Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

72

Many analog gauges such as speedometers have a maximum marking which is technically not as high as you might be able to make the reading actually go. To prevent the indicator needle from going too far beyond that marking and possibly getting bent or otherwise damaged when it hits the casing, a small peg is placed at or slightly beyond the maximum marking. ...


55

Moocher--a bit old-fashioned and not much in use nowadays. Deadbeat is a bit more general. Or sponge.


26

You can consider welch or welcher. These terms are used for people who fail to repay a small debt. The debt is usually a betting or gambling debt but these terms can be applied to other contexts as well. They are considered derogatory. welch (n) A person who defaults on an obligation, especially a small one. She's a welch. That isn't hers, I ...


17

A scrounger is a term commonly used for this kind of person: to scrounge: (from TFD) To obtain (something) by begging or borrowing with no intention of reparation: scrounged a few dollars off my brother. to scrounge: (from OED) Seek to obtain (something, typically food or money) at the expense or through the generosity of others or by ...


12

Deadbeat specifically means someone who doesn't pay back money borrowed, or debts owed, ever. A deadbeat borrows, and betrays trust of family and friends. A moocher or a sponge or a freeloader or a scrounger have similar meanings to each other, but different than deadbeat. All are cheapskates, consistently taking advantage of the generosity or obliviousness ...


9

If the lady in question is well past her forties, and used to be a highly attractive and courted woman in the past, she might dress provocatively and wear heavy makeup in order to recapture her former glory. Such a woman is often derogatorily called mutton dressed (up) as lamb. in British English. an offensive way of saying that a woman is dressed in a ...


8

No. You cannot use TL;DR in a formal email to a client.


8

Sponger: Freeloader: Parasite: Leech: Bloodsucker; will all serve your purpose, but use at your own discretion as some are stronger than others. Sponger could be used quite lightly, but parasite would be harsh. Example: 'You sir! Are a freeloading, bloodsucking parasite!'


7

The noun show-off refers to a person who likes to show off. The adjective ostentatious means showing off your money or possessions to make others notice.


7

I hear "mooch" more than I hear "moocher." To me it means someone who's always looking to get other people to give them stuff. I don't know that I've heard "scrounger" or "scrounge" since I was a teen -- which is a long time ago. To me, "deadbeat" is the closest word, as in "deadbeat dad," a father who owes child support but isn't paying it. As with most ...


7

I would suggest the adjective promiscuous, as OALD explains: having many sexual partners promiscuous behaviour a promiscuous lifestyle to be sexually promiscuous While the dictionary says the term is "disapproving," I believe it is the most neutral term you will find. It describes the behavior without explicitly approving ...


6

You can use the CONCEPT of a tl;dr in a formal mail. just don't NAME it that. Call it "summary" or a similar term. Clients will love a short and to the point conclusion, because it means they don't need to read a 50 line email if they can't or don't want to. If they want to know more, they can read the rest, but if they are preparing for a meeting or are ...


6

People in England know lots of meanings for the word cool. As a personality trait, it can mean aloof, trendy, laid-back, sound, or accomplished, and probably many more things too, even before you start thinking of its meaning more widely. Each of these meanings can be quite distinct from the others. If someone from the UK was asking you what you meant, they ...


6

In the digital generation, leecher is also used. It can include other kinds of social parasitism, but the not-repaying-money scenario is a very good example for it. As far as I'm aware, the origin is from P2P networks. But maybe there is an earlier use which was already established when the term became common in P2P.


5

Probably flashy may fit your description: ( from TFD) tastelessly showy. ostentatious and tasteless. also the expression bling-bling may fit the context: (Noun) ostentatious jewellery. Bling (or bling-bling) is a slang term popularized in hip hop culture, referring to flashy, ostentatious or elaborate jewelry and ornamented ...


5

Another synonym I haven't seen mentioned yet is cadger. To cadge is to persuade someone to give you something, and a cadger is someone who cadges things. Cadger should not be confused with codger, which is a mildly derogatory term for an old man.


4

It can be offensive, but depending upon the context, it might not be. In the context you describe, it is apparently a tongue-in-cheek award for making some kind of mistake, and everyone (the recipient included) appreciates the humor involved. However, turkey can also be intentionally offensive, and taken as such. Context is everything.


4

If you're delivering a speech or lecture and suspect that your audience might be uncomfortable with the word, you might consider first giving them advance warning that you're about to mention a controversial term, and then say it (or write it) at least once. After that, if you think it would make those in your audience feel better, the next time you mention ...


4

According to dictionary.com, the term "fresher" is British slang for a freshman. I assume that's why they're using it to describe themselves as beginners. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fresher


4

'schnorrer'--A Yiddish/German term to describe a freeloader who frequently asks for little things, like cigarettes or small sums of money without offering a return. The English usage of the word denotes a sly chiseler who will get money out of his acquaintances any way he can, often through an air of entitlement. The 'schnorrer' is distinguished from the ...


3

If I had an OED, I could be more specific, but the phrase rat-run is in the Oxford Online Dictionary: British informal A minor, typically residential street used by drivers during peak periods to avoid congestion on main roads: 'our road was used as a rat run between two main roads.' Etymonline lists rat-run from 1870 "in a literal sense", but doesn't ...


3

I imagine that my internet and email usage is significantly higher than for many of my generation but despite being familiar with most shorthand, I've not previously seen TL;DR . My point is simply that, in a formal letter, you probably want to be certain (not merely "reasonably sure") that the person to whom you are writing will know what you mean. And you ...


3

It's often been said that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. What one person finds trashy, slutty, tarty, cheap or tacky-looking in a woman; another sees a woman who oozes self-confidence, style, glamour and sex-appeal. A woman who has put on a gaudy outfit could be described as being dressed to the nines; gussied, fancied or dolled up; sassy; and ...


3

Swot as a slang word. (British slang) (Offensive Slang) Swot; A person who values his education at least three times more than his social life and his teacher at least three times more than his friends, hypothetically. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Swot a student who studies assiduously, especially to the exclusion of ...


3

The way geese move their neck to look around seems to be at the origin of this saying: gander: from Etymonline.com "take a long look," slang, 1886, from gander (n.) on the notion of craning one's neck like a goose; earlier it meant "to wander foolishly" (1680s). Related: Gandered; gandering. Gander from (www.worldwidewords.org) A quick, ...


2

Eskimo Brothers When two males acknowledge having been intimate with the same female and remain on good terms, the men are now bonded by having shared the same igloo at one time or another. This can lead to perks by making the information known to other males who you can network with. Male 1: "Yea man, I got us a hook up at the show tonight, ...


2

Consider hound dog (slang) A promiscuous man. [Wiktionary]


2

A pick up artist is someone who is intentionally and systematically approaching women with the intention of seducing them. A term for pursues intimate relationships with a lot of women is a womaniser or a casanova. A man who is good at chatting or flirting with woman, would be a charmer. This term tends to be a compliment, and charmer isn't necesserily ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible