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57

There is a specific name for it: pandiculation. A stretching and stiffening of the trunk and extremities, as when fatigued and drowsy or on waking, often accompanied by yawning. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/pandiculation Joseph Ducreux pandiculating; self-portrait ca 1783 Note: While stretching is more common, it is also more general. OP ...


43

She is doing the same thing this cat is doing: stretching. English doesn't have a common word for the stretching associated with yawning, or with waking up. Do it whenever you need to, just because it feels good.


21

I think the word you're looking for is leitmotif: A recurrent theme throughout a musical or literary composition, associated with a particular person, idea, or situation. [ODO]


18

It's called a ghost image. That link is to a scientific paper entitled: Ghost image cancellation algorithm through numeric beamforming for multi-antenna radar imaging


16

Bearing in mind your specific request for non-vulgar terms, and being concerned with my own health and safety, the most commonly used words I use to address my better half when she is in such a state would be honey dearest baby sweetheart princess sweetheart buttercup pumpkin cupcake darling This is one of the rules to be found in the ...


15

This kind of user is called an ask-and-run. It is even mentioned on Meta Stack Overflow: Dealing with “ask-and-run” questioners Bonus: If we follow the same pattern, we can also come up with a specific term ask-and-idle for users who post a question but stay idle (but don't disappear/leave) without accepting an answer, commenting, replying to people, ...


15

"Grumpy." I do not ever call my wife a bitch, or even say that the is acting like one. I would definitely not call her bitchy. I might, while using one of oerkelens' terms of endearment, tell her, "You seem grumpy." If that does not express the idea accurately, I might say "especially grumpy."


13

False reading is the most common phrase. It can be applied to different kind of radars and other kind of devices as well. If the antenna part of a radar unit is hung on the outside of the police officer's car , the beam can actually hit a side window or part of the window and a false reading occurs which will distort the actual reading for the targeted ...


12

Probably a showdown: An event, especially a confrontation, that forces an issue to a conclusion. or a clash: An encounter between hostile forces; a battle or skirmish. (from TFD)


10

Two terms I think applicable have been mentioned already: • face-off, “to be in or come into opposition or competition” [merriam-webster.com] as a verb, or as a noun, the competition itself • showdown, “The final battle between two nemeses, in which there can be but one victor” [wiktionary] Also consider the following. • dogfight, “a fierce fight or ...


9

The word "rumble" specifically refers to a confrontation between two rival gangs. It could be a spontaneous event, or it could be planned in advance. The goal of the fight was to settle a dispute, demonstrate the gangs' fighting skills, or establish territories. Gang rumbles were often planned in advance by leaders, sometimes even negotiating times and ...


8

Hormonal You seem a little hormonal this week, why don't you pour a glass of red and run a bath. You convey that your partner is 'acting up' but acknowledging it is neither persons fault - biology is biology after all and can't be helped.


7

That is 'clutter'. The word is sometimes used specifically to refer to the nearby wave-peaks which can be picked out by marine radar. clutter, n. 2c. Unwanted images on a radar screen. 1945 in Army & Navy Jrnl. (U.S.) 18 Aug. 1534. 1946 Electronic Engin. 18 267 Sea clutter, caused by echoes from the tips of waves and broken ...


7

There is an idiom of herding cats. An idiomatic saying that refers to an attempt to control or organize a class of entities which are uncontrollable or chaotic. Implies a task that is extremely difficult or impossible to do, primarily due to chaotic factors. (Source: Wikipedia) This only addresses one half of your request, the impossibility of the ...


7

Duology is possible. For example, Time Duology by Nora Roberts.


7

The tune associated with a particular character is called that character's musical theme, theme music, or signature song. From the Wikipedia article on Peter and the Wolf, for example: Each character in the story has a particular instrument and a musical theme: Bird: flute Cat: clarinet Duck: oboe Grandfather: bassoon Hunters: woodwind ...


6

I don't think there's any standard word for loss of stickiness [caused by the passage of time]. I acquired a large box of "self-seal" envelopes many years ago (the kind with two "tacky" surfaces like that on the back of a Post-it note, which stick when pressed together without needing to be wetted by licking). I'll usually say something like "The gum has ...


6

That would be a "standalone" application. Word processing works in a standalone manner, while email requires a client-server organization.


6

In a modern civil law context, damages: A sum of money claimed or awarded in compensation for a loss or an injury: He or she sues not only for personal injury but for damages for the loss or destruction of the motor vehicle. Also sometimes compensation: Something, typically money, awarded to someone in recognition of loss, suffering, or ...


5

The idiom Flogging a dead horse comes to mind. ... to continue in any endeavour (physical, mental, etc.) is a waste of time as the outcome is already decided.


5

These users appear for a short time before disappearing forever, resembling the behaviors of virtual particles in quantum field theory, and therefore I would like to nickname them Q&A fluctuation: the temporary appearance of contribution out of empty space.


5

From en.wiktionary, snatch means “To grasp quickly. [eg] He snatched up the phone”. Related senses of this verb include: • To attempt to seize something suddenly; to catch • To grasp and remove quickly • To do something quickly due to limited time available • To take or seize hastily, abruptly, or without permission or ceremony


5

I think there isn't a single word that exactly covers this meaning but blight comes close. It is actually a plant disease or the symptoms of that disease caused by pathogenic organisms (insects and fungus usually). But if you say blighted, you imply that crop is destroyed by blight. Blighted crops are crops blighted by pests, that is, crops damaged by ...


5

This isn't menstruation specific or even gender specific, but the term we use is either "cranky" or the slightly more humorous "cranky-pants". It's a non-inflammatory way of either asking or stating that there's something bothering you/them which isn't related to the other party and allows for comedic exchanges. "I think you really need to change your ...


5

The idiomatic way of saying this is The stranded fish were flapping desperately on the sand, gasping for breath.


4

The universally-accepted term in software is "deathmarch" as @carneseca posted. This has been the accepted term for at least two decades now.


4

Ugh. I know it's not one word, but I've heard "Like watching a train wreck in slow motion" effectively used to describe that kind of project. I like death march too. Good luck! This too shall pass. :)


4

Brawl might apply here: a rough or noisy fight or quarrel. Feud can be used between gangs - over a longer period of time: a prolonged and bitter quarrel or dispute.


4

The "less" suffix there is not a comparative, but from the Old English suffix "-leas" meaning "to be without, lacking".


4

The word Cameo is not English sounding - it comes from the Old French and Italian. a short descriptive literary sketch that neatly encapsulates someone or something. Image and Definition -- Google Dictionary



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