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22

Trivializing or trivialization doesn't explicitly describe the act, but it describes the effect you're talking about. This is in conjunction with WS2's answer: you reduce (or maybe minimize, as per Centaurus) the story to the point where it is trivial.


17

You could generally subvehiculate someone, maybe? (Subvehiculation would be the obvious noun then). In reference to this question, you could even say the person that was handled in such a way was subvehiculate, as an adjective; of course with a schwa in the final syllable).


12

What you are talking about here is reduction, as expressed in reductionism or reductionist. Reduction is a perfectly valid process, not only in mathematics - reducing a mathematical argument to its simplest form - but in things such as philosophy etc. But the examples you give are of things, which I would assert are perversely reductionist. The Oxford ...


10

You might try this : On the cusp of a new day. On the cusp: On the threshold or verge of a development or action. (TFD)


10

I think that at the stroke of midnight is a useful expression that comes close to what you are looking for. It actually indicates the last moments of the day and the beginning of a new one. the sound of striking, as of a clock


10

Here's one that's quite casual: Plus, if they let me pass,...


9

minimize - to treat or describe (something) as smaller or less important than it is Merriam-Webster "I don't mean to minimize his contributions, on the contrary." "During the interview, he tried to minimize his flaws." minimize - "to represent as having the least degree of importance, value, or size: minimized the magnitude of the crisis." TFD


8

The rhetorical device known as bathos is defined as an abrupt transition in style from the exalted to the commonplace, producing a ludicrous effect. [Wikipedia]


8

You can consider brinkmanship but it is usually used in political contexts. the practice of causing or allowing a situation to become extremely dangerous in order to get the results that you want [MW] However, this word can be used in other contexts as well and the below excerpt is about spiritual healing, similar to the first example you gave. (from ...


7

You could say: "I went to great efforts to fix a stubborn bug in my code." Google defines stubborn as: difficult to move, remove, or cure.


7

Since nothing in the dictionary quite fits, we can cut and paste to build Surbusticate: VERB to sacrifice an innocent subordinate to the the crushing condemnation and wrath of the larger community for the sake of maintaining the boss's pristine self-asserted innocence: The explicit word picture of the root bus hides behind the t , a ...


6

Tenacious: holding fast; characterized by keeping a firm hold (often followed by of): a tenacious grip on my arm; tenacious of old habits. highly retentive: a tenacious memory. pertinacious, persistent, stubborn, or obstinate. "I went to great efforts to fix a tenacious bug in my code."


6

I think the word you're looking for is: incentive: something that encourages a person to do something or to work harder (Merriam-Webster) a thing that motivates or encourages someone to do something; a payment or concession to stimulate greater output or investment (Oxford Dictionaries Online) something that makes you want to do something or ...


5

Obstinate is a good word for this, as it describes something that is undesirable and persistent. From Dictionary.com: firmly or stubbornly adhering to one's purpose, opinion, etc.; not yielding to argument, persuasion, or entreaty. characterized by inflexible persistence or an unyielding attitude; inflexibly persisted in or carried out: obstinate ...


5

For a single word, one could use denude and it's various forms. [OED] denude. 1. trans. To make naked or bare; to strip of clothing or covering; spec. in Geol. of natural agencies: To lay bare (a rock or formation) by the removal of that which lies above it. However, if you were to take your car into a garage and ask them to denude it, I suspect ...


5

How about 'cut down' ? As in "he cut her speech down to a simplified version of several complex points" Although this can have a wider meaning. But the words have both a specific meaning and a general hint of the negative aspects of reduction as in 'cut it out' or 'cut from the team' and down as in lower or lesser in both senses. Or else the more ...


5

The French word dérouler means to unroll or to make flat. That certainly can happen to someone that ends up under a bus. So, maybe derolate Thinking of falling under a chariot's wheels (carrum in Latin, giving us car, cart and carriage) might suggest something simple like decarate, which is not very decorous, but is quite decarrous, and you may want to ...


5

A few choices- stop by for a few moments. drop round for a few minutes pop in for a minute I like the expression - an abbreviated visit- though I have not heard of this phrase before and could not find much reference. And for the supporting cast- Cameo- the suggestion by Dan Bron definitely appears the most suitable. ...


4

Intractable is my favourite for this sort of thing; not hard, but annoying and difficult to get to grips with.


4

Circumlocution might fit the bill, but it's more often applied to a single person speaking than a group having a discussion. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/circumlocution Definition: the use of many words to say something that could be said more clearly and directly by using fewer words Another adjective that's commonly used is roundabout, as ...


4

You can use the word "outgroup", which is used in the social sciences as a term to refer to a social group you are not a member of without any implication of the group being "fringe". It's not an adjective, but "outgroup" can like most nouns be used to modify another noun, like "outgroup relationships". If you need to talk about multiple groups, you could ...


4

If you don't like any of the others people have given in comments, you could try except, which, as a verb, means except verb, transitive 5. (tr) to leave out; omit; exclude [TFD] It carries the connotation of making a special case for the item in question.


4

Self-immolation is used for great personal sacrifice in the pursuit of a goal / cause. It can involve the ultimate earthly sacrifice: self-immolation: a deliberate and willing sacrifice of oneself often by fire [Merriam-Webster] but need not be quite so drastic: self-immolation: voluntary sacrifice or denial of oneself, as for an ideal or ...


4

I am not sure if this will entirely answer your question, but I think a word which may help is ascetic (adj) or asceticism (noun). The ODO defines the former as "characterised by severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons: an ascetic life of prayer, fasting and manual labour" Not directly implied in ...


4

Great question; as a long-time political activist, it has me scratching my head. I think Dan Bron's suggestion, "quixotic," is the best by far. The primary definition listed @ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/quixotic is "hopeful or romantic in a way that is not practical," though there is another definition that includes the word "foolish." But ...


4

Sounds more like a fixation (fixated ideation or 'idee fixe') than idealism. Fixation carries the connotation of being blind to negative consequences.


4

If the information is condensed and summarised, then a common word for this is dashboard. It might apply even if the information is not summarized. "An easy to read, often single page, real-time user interface, showing a graphical presentation of the current status (snapshot) and historical trends of an organization’s key performance indicators (KPIs) - ...


4

You're describing a flying visit, it might also be pro forma or perfunctory, depending on why it is short.


3

Resilient would be appropriate. From Merriam-Webster: : characterized or marked by resilience: as a : capable of withstanding shock without permanent deformation or rupture b : tending to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change Definition 'b' seems especially apt. In science and medicine literature people often talk about bacteria ...


3

When I have longstanding bugs in my code they end up entrenched in all sorts of different processes. Oxford Dictionaries, entrench: 1 [with object] Establish (an attitude, habit, or belief) so firmly that change is very difficult or unlikely: 'ageism is entrenched in our society'



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