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45

As Jo Bedard mentions in the comment to Sumit's answer, there are sexual overtones (they are too explicit to be called undertones indeed). The general meaning of all three expressions is that the speaker's reputation and / or career may depend on the outcome of the current project or undertaking and he urges the other person not to contribute to a failure. ...


15

According to Etymonline expressions using the concept of holding the nose up in the air suggesting superiority or disdain are used from 1570. Probably other expressions like stick one's nose up in the air and stuck-up are derived from this usage: Nose: To turn up one's nose "show disdain" is from 1818 (earlier hold up one's nose, 1570s); similar ...


13

The OED dates boink as a verb back to 1984, citing Stephen King's Thinner, where it appears to be used as onomatopoeia, similar to bonk: He half-expected them to begin bopping and boinking each other. For this sense, the OED gives the definition "to strike, to knock", which is fairly similar to how bonk is used. As for the sexual meaning, their ...


12

Past Definitions of Stuck-Up The earliest definition of stuck-up that I’ve been able to find is in John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, Second Edition (1860), published in London, which offers this very narrow meaning: STUCK-UP, “purse-proud”—a form of snobbishness very common in those who have risen in the world. Mr. ...


9

fanny is defined in Collins English Dictionary at CollinsDictionary.com as (taboo, British) the female genitals (mainly US & Canadian) the buttocks It is used frequently to describe someone in a not very polite manner You are a fanny! (often as complete and utter fanny) 'Taboo' seems a little strong for fanny as it can be used in a ...


7

The verb fannying (about) is intransitive. As such it is not used in a sentence like "Don't waste my time," where the verb is transitive. fanny on ODO: verb (fannies, fannying, fannied) [no object] (fanny about (or around)) British informal Mess around and waste time: they were fannying about in the street Compare, loafing, a similar ...


7

There does not seem to be a definite answer here, but it seems that most people are generally satisfied that stuck up may have come from the idea of sticking one's nose up. However, I hope I can provide support for the idea that the phrase stuck up could easily have come from a meaning that has nothing to do with a person's nose. Possibly stuck up came ...


5

The term has an interesting story. From the “the celebrated gold brick swindle” of October 1879, the term took on a different meaning. It is currently used mainly with as a noun meaning shirker and as a verb meaning to swindle. As noted, its usage has been decreasing in recent decades. Goldbrick : (www.merriam-webster.com) Noun something ...


4

According to the following source the usage of 'boink' by David Angell in the American sitcom 'Cheers' may have predated Bruce Willis's line in 1985. But it seems likely now that Cheers used it first, though not very long before. Les Charles, one of the creators of Cheers, said, in remarks delivered at the memorial service for David Angell (and his ...


3

There are three answers to this that I'm aware of... One is that it's unintentional and occurs when someone is talking to someone who reminds them of their mother. This is usually down to the situation they're in, where they're talking to a woman who's caring for them. The other is the intentional use of the word. In some regions (I can only talk for the ...


3

It's generally makes more sense to say that clauses and not verbs are transitive or intransitive. However, this won't stop dictionaries or grammar books for language and linguistics students giving lists of verbs that they'll describe as 'transitive' or 'intransitive'. Having said that, it's also true that whether a clause is transitive or not is also ...


2

My Oxford English Dictionary gives this definition, dating it to the 19th century (UK): stuck-up /stʌkˈʌp/ adjective. colloq. E19 (= early nineteenth century = 1800-1829) [ORIGIN from stuck adjective + up adverb².] Affectedly superior, pretentious, snobbish. (Example) D. Madden: Stuck-up baggage…You're better off without her for a friend. It doesn't ...


2

A grommet is derived from the French word, gremmete (modern-day gourmette) meaning curb of a bridle. Etymonline furthermore states 1620s, "ring or wreath of rope," Extended sense of "metal eyelet" first recorded 1769. The French word, gourmette, means a small chain bracelet, and if you have ever looked at one closely, you'd know that a chain is ...


2

Cockney rhyming slang originates in London and is spread across Britain by the London-based national media (most of it). There are many other local dialects and slang words used in different areas of Britain which aren't universally understood. These are less known across the whole country because of the London-based national media. "I'll mash the tea" ...


1

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that this is only an example of slang: words that are not considered part of the standard vocabulary of a language and that are used very informally in speech especially by a particular group of people. - MW It is certainly alliterative: the repetition of the B sound, but other than that, I can't really think that ...


1

The copulation sense of shag certainly seems to have come first, so to speak. From Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, Third Edition (1796): TO SHAG. To copulate. He is but bad shag; he is no able woman's man. Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961) sees the same possible connection ...


1

The Earliest Bad-Ass According the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994), the word bad-ass is attested first as an adjective (1955), then as a noun (1956), and then as a verb (1974–1977). Here are the main entry and the three earliest occurrences identified for the adjective form: bad-ass or bad-assed adj. bad (in any common sense, ...


1

Grommet (also Grom, Gremmie, Grem) appears to derive from the term Gremlin: Grommet: A grommet (grom) is a young participant in extreme sports. Originally, a grommet was a surfer under the age of 16. In recent years, this has expanded to include other extreme sports, most notably skateboarding and snowboarding. The first contextual use: ...


1

According to Etymonlime the term smashing has undergone the change in meaning like other terms such as: fabulous ( see below). smashing (adj.) 1833, "violently crushing to pieces," present participle adjective from smash (v.). Meaning "pleasing, sensational" is from 1911. Fabulous: Sense of "incredible" first recorded c.1600. Slang shortening ...


1

I don't want to upset OP, but oxforddictionaries has... nunu also noonoo Pronunciation: /ˈnuːnuː/ South African INFORMAL An insect, spider, worm, or similar small creature: the box gives protection against worms and other nunus from Zulu inunu 'horrible object or animal' And here's someone who knows that, commenting on the usage as an ...


1

According to this article titled "Ratchet does not come from Wretched – Slang Word Origin History", it does indeed come from ratchet the mechanical device. It comes from the Mr. Mandigo song "Do the ratchet", "The Ratchet" in this case being a dance whose motion is similar to the action of a ratchet.


1

The term 'fanny about' has nothing to do with female genitals but instead comes from naval slang. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanny_Adams 'Sweet Fanny Adams' aka 'Sweet FA' and thus 'fanny about' means to do nothing. This is why on your scale of rudeness it is not anywhere near as vulgar as 'dicking about' because while fanny can refer to genitalia in ...


1

I think pot is being used in terms of "a collection of something" or another way to say "a lot of", so a moneypot is someone with a lot of money, a fusspot is a overly fussy person, a tosspot is someone who is very mucher a tosser (British slang) or very toss-y in nature. A crackpot therefore, drawing on the suggested meaning for crack, would mean someone ...


1

I'm just going to go ahead and add another answer here, since really it may help. It could be that keen surfers, don't realise that: "grommet" is used (much like mouse, flea, etc) as slang for ANY sidekick, student, or apprentice-like person .... indeed, quite simply for kids! Then: In answer to the question "Why is that?" It's a bizarre question: it ...


1

The first known recorded use of stuck-up is in 1829 (References: 1, 2). No one has definitive documentation on how its use started. The idea that it involves having the nose stuck up in the air is very likely. This is a word-of-mouth explanation that has come down through the years. Before we can accept such a word-of-mouth explanation, we need some ...


1

It could be @Barmar was right by asserting that the woman in the Judas Priest song is a tribute to the female spy known as Agent 99, in the American T.V. comedy show Get Smart. The show ran from September 18, 1965 to May 15, 1970 and Judas Priest's debut album was released in 1974, so the timeline fits. Unlike another user, Greycat, I could not find any ...


1

I was led to believe 22 Acacia Avenue is based on the Cynthia Payne story from the late 70s and early 80s when she was acquitted of being a madam and running a brothel at 32 Ambleside Avenue, in Streatham, London, England. She got punters to pay for services with "Luncheon Voucher" coupons, so argued she never provided sex for money. Plus, it's rumoured 22 ...



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