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32

That 'part' is the computer. The other devices you describe are peripherals connected to it. If the form factor is a traditional, vertical case, as pictured, 'tower' is often used as well. And of course, if you're looking for a term specifically for the housing, well, that'd be the 'case'.


22

There is no universal affix in English equivalent to the German suffix behaftet. Instead, there are two different ways to form this kind of adjective in English. The suffix -ful suggests that the noun modified has the quality in question in abundance. It is a limited suffix that can be used only with certain words: hopeful, but not hungerful. The past ...


15

As a neologism, it can be smedium There are urbandictionary entries also. Here is one: when a size small is too small and the size medium is too big you are a size smedium!! They don't have my size I can't fit the small or the medium if only they had a smedium! Other than that, you can use different degrees of small like extra small. So small ...


12

The outer box can be called any of the following: computer case computer chassis tower system unit base unit Though most of the times, people would refer it by just chassis or 'CPU' which is technically incorrect but widely accepted.


12

While most monarchs have been male, many female monarchs also have reigned in history; the term queen regnant refers to a ruling monarch, while a queen consort refers to the wife of a reigning king. Most states only have a single person acting as monarch at any given time, although two monarchs have ruled simultaneously in some countries, a situation ...


10

I go with "medium-small" (with or without the hyphen). The size between medium and small is like the direction between North and West (Northwest) Similarly, the size between Medium and Large is Medium-Large, This also fits nicely with how we order steaks: Rare Medium-Rare Medium Medium-Well Well Done


10

One obvious noun for "the state of being flustered" is ... flustration. Writing in the late nineteenth century, Farmer & Henley, in Slang and Its Analogues (1893), list it as being "old and colloquial": FLUSTRATION, subs. (old and colloquial).—Heat; excitement; bustle; confusion; FLURRY [in the sense of "agitation"]. [Example] 1771. Smollet, ...


9

I think the most common term in America for this is saloon. In westerns the cowboys would be drinking at the saloon. Surely its floors weren't better than sawdust. Saloon usage can vary between Old Western to your corner pub that is a little old fashioned, to a retro microbrewery. It is still very common in the Midwest US to open a bar with the name ...


9

Instead of saying something like “Pat had noticed my frequent flusteredness. . .” you could use: “agitation” “bewilderment” “befuddlement” “discombobulation” “disquiet” There’s also “dithers” and “tizzies” to consider for different constructions. I’m rather fond of “discombobulation” if I had to pick just one.


8

Flatulence: the presence of too much gas or air in the stomach or intestines. The action would be flatulate: To emit digestive gases from the anus, especially with accompanying sound. Fart is the slang form.


7

I think the closest word is obit, which the Oxford English Dictionary defines as "A record or notice of a person's death, or of the date of it; (also, occas.) the date itself" (sense 1(b)), and further as "An office or service, usually a mass, held to pray for the soul of or otherwise commemorate a deceased person ... on the anniversary of his or her death, ...


6

smaller might be OK as long as you take medium to mean 'normal'. Not quite the same as CSS font-size 'smaller' but I think the meaning is clear, it's not medium and it's not small. smallish if you prefer. Learn the lesson not to call 'styles' by a common enumeration, small=size32, medium=size64, large=size96. Then you can add in as many different sizes as ...


6

Word starting with T Since you mention t in your comment to Chenmunka... tem·er·ar·i·ous [tem-uh-rair-ee-uhs] adjective reckless; rash. Alternatives saucy adjective ˈsȯ-sē, ˈsa- 2 a : impertinently bold and impudent b : amusingly forward and flippant Usage: "Not today my good man, I'm feeling saucy." Saucy in your example ...


6

Intentional: done deliberately; intended deliberate: done with or marked by full consciousness of the nature and effects calculated: undertaken after careful estimation of the likely outcome premeditated: characterized by deliberate purpose, previous consideration, and some degree of planning I would call this behavior insidious (stealthy, subtle, cunning, ...


6

I've seen both "Orthogonally Adjacent" (Adjacent at right angles) and "Edge Adjacent" (Adjacent across edges rather than corners) used. They do mean slightly different things, but it's only relevant when dealing with something other than a regular rectangular grid. Since measuring distance in this kind of topology is called "Manhattan distance" you might ...


5

Consider custom-fit personalized with regard to shape and size A Britishism that is sometime heard in the US is bespoke (Of goods, especially clothing) made to order: a bespoke suit


5

In this instance, you could use "overtaken" The overtaken bidder Which means that someone else out-bid them, but that they still could retake their place as the highest bidder. Overtake o·ver·take [oh-ver-teyk] verb (used with object), o·ver·took, o·ver·tak·en, o·ver·tak·ing. to catch up with in traveling or pursuit; draw even ...


5

Consider "dump," "roadhouse", and 'juke (house/joint)." roadhouse: a tavern located on a road outside of a town or city. juke house: Southern US: a cheap roadhouse.


5

The -ful suffix can frequently be used to form the opposite of an adjective ending in -less. Another general translation of the behaftet concept might be -bearing. That would be appended to form a hyphenated word, e.g. a fruit-bearing tree. Note that a fruit-bearing tree is not quite the same as a fruitful tree. The former emphasizes the general ...


4

system box An entire computer ... consists of: a display, either color or monochrome; a system box (processor, memory, disk drives, power supply, and communication interfaces); a keyboard; a pointing device, often a mouse. It may also be called the [computer] base unit.


4

small (32px wide), small-plus (48px), medium (64px), medium-plus (80px) and large (96px). Adding plus immediately after the adjective effectively shows it is the next size up, and it's easily shortened to small + and medium +


4

Monarchy comes from the Greek for 'one ruler'. So all monarchies have either a king or a queen in power; though the ruler's spouse may be called 'queen' or 'prince consort', the title does not grant equality. If it did, the system would no longer be a monarchy: possibly, as mentioned above, a diarchy. (Note for historical pedants: though Philip of Spain ...


4

A "monarchy," by definition, is a "one person" rule. (Mono= one, archy=rule). In English history, there was the joint rule of "William and Mary" cited by others, but that was the exception, not the rule. The confusion may arise from the fact that most "monarchs" have spouses. These spouses are referred to as "consorts" and are often given "equivalent" ...


4

Politicaster: Po*lit"i*cas`ter\, n. [Cf. It. politicastro.] A petty politician; a pretender in politics. --Milton. Snollygoster: One, especially a politician, who is guided by personal advantage rather than by consistent, respectable principles. Politicaster: n. 1. A petty politician; a pretender in politics Highbinder: 2.a dishonest political official ...


4

The above answers are indicative of existing usage and contain a lot of good ideas. However, here's another one. Especially in technical jargon, people invent words like "unitful" or "dimensionful" and they often stick. For example, "stateless objects" in object-oriented software design are objects that don't carry state between method calls. "Stateful ...


3

In this specific case the bidder was outbid, an easy phrase to use in most situations like this is the word passed. The largest auction site in the world uses outbid for temporarily falling behind.


3

Perhaps trailing (intransitive) to be falling behind in a race or competition: the favourite is trailing at the last fence It has the advantage of suggesting that a rally may occur.


3

I am not big on jack of all trades used in a "company" sense. Not many people would say, let us get our jack of all trades to help you out. I have heard one specific title given to this type of person at restaurants, construction jobs, and big company. The term is floater. One who wanders; a drifter. 3. An employee who is reassigned from job to ...


3

Rather than 'philosopher', there is an Ancient Greek word: 'philosophos' - meaning 'lover of wisdom' (from philein ‘to love’ + sophos ‘wise’). 'Autodidact' is one possibility. Although it literally means 'self-taught', it does carry the connotations you're referring to, of self-motivation, intellectual curiosity beyond the bounds of formal schooling; ...


3

small / medium / large / jumbo I like the idea of creating an extra size on the large end of the spectrum rather than the small end of the spectrum because of the difference in sizes. 32 / 48 / 64 have a difference of 16 between them and 64 / 96 have a difference of 32. "Jumbo" is also a fun word and seems to connote inordinately large. I used to work at ...



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