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142

CBS Sports has this nice article explaining the origin of the word, including a newspaper snippet from 1909: “Hand-Egg,” Not Football. To the Editor of The New York Times: Football is certainly a misnomer, for the game is played not with the feet but with the hands, and the ball is not a ball but an egg. I propose that the game be played ...


85

It's a football reference. The hat is a football helmet The football is egg-shaped and held in your hands A touchdown is worth 7 points (including the obligatory point-after-touchdown) Urban Dictionary Wiktionary


38

Bearing in mind your specific request for non-vulgar terms, and being concerned with my own health and safety, the most commonly used words I use to address my better half when she is in such a state would be honey dearest baby princess sweetheart buttercup pumpkin cupcake darling This is one of the rules to be found in the Handbook for ...


20

"Grumpy." I do not ever call my wife a bitch, or even say that the is acting like one. I would definitely not call her bitchy. I might, while using one of oerkelens' terms of endearment, tell her, "You seem grumpy." If that does not express the idea accurately, I might say "especially grumpy."


13

A handegg is an American football. It doesn't (often) touch the foot and isn't (much of) a ball shape.


12

Hormonal You seem a little hormonal this week, why don't you pour a glass of red and run a bath. You convey that your partner is 'acting up' but acknowledging it is neither persons fault - biology is biology after all and can't be helped.


12

out-of-sorts is both accurate and not gender-specific. I think what gets up my nose the most is the assumption that my mood must necessarily mirror my hormone levels. Most times my mood is proportional to the amount of assitude in the air. ;)


9

Handegg: Etymology From hand +‎ egg, by deliberate contrast to football meaning “soccer”, emphasizing the use of the hands and an elongated rather than round ball. handegg (countable and uncountable, plural handeggs) (slang, uncountable) A humorous term for the game of American football, or for any other sport called “football” that uses ...


8

This isn't menstruation specific or even gender specific, but the term we use is either "cranky" or the slightly more humorous "cranky-pants". It's a non-inflammatory way of either asking or stating that there's something bothering you/them which isn't related to the other party and allows for comedic exchanges. "I think you really need to change your ...


8

I wonder if the OP wanted a word to describe this female partner, rather than a term of endearment to placate them? I think a great word to describe somebody who is being unreasonable because of the way they are feeling is "Prickly." Google defines prickly as "ready to take offence" which seems to fit quite well.


8

The classic idiom in English is "third wheel". This can be used both against both parties (the couple and the third party). For example: The couple might say: "He is such a third wheel. I wish he'd stop trying to hang out with us." The third party might say: "They make me feel like such a third wheel. I don't understand why they invite me along when ...


8

Handegg is a village in Switzerland, in the Canton of Bern, somewhat near Lucerne. Beautiful place, I am sure, but just why they named that hat after it escapes me.


7

When a slang word catches on, students of language often have a difficult time figuring out its meanings and origin. This, I suspect, is because it emerges not like Athene—a fully formed adult released from the mind of Zeus—but like several thousand frog eggs—similar in appearance to one another but bewildering in number and neither well defined nor mature. ...


7

People who share your name (whether full name or just part of it) are your namesakes: A person or thing that has the same name as another As Hot Licks points out in the comments, namesake is most commonly used for someone or something that is intentionally named after you, but it can be used for non-intentional, coincidental name identity as well. The ...


7

That person could be called a "braggart" From the Google Dictionary: brag·gart /ˈbraɡərt/ noun: braggart; plural noun: braggarts a person who boasts about achievements or possessions.


6

"Khakis" is often used to refer to pants (that are khaki-colored, or made of the khaki textile). For example, Old Navy has a khakis page that lists various pants [1] and one specific to men's khakis [2]. In the context of the movie, khakis are another 'material good' that Tyler denounces, like cars, ikea furniture, etc. [1] ...


6

Is there a word or expression for your partner or girlfriend or her behaviour? What do you call a woman who's feeling "bitchy"? Why look for a word for a woman who acts that way or feels that way? Isn't what you want a word for that behavior or that feeling? What is the point of trying to see behind the behavior or feeling to biology? Sure, biology ...


6

I use "grouchy", meaning ill-tempered. My partner never objected to it, and she sometimes uses the term herself From Dictionary.com: sullenly discontented; sulky; morose; ill-tempered.


5

New and Improved; Made-Up Definitions: Altruistic Vampire -one who subsists on the dopamine released when they help another; for whatever personal motivation: an addict of altruism; someone addicted to answering questions online. -Similar and often found in conjunction, though not to be confused with: Stack Exchange; Rep-Whore. Cyber Vampire -one ...


5

Jungle Fever originally meant malaria, according to The American Heritage Dictionary, Collins, and others. It's use with this meaning peaked between 1820 and 1860, according to Google ngrams. During that period, stories and novels regarding missionary travails in foreign lands were popular. Some were erotic or about "forbidden love". See for example The ...


5

My understanding: Book larnin' = book learning (education) small trumps = to come up trumps; small triumphs; winning cards. bowers = a jack in euchre (played with the 32 highest cards in the deck) and similar card games. [HT to andy256 for explaining that a jack is a high card in the given situation: when it is trumps, the bowers are the Jack of the suit ...


5

I can think of many terms for an event that occurs or passes, but without the expected result; for example, a nonevent, a false alarm, or a damp squib. For example, you could say: The Y2K bug got a lot of press, but in the end it was a nonevent. For something less well-defined, like the tech bubble, you might say it defied conventional wisdom. There's ...


5

It's an American football. It could also be related to Rugby football as rugby players are jovially known as "egg-chasers" in Britain.


4

"Namesake" technically means anyone who has the same first name as you, but using it in that broader sense may cause confusion. The word is most commonly used to mean someone who not only has the same name as you, but someone whom you were named after or someone who was named after you. For example, if you were to say, "The Queen of England is my namesake," ...


4

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2011) seems to split the difference between the answers offered by Janus Bahs Jacquet and Nicole: namesake n [prob. fr. name's sake] (1646) : one that has the same name as another; esp. one who is named after another or for whom another is named. Thus, according to Merriam-Webster, the name can be ...


4

The standard colloquial term for such behaviour is one-upmanship - the technique or practice of gaining an advantage or feeling of superiority over another person


4

Blowhard : someone who always brags or boasts about himself. He is also a braggart, bragger, line-shooter, vaunter, etc. Blowhard is an informal word describing someone who can't stop talking about themselves or their accomplishments, real or imagined. From ODO: blowhard: A person who blusters and boasts in an unpleasant way. My pick for an ...


4

The term "on fleek" first appears in Google Trends in July 2014. (It's difficult to find actual pages with it prior to 2014 due to content aggregation, e.g. 2008 posts on sites with twitter side bars come up in Google searches for "on fleek" limited by time, despite the phrase being part of a 2014 tweet, so I'm not able to truly say it began this year, but ...


4

Blame the English, they invented the names for all of the sports derived from soccer. Association football (soccer) came first. Then the English named the next game rugby football, after the town in England that changed the rules of soccer. Then others derived games from rugby, still keeping the football name. Rugby Football League Australian Football ...


3

I have a 1992 use of "ratchet-ass" in the lyrics I'm So Bad from an album by UGK. I will post only a snippet of it here: ... get your ratchet ass out my fuckin do' Cause I'm Pimp C, I put a bitch in her place Reader discretion is advised. P.S. I wonder if it's a variant of raggedyass ? NORA: I better wait outside for Joan, 'fore you make me go ...



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