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51

Legacy "A thing handed down by a predecessor" - OED


36

I like Chris's suggestion, "legacy", but another synonym that fits might be "bequest", which is defined in simple terms by Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary as the property or money that you promise in your will to give to another person or organization after you die


23

Such a joke is often told with deadpan Deliberately impassive or expressionless Oxford Dictionaries Online Example: "His deadpan tone made it difficult to tell whether my dog had actually been crushed by a piano." This is typically only done in situations where one would expect the speaker to sound serious.


22

There are many ways, depending upon the situation. The direct answer would be "You don't need to flatter me." For a polite rejoinder you could use "Please, you are too kind. I will be glad to help." If you wish to be humorous you could say "Flattery will get you everywhere."


18

I would argue that Cassandra does work here: the name is often used metaphorically, in a variety of fields. For example, achieving a clear, shared vision in an organization is often difficult due to a lack of commitment to the new vision by some individuals in the organization, because it does not match reality as they see it. Those who support the new ...


13

Not strictly a description of the person, but... Falling on deaf ears if a request or advice falls on deaf ears, people ignore it. Warnings that sunbathing can lead to skin cancer have largely fallen on deaf ears in Britain. Link


13

A megaphone or loud hailer. They are commonly used at outdoor political rallies.


12

"Something left by the subject to be inherited by someone else" is called the estate, especially in legal documents. E.g. The late Mrs A's house is part of her estate


12

Consider 'a voice in the wilderness' Different sources give slightly different nuance, Meaning: You're a voice in the wilderness, or a voice crying in the wilderness, if you're expressing an unpopular opinion or insight. Meaning: You're a voice in the wilderness, or a voice crying in the wilderness, if you're expressing an unpopular opinion or ...


11

While not a noun for the joke itself, the term straight face is often used to describe the demeanor of the teller A blank or serious facial expression, especially when trying not to laugh: my father kept a straight face when he joked Oxford Dictionaries Online Note that this expression is also used to describe someone who is deliberately lying.


9

You have two concepts there - (a) a joke, and (b) something to fool people. I can't think of something for the first (i.e. something funny), but for the second you could consider: Ruse - An action intended to deceive someone; a trick ... or synonyms such as hoax, artifice, deceit, and similar. None specifically means "... and then you get told the real ...


9

This may fall under a practical joke which ranges from tricking people into believing something frankly preposterous to painting someone's banister in honey. It may also be referred to as a hoax or ruse as stated by Prof yattle. Edit: upon further consideration, this is a case of somebody kidding you. Often somebody will say, after fooling you: "just ...


8

Perhaps, catharsis — M-W 2b : a purification or purgation that brings about spiritual renewal or release from tension "She has learned to have her catharsis, take a deep breath and move on. … she does not dwell on the negative anymore." —Selena Roberts, New York Times, 24 June 2001 Wikipedia explains in detail: Stages of social catharsis: ...


7

Paradox, but more precisely, Liar paradox Wikipedia eg. If "this sentence is false" is true, then the sentence is false, but if the sentence states that it is false, and it is false, then it must be true, and so on. Dictionary.com philosophy A sentence which asserts its own falsity, e.g. "This sentence is false" or "I am lying". These ...


7

For your specific case consider highlight: "You should highlight what you've done when we have the meeting." Strictly speaking, the verb merely denotes accentuating or emphasizing. However, positive connotations carry over from the usage of this word as a noun.


7

A shaggy dog story extremely long-winded anecdote characterized by extensive narration of typically irrelevant incidents and terminated by an anticlimax or a pointless punchline Shaggy dog stories play upon the audience's preconceptions of joke-telling. The audience listens to the story with certain expectations, which are either simply not met or ...


6

Flattery can be used here, it can be also said like :- I will do that for you, this sweet-talk is not required. or sarcastically - "Butter-up and get things done." I'll do that for you, without taking your blarney seriously.


5

Paradox is likely what you are looking for: a statement or proposition that seems self-contradictory or absurd but in reality expresses a possible truth. a self-contradictory and false proposition. any person, thing, or situation exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature. (From Dictionary.com)


4

You could consider using “hopped about/around” in a suitable simile to try to capture the image you’re after: He hopped about/around like a [an excited] baby bunny/chick/sparrow, wanting to go as soon as possible. (example usage from ‘Jeeves and the Christmas Grotto’ [Chapter 1, paragraph 5] via ‘archiveofourown[dot]org’)


4

A few synonyms pop up if you google excitement - exhilaration, elation, animation, enthusiasm, eagerness, anticipation, feverishness, fever, delirium, agitation, emotion, fire, fieriness, intensity, zeal, zest; informal pep, vim, zing, spark You could also replace jumping with bouncing which seems better to convey the idea of excitement. He was bouncing ...


4

A megaphone. An electric handheld megaphone.


4

144 is a dozen dozens, or one gross That's all I could find. New words are made every day. But only if there is some use for those words, they will stand the test of time. So you may create a word for it, but nobody would understand it. But of course, if you're famous, anything you make up may become a meme and survive for a while, at least.


4

I think brag is good enough, if you use it in the right context. There are terms like bragging rights (a positive thing). I've been prompted before (in an interview, and on my Google+ profile a while back) to brag about something--the asker simply wants to know of achievements or cool things that I've done, and is using the term brag to ask for them. ...


4

A leg-pull - from the phrase "pull one's leg". (Similarly - at least in Australia - "yank one's chain". In other cultures this seems to mean to harrass.)


4

No. A humanitarian is someone who helps others in a practical sense (feeds the poor, cures the sick etc.). I’d just say a liberal arts graduate.


3

Hustler, Conman, Swindler, etc. Hustler definition from Dictionary.com noun 1. an enterprising person determined to succeed; go-getter. 2. Slang. a person who employs fraudulent or unscrupulous methods to obtain money; swindler.


3

A somewhat blunt term for finessing a statement this way is pussyfooting around. to avoid making a definite decision or stating a definite opinion because of fear, doubt, etc. "Pussyfoot." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 18 May 2016. It's commonly heard as "stop pussyfooting around" and is well suited to disclamatory bloat that ...


3

It depends on context. Although other answers suggest generic words like meter, gauge, instrument, etc. those words are not commonly used in practice. More typically, we refer to the specific name of the device being used to take the measurements. For example, a device that measures length might be a ruler. Or a yardstick. Or a tape measure. Or a caliper. ...


3

I have never used "a gross of years", and I'm not sure many people would understand, but I don't see a particular need for a more specific word.


3

"You should speak up about what you've done when we have the meeting" speak up, according to Cambridge Dictionaries Online to give your opinion about something in public, especially on a subject that you have strong feelings about. The shy person the OP is encouraging must have strong opinions about the worth of what he/she has done. Collins ...



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