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63

In English, we would usually use the word play. That covers both the act of performing the song on an instrument (perhaps while singing, if the instrument permits) and the act of playing a recording of the song. If you give an a cappella rendition, live, you would use the word sing.


50

I don’t think you will find a better word than begrudge for “regard as ill-deserved”. I know I shouldn’t care, but I begrudge my ex his new partner a bit. Merriam-Webster agrees that it needn’t have a covetous connotation: be·grudge verb \bi-ˈgrəj, bē-\ : to think that someone does not deserve something : to regard (something) as not ...


36

I don't know anything about Maltese grammar, but I want to guess that nurik and nsemmgħek mean, respectively 'cause to look' and 'cause to listen'. Some languages have standard ways of converting one verb to a causative verb (one that means 'to cause to do'). As an example, in Classical Nahuatl the suffix -ti turns any verb into a causative verb. So the word ...


23

A prerequisite is something that must exist for another to exist.


18

Believe it or not, the word you are looking for is floor. It refers to both the space between and the actual divisions. But the space between can have other names like story ("storey" in British English). If it were a house it would be the roof. I think you could use "floor slab" or deck.


9

Per @bye's answer, in the case of a song, you'd probably play or sing it to someone else (depending on how you cause the sound to be made). But if you wanted the band at your private party to play some particular song that you can't think of the name of, the bandleader might say:- "You hum it and we'll play it" (just give us idea of what it sounds like; ...


6

I've heard people say they have "dipped into a book" to mean that they have read a few pages or chapters here and there.


6

Play is good if you want something specifically for sound, but I would generally use show here. It refers to introducing or presenting new information in a variety of contexts, not strictly related to sight. For example, “He showed me a great new sandwich shop”. I find it no different than saying “I see” to metaphorically mean “I understand”.


6

They are called onryō. In traditional beliefs of Japan and in literature, onryō (怨霊, literally "vengeful spirit", sometimes rendered "wrathful spirit") refers to a ghost (yurei) believed capable of causing harm in the world of the living, ailing or killing enemies, or even causing natural disasters to exact vengeance to redress the wrongs it received ...


5

I would such a stimulating quotation is evocative (it evokes other, latent, concepts), suggestive (it suggests other ideas to you), or inspiring (it inspires you). If you're trying to emphasize the productivity of the word, the sheer amount of other ideas it generates, you might use an agricultural metaphor, such as fertile, fruitful, or fecund (or, even ...


5

"War and Peace? Oh sure, I've perused it." See also skimmed, flipped through. peruse (sense 1b): to look over or read through in a casual or cursory manner skim: to give a cursory glance, consideration, or reading flip though: to look quickly at the pages of a magazine, book, etc. Note that peruse has the additional advantage of being an ...


4

Perhaps, contingency/contingent? Maybe this definition for contingency: a future event or circumstance that is possible but cannot be predicted with certainty and this one for contingent: occurring or existing only if (certain other circumstances) are the case; dependent on EDIT: I just thought of this one after I had posted, but it could also be ...


4

One word that comes to mind is "provable" or "scientifically provable" with the connotation of proof such as used in sciences like geometry or philosophy. The method that Sherlock Holmes used was based on how scientific proofs are built. There are many things which science has proven which, at least at one point of time, were not evident to many people. ...


4

This principle is simply called scientific control, wherein one changes the independent variable while trying to avoid the influence of confounding variables.


4

I think you are referring to a sequence of photos: Sequence photography is the technique of combining different shots of the same subject to present its course of action in a final single image. Capturing a subject in motion will provide you with images which, basically, have the subject at different moments of its movement throughout the frame, ...


4

Someone who questions is a skeptic. Dictionary.com: 1. a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual. 2. a person who maintains a doubting attitude, as toward values, plans, statements, or the character of others.


4

In Russian, we say "дать послушать" which means something like give to listen or give a listen (according to Google translate), like if you have some recording (MP3, CD etc) and you give that recording to someone. In English, it's similar. You could say to your friend "give a listen to this song" or "give this song a listen".


3

I think the term OP is looking for is... reach noun 3 b. - range or scope of influence or effect. (thefreedictionary.com) I can't find an actual instance offhand in the book I'm currently reading, but I'm quite certain more than once in David Deutsch's The Beginning of Infinity he makes the point that a "good" theory is one which has extensive reach. ...


3

Given the statement "Logically, A can't exist or occur without B", then to describe A 's relationship to B, you'd say "A is a prerequisite of B" (as @JasperLoy answered). By contrast, if you wanted to describe B 's relationship to A, you'd say "B is predicated on A" (which sounds a lot like your "predecession" to me).


3

Perhaps the word you're looking for is autological (or homological). An autological word (also called homological word) is a word expressing a property which it also possesses itself. Source


3

You could use the word Partition. It is even more general and doesn't specify vertically or horizontally. It defines an object which separates something into parts. So: For a building, a partition separates the building into floors, stories, rooms, or whatever your preference is. "a division into parts; separation" Reference: Partition


3

I believe the best word to describe what you are feeling is indignation. Begrudge is a good word if you don’t care about the similarities with envy and resentment. According to Dictionary.com: indignation (n): strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base; righteous anger. That is, indignation at the other ...


3

As was suggested, you could use the word play. But the word show is also acceptable. The word show does not exclusively mean cause to be seen. Other meanings include: 3 : to present as a public spectacle : perform 6     a : to point out : direct attention to     b : conduct, usher 7 : accord, bestow Source ...


3

Although both solecism and malapropism may be more common as count nouns, they can themselves both be used as mass or abstract nouns too. OED lists some non-count or “without article” senses of solecism as Rare, but conspicuously not the one in question here. Under malapropism the sole definition given offers a non-count sense first, and the count sense ...


2

Consider impartation, of which one sense is to communicate the knowledge of something [Merriam-Webster] or more generally, the transmission of information [Wordnetweb at Princeton]. The -ation suffix may fit well with names of your other schools of magic.


2

Anaclitic - Relating to or characterized by a strong emotional dependence on another or others. You can find this definition on oxford. In psychology, we use it to define the relation you described, often with features or symptoms like "anaclitic happiness" or "anaclitic pain." But it can be extended to non-emotional features in informal conversations. ...


2

You might call such a person a: Epistemophile: one who has a love of knowledge; specifically, excessive striving for or preoccupation with knowledge. Philosophile: Similar, but more of an emphasis on learning and philosophy. Sophophile: Similar, but with more of an emphasis on gaining wisdom. A little further afield, some define the doctrine ...


2

I suppose you could use sworn enemy. Sworn enemies are people who will always hate each other.


2

There is an uncommon word thoughtworthy: (used as thought-worthy also) Worthy of thought or of being thought; considerable. Though, considerable is a more common word with a close meaning but does not seem like a good fit for your example.


2

You can describe such a theory as provocative: Causing discussion, thought, argument, etc. Note the use of provocative to describe the theories in these articles: How to test Weinstein's provocative theory of everything Lab Findings Support Provocative Theory On Cancer 'Enemy' Within



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