Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Because the grammar is incorrect. It should be "him and his wife" as you correctly say. This is probably an example of hypercorrection. The speaker has been corrected at some time for using 'him' instead of 'he', e.g. "Him and me did it." He has misunderstood the grammatical rules, over-generalised and gone to the other extreme.


15

You have to understand that this novel is written from the perspective of a youth who speaks largely in slang and colloquialisms and the imperfect grammar is part of his persona. That said: Correct grammar would dictate that the pronoun used as an object of an action (here the action is waking up) should be "him". So correctly the phrase would include "him ...


10

The speaker is Holden Caufield narrating his life. Holden is the rebellious protagonist of the novel, and if you've read much of the book, you'll know that Holden doesn't get along in school. J. D. Salinger is trying to capture how such a character would sound. "Helluva" is a phonetic rendition of "hell of a," meaning a remarkable example of something. ...


10

The reference is almost certainly to an E-mu SP-12—which Wikipedia refers to as a "sampling drum computer." As the Wikipedia article on the SP-12 notes, The name SP-12 stands for sampling percussion at twelve bits, demonstrating the power of the sampler. The E-mu SP-12 is credited with helping usher in the era of digital sampling by being one of the ...


8

Aside from two matches to a Tumblr page with the name "The Cat's Evening Wear," a Google search returns the following six readable matches for the phrase. From a September 8, 2004, post at RoadbikeReview.com: My SO is the cat's evening wear, but useless when it comes to bike related anything. From a September 21, 2006, comment posted at Threadless.com: ...


6

The expression that sucks seems to be predominantly connected to the reduction of a colloquial expression for fellatio as it is metaphorically applied to any disgusting or contemptible situation: Meaning "do fellatio" is first recorded 1928. Slang sense of "be contemptible" first attested 1971 (the underlying notion is of fellatio). etymonline.com ...


5

In British English 'cop it' can mean a few things but one of two of those things is certainly being referred to. From http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/cop: 1.2 (cop it) British Get into trouble: will you cop it from your dad if you get back late? 1.3 (cop it) British Be killed: he almost copped it in a horrific accident London ...


4

Here's the lyrics: I got a ho named Reel-to-Reel She got a buddy named SP 12, now you know the deal We gets freaky in the studio late night That's why the beats that you hear are coming real tight Note his ho is named "Reel-to-Reel", not "Real de Real". Rap Genius explains: 4-Tay talks about the physical act of making a record. Reel-to-reel ...


3

The verb to cop has quite a few meanings, the most basic of which is ‘seize, grab’. The sense relevant here is definition 1.1 (of the verb) as given in the Oxford Dictionaries Online article: Incur (something unwelcome) If you cop something, it is forced on to you, you get it without wanting it. You can cop the blame for something; you can cop a bad ...


3

Wikipedia traces the expression to two 1965 US television sitcoms, Bewitched and My Mother the Car. Its popularity probably peaked with the 1995 film Clueless, and fifteen years after that, the word had topped the Marist poll two years running for the most annoying word.


3

The google (books and web) says that "goose bumps" (also one word, "goosebumps") is by far the more favored term over "goose pimples" or "goose flesh." The technical terms for this phenomenon is cutis anserina, horripilation, or piloerection. The google finds over 750K uses of "goose bumps" and only 124 of "chilly bumps." I didn't look closely at the ...


2

Robert Chapman & Barbara Kipfer, Dictionary of American Slang, third edition (1995) has this entry for whatever: whatever adv by 1900 Perhaps, possibly[.] Often a reply to an unanswerable question, with the force of "Could be" or "We'll see": Well, whatever. The point was, he was dead... —Carsten Stroud [Lizardskin (1992)]/ Which I can do on my own, ...


2

My father has used that expression all his life. He was born in 1920, which is in agreement with the idea that the expression was somewhat common through the 1920s-1940's. From context I always understood it to mean, as others have stated, of poor quality, a last resort. Interestingly, he is from New Hampshire with no Yiddish connections. Perhaps if the ...


1

Yes she can because "momma" is used by many people to refer to their own mothers. It is used by people from all around the world so it wouldn't sound unusual to hear the word(s) "(my) momma" from a lot of different children. For short, it is just a common noun.


1

It's pronounced like Bee-Otch. First syllable the same as a "bee", second rhymes with "botch". Let Jesse demonstrate (on 0:21): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVR476WHmR8


1

It is an alternative spelling for biatch. There is little or not much difference in pronunciation. Note that, since the stress is on the first syllable, the second syllable may be an intermediate sound between 'a' and 'o', perhaps a schwa. Here is the definition (and pronunciation) from en.wiktionary.org biatch Pronunciation (US) IPA(key): /bi.ˈɑtʃ/ ...


1

Yes, you can use all three slang (words) in one sentence; but no, your example isn't correct since it makes little sense. It literally reads: "Can someone be 'in such deep trouble' (so screwed) because someone 'easily won' (nailed) an argument that made him 'drunk' (hammered). But how about: My boss busted (nailed) me at work for being drunk (hammered) so ...


1

My grandparents used the term.... it means, a reprimand, scolding, etc. "I'll give him a good "what for"!


1

Recent slang dictionaries on the origin of 'wank' and 'wanker' I note at the outset that every recent slang dictionary ultimately concedes that 'origin unknown [or obscure]" remains the final word on these terms. Nevertheless, some dictionaries are more inclined than others to entertain speculation. Starting with the most cautious treatment, we have John ...


1

Albert Barrere & Charles Leland, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume 2 (1890) has this entry for posh: Posh (society) modern term for money, originally used for a halfpenny or small coin. From the gypsy pash or posh, a half. In Romany poshero, the affix ero being corrupted from hāro, copper, i.e., a copper or a penny. Posh an' posh, half ...


1

In the British TV series "Lovejoy", the antique dealer (Lovejoy) was called a divvy because of his intuitive recognition of valuable and genuine objects - based on "diviner".



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible