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16

"Please advise" is quickly becoming common place in email conversations where one person asks a question and then makes it extremely clear that the other side now has responsibility for doing something next. Essentially, it means "I am now done doing things; you go do something and get back to me." I do not know of its use outside of emails or other ...


11

A, an and the are all dropped. Using past tense with did (in my experience almost all non-native do this until they learn not to). Sometimes using she instead of he. Word order is not as important in Russian as in English. Missing prepositions Russians I have met who have large vocabularies tend to stress words with more than two syllables in an ...


11

Aside from the items pointed above, a well-educated native russian speaker often writes (and speaks) in incredibly long, almost Hemingway-ish, compound sentences, where you can barely remember what the beginning of the sentence was about. I'm not sure if it's primarily the influence of russian prose, or something about the language itself which causes the ...


10

I am from Russia and I work at an international company so my colleagues and I have to use English all the time. There are really some common errors. The most difficult for us is to use articles properly. There are nothing similar to them in our native language. That is why we often use them where they are not needed and vice versa. The second difficult ...


10

Russian and English languages have somewhat different structure of verb tenses. For native speakers of Russian it can often be difficult to correctly use perfect tense forms due to the influence of their mother tongue. The grammatical concepts behind the correct usage of English perfect tenses can be very confusing to Russian speakers, so they tend to ...


10

One thing that nobody seemed to mention is punctuation. It is of paramount importance in Russian, because it brings intonation across. Here is a famous example from an old Soviet cartoon that is based on a tale by Hans Christian Andersen in which a little princess is asked to sign a decree of execution. Pay attention to the position of the comma. ...


8

Dutchmen sometimes make the same mistake, because the construction * he would do x, if y would be true is correct in Dutch, besides he would do x, if y were true, which is also correct in Dutch. This might apply to some other European languages as well. In addition, I recently read that some English style guides warn(ed) against this usage too, which makes ...


7

I'm in a similar boat to you. I don't know that it's really possible to pin down a regional accent. The consensus appears to be that there are three types of accent, broad (that's your country, 'ocker' or Strine), cultivated (like Peter Costello or Geoffrey Rush), and general (that'll be your town accent). You're more likely to pick up on someone's region ...


5

As previously mentioned, Russian doesn't use articles (a, the), so Russian speakers use them - or don't - by guesswork, and often get them wrong. What I haven't seen anyone else mention, however, is that the present tense of to be (I am, thou art†, he is, we are, you are, they are) is rarely (if ever) used in Russian. As a result, again, Russian speakers ...


5

Advise means "offer suggestions about the best course of action to someone," in both American and British English. It can be used as a transitive and non-transitive verb. I advised her to go home. She advised caution. We advise against sending cash by post. Looking for please advise in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, I get the ...


5

In the United States, please advise is very common in business and legal writing, both paper and electronic. I have never heard it spoken. While it is understood that the object is dropped for the sake of brevity (please advise me), advise is a transitive verb and technically must have an object. Therefore the phrase is grammatically unsound, and should be ...


3

I think "please advise" used to be a relatively common phrase and may stem from the days of the telegraph. Brevity and clarity were key with telegrams. This phrase appears in versions of a joke telegram attributed to Robert Blenchley, a reporter assigned to a story in Venice, in which he telegraphs his editor "Streets flooded. Please advise." (there are ...


2

Probably not. This is pretty common when expressing regret towards your past self: If only I would have known! If only I would have taken the bus instead of the tram... If I would have said, "I love you," she would not have left me.


1

Here´s a conversation I had with my Russian colleague, who speaks English well: me: Is Jane on board with this plan? Russian: Jane's not on the board now. Didn't you know that? me: No, I mean, does Jane agree with us on this? Russian: What? What are you talking about? me: "on board" means "is she on the same boat (page, etc) with us?" To her, the word ...


1

Thanks for the very useful examples and explanations! Actually I am still keep "fighting" with English articles after my at least 15 years of good English experience. I tend to drop them in order to avoid using them wrong. I remember very good how my collegues and my chief cursed my disability to use articles when editing my English texts (looking for and ...



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