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7

A red carpet, literally, is a carpet that is red. A red carpet, figuratively, can be a carpet that is actually blue, or no carpet at all, just some pavement painted red. A four-letter word, literally, is a word with exactly four letters. A four-letter word, figuratively, is a swear word. Literally, literally, means "literally". Literally, figuratively, ...


4

For the sake of completeness: al av ya mum ya larl cunt al = I will -> I'll -> ah'll av = have -> 'ave (in this case have has overtly sexual connotations as in "have sexual relations with") ya = your -> ya'r -> ya mum = mother (not really slang) ya = you -> ya larl = little -> lirle -> lahrl And the last word is so commonly used I feel I need ...


4

When you want to say that you, or someone else, has done the same as someone else, you use too, indeed. However, in the negative, if you want to say they have not done something, just like someone else has not done it, you use either. I enjoyed watching the game. I bet you guys enjoyed it too! But: The game was boring, I could not watch it till ...


3

The expression is very old. in Washinton Irving's "The Devil & Tom Walker", a character says "When will you want the rhino" when referring to some buried treasure. Clearly it was a common enough expression at the time, because Irving makes no effort to explain it to his readers. So, I think we can rule out Ryan O'Neil as the source.


2

Without hyphenation ten dollar word is the only of those to come up on a NGRAM. Having assumed that this was adjusted for inflation, I added hyphens and plotted a fifty-cent word (the way I've known the expression), too. The resulting NGRAM was less than impressive. But, ten-dollar word seems to be the winner on the NGRAM front. With that in mind: ...


2

The above ngram shows that Google books hasn't any record of "two dollar word" or "four dollar word" and some records of "ten dollar word". (I also searched for "2 dollar word" and "4 dollar word", and got the same result.) I would say that "ten dollar word" is the most common. As to which to use, people will get what you mean whichever you say.


2

OED Well, unfortunately the OED says the origin is unknown and: It is uncertain whether there is any connection with the slightly earlier use of munter in Australia and New Zealand to denote a loutish individual. Their first two quotations show it's originally UK student slang. 1999 A. Losowsky Let. 21 Apr. (O.E.D. Archive) , Words and phrases ...


2

Are you going to the store? might be said by someone who does not necessarily expect you to to be going there. Aren't you going to the store? would be said by someone who does expect you to go there, and is possibly a little surprised that you haven't gone there already.


1

It was common in the 18th and 19th centuries to hold impromptu shooting matches where the target was simply a rag hung on a bush in the distance. A good shot would hit the rag, making it visibly jump. A great shot would literally “take the rag off the bush,” putting an end to at least that round of the contest with an overwhelming success. Making this ...


1

In English the polarity of the answer is not with respect to the question, it is with respect to the answer. Also, the two parts of the answer agree in polarity. For example, If the question is "Aren't you going to the store?" there are two possible situations, that you are going to the store and you aren't going to the store. In English the responses for ...


1

The uncontracted version of the question is "Are you not going to the store?" and the fully qualified answer would be "Yes, I am going to the store." It's a common idiom, the "not" is not ignored; it's merely an invitation to refute or deny the proposition, but in a sort-of polite way (i.e. "I am not presuming or assuming that you are going to the ...


1

Scrilla (sometimes skrilla, scrillah or skrillah) dates to at least the mid-1990s, when it was popularised by hip-hop from the San Francisco Bay Area. The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English (2008) by Tom Dalzell says: scrilla; skrilla noun money US, 1995 that scandalous bitch just wanted some scrilla. ...


1

To my understanding, nailed here means outwitted/beaten, but also carries a sense of being struck down as well. In other words, her conversational wit is kicking him while he's down: He says he wants to go outside and talk about this (with her). She says then go ahead . . . (Meaning, go outside and talk about it, but she won't be joining him, so he'll be ...


1

As a New Yorker, I'm use to most people simply referring to it as "Sriracha" (sir-ah-chuh). Pretty much every cooking show and TV chef refers to it thusly. Occasionally, fans of the stuff will call it "rooster sauce". This is also useful terminology for people who have only tried the stuff a few times in a sushi restaurant or something (they're more likely ...


1

This doesn't directly answer your question, but the Historical Dictionary of American Slang volume II has an entry: jo v. 1. to spoil; (also) to exhaust. *ca*1800 in Dolph Sound Off! 503: As to Saratog' he came, thinking how to jo the game. 1932 AS VII (June) 333: Joed—tired; exhausted. I'm not sure I agree that those citations are the same word, however, ...


1

Both the OED and Professor Jonathan Lighter (in the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang) point tentatively to an earlier use of Gussy or Gussie as a term for an effeminate or weak person. This appeared in the US at the end of the nineteenth century. An interesting discussion here


1

Wire-pulling is associated with trickery: Wire-pulling is defined as political manipulation in The American slang dictionary 1891 and Wire-puller in the political sense is 1848, American English, on the image of pulling the wires that work a puppet. but a good magician needs to be artful in 'picking your pocket', as well as, adding items to your person, and ...



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