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33

Yes, you can use the word in the way that you have described, but it's considered more harsh than polite, and it has somewhat vulgar overtones. How it's regarded or received might be generational. I typed is suck vulgar? on Google, and found mixed responses. Feel free to do the same if you want diverse opinions on the matter. I thought this excerpt from a ...


12

Yes, as used in the OP, "sucks" is always slang. SUCKS transitive verb; slang: a. To be highly unpleasant or disagreeable: This job sucks. b. To be of poor or inferior quality: The acting in that movie sucked. c. To be inept: I suck at math. see TFD The fixed-phrase “this/that SUCKS dick/cock” gained currency exclusively among male American ...


10

The reference is almost certainly to an E-mu SP-12—which Wikipedia refers to as a "sampling drum computer." As the Wikipedia article on the SP-12 notes, The name SP-12 stands for sampling percussion at twelve bits, demonstrating the power of the sampler. The E-mu SP-12 is credited with helping usher in the era of digital sampling by being one of the ...


8

Harold Wentworth & Stuart Flexner, Dictionary of American Slang (1960) has some interesting commentary on suck and the seemingly allied phrases suck around, suck [someone] in, suck off, and suck up to [someone]. Of that entire group, only one term, suck off, is characterized as "taboo" across the board: suck off [taboo] 1 To commit cunnilingus or ...


6

The expression that sucks seems to be predominantly connected to the reduction of a colloquial expression for fellatio as it is metaphorically applied to any disgusting or contemptible situation: Meaning "do fellatio" is first recorded 1928. Slang sense of "be contemptible" first attested 1971 (the underlying notion is of fellatio). etymonline.com ...


5

Freebie: noun informal A thing that is provided or given free of charge: ODO It's OK, I owe you a freebie.


4

It is not exactly foul language, but it is considered vulgar and rather common to use "suck" in this context. There are better words to express discontent or dismay at inefficiency of something. On another note, the term is usually applied to things or situations, not people; it is said that "something sucks" but it's unusual to hear that "someone sucks".


4

Here's the lyrics: I got a ho named Reel-to-Reel She got a buddy named SP 12, now you know the deal We gets freaky in the studio late night That's why the beats that you hear are coming real tight Note his ho is named "Reel-to-Reel", not "Real de Real". Rap Genius explains: 4-Tay talks about the physical act of making a record. Reel-to-reel ...


4

Many derogatory terms - such as "faggot" - are not used based on their literal or slang meaning. Instead, some people use these words as a general insult. Anecdotally speaking, I have a homosexual friend who calls others "faggot". Obviously he's not using it to mock gay people, but the word has been overused in some environments (such as online gaming) that ...


3

It's important to remember that slang changes quickly and thus the dictionaries will have trouble keeping up. There is, however, a sense that we have for our native languages that allows us to be able to construct words that others understand. Comedians are often very good at this. The two words you have offered from Chinese demonstrate this perfectly. As ...


3

Cruciverbalist: A person who enjoys or is skilled at solving crosswords. (ODO) An enthusiast of word games, especially of crosswords. (AHD) A crossword puzzle enthusiast. (Collins) Ngram: cruciverbalist, the term is relatively recent, its usage is from '80s.


3

"学霸" (literally meaning "academic overlord") to refer to someone who does very well in his/her study and who always achieve high grades in exams. I believe the equivalent is straight A student. It is used for students who always get high grades (to get straight A's). Derogatory alternatives are grind (US slang) and swot (BR slang). "学婊" ...


2

The BrEng term a swot comes to mind, this is commonly used for students who not only got brilliant grades but studied hard too. Normally, the kids (when I was at school) who said this were envious of the student's almost perfect grades, especially if the student showed a natural flair for the subject and an agile mind. They were the ones who could absorb any ...


2

Is it derogatory? Yes. But also there is the fact that in many instances close friends frequently call each things that they wouldn't call others, and it is not taken as an insult. A black person calling another black person "my n****", or a close friend calling his buddy "you A$$hole" during some competition when the friend just scored a point against you. ...


2

The history and etymology of the phrase has been discussed in the other answers, and for that reason, another two factors to consider are 1. age and 2. dialect of the speaker. I am fifty one, exactly of the "male youth of the early 1970s" age in Little Eva's answer, so I'd NEVER use the word to someone my own age. As for my children: that's quite a different ...


2

Translation is difficult, and translation of slang is even more difficult because of all the non-shared cultural context and nuances involved. So there's usually not a direct translation (one-to-one always) that fits for slang. Often that results in a direct loan word, like 'kow tow' or 'kung fu', or loan translation, like 'brain washing' or 'lose face'. ...


1

to put it straight, gonna stands for going to while wanna stands for want to. gonna will be used to indicate that something is actually going to happen soon. In the other hand, wanna means I am deciding to do something. It doesn't mean that I have actually planned or scheduled it. for example: I am going to see the movie on tuesday's night. (means that I ...


1

If you are asking which form is more "accurate," neither is standard educated English. They are spoken forms only and not written. Educated speakers might say "I'm gonna" for "I'm going to" in informal conversation depending on the context, but these forms are never written unless you are reproducing spoken dialogue in a story or a play. I gonna is dialectal ...


1

Yes, you can use all three slang (words) in one sentence; but no, your example isn't correct since it makes little sense. It literally reads: "Can someone be 'in such deep trouble' (so screwed) because someone 'easily won' (nailed) an argument that made him 'drunk' (hammered). But how about: My boss busted (nailed) me at work for being drunk (hammered) so ...


1

I don't think there are widespread English equivalents for those expressions that would be universally recognized, though you may find regional or historical equivalents. I wouldn't be surprised if the British have or once had words for these things, for example. That said, I just wanted to point out that "curve-wrecker" does have a negative connotation in ...


1

It is looking for some level of similarity as cultural context is very different. So approximations only: 1 Academic prodigy A young person with exceptional qualities or abilities: a Russian pianist who was a child prodigy in his day 2 Unostentatious 1. unostentatious - not ostentatious; "his unostentatious office"; "unostentatious elegance" ...


1

Well, "suck" does have a literal, non-slang meaning: to draw a fluid in by suction. As in, "I sucked the soda through a straw." Clearly that's not the meaning you are using here. If you use "suck" to mean that something is bad, that's slang, period. Whether the word is appropriate depends on the context.


1

Believed to originate from British military personel in Northern Island in the late 60's early 70's, as a derogatory term relating to people living in the Divvies flats area.


1

My grandparents used the term.... it means, a reprimand, scolding, etc. "I'll give him a good "what for"!


1

I vividly remember the term scrubs being used in the late 1960s in high-school sports (in Texas) to refer to the players who barely made the team and would be extremely unlikely ever to appear in an actual game that wasn't already a blow-out win or loss. Often scrubs were underclassmen who were included on the team to get seasoning and on the off-chance that ...


1

It's Bostonian. The concept comes from the thalidomide babies born with "flippers" for limbs in the late 50s. The idea is that instead of arms or legs it was your head and your brain that were stunted and came out as a flipper. It's a way to say you're a monumental, irretrievable, freakin' idiot.



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