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65

You mean one's (personal) vocabulary? Merriam-Webster says: all of the words known and used by a person


41

For some purposes, I like: indelible: making marks that cannot be removed It makes me thinks of spills, stains, bad tattoos, burns... things that you want to delete, but can't. Though I think @Sven-Yargs hit it on the head with haunting.


39

Consider Sisyphean: ADJECTIVE (Of a task) such that it can never be completed. EXAMPLE SENTENCES It was a Sisyphean task - but Paul did not give in. Not only do they lose the game but they are sentenced to a Sisyphean task. It was a Sisyphean task of epic proportions that defied a normal life expectancy. The adjective originally ...


39

The term "death march" was used by Edward Yourdon to describe such futile projects specifically in the workplace. The workers know the project will end in failure, but they are forced to continue anyways. It's very close to "Dilbertian", in that it makes a cynical yet humorous jab at workplace issues, but it has the same problem of only being known to a ...


34

In American English, we describe cold weather in a positive sense as crisp. As if the cold air hitting your face has a pleasant "breaking" to it. A Google search for "define crisp" yields this definition, among others: (of the weather) cool, fresh, and invigorating.


32

I would use the word lexicon. noun the vocabulary of a person, language, or branch of knowledge. Quoted from Oxford Dictionaries Online.


24

That sounds 'a bit brisk' to me. brisk (Of wind or the weather) cold but pleasantly invigorating: A cold, brisk wind fills the square on a grey Saturday afternoon. Though the wind was brisk and chilly, the sun was bright and warm. The September night was chilly, with a brisk wind picking up, but neither seemed to notice. Here in the UK ...


23

I'm surprised by the absence of fool's errand. Perhaps appending "obligatory" or "mandated" to the front to meet the requirements of the question. Apparently, it means snipe hunt which could be another one or you could click through all the links you find which would be a fool's errand of its own.


21

traumatic may fit, even though the word means basically "causing mental or emotional problems, usually for a long time". It was a traumatic experience for all of us. Not all unforgettable events are traumatic but most traumatic events will be unforgettable.


19

You already mention futility as being a characteristic of this kind of task, but the phrase "exercise in futility" is one I've heard to describe such a thing.


18

If you're looking for adjectives, as opposed to phrases, then I think there are three good candidates: inextirpable: incapable of being destroyed inexpungible: incapable of being obliterated inerasable: incapable of being erased Of course, the implication with these words is that we might, in fact, like to destroy, obliterate, or erase the things they ...


18

You would be able to get away with seared into my memory or similar variations as a phrase to describe such an event. The train crash I saw that afternoon was seared into my memory. The report on teen drug use seared itself into my memory. I cannot think of any adjectives that would suit your purpose, however.


13

When it comes to partial burial, there can be no more obvious Germanic choice than half-buried, with learnèd Latinate alternatives semi-interred, semi-inhumed, and semi-intumulated available for those faint not of heart nor pen. All would be grave terms indeed, especially the Latinate ones, and at risk for tenebrous overtones anywhere this side of the ...


13

It's called a ghost image. That link is to a scientific paper entitled: Ghost image cancellation algorithm through numeric beamforming for multi-antenna radar imaging


12

mplungjan's Fresh is a very good suggestion, but have you considered calling it cool rather than "{adjective} cold"? Describes the low temperature and implies no discomfort (or you would have used something more harsh than cool)


12

Wild Goose Chase Lost Cause futile a favorite phrase of mine is death knell http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/death%20knell It means the obvious signs that someone or something is about to fail or die. I like it because it sounds so wonderfully dramatic!


9

Settle To cause to sink, become compact, or come to rest; to move downward; sink or descend, especially gradually. (The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language) They can also nestle into the sand. Nestle implies partially obscuring, or settling into (similar to) a nest. Ensconced: To settle (oneself) securely or comfortably. (AHDEL) ...


9

There is a rare word you can consider: lethonomia. Though, it is used in psychiatry too and it can be part of nominal aphasia. A tendency to forget names. The inability to recall the right name. http://www.encyclo.co.uk/define/lethonomia Etymology of the word: It is derived from letho-, compounding form of Greek λήθη (lḗthē, “a ...


8

My humble Pocket Oxford Dictionary says simply: snaky. If you want to describe someone in a negative way, perhaps treacherous would do the trick.


8

Nate, several factors influence the way cold temperatures are perceived by the body. It may have been around 5ºC but, with no wind and very low humidity, it may have felt relatively pleasant. The reason is that under such circumstances, it will take longer for the exposed skin to cool and for our body to perceive it is really cold. we could then say... ...


8

Oh, I got it: hackneyed. Still uncommon enough that it hasn't become cliched to the point of banality, resulting in an empty, vapid, platitude. :)


7

When I find multiple conflicting usages, I like to see what other people are using. The NGrams data clearly shows a vast preference for Nigerien. A slate.com article which claims to have verified its facts with the Nigerien Embassay in the US says What do you call someone who hails from Niger? Old-schoolers (and, in what an editor there called ...


7

The English Wikipedia page lists Nigerien (/niːˈʒɛəriən/). Usually the guys over there are good with such stuff so I'd trust them with this one. This is also backed up by the Oxford Learner's Dictionary and Wiktionary.


7

"What has been seen cannot be unseen". Slang. For citations see: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:what_has_been_seen_cannot_be_unseen e.g. At Dachau he was witness to real rather than abstract suffering; what has been seen cannot be unseen, nor can it be rationalized. Brad Prager, "Suffering and Sympathy in Volker Schlöndorff's Der neunte Tag ...


7

Sunk, the past participle of sink. From Macmillan move to lower level fall/sit/lie down For example They sat on the lower part of the beach, sunk in the sand.


6

I like an inescapable memory. The escape implies a concerted effort to relieve oneself of the memory. I find it's less passive. Requires the 'memory' after unfortunately. Edit: I realised this was very similar to Rusty Tuba's answer... but I've posted it now.


6

It's not technical, but 'planted' in the sand is the visual I get from your description.


6

I also like bracing although it doesn't necessarily mean cold.


6

Consider maybe the phrase/idiom: "rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic" http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/rearrange_the_deck_chairs_on_the_Titanic Or perhaps that's straying too far from the context. You might successfully rearrange the deck chairs but it won't solve the problem at hand. Completing the task still means failure to achieve the objective. ...


6

Maybe kitchenware is what you are looking for: Kitchenware includes utensils, appliances, dishes, cookware, and so on for use in the kitchen. or Definition of KITCHENWARE : utensils and appliances for use in a kitchen



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