Hot answers tagged

41

"Beast" is a bit biblical, perhaps, but it is commonly understood to mean non-human animals. From Merriam-Webster: Beast: 1 a : a four-footed mammal as distinguished from a human being, a lower vertebrate, and an invertebrate b : a lower animal as distinguished from a human being More clarification from the Oxford English Dictionary follows. ...


37

Creature - an animal, as distinct from a human being. Creature - 1. an animal, especially a nonhuman:


31

"Wildlife" could be used to differentiate between humans and non-human animals, but will not account for any non-human domesticated animals like dogs, cats, birds, etc. From Merriam-Webster: living things and especially mammals, birds, and fishes that are neither human nor domesticated Another option could be "Fauna" which describes the animals common ...


29

I believe that's called "guilt tripping" someone. "Guilt trip" VERB make (someone) feel guilty, especially in order to induce them to do something: Ex. "a pay increase will not guilt-trip them into improvements." (Source: Oxford Dictionaries)


14

Shame (dictionary.com) n. the painful feeling arising from the consciousness of something dishonorable, improper, ridiculous, etc. In the example above, however, the mothers are using the verb Shaming v. to cause to feel shame; make ashamed


9

In American English, we would usually say "his joke flopped," or that "his joke was a flop." The noun "flop" is sometimes used informally to mean "a complete failure." A phrase similar to your Japanese idiom about the air freezing would be "(his joke was so bad), you could hear the crickets chirping." This is referring to the silence that follows a bad joke,...


8

I think the word you are seeking is sidebar. a typographically distinct section of a page, as in a book or magazine, that amplifies or highlights the main text. Another example: A brief section of text or another feature that appears alongside a more detailed discussion of a subject, often separated graphically in a box.


8

I usually associate “an instrumental reprise” with an instrumental version of an entire song that was originally written with vocals, like the instrumental version of the Eagles' Wasted Time discussed in paragraph three of the “Song Facts” link. However, this link seems to be using “instrumental reprise” (and the less ambiguous “instrumental response”) to ...


7

I always like "sycophant" for the noun, "obsequious" (as mentioned) for the adjective. syncophant, from Merriam-Webster a person who praises powerful people in order to get their approval


7

Informal forms of address: colloquial vocatives, faux intimates, hailnames What you’re talking about are informal forms of address, colloquial vocatives, faux intimates, or my favorite from William Safire, hailnames. They’re forms of direct address (hence vocatives) used in casual situations as a substitute for you or for the formal sir or ma’am (depending ...


7

An altruist: a person unselfishly concerned for or devoted to the welfare of others (opposed to egoist ). http://www.dictionary.com/browse/altruist The adjectival form is altrusitic. "She is very altrusitic, her greatest joy is to help out a friend in need."


6

While it's not a single word, sometimes this is referred to by the action — "restating the melody." The section itself would be called a solo, if one player is featured, or an instrumental break, if it's an ensemble. ...the sax player who steps forward to restate the melody in the middle of a song is also soloing. Complete Idiot's Guide to Solos and ...


5

My candidate is hodge-podge. hodgepodge ‎(countable and uncountable, plural hodgepodges) A collection of miscellaneous things; a jumble. His latest sculpture is a hodgepodge of kitchen clutter and scrap glued together. In fact, all his recent pieces have been similar hodgepodges. 1653, Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler Man's life is ...


5

Concoction — Vocabulary A concoction is a curious mixture of things, like a bunch of liquids stirred in a cup, or the elaborate and unbelievable story you make up to explain not finishing your homework. Mix eight different liquids in a glass and you've got a concoction. Scientists create concoctions of chemicals in test tubes, and a bicycle ...


5

In this instance you could say that the joke "went down like a lead balloon" or "missed the mark" (although the latter could imply that it was in poor taste as well as not being funny). It's worth noting that neither idiom is specific to jokes.


4

You could say the punchline was tepid, or one of its many synonymns: (especially of a liquid) only slightly warm; lukewarm. synonyms: lukewarm, warmish, slightly warm; at room temperature "tepid water" showing little enthusiasm. "the applause was tepid" synonyms: unenthusiastic, apathetic, muted, halfhearted, so-so, 'comme ci, ...


4

You could say "a soft touch", but this is a more general characteristic meaning that the person is easily tricked or taken advantage of, and doesn't capture the "one side of a specific relationship" aspect. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/soft-touch 1. a person who is easily convinced, especially to give or lend money: 2. a person who is easily ...


4

Lickspittle is somewhat less vulgar, without getting too nice about the matter. Wiktionary: A fawning toady; a base sycophant.


4

It's not very exciting I'm afraid, but I believe this is the term that describes the graphic or text elements in your question. Panels and box copy Boxes are used as news items or as extensions to a long article in which you can place some other facts or data which are relevant to the article. These types of copy are generally shorter in length and ...


4

Perhaps you encountered colonnade: a row of trees or other tall objects. Or perhaps you encountered one of the following and confused it for "a single row of trees on a hilltop". stand: a group or growth of tall plants or trees: a stand of pine copse: a small group of trees


4

The Latin 'fauna' is one option. 'Animals' does not include humans; 'animalistic' refers to behaviour that is sub-human in its character. 'Creatures' does however include humans as part of God's living Creation.


4

The word you are looking for is a musical lead. Typically it is because that part will play at the same time as the vocals "lead"ing them. However, it qualifies regardless of the order they are in the song. Incidentally, this is also why the main guitar is called the lead guitar. Not because it's the main one and thus the leader, but because it plays the ...


4

"good samaritan" comes to mind - Someone who helps another in need for compassionate motives and with no thought of reward. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parable_of_the_Good_Samaritan


4

Seems like you can actually be "starved" of things other than food... To suffer or die from extreme or prolonged lack of food. Informal To be hungry. To suffer from deprivation: a puppy starving for attention. "Starved for attention" as in the third definition above, or "starved of oxygen" for example. So, as in this article, they use "...


4

A frequently used noun would be "Trailblazer" - owing to the concept of the first person to enter an unknown, potentially risky area. The term is used in nearly any application where innovation, and a fearless disregard for conventional wisdom are involved , i.e. Medicine, Technology, Sports, etc. Example: "Dr. DeBakey was considered by most to be a true ...


4

The phrase lame joke is broadly used to describe (idiomatic) An attempt at humor which is perceived to have been used previously to the point of being cliche, or was never funny to begin with. You could use "His joke was lame", "His joke was not even funny" or "His joke was corny." [Wiktionary, Merriam-Webster Learner's Dicitionary]


3

If the text box is pointing to a specific section of the main text, you might call it a callout: In publishing, a call-out or callout is a short string of text connected by a line, arrow, or similar graphic to a feature of an illustration or technical drawing, and giving information about that feature. The term is also used to describe a short ...


3

An enigma can be tricky to deal with. It can be a person, concept, or work. Enigmatic refers to the "problem." A deception is some thing that is or can be purposefully meant to look like something it is not. An adjective like deceptive might work if you don't need a noun. Simple looking situations can be misleading in that the solution might involve unseen,...


3

Have you considered alacrity? http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/alacrity http://sentence.yourdictionary.com/alacrity He learns a new word each day with eager alacrity.


3

Voter's remorse would seem to be a straightforward parallel, and has a fair amount of usage. The political equivalent of buyer's remorse is voter's remorse. --The Atlantic 2007-04 http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/04/voters-remorse/305859/ Voters’ Remorse: Brits Regret Vote To Leave EU, Claim They Didn’t Know Their Votes Would Count; ...



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