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70

This is usually just called the "laundry room". It could be for a single apartment or house, or it could be a communal space with several washers and dryers.


67

While you can easily choose an antonym of ruthless here, it is worth noting that ruthful was actully a term used in the past: “Ruth” was a common word in Middle English, first appearing (as “reuthe”) around the 12th century, meaning “pity or compassion,” and in the 13th century we spoke of a person who was kind, charitable, and just generally felt ...


55

You may be thinking of the word interregnum, but unless there is no clear line of succession, or there is disputed succession, it does not apply when a monarch dies. Certainly not in an established monarchy like the British one, and probably not in most others either. You have perhaps heard the expression "the king is dead, long live the king"? It's not ...


52

If you're looking for an informal word, consider newcomer. Merriam-Webster has: newcomer(n): a person who has recently arrived somewhere or who has recently started a new activity If you want something a little more formal and with perhaps a religious flavour, you can use neophyte: neophyte(n): a person who has just started learning or doing ...


51

For a brand new beginning-beginner, I would use the term "novice".


27

Consider the phrase red-letter day. Merriam Webster says: : of special importance : memorable "This was a red-letter day in my life." It sometimes carries a religious connotation, but this is not necessary. I think Jasmine in the Disney movie "Aladdin" uses it in a song somewhere.


27

In the UK it's a utility room. Image from Orkney self-catering. utility room a room with equipment for domestic work like washing and ironing [Collins]


22

The person is a bore. I can't think of a type of bore specific to travel but if you would accept a hyphenated one I suggest travel-bore, which I have occasionally heard used.


22

In the context you provide – a training course – I would go with this: Uninformed Beginner Intermediate Expert These are students and teachers who will read this. Many of the terms provided in other answers (e.g., "ignorant", "virgin") may meet the requirement for the definition, but are inappropriate in terms of context. "Uninformed", in ...


22

You could call this a double-edged sword. It can be used both for good and bad.


20

I would go with "lame," since it seems to me that people use "gay" to describe lame stuff that isn't necessarily sappy.


20

I am not sure if you are stuck to the notion of altruism, but in the context of making a show of being nice to others to make themselves feel good, you could use sanctimonious. Sanctimonious is a twist on the words sanctity and sacred, which mean holy or religious. A sanctimonious person might think he's holy, but their attitude comes across more like ...


20

I would say such a person was brazen ˈbreɪz(ə)n adjective 1. bold and without shame. (Google) For the example given: He’s brazen; he asked me for another $100! or more effectively: He’s a brazen [expletive]; he asked me for another $100!


19

To lift an answer from Josh61's clear and ruthful reply, you could well use compassionate compassion: a strong feeling of sympathy and sadness for the suffering or bad luck of others and a wish to help them: I was hoping she might show a little compassion. Cambridge Dictionaries The Free Dictionary uses "compassion" in its definition of ...


18

In construction type jobs, people who are new to the profession are called greenhorns In academia, they're known as freshmen In the police force, they are called rookies Other words worth mentioning are: naif green amateur inexperienced ignorant


17

hone - to perfect or make more intense or effective (thefreedictionary.com) From Kiplinger's Personal Finance... To hone the numbers further, figure out how much income you would need to replace each month if you lost your job But in practice most people would probably use... fine-tune - to make fine adjustments to (something) in order ...


16

"Twee" has always been my fallback for just this situation. It has just the right level of contemptuous disdain. Unfortunately, Merriam-Webster.com says it's chiefly British, so it may not work so well universally: Twee: adjective \ˈtwē\ : sweet or cute in a way that is silly or sentimental Chiefly British: affectedly or excessively dainty, ...


13

For private residences/apartments, we say laundry room and sometimes utility room. Laundromats are usually referring to much larger commercial businesses, that house numerous washers and dryers.


13

I would call this person audacious (adjective) or say that he/she has chutzpah (noun). The word "audacious" can be in a positive or negative fashion, so the speaker can use tone of voice to determine which one is meant. This sort of subtlety lends a certain intimacy to conversations. According to the Cambridge dictionary, audacious means: audacious ...


12

I can't come up with something travel-specific, but this may help: The late Sir Christopher Lee was described as a long-winded raconteur in his obituary in the Telegraph. Throughout his career he had a reputation for being a long-winded raconteur whose reminiscences tended to focus on himself. In 1976, when Lee left Britain for the US, the move prompted ...


12

The word you're looking for is enate. From The Free Dictionary: e·nate (ĭ-nāt′, ē′nāt′) adj. 1. Growing outward. 2. also e·nat·ic (ĭ-năt′ĭk) Related on the mother's side. n. A relative on one's mother's side.


11

I would call the room "the laundry", without specifying the word "room". In fact, the phrase "kitchen and laundry" commonly appears in advertising (particularly real estate listings). Here's a quote from an arbitrary commercial page which showed up when I searched for "kitchen and laundry": The laundry is the engine room of your home, helping you keep ...


10

A useful word I haven't seen mentioned yet is layman, someone who has no or little knowledge of a particular subject. One might say "in layman's terms" before explaining something technical to someone with no specialist knowledge of that area.


9

A slew of people said "novice" at about the same time - that would probably be my first choice for a safe but well understood term. But, "initiate" (also with a religious or cultural undertone) would be well enough understood by most people. From another age, probably too light hearted for business use but OK for eg a conference course description is ...


9

You could say: Not a run-of-the-mill day


8

The following article from The Economist refer to this part of the conutry as "ungoverned territory". Neighbouring regions worry about the Donbas becoming a largely ungoverned swathe of land. Somalia scenario”, under which the Donbas becomes a swathe of ungoverned territory harbouring bandits who cross ...


8

I suggest rattle: : to make a rapid succession of short sharp noises <the windows rattled in the wind> Merriam-Webster


8

interregnum noun: 1: the time during which a throne is vacant between two successive reigns or regimes 2: a period during which the normal functions of government or control are suspended (Merriam-Webster online)


7

Ruthlessness is a lack of compassion or pity for others (OED). It's a common symptom of psychopathy (i.e. psychopaths, who have difficulty empathizing with other people, tend to be ruthless). A ruthless person doesn't slow down for anyone. Such a person might also be called aggressive and cutthroat if their ruthlessness applies to advancement in competition, ...


7

A “remarkable” day. Worthy of remark. Worthy of note. Different than the usual, exceptional. I suspect Rodale’s Synonym Finder has good alternatives under “remarkable.” A “standout” day (if you are OK with “standout” as an adjective).



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