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47

I would go with disillusionment. A feeling of disappointment, akin to depression, arising from the realization that something is not what it was expected or believed to be, possibly accompanied by philosophical angst from having one's beliefs challenged. [Wiktionary] An example from vocabulary.com: Disillusionment is when the hard truth of ...


22

If you're not looking for outmoded or unfashionable, I suggest "commonplace". Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 can become commonplace in 2015" commonplace (adj) - an idea, expression, remark, etc., that is not new. Merriam-Webster


19

Buyer's Remorse is the sense of regret after having made a purchase. "[The] Bears may suffer 'buyer's remorse' over Cutler, but real leaders admit it" -Phil Rosenthal, Chicago Tribune See also, Caveat emptor; Buyer Beware. Even if it was the trip of a lifetime, you'd be lucky (though, irresponsible) to not feel a tinge of remorse at having spent ...


16

I think you're looking for tenure, defined by the online Merriam-Webster as the amount of time that a person holds a job, office, or title In your example, you would say The average tenure of Software Engineers in Seattle, WA is about two years.


9

Actually travel-weary and travel-worn are likely your best options: Collins defines it: travel-weary (ˈtrævəlˌwɪərɪ) or travel-worn tired or exhausted as a result of travelling ⇒ "It's hard to rouse a travel-weary body from the king-size bed and immerse yourself in the city."


9

"Disenchanted" is another one. It strikes me as somewhat less deep and abiding than "disillusioned", and may be a good fit for the OP's examples.


8

What you are probably looking for is "to list [a house]". For example: The real estate agent finished taking pictures yesterday, and is going to list my house tomorrow.


8

The tenure of Software Engineers in Seattle, WA is about two years. From the Free Dictionary: tenure (n.): 1.a The act, fact, manner, or condition of holding something in one's possession, as real estate or an office; occupation. 1.b A period during which something is held. The status of holding one's position on a permanent basis ...


6

I think standard may fit the context suggested: commonly used or supplied; "standard car equipment", "a standard service".


6

If without a negative connotation I think the word classic is appropriate.


6

Ignore: to refuse to pay attention to; disregard. From the Latin ignōrāre: in- ‘not’ + gno-, a base meaning ‘know’. It implies the refusal to take notice of or acknowledge; disregard intentionally. Disregard: to pay no attention or heed to; ignore; to show no evidence of attention concerning (something); to treat without proper respect or ...


5

Normal. "(In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 can become normal in 2015" If I could impose some stylistic changes, I might phrase the sentence as follows: "(In computing) Service Oriented Architecture is the trend as of now. But what is trendy in 2014 may merely be normal by 2015" The ...


5

You could say she is dismissive of her job. Dismissive: Feeling or showing that something is unworthy of consideration.


4

$0.02: But what is trendy in 2014 can become the norm in 2015.


4

To stoop may describe the action : (from M-W) to bend the body or a part of the body forward and downward sometimes simultaneously bending the knees. he stooped under the barrier, striding towards the American checkpoint.


4

I have three verbs that describe your friend's feeling or attitude: disparage: (vt) regard or represent as being of little worth. Disparage is most commonly used to refer to how someone speaks or writes of something, but it does include the thought or feeling as well. undervalue: (vt) rate (something) insufficiently highly; fail to appreciate. Included ...


4

The proverb: "The grass is always greener on the other side (of the fence)". Something may seem fantastic, but never as good as they appear from a distance. The expression particularly refers to wanting something that someone else has, or wanting to emulate a particular person.


4

I think the closest word to describe Mario would be a hypocrite, defined as one whose actions belie their professed beliefs. Note that hypocrite is a fairly derogatory term in modern parlance - but then, it's hard to describe the behavior you're talking about in positive terms. Still, if you were looking for a more "oh, well, there he goes again!" type of ...


3

There is wayworn as a single word. (also way-worn). The usage of the word has declined in recent decades but there is still contemporary usage. [See: Google Ngram] worn or wearied by travel: She was wayworn after the long trip. [Dictionary.com] OED lists the figurative usage also: fig. 1848 Thackeray Vanity Fair liii. 478 ...


3

Road fatigue and the more general term travel fatigue describe the adverse effects of travel on one's system. From Wikipedia: Travel fatigue is general fatigue, disorientation and headache caused by a disruption in routine, time spent in a cramped space with little chance to move around, a low-oxygen environment, and dehydration caused by limited food ...


3

There's also **road-weary* The traffic control the police put in place indicated a visible agreement that the rancher could continue to take money from the road-weary pilgrims ... a little insurance. (The Calling) This appears to be rising vis-a-vis travel-weary.


3

Logophilia: The love of words. Logophile: (from TFD) One who appreciates and enjoys words. Someone who loves words is called a logophile. Despite there being quite a few of us word-lovers, logophile is not common enough to find its way into most dictionaries. Logophile comes from two Greek roots--logos, meaning "speech, ...


3

There are a few concepts in your question...You seem to be looking for a word that describes a person with a desire for something in the future, a realization of that desire, and disappointment in the fulfillment of said desire. There are 2 halves to this concept; A desire for something in the future, and disappointment with how things turned out in the ...


3

Vagabondage is a recognized word and there are dictionary entries for it. However, it is borrowed from French and it is used in French also. A more common term in English is vagrancy, as vagabond and vagrant are synonyms. vagabondage: the state or characteristic of being a vagabond. vagrancy: the state of being a vagrant [Wiktionary] On the ...


3

Nodding-off or to nod-off sounds about right: To let the head fall forward when sleepy. Not exactly one word, but might still be wroth using.


3

Now (adverb) At the present time. It is raining now.


3

Tolerate and condone go to the other end of the spectrum: they imply that the person knows of the offense but does nothing about it.


3

To overlook, to ignore, to disregard, to neglect should be appropriate to be used in place of this idiom. The meaning of the idiom is to ignore deliberately, to pretend not to notice. In-fact there are many synonyms for this. The origin of the idiom goes like this: Admiral Horatio Nelson is supposed to have said this when wilfully disobeying a signal to ...



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