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10

Try doormat one that submits without protest to abuse or indignities. An even better word is kowtower  someone who agrees too easily or eagerly to do what someone else wants you to do : to obey someone with power in a way that seems weak. But the best one is he/she is my bitch A submissive person (often female), who does what others want. ...


9

Pushover a person who is easily persuaded, influenced, or seduced. You could also just refer to puppet for your "controlled by" sense: a person, group, state, etc, that appears independent but is in fact controlled by another


5

It is impossible to tell from the minimal description of the circumstances surrounding the guard's comment what his intentions were in saying "Nice shoes." On the one hand, there is at least a possibility that the intention was sincerely to compliment you on your shoes. After all, some consultants recommend it as an ingratiating strategy. From David Topus, ...


4

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


4

someone's bitch (noun) could be used (where someone is a proper noun), though I don't like this phrasing One might say a person is whipped (adj.), particularly if referring to a romantic relationship pushover is probably the best noun


3

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


2

"Six figures" usually refers to amounts over 100,000, not amounts over 1,000,000. Yesterday's question on what six figures means is related.


2

Its slang put you brought up prision bucking for solitary, in prision bucking means the oppisite of trying to obtaian something. For example im bucking work call,or if some is gonna jack or take something from you.Im bucking the jack..if someone is called out to fight and doesnt he bucked the callout any who its no answer just insight


2

In the sense that an alpha is the dominant member of a group (as in alpha male), and a beta the alpha's lackey: omega From the Wikipeda article on Alpha (ethology): Omega … is an antonym used to refer to the lowest caste of the hierarchical society. Omega animals are subordinate to all others in the community, and are expected by others in the ...


1

According to Barbara Kipfer & Robert Chapman, Dictionary of American Slang, fourth edition (2007), "the pits" has two meanings in U.S. slang: pits, the n phr 1 The most loathsome place or situation imaginable : This school is the pits 2 The armpits: Your pits have BO (1953+) The first definition is undoubtedly the one intended in Hamilton. As ...


1

You could also consider Yes-Man, someone who automatically agrees with everything their superior(s) tell(s) them and only tells them what they want to hear.


1

gewgaw, as defined by Wiktionary Showy; unreal; pretentious. It has a nice 600 year history, too. 1678, Dryden, John, All for Love, Scene II, The rattle of a globe to play withal, This gewgaw world, and put him cheaply off. Another example: 1855, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Maud; A Monodrama, X, stanza 1, Seeing his gewgaw castle shine, New as ...


1

This complement was likely genuine but likely also meant as a humorous, slightly sarcastic understatement. It's a stereotype almost to the point of cliche in business that you can tell who really has money by looking not at their suit, but at their shoes. The same mentality is also behind the term "well-heeled" meaning wealthy; shoes typically have a ...


1

I'll offer a different theory origin. The phrase is a generalization of the phrase bucking for freight From the October 1857 article History of the Express Business: "Bucking for freight" as it was called, was carried to perfection by them, and it is almost incredible the pains any one of them, from the " boss" to the boy, would take to obtain ...


1

I'm from Texas, by way of Oklahoma, and my experience with this term is slightly different than most here. Most of the answers have described it as either close enough that a platonic kiss is proper, or distantly related enough that a romantic kiss is proper. In my experience, the term has no limits of propriety; two things are "kissing cousins" if they are ...


1

I received my first black eye last year. I was hit on the brow bone. It WAS a shiner, literally. It was the most reflective thing in any photo. Without flash. An egg on a forehead could/will also be called a shiner. The shiny part was never dark with bruising.


1

If I'm fixing (or fixin') to do something, fixing is an adverb, answering the question of "when" you're going to start doing something. I'm from the South (Savannah, Georgia) and this is common usage in those parts. This "fixing" is completely different from the verb "fixing" in this sentence: "I'm fixing the broken gate" - How about this one? "I'm fixing ...



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