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56

If it's mild, but witty, it's simply word-play. If it's humorously argumentative, it's repartee. or perhaps verbal tennis (I made that one up). They are trading ripostes. if they try to outdo one another with their words, they are having a battle of wits or a battle of words. if they insult one another, they are trading barbs or trading insults. They are ...


31

How about flyting? It was a fairly commonly-practised activity in Shakespeare's time. Essentially it was the equivalent of a rap battle, in which it was not unusual for participants to insult the virility of their opponent, or suggest that their mothers were... promiscuous.


28

In psychology, it is called doorway effect or location updating effect. Researchers already know that walking from one space to another makes people more likely to forget tasks when compared to others who don’t make such a transition. Called “location-updating effect” the phenomenon also causes people transitioning between rooms (even virtual ones) to ...


21

Get-together Or Meetup This would be used in Australia I can say. These words: appointment/ rendezvous/ / arrangement / meeting Are probably too formal to talk about a regular, but casual get together with friends.


20

Within the specific contexts of these scenarios we might describe these words as controversial. Perhaps the individual words could be described more specifically as divisive. In each case, one person used divisive language which discouraged the other person from wanting to participate. I would argue that the words could be considered divisive because they ...


18

Snowball: verb [NO OBJECT] Increase rapidly in size, intensity, or importance: "the campaign was snowballing" ODO


16

We've got some very good suggestions in the other answers, but I will put forth a few more that seem particularly appropriate: polarizing : causing (people, opinions, etc.) to separate into opposing groups (source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/polarizing) or loaded (language) Loaded words and phrases have strong ...


15

Possibly "doleful" would be appropriate, doleful adjective: expressing sorrow; mournful. "a doleful look" synonyms: mournful, woeful, sorrowful, sad, unhappy, depressed, gloomy, morose, melancholy, miserable, forlorn, wretched, woebegone, despondent, dejected, disconsolate, downcast, crestfallen, downhearted. See, Google doleful Or perhaps, ...


13

Pithy statements that give advice, e.g. "Fake it till you make it" (not a particularly good one, however...) are called aphorisms: A tersely phrased statement of a truth or opinion; an adage. They are also known as adages, maxims, axioms, etc. Common aphorisms are easy to recognize, and they aren't necessarily idioms: Actions speak louder ...


10

Chagrined: verb (be chagrined) Feel distressed or humiliated: ODO From 100 Words for Facial Expressions, by Mark Nichol, on dailywritingtips.com: Chagrined: humiliated or disappointed From A Bit of Blue Ribbon, by Sarah Beaumont Kennedy, in Outing, Volume 27, 1896, page 5: The girl with the parasol nodded, the marvelous ...


10

The term I usually hear is sandbag v, v tr To downplay or misrepresent one's ability in a game or activity in order to deceive (someone), especially in gambling: sandbagged the pool player by playing poorly in the first game when stakes were low. TFDO The etymology is interesting and instructive. From Etymonline: . . . Meaning "pretend ...


9

Yes, it's called a taboo subject/topic. What other things might be considered taboo depends on the social situation. It's not always that the subjects themselves are taboo/unmentionable, but their tendency to foment heated, divisive, or even disruptive discussions (or awkward, embarrassing moments), so they are avoided in certain circles. For example, a ...


8

Burgeon: verb [NO OBJECT] (often as adjective burgeoning) 1 Begin to grow or increase rapidly; flourish: ODO The etymology of burgeon suggest new life: early 14c., "grow, sprout, blossom," from Anglo-French burjuner, Old French borjoner "to bud, sprout," from borjon "a bud, shoot, pimple" (Modern French bourgeon), of uncertain ...


8

As a formal/literary alternative to trash-talk I suggest : altercation: a heated or angry dispute; noisy argument or controversy. or, with a stronger connotation, a confrontation: a situation in which people, groups, etc., fight, oppose, or challenge each other in an angry way (TFD)


8

Here's two adjectives that may be useful for the contexts you've included. contentious adjective: causing or likely to cause an argument; controversial. "a contentious issue" synonyms: controversial, disputable, debatable, disputed, open to debate, vexed "a contentious issue" see, Google.com contentious coloured adjective: 1.1. Imbued with an ...


7

"Date with friends" is fine. See examples of "lunch date with friends" in published books listed at Google Books.


7

This could also be referred to, variously, as examples of a social indiscretion, impropriety, or gaffe indiscretion noun: 1: lack of discretion: imprudence 2 a: something (as an act or remark) marked by lack of discretion b: an act at variance with the accepted morality of a society see, Merriam-Webster indiscretion impropriety ...


7

The answers and comments to this question have already demonstrated that it varies across the country. I would have answered that the terms "Primary School" and "Grade School" both refer to elementary, middle, and high school collectively. According to Wikipedia, the government considers "elementary school" to cover anything up to grade 8, whereas in my ...


7

David. David was a young shepherd with a sling and 5 smooth stones who pitted himself against a gigantic Philistine who was fully armed for battle. Yet he brought the giant down with one stone (saving the others for the giant's brothers.) But we've known O'Brien is a fighter since back in the day, when he was the David to Jay Leno's Goliath. [Boston ...


7

Issues like abortion and evolution are often described as Divisive. I think in the context you describe it would be acceptable to describe the language tied to those issues as divisive. If you want to describe a situation where a minority group or an individual is being excluded, rather than one where a group is divided into factions then you might use the ...


6

There seem to be lots of words in English for accepted wisdom expressed pithily in the form of a particular situation: adage, proverb, aphorism, saw, saying, etc. Of these, 'adage' seems to express most prominently the advisory part which the questioner wants. The OED defn is: "A traditional maxim; a proverb or short statement expressing a general truth". I ...


6

As related in comment, both "holdable" and "grippable" are usable and easily understood, but for good measure here's another option: graspable, adjectival form of grasp verb (used with object) 1. to seize and hold by or as if by clasping with the fingers or arms. 2. to seize upon; hold firmly. See, Dictionary.com grasp


6

Elsa was horny and became wet If you can change the verb to "became", then this is probably the most 'tasteful' way to specify female sexual arousal in this sense. The first adjective eliminates any ambiguity. I feel it is the most widely used present-day expression, found in almost all mediums - from novels to film. Given the presented sentence ...


6

I'm not sure there is a single word which would capture all the nuances which you are after. Precise probably comes close, but has overtones of pedantry (which I think you don't want). Some combination of precise, articulate and sensitive might be what you are after. I would agree with you that eloquence probably veers more into the realm of ...


5

In the context of gambling, you can use hustle: To lure less skillful players into competing against oneself at (a gambling game) (Merriam-Webster) For other contexts, there's the idiom play dumb: To pretend to be slow-witted or lacking in specific knowledge, usually in order to avoid responsibility or to gain some advantage (Wiktionary) ...


5

There is no physiological term for this phenomenon. If you don't believe me, please read this. Salivation is an active process, as is lacrimation. Rhinorrhea (a runny nose) has no active verb either; the nose isn't mucorating, rhinorunning, or anything else. There is excess mucous production and gravity does the rest. Similarly, the vasodilation and ...


5

Palpable: 1.1 (Especially of a feeling or atmosphere) so intense as to be almost touched or felt: ODO From etymonline.com: late 14c., "that can be touched," from Late Latin palpabilis "that may be touched or felt," from Latin palpare "touch gently, stroke" (see feel (v.)). Figurative sense of "easily perceived, evident" also is ...


4

You don't want to make a "faux pas". Which according to Wikipedia: ... is a socially awkward or tactless act, especially one that violates accepted social norms, standard customs, or the rules of etiquette.


4

You've already had unmentionable in the comments. Consider also unspoken. If something is in the background of a conversation but not directly mentioned because it's a too sensitive topic then you might even call it the elephant in the room. Some topics are considered unsuitable for conversation - traditional dinner party etiquette says to avoid religion ...



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