Hot answers tagged

105

Consider confidant A person with whom one shares a secret or private matter, trusting them not to repeat it to others: a close confidante of the princess [ODO]


44

The closest suggestion I can think of is creamery. creamery - Technically a manufacturing plant that processes cream, but can be used to describe a retail outlet. Example. Consider also: dairy (New Zealand English) - A convenience store. Sells milk, ice cream, newspapers, cigarettes etc. Can you go to the dairy to pick up some milk? ...


39

Remote. Harvard Law School website has a section on Remote Interviewing which may be Telephone Interviews or Skype/Videoconference Interviews. Quoting dictionary.cambridge.org: remote adjective (DISTANT) specialized internet & telecoms remote ​computer ​systems are ​available to ​users in another ​part of a ​building or in another ​place, ...


25

Inconspicuous things are easily overlooked. Inconspicuous Not clearly visible or attracting attention - ODO


25

I've heard such a place called simply, "a dairy". According to thefreedictionary.com, "dairy (n): 1. A commercial establishment for processing or selling milk and milk products."


17

Consider, insider One who has special knowledge or access to confidential information. American Heritage® Dictionary initiate A person who is being formally accepted or who has been formally accepted as a member of a group or organization (adj.) Instructed in some secret knowledge M-W repository A person to whom something is ...


15

You are quite correct that simply describing someone simply as bald is ambiguous: it could mean that they can no longer grow hair, or that they have cut off all their hair. To disambiguate: Gone bald describes someone who has lost the ability to grow hair. (Closely related, balding or going bald describes someone who is in the process of losing their ...


15

Originally conspirator simply meant someone who breathed with you; but words change and as you say, it desn't mean that now. Try confidant Merriam-Webster link.


13

If cheese is the predominant product, consider Cheesemonger : A person who sells cheese, butter, and other dairy products. This is chiefly BrE. Caveat: Sometimes cheesemongers, in Britain and Ireland at least, use fancy French names like La Crèmerie or La Fromagerie. Example usage from oxforddictionaries.com From specialist cheesemongers to ...


9

A facility such as you describe used to grace the campus of the University of Vermont. (For the geographically distant, Vermont is a small dairy-producing state in the northeastern US. It is the home of US Senator Bernie Sanders.) The store was called The UVM Dairy Bar. From the university website: Generations of Catamounts have sweet memories of the ...


9

Negligible conveys the meaning you are referring to: of little consequence as to warrant little or no attention : trifling a negligible error (M-W)


7

Inconsequential: adj. Lacking importance.


7

I've never seen it used in this context, but I think it would be a good use of "virtual". Wikipedia defines "virtual" among other meanings as "Operating by computer or in cyberspace; not physically present".


6

Conspirator is a suitable synonym One of a group that acts in harmony https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/conspirator


6

Otosis conveys the meaning you are referring to: mishearing or misinterpretation of spoken sounds, also an alteration in word forms due to it. (M-W) Origin: Mid 19th cent. From ancient Greek ὠτ-, οὖς ear + -osis. (ODO)


5

The word privy almost meets your requirements, but it is an adjective rather than a noun. I have heard people use privies as noun but I can't verify the correctness of that or not.


5

Fifty years ago there were many shops in the US selling primarily milk, with ice cream and perhaps cheese being secondary offerings. One of these shops would have been referred to as a "dairy" (even though the same term was used for an agricultural business which milked cows) or as a "dairy store". These have largely vanished, and the few that remain have ...


5

I've never heard of spread-eagle, where I come from, people say spread out. Nice to come across new expressions :) She lay spread out on her back after she had fallen from the jungle gym, the air knocked from her lungs.


5

They are called false cognates. From the Wikipedia: False cognates are pairs of words that seem to be cognates because of similar sounds and meaning, but actually have different etymologies; these word pairs can be within the same language or be from different ones. This is different from false friends, which may in fact be related but have different ...


5

There are some common words mentioned in the comments but there is a word derived from staff which is staffer. It is AmE but might not be that common. [The frequency is band 4 in OED] OED defines as: orig. and chiefly U.S. A member of a staff. a. Of a newspaper or journal: a staff writer. b. More widely, of a business or other organization. ...


4

A reputable medical website http://webmd.com describes the condition alopecia as the medical term for baldness. Notwithstanding a variety of treatments, cosmetics and quackery, the condition is more or less permanent. Hairless, on the other hand, could be the result of a mechanical, not a bioogical process, and can usually be remedied by time and ...


4

You could consider using face-to-face communication or face-to-face discourse: Face-to-face interaction (less often, face-to-face communication or face-to-face discourse) is a concept in sociology, linguistics, media and communication studies describing social interaction carried out without any mediating technology. [Wikipedia]


4

obscure not known about, or not well known also Not readily noticed or seen; inconspicuous


4

animated full of movement and activity or (although it's not as broadly usable as animated) gesticulator one who gesticulates, where gesticulate means To say or express by gestures.


4

You might consider inner circle, which implies a select few who possess special knowledge or power that is not available to others. inner circle noun : a small group of people who lead a government or an organization or who are close to its leader source: Merriam-Webster While this definition speaks of an organization, to me the term can ...


4

The most pedantic and archaic, and thus the most correct, is Secretary which literally means the keeper of secrets. From the latin Secretum (secret) the primary use of the word Secretary in middle English was exactly what you are talking about. A person that keeps secrets.


3

I think they are generally referred to as service spaces: Service spaces are those used for galleys, pantries containing cooking appliances, lockers and store-rooms, workshops other than those forming part of the machinery spaces, and similar spaces and trunks to such spaces. (www.iadclexicon.org)


3

The best single word for the attitude that finishes your sentence is criticism. The phrase you're looking for is judgmental attitude. Full Definition of judgmental 1 : of, relating to, or involving judgment 2 : characterized by a tendency to judge harshly <judgmental prigs> I'm not aware of a single word that means the same thing as ...


3

judgmentalism (no e on judge) or the less common judgementalism Although the best definitions can only be found at wiktionary (judgmental behavior or attitude) and a Washington Times article (quoted below), I think we will find this word in standard dictionaries soon enough. Opinion columnists, like the rest of humanity, walk a fine line between ...


3

I think you can describe it as a semi-automated process: partially automated. (Dictionary.com)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible