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35

I hear the word superficial often used in this context. Someone might be superficial, or only engage in superficial conversation.


35

Originally coined to describe one who took a superficial, rather than serious, interest in the arts, a dilettante now connotes someone who takes a light interest in many diverse fields, and a deep interest in none; a dilettante is a dabbler.


31

I would use Flamboyant. A person with a showy style. The word doesn't just apply to clothing but to any extravagant style of behaviour. As others have said, in times gone by the words fop and dandy would have been common. However, they would nowadays be taken to referring to the Regency period.


29

An eclectic: noun A person who derives ideas, style, or taste from a broad and diverse range of sources. ODO


25

A polymath: A person of great or varied learning; a person acquainted with many fields of study; an accomplished scholar. [OED] From Greek πολυμαθής, “having learnt or knowing much.”


24

The argument would be said to be contrived. Deliberately and artificially created.


23

A person who projects a sincere friendly attitude without a sense of deep commitment is cordial: adjective 1 Warm and friendly: the atmosphere was cordial and relaxed ODO The connotations of cordial were historically heart-felt: late 14c., "of the heart," from Middle French cordial, from Medieval Latin cordialis "of or for the heart," ...


21

A meter (as opposed to metre). Or a gauge.


18

Gladiators gladiate. Yes, it is a word and it is mentioned as a back-formation from gladiator in Wiktionary. It is a noun-to-verb derivation, originally from the Latin noun gladiator ("swordsman"), from gladius ("sword"). (However, it is also used in botany and means "sword-shaped"). Gladiation is also in Wiktionary and defined as a combat between ...


17

The item you are describing is prerequisite for whatever more comprehensive thing will be based on it. The term prerequisite certainly indicates that your subject is required or necessary, but also implies that its establishment or attainment is not the main goal. The noun form, referring to your subject as "a prerequisite" for something else, may be clearer ...


17

Another choice : Renaissance man "a man of any period who has a broad range of intellectual interests"


15

I think you're thinking of 'Zeitgeist'. It typically refers to the general 'spirit' of an era - that is to say 'the culture' - but can include things like art, architecture and fashion that represent an era as they are so closely entwined with the dominant culture (see Wikipedia) noun, German. 1. the spirit of the time; general trend of thought or feeling ...


15

That missile is a single point of failure device, which is why it's not man rated.


14

How about doing something half-heartedly? without enthusiasm or effort I half-heartedly joined a gym to get fit. Or a half-hearted attempt. Synonyms include: desultory perfunctory cursory [Oxford] EDIT: The word the OP was looking for is: perfunctory (Of an action) carried out without real interest, feeling, or effort:


14

Ostentatious or showy for negative connotations. (disapproving) expensive or noticeable in a way that is intended to impress people Resplendent for positive. Attractive and impressive through being richly colourful or sumptuous: Extravagant for somewhat neutral Exceeding what is reasonable or appropriate; excessive or elaborate: Take your ...


13

Just negate the term with non- to form non-redundant (or nonredundant). As with redundant itself, an engineering context directs the reader or hearer to understand the term in the engineering sense. Wiktionary gives primacy to the closed spelling; OED offers only the hyphenated one, with examples but no definition (since defining the negation of redundant ...


12

masquerade dress/costume: noun used to emphasise the wearing of clothing to appear in the likeness of another character or object outlandish: adjective Looking or sounding bizarre or unfamiliar (archaic) Foreign or alien [Source: Oxford Dictionaries]


11

Instrument. 1.a tool or implement, especially one for delicate or scientific work. 2.a measuring device used to gauge the level, position, speed, etc., of something, especially a motor vehicle or aircraft.


11

How about lackadaisical? Lacking enthusiasm and determination; carelessly lazy The effort from the players was lackadaisical at best.


10

I'd call them Quixotic [Oxford] Extremely idealistic; unrealistic and impractical: However, Quixotic usually describes ideas (as against the three words in its definition, which can describe both ideas and people). To describe people, I think you might have to go with the character name: Quixote EDIT: Based on the comments, I think most people, like ...


10

Such a person is affable. Neither M-W nor OED explicitly defines this quality as shallow or superficial, but usage tends that way in my experience—similarly with bonhomie and hail-fellow-well-met.


9

I would use galling. fig. Irritating, offensive to the mind or spirit. [OED] irritating, exasperating, or bitterly humiliating [Collins] Your example: You telling me that my question asking abilities are poor is very galling. Another example from Google Books: It is very galling to the pride of our troops to submit to such continued ...


9

"Concocted" gives the impression of having been manufactured to deceive, as in the 2nd definition of "concoct" from MW-O: "to invent or develop (a plan, story, etc.) especially in order to trick or deceive someone"


8

Please note Jano, the two photos you present are utterly different I normally love your questions but I'm afraid this one does not work! I noticed this incredibly intelligent comment above, I'll paste it in here: "The two photos are TOTALLY DIFFERENT, the only similarity is they are both human beings. The second photo is just utterly normal, everyday, ...


8

I might also add Bohemian Adjective of, relating to, or characteristic of Bohemia, its people, or their language unconventional in appearance, behaviour, etc "He was somewhat bohemian in appearance..."


7

The word that came to mind when reading your question about a word to describe hurt pride was: humbling humble: to make (someone) humble in spirit or manner The above definition of the verb humble uses the adjective humble in its definition, which is defined as "not proud". So in essence, when you humble someone, you diminish their pride (if ...


7

This is a turnkey solution. From The Free Dictionary: turn·key adj. Supplied, installed, or purchased in a condition ready for immediate use, occupation, or operation: a turnkey computer system; a turnkey housing project. Of or relating to something supplied, installed, or purchased in this manner: a turnkey agreement. A turnkey ...


7

As long as you are specific about what you are referring to, emblematic may be used: adj Serving as a symbol of a particular quality or concept; symbolic In the particular sense you are looking for, a common phrase would be that something is "emblematic of its time." Example: "This book is emblematic of Russian literature at the turn of the ...


7

The areas are known as council estates, and the properties, council housing, as they were built and managed by local government, typically a city or county council. Today, many of the properties are owned by private, non-profit housing associations, but the term council house is still commonly used to describe them. There are a number of names for somebody ...


7

The -end- morpheme in subtrahendum, -a signifies in Latin a gerundive: a verbform designating things to be VERBen. Corrigenda is the title of a list of things which you are to correct, presumably by paging through the text, striking the mistakes and writing in the corrections. Agenda, likewise, designates things to be done, in the vague future or on a ...



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