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32

It is spelled with one 'n' because it comes from "gone" (not from "gonna" - going to) as in earlier expressions like gone goose or gone coon. Goner (n.): "something dead or about to die, person past recovery, one who is done for in any way," 1836, American English colloquial, from gone + -er (1). From earlier expressions such as gone goose (1830), ...


32

Date as a synonym of "anus" is Australian slang. The definitions I've found are a bit vague in terms of what specific anatomical feature it refers to (some say "anus," some say "buttocks"), but other people responding to this post have provided evidence that this vagueness may just be due to some dictionary-writers misunderstanding the meaning. (For example, ...


20

The original term was "in my humble opinion", often abbreviated IMHO. I remember it appearing on the early Internet, especially in Usenet discussion groups. It often got used in flame wars to try to reduce the impact of dogmatic opinions. However it became obvious that the people using it were not being at all humble, and hence "in my arrogant opinion" ...


12

The Australian National Dictionary has an entry for "date" meaning anus and vagina. http://australiannationaldictionary.com.au/index.php The link does not work well. You have to fill in "date" in the search field. 1919 W.H. Downing Digger Dialects 18 Date, a word signifying contempt.] 1961 M. Calthorpe Dyehouse 214 “In your bloody date! What do ...


12

Yes. It's spelled goner. slang One that is ruined or doomed. Someone or something that is going to die or that can no longer be used. Gonner is a spelling variant.


8

Strength of belief IMHO is often treated as a qualifier with a meaning like "I believe X is true, but I might be mistaken". IMAO isn't nearly as frequent, and would (IMHO) be used only sarcastically, but it has an implied literal meaning of "I believe X is true and I'm really, really sure that it is so". I have seen IMNHO or 'in my not so humble opinion' ...


8

False Italianisms in British and American English: A Meta-Lexicographic Analysis by Cristiano Furiassi has a list of selected false Italianisms. Lest there be any doubt about what it’s meant by false Italianisms, here it is in the autor’s own words: False Italianisms – which most English speakers believe to be purely Italian – are created when genuine ...


8

In manga dot's are used to express a silent response. This is needed because manga doesn't have time, it has panels. To show time passing without anything being said they put in dots. If I send you a single dot in an SMS or chat it means, I'm here. I'm reading. I'm not saying anything. Because if I didn't for all you know I'm asleep.


7

Paul Johnson is certainly correct in identifying the phrase "in my arrogant opinion" as being an ironic reversal of the set phrase "in my humble opinion." As this Ngram chart for the years 1600–2008 illustrates, however, the phrase "in my humble opinion" has been around for a lot longer than the Internet has: In fact, the phrase attained its greatest ...


7

As attested by most sources the origin is probably from a humorous reference to the very popular music hall song, "Archibald, certaily not" which became a cachtphrase in those years: Archibald: masc. proper name, from Old High German Erchanbald, literally "genuine bold," from erchan "genuine" + bald (see bold). Archie, British World War I ...


7

A brat. a : child; specifically : an ill-mannered annoying child a spoiled brat b : an ill-mannered immature person Merriam-Webster While there are many other terms for this idea, this one is commonly understood in American English.


6

The term "war horse" or "old war horse" is often used to refer to an aged, experienced soldier. (Informal) a veteran, as a soldier or politician, of many struggles and conflicts. (Dictionary.refeence.com)


4

bussin should be interpreted as busting (it's written as "bustin" on Gucci Mane's t-shirt in the official video of the song). juugs is also sometimes spelled joogs. I believe it derives from the word "drug". As a noun, it seems to mean something like a small-time drug dealer, or the act of selling a small quantity of drugs. It can also be used as a verb ...


4

If you haven't found www.urbandictionary.com yet, that site has very much useful information and it is certainly uncensored. Be aware though that the explanations with the highest ranks are not necessarily the most "correct" ones, people tend to vote for funny/smart definitions.


3

This question brought to mind a toy we had when I was a kid. It was made popular on the TV show "Romper Room" Plastic cylinders (like small coffee cans) with loops of cord attached - and you'd stand on them, hold the cords taut, and clomp around with your arms at your sides. If you called this person a Romper Stomper I'm pretty sure folks of my generation ...


3

It's difficult to know exactly how people spoke in earlier times. Also, when asking this question, it is important to know which class of individuals you are speaking of. "Upper crust" used language differently than the "common" person. Also, swearing is a highly individual matter. One reason this is a difficult question to address is that the printed ...


3

In Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist/science fiction novel, The Sirens of Titan, the entire purpose of the evolution of the human race was to produce and deliver a small replacement part to a moon-stranded spaceship so it could complete its mission of carrying a message from one side of the universe to the other. "The message consists of a single dot, which in the ...


2

Military slang is notoriously hard to pin down ("Tell me, trooper, where exactly did you first hear the opprobrious term 'f***ing spare part'?"), but this seems more elusive than most. I have found a couple of memoirs that say it was 'universal slang' by September 1915, which is pretty soon after the first guns were turned on our brave RFC boys; but how was ...


2

Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, first edition (1937), which is usually very strong on British military slang, seems to favor the Brooklands aerodrome explanation, citing Ernest Weekley, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921) as his authority, but adding a starting date for this usage of "ca. 1910–1914" (which ...


2

The word means different things in accordance to the context in which it was applied. Answers: My Year is starting off lit af👌🏼 ...but is gonna be TD by Monday morning Meaning: my year, 2016, is starting off really well, but it will be even better by Monday Morning. Lit in this context means great, AF means as fuck. *Also, TD means Touch Down, which ...


2

When I lived in Leeds Yorkshire UK, 'Oojah--kapivvy' was definitely part of our family vernacular and was particularly used by my Father. Dad was a WW2 Vet, so he may or may not have picked up the expression during his years in the army. It is synonymous with Thingamajig, Whatchamacallit etc. Sometimes, though it was shortened to Oojah. Here in New York no ...


2

Terrible Twos Not used so much as a term for the person, but the development stage of that toddler. Charlie is in his terrible twos, and it's been so difficult! Dictionary.com defines as: "A stage of development in which toddler behavior is a particular challenge." Additionally, this term is widely used throughout parenting (Parents.com) and health ...


2

"Exes" are defined in your question as "A former spouse or partner." This definition already covers spouses, and girl- and boy-friends (live-in or not). In modern English, "partner" is an umbrella term to mean any romantic partner, of any gender, with or without marriage. Partner A partner in a ​company is one of the owners. A person’s ...


2

Per Merriam-Webster, some definitions of "quip" are: a clever remark a witty or funny observation or response usually made on the spur of the moment Again, per Merriam-Webster, some definitions of the suffix "-y" are: characterized by, full of having the character of like that of Therefore, a quippy message is a message that is ...


2

You can easily use this list on Wiktionary.org. It requires attribution according to these terms.


2

Are you looking for something mean or neutral? Not sure I can help with a neutral descriptor, but any number of nasty ones come to mind. Consumer whore, ditz, twit, shallow superficial... Kardashian? That could probably be made into a general-purpose adjective.


2

Enigmatologist is a word for a person you describe. The term was coined by Will Shortz, the former editor of Games magazine, which I read voraciously as a child. He's currently the editor of the New York Times crossword puzzle. Mr. Shortz is apparently the only person in the history of the world to have a degree in Enigmatology (the University of Indiana, ...


1

Old standbys like boring, superficial, and bubbleheaded come to mind.


1

Historically it most likely stems from the word "Alcoholic" which is quite a common word. Even though it's actually pronounced "Al-Ko-Hall-Ik" people (including myself) when talking fast say it as "Al-Ka-Hall-Ik". When creating new terms people match the words to how they will say it, with the "-A-Hall-Ik" transferring. A more common example of this is the ...


1

According to Etymonline the suffix -oholic has been gradually replaced by -aholic in new words formation like shopaholic or golfaholic: word-forming element abstracted from alcoholic (q.v.); also see -aholic, which has tended to replace it in word formation. -aholic: word-forming element abstracted from alcoholic; first in sugarholic ...



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