


5

As a Software Developer myself, I can say that there is no commonly used term to describe a person that knows more than one programming language. It is so common-place that it would be peculiar to specifically point that out. That is not to say that there is no term with the meaning you seek, but it would be an obscure one, not often used. Though I would ...


4

It doesn't, but the language is both too slow to change and too quick for it to prevent them happening. Now, it is true as you say that some people favour rooster over cock precisely because cock had an association with penises. And if everyone both 1) thought "penis" when they heard cock and 2) were terribly upset about this, then the word would die out in ...


4

Not that long ago I asked a question about 19th century north American slang which contained the following ... Bob, be honest, never take a man's trick wot don't belong to you, nor clip cards, nor nig, for then you can't look your man in the face, and when that's the case there's no fun in the game... The excerpt is dated 1858, and none of the users ...


3

What '[on] fleek' means and where it came from: the standard view As Matt Эллен notes in his answer, the road to mass adoption of fleek runs through a Vine mini-video uploaded on June 21, 2014, by Peaches Monroee. If you don't have Flash on your computer (as I don't), you can relive Ms. Monroee's 12 seconds of stardom here on YouTube. One commenter at ...


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Much as I admire the Random House Dictionary of Historical Slang (cited in Grant Barrett's answer), its decision to list the slang verb jo in the sense of "spoil" (on the strength of one occurrence from circa 1800) in the same entry with joed in the sense of "tired, exhausted" from 1932 seems to me to be quite a stretch. I checked multiple dictionaries of ...


3

A possible word for such a programmer is a software generalist. This refers to someone who can solve a number of different kinds of programming problems. One way of growing oneself into a software generalist is to learn multiple languages. This is because different problems will often require using a different language. For example, resolving a database ...


3

I assume it's the 'hospital corner' reference you are having a problem with. There's a useful explanation here, from which I have quoted the following excerpt: The bed-making technique of folding hospital corners originates back to the 19th century and the profession of nursing. Nursing is a profession with a long history that was built on war-time and ...


2

(You) wouldn't know (x) if (y)... is a relatively common way to express that the other person is unfamiliar with something. In this case it's a particular way to do up sheets on a bed. If something bites you in the arse, trips you, or hits you in the face, it's presumed you'd recognize it on sight or by feel (as in, a dog bite). Therefore: You ...


2

I grew up with hearing my parents say "someone was strictly from hunger" usually referring to inlaws. I had the idea it meant from poor immigrant backgrounds. It sort of went along with "basement relatives" that lived in basement apartments who's front doors were in the alleys and not on the street. To me it had the idea of a person that came to America and ...


2

Also, I wonder if there is any single word used in tech jargon. No. As user96258 notes, it is effectively unheard of for a programmer to know only a single language. These days it's very difficult to do anything of note without at least having a working knowledge of some of the more specialized languages (SQL, Javascript, arguably HTML/XML for ...


2

Whether "Nig" is a back-formation from the well-known racist term for American Black people, or branches off from that other pejorative, “niggardly,” what’s plain is that the mere utterance of the word so traumatizes many of us that—-unlike any other word I know—-even the linguists of EL&U have great difficulty extricating themselves sufficiently ...


2

"Nig" here is a back-formation from a word that is currently considered very offensive. It means "to behave in accord with negative stereotypes of black people." A back-formation is a word produced by starting with a word whose form suggests a derivation but which was not produced through that derivation and then running the derivation in reverse. One might ...


2

Word! Dig a bit deeper into the Urban Dictionary and you will find this: word to your mother: An anachronistic corruption of the phrase "word to the mother", which was a popular reference to Africa or "The Motherland" during the late 1980s Afrocentric movement. While the replacement of "the" with "your" effectively obliterated the term's Afrocentric ...


2

Dirty refers to adding olive brine to a martini. Extra dirty refers to adding more olive brine to a martini (approx 2 parts vodka/gin to 1 part olive brine), and usually extra olives too. See this article for more on dirty and extra dirty martinis. I would presume that she considers adding all this extra olive flavour to be messing up a martini, or ...


2

All due respect, Mr. Kowal, but I have always spelled it nutsac. (And apparently, Coolio, and other artistes of of his genre, agree.) I have also learned (in researching this particular question) that there is apparently a sport called disc-golf (which really shouldn't surprise me because I went to a hippie college where the only sport was "freestyle ...


2

"FU" is a fairly common abbreviation for that particular phrase. The "F" standing for the offensive word, and the "U" standing for a phonetic representation of the word "you". There are...a number of other colorful "F"-related acronyms that pertain to this saying, but I don't think a full list of them is necessary here.


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One for the road is the usual phrase. It isn't just used in a pub, it is used when offering a visitor a final drink before leaving. It is becoming less commonly used as drinking and driving is becoming less common.


1

Etymonline offers this commentary for the use of way as an adverb c.1200, short for away (adv.). Many expressions involving this are modern and American English colloquial, such as way-out "far off;" way back "a long time ago" (1887); way off "quite wrong" (1892). Any or all of these might have led to the slang adverbial meaning "very, extremely," ...


1

Sack is short for nut sack or nutsack, meaning the scrotum. (In case it needs spelling out, the allusion is to a bag containing nuts, i.e. testicles.) A word spelled sac also exists, which Oxforddictionaries.com defines as A cavity enclosed by a membrane within a living organism, containing air, liquid, or solid structures. The latter spelling is ...


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The obvious reason that the usage of the term arose is that despite the hopes for an industry, the plant itself proved useless for any purpose - just occupying space, kind-of like politicians, but easier on the eye. Hence, anything in general that was useless became "cactus".


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Can I suggest that the term may derive from gold brought from the Rhine. An old term for gold is Or an so this may have been termed "Rhein Or" ? This could have been around since Roman times?


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This first edition of OED includes the noun sense of 'gyp' as 2. U.S. slang. A thief. 1889 in Century Dict. but makes no mention of any relation to gipsy/gypsy (or anything else). Later editions include a 3rd sense of 'gyp' 3. A fraudulent action; a swindle. Also as adj. Cf. gyp v. orig. U.S. gyp, v. orig. U.S. To cheat, trick, swindle. ...


1

Most serious slang dictionaries put considerably more effort into identifying when a term arose than in trying to identify when it fell out of widespread or well-informed use. In part this is because documenting usage generally involves finding published instances of it—and noting that published instances of a term have declined or vanished is not an ...



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