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6

Yes, dictionaries other than the OED list "painted lady" as a term for a prostitute. Not in your reference, though. Geishas are not prostitutes, but it's fair to say they are painted, as you can check in this how-to guide. The horticultural and entomological usages seem to outnumber the references to the world's oldest professions, but the google does ...


4

"classy" = stylish "sassy" = spirited, cheeky 'smart assy" = an adjective, facetiously derived from "smart ass," slang for someone who's an irritating know-it-all


3

I would say no. The concept of the stage as a box has been well known since Molière, I think, but the word scenic in English has an overwhelming connotation of picturesque, unfortunately. In other words, while it is possible to refer to the actual stage by the word scenic, the sense of natural scenery is dominant in the word, which may therefore confuse ...


3

cradle-snatcher someone who has a romantic or sexual relationship with a much younger partner (thefreedictionary.com) You could try forcing a "neologism" such as juvenophile, but any term with this general sense is likely to be derogatory and/or humorous. Noting @James's simultaneous post with an unfamiliar (to me) alternative version, I should ...


3

cradle-robber: (noun)(derogatory) A person who marries or has a sexual relationship with a much younger person. Oxford Dictionary


3

(Since this is about colloquial usage, I hope informal examples from my own experiences are acceptable as reference) I mostly hear/see hashtags used in real life and on online forums without hashtags as something one would hypothetically add to a social media posting about whatever is currently the topic. e.g. someone doing something crazy in real life ...


3

Dude has really crept like moss in the past decade or so. As with most slang, it doesn't ask your opinion before it comes knocking, and it doesn't care what you think of it. What I'm trying to say is, males in America will hear themselves called dude, whether by friends, acquaintances, or strangers (it's common even in business transactions, if you are ...


3

I don't have an instance of that exact phrase, but you might find Gone With The Wind interesting: There were women in the mob near Decatur Street, garishly dressed women whose bright finery and painted faces gave a discordant note of holiday. Most of them were drunk and the soldiers on whose arms they hung were drunker. She caught a fleeting ...


2

(It's been bugging me for ages this "boink".) The earliest instance I found boink, used unequivocally as a verb, is in an electrical engineering volume called R & D Review, 1957. The analogous picture in a simple mechanical model is that of the bottom of anold-fashioned [sic] oil can just as it “boinks”: there are two stable states separated by an ...


2

In English (as in other languages, I am sure), we do not like to repeat words or phrases too often. In this case, "to no end" makes sense as well, because the rest is implied. "He annoys me to no end (of my annoyance)." In other words, there is no end to his annoying behavior. At least, that is my understanding of using the phrase in that way. Better usage ...


2

'Not worth shucks' John Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms, first edition (1848) has this entry for shuck: SHUCK. The outer husk or shell of the walnut, chestnut, &c.; or the husk of Indian corn. In England, the word is applied to pods as well as husks; as, pea-shucks. Not worth shucks, is a Southern expression meaning good for nothing. ...


2

Perhaps "horn" is a slang word for the male member in a state of excitement and, by analogy, "horny" meaning having a woody?


2

These days, the term full stack developer gets thrown around a lot, in an attempt by employers to suggest the programmer should not be siloed into one area of development. eg. In the development of web applications, developers are commonly expected to know multiple languages, such as Javascript, SQL, XML, Java or C#, in order to achieve basic functional ...


2

An older woman seeking younger men may be called a cougar. Cougar (slang) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cougar_(slang) Wikipedia Cougar is a slang term that refers to a woman who seeks sexual relations with considerably younger men.


2

It is colloquial because it is a current trend, more so with the younger generation. It's meant to sound cute, and ironic since hashtags aren't meant to be voiced, but written rather. The real word here is hash Hash refers to the # symbol The tag part of the phrase is the subject here. The act of tagging things (in this case, words) using the hash ...


1

1) It's a parody of shallow internet comments, combining several trendy phrases in a manner meant to be reminiscent of an annoying teenager. In order they are a wry-faced emoticon, an lolspeak abbreviation for the phrase "Oh my God!" and a reference to a popular juvenile joke, where the phrase "deez nuts," meaning "these (my) testicles" is used as a ribald ...


1

Does not have an answer, the author likely misinterpreted the meme's usage Deez Nuts ain't loyal is a variation on "These hoes ain't loyal" EXPLICIT LANGUAGE WARNING, a line in a song by Chris Brown. Many people said "Deez" instead of "These", so a "Deez Nuts" Joke was inevitable.


1

The euphemisms #1 and #2 are most needed by parents of small children. Small children usually learn to control urination first.


1

horny (adj.) "lustful, sexually aroused," definitely in use 1889, perhaps attested as early as 1863; from late 18c. slang expression to have the horn, suggestive of male sexual excitement (but eventually applied to women as well); see horn (n.). Online Etymology Dictionary There doesn't seem much more to say - it's a pretty obvious metaphor.


1

It carries almost unlimited connotations. Here is just a small sampling (short clip of stand-up comedy). When someone uses it in a context like this, it is almost certainly meant to convey an ironic or tongue-in-cheek mood. Used here to introduce a sentence, most likely in a comment since those are less formal than answers, it is probably meant to warn the ...


1

It appears to be mainly a BrE slang expression: To trump: Over the centuries, fart has not been without linguistic rivals. Since the early fifteenth century, for example, trump has served as a synonym for fart, or rather to denote an especially noisy fart. (A Dictionary of Culinary Curiosities) by Mark Morton Trump: Verb. To break ...


1

There are a few reasons for a Peg to by placed on the face of an analog meter. 1) The devise was designed to measure a certain range accurately. A peg prevents rotation beyond the limit. 2) Some of these devices have a limit to how far the pointer can rotate before it would jam or damage the device. 3) Many analog meters have a spring connected to the ...


1

In terms of labelling a human, simply popular is your best alternate. It's that simple. Note however that (as I think you suggest) "cool" (when labelling a human) can have three main meanings: Cool as in Joe Walsh Cool as in sang froid (although this is less used by young people, only boring old people use it this way) Cool as in simply "popular", ...


1

I'm Australian and I've heard the word festy before, it means dirty or disgusting. Sometimes you can call people festy or things. From the Collins dictionary: Festy - dirty, malodorous, very bad


1

Dictionary coverage of 'golliwog' Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) shows no hesitancy in declaring the source of the word golliwog: golliwog also gollywog or golliwogg n {Golliwogg, an animated doll in children's fiction by Bertha Upton †1912 Am. writer) (1895) 1 : a grotesque black doll 2 : a person resembling a golliwog That ...


1

In my village dialect, not far from Newcastle, UK "them's" is used as a short form of "they are" or "those are". Not grammatically correct but understood but all locals. Foreign language students would do well to avoid using it.


1

The usual way to denote an acceleration of "ten gee" in technical writing would be 10g (lower case 'g'). Upper case 'G' usually denotes the Universal Gravitational Constant that appears in the law of gravitational attraction.


1

The tangential role of werewolves in the expression 'sliver bullet' Most of the discussions of where "silver bullet" comes from point to the legendary ability of silver bullets to kill werewolves. The word bullet in English goes back to 1579 and werewolf to "bef[ore] 12c" (according to Merriam-Webster), so there is a considerable space between the emergence ...



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