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80

Cockled. That is the paper conservator's technical term for wavy or rippled paper. See e.g. Laura Schell paper conservator


40

According to Merriam-Webster: implicate: (3a) to bring into intimate or incriminating connection evidence that implicates him in the bombing So I would write this: Lucy realized she found the proof that implicated Robert in the murders. You can omit "in the murders" if it is implied by context.


24

How about delicate? Mealy-mouthed (from @Josh61 's answer) conveys what you want more precisely, but delicate has that soft negative connotation. fragile; easily damaged; frail. From dictionary.com A alternative if you don't like delicate could be squeamish: easily nauseated or disgusted. From dictionary.com


21

You already have the most common phrase: the evidence to prove [ or that would prove] Robert guilty. If the word proof is important, simply the proof that Robert was guilty would work well.


19

It's almost a direct translation: "gas money." Here's an example of the usage from the novel WWW.MATE by Tamaya: She wanted to pay me for [the gifts], but I declined. After all, she was a friend, always driving me around when I needed a lift somewhere without taking or asking for gas money.


17

Lucy realized she finally had enough evidence to indict Robert on the charge of murder. Indict in·dict /inˈdīt/ verb, North American –Google past tense: indicted; past participle: indicted formally accuse of or charge with a serious crime. Because of double jeopardy, one had best be sure you have all your ducks in a row before you indict a ...


17

I agree that the verb convict pretty much means found someone is guilty of a crime. The proving part is the prosecution process itself. If you are looking for a more direct way to apply the proof in your sample sentence, I would use committed: Lucy realized she had proof that Robert committed the murders.


16

Perhaps you can use shrewd or astute. Wary may be also a good fit


15

convict is the correct word here. It's the strongest and most succinct, though legally speaking, Lucy would not do the convicting: that would be filled by the role of judge, jury, or relevant prosecuting attorney for the government. indict and implicate are too weak: especially in modern, western legal systems, the accused benefits from the presumption of ...


12

In British English, "petrol money" would be universally understood and used by native speakers for exactly this situation. An example would be the title of this thread.


10

As mentioned in some comments, Warped - is the more general laymen term, but not quite as specific as Cockled (which I had not heard before) Become or cause to become bent or twisted out of shape, typically as a result of the effects of heat or dampness[1]


10

I am tempted to propose the following: Lucy realized she had the proof to establish Robert's guilt. Per Merriam-Webster: establish verb : to cause (someone or something) to be widely known and accepted : to put (someone or something) in a position, role, etc., that will last for a long time : to begin or create (something that is ...


10

Rodenticides and biocides legislation This page explains how rodenticides (chemicals used to control rodents such as rats and mice) are affected by biocides legislation. It is intended to help suppliers wishing to market rodenticide products in the UK, and people who use rodenticides, such as pest controllers Health and Safety Executive ...


9

I'm not clear if the word you describe was in the novel itself or in commentary to the novel, but possibly it could be "epiphany." An epiphany is: a realization on a large scale, a revelation, something life-changing in its effect; something which transforms a person completely, particularly in the sense of shedding new light on old situations. It is a ...


9

"tender" has the connotation of being gentle and soft. "Oh, you French people are so tender, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." tender (adj) marked by, responding to, or expressing the softer emotions, showing care.


9

One of the senses of precious may work: Affectedly dainty or overrefined: precious mannerisms. {AHDEL} though this obviously covers an affected attitude. If the person is genuinely soft, the dialect term nesh would often be used conversationally in the UK: nesh adjective dialect (Especially of a person) weak and delicate; feeble ...


9

It is a generational title/suffix: Generational suffixes are used to distinguish persons who share the same name within a family. A generational suffix can be used informally (for disambiguation purposes, or as nicknames) and is often incorporated in legal documents. Wikipedia


7

Sentence 1 (with nail) sounds a bit colloquial to my non-native ears. Furthermore, I think that “nailed Robert to the murders” links Robert to the murders but is ambiguous as to whether he was the murderer, an accomplice, or perhaps even merely involved in some way (e.g. he drove the murderer to the place where the crime took place but did not know of the ...


7

I agree that "gas money" would be how English-speakers would identify the concept. However, in my experience, it wouldn't be referenced directly in your context. I think American English-speakers would generally phrase it something like "How much do I owe you for gas?" It's quite a bit less-awkward than phrasing it, "How much gas money do I owe you?" They ...


7

In the US, we call a person who is quick to "see through" others, "street-smart". While the expression can be used in other ways, it is often a way to describe someone who is not easily deceived.


6

The OP hasn't explained why the term multipurpose is not appropriate for their needs, it seems a perfectly appropriate expression to describe any object that has more than one function. There are; however, viable alternatives. I suggest: multifunctional and all-purpose something that is multifunctional does several different things or has several ...


6

I think mealy-mouthed may fit in your context: Afraid to speak frankly or straightforwardly: mealy-mouthed excuses. (ODO)


6

sentimental: having or arousing feelings of tenderness, sadness or nostalgia, typically in an exaggerated or self-indulgent way (Defn. 1.1) [Source:ODO] weakly emotional; mawkishly susceptible or tender (Defn. 3) [Source: Dictionary.com]


6

Occupants A person, family, group, or organization that lives in, occupies, or has quarters or space in or on something: The occupant of a taxicab; The occupants of the building. dictionary.reference.com


5

Dainty and Prissy come to mind. Weak, Babies, Cowards would also definitely fit. Cowards would have historical context as the general view of the French by Germans of that time period. These of course are more straight insults instead of just implied ones. Pussyfooted would also fit, though I am unsure how insulting this is historically. MW: pussyfoot ...


5

"Penalty" http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/bonus?s=t Interesting concept, "Penalty Avoidance Question".


4

Formal word - Multi-tool Casual use word - Swiss Army Knife Update 3-a: People are pointing to the fact that Swiss Army Knife softwares are bad softwares. That is not what this question is about. It is about how to describe a Swiss Army Knife like software. Please go to Update 3-b. Since you have given the example of swiss-knife, I searched for the ...


4

I think squeamish is the adjective you're looking for, as in: "Oh, you French people are so squeamish, just say that you're looking for something to kill the mouse with." Now whether or not there's a German word for squeamish might create a problem, but if you're writing in English, you'll get your point across appropriately. If it were a loutish ...


4

I think your question doesn't match your context. Lucy realized she had the proof to _________ Robert. The blank here is not a verb meaning "to prove his guilt". Lucy had proof to prove-the-guilt-of Robert. That doesn't really make sense. A better way: Lucy realized she could prove Robert's guilt. Alternately, Lucy realized she could ...


4

Perhaps dogmatic? Merriam-Webster: "expressing personal opinions or beliefs as if they are certainly correct and cannot be doubted" or, upon looking for synonyms for dogmatic, there's doctrinaire: dictionary.com: "dogmatic about others' acceptance of one's ideas; fanatical: a doctrinaire preacher"



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