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2

Particularly is one of the group of words that The Cambridge Grammar Of The English Language (p592) calls partial restrictive focusing modifiers. Others include primarily, mainly and chiefly. The CGEL notes that: It is characteristic of focusing adverbs that they modify a wide range of constructions, and includes clauses in the list of such ...


1

'Particularly' is an adverb and needs to modify a noun or adjective. No noun or adjective, however, comes after 'particularly' in this sentence. That is the the word that is missing. Saying 'particularly so' makes it technically correct but is still poor writing. I could suggest a better word but I would need the rest of the article.


1

If you're referring to the word that that begins the second sentence, then certainly. It's a matter of choice (and style) whether you want to use this or that. By the way, you missed a "d" a the end of "decline" - it should be declined, past tense. Also, the two sentences do not connect smoothly, in my opinion. There is a 5 year gap between 1995 and 2000. ...


0

The original sentence is nonstandard. This is ____.... needs a complement, and complements are nouns (or pronouns, as so would be if used here) or adjectives.


0

The first rendering flows better. The second seems to interrupt. If I used that ordering, I would set off the "which" clause with parentheses rather than commas.


2

If you are asking the question formally, the better way would be, "Do you have your internet banking login credentials?".


1

Inspired by Richard A. Lanham's Revising Prose mission to remove lard from the written word, I’ve found that you can often avoid the preposition-at-the-end problem by using active voice instead of passive voice. “Two communities I am contributing to” or “Two communities to which I am contributing” can be refined and refocused to the simpler, more direct, ...


4

The rule about ending sentences with prepositions is a bit of a dinosaur. It, along with the rule about not splitting infinitives, is an artifact left over from Latin, where such constructions are impossible. Quite often, the reworking you have to do in order to avoid ending a sentence with a preposition makes the sentence even more unreadable. Example: "X ...


0

You could rephrase it as "I'm working to contribute to two communities."


1

How goes it? is perfectably acceptable, if quirky, according to Urban dictionary. If your son is a Doctor Who fan you can show him this extract from the official site: River: Well then, soldier. How goes the day? The Doctor: Where the hell have you been? Every time you’ve asked I have been there. Where the hell were you today? Moving into the ...


0

"At Stanford, the range of courses available in the subject areas of information theory, signal, image, and video processing will not only provide me the adequate mathematical and computer skills but also train me well in niche areas of communications and networking with their extensive list of electives" I knocked off the second 'will', and added 'the' ...


4

There are several meanings for the word “sentence”. The online Merriam-Webster describes “sentence” as “a group of words that expresses a statement, question, command, or wish”, without restricting its grammatical form. But it also describes “sentence fragment” as “a group of words that is written out as a sentence but that lacks a subject or verb” (as the ...


0

It's largely correct, but (as you noted) it can be improved. I would rewrite it as follows: "The range of courses available at Stanford pertaining to information theory, signal, image, and video processing will not only equip me with adequate mathematical and computer skills, but will also train me well in niche areas of communications and networking." I ...


5

I think the correct formulation may be "The system will shutdown in 60 seconds" A shutdown or system shutdown is a thing, a term from (mostly computer) engineering. I believe the phrase you have quoted would expand to A system shutdown will occur in 60 seconds or There will be a system shutdown in 60 seconds. The sentence as you have ...


0

"System shutdown in 60 seconds" is an incomplete sentence, or sentence fragment. It lacks a verb, and it lacks punctuation. It gets the point across, but it's not a whole sentence. An incomplete sentence, or sentence fragment, is a set of words which does not form a complete sentence, either because it does not express a complete thought1 or because it ...


0

I can think of one situation where "Hot she is" might be uttered without it sounding unnatural. Consider the following sexually objectifying dialogue: A: "Wow! Look at that awesome-looking broad over there! She's hot!" B: "Yeah! Hot she is!" Here, the inversion of the normal word order in "Hot she is!" is being used to emphatically restate the ...


0

If you're asking whether A nice rhinoceros she is, too. is a well-formed sentence, the answer is yes.  If you're asking whether the sentence A nice rhinoceros, too, she is. is well formed, the answer is still yes.


0

Both WS2 and Eric Kowal are right. Inversion of the usual word order can occur when the speaker wishes to place an emphasis on the element that is made to appear first. That can happen when the speaker agrees emphatically with, or wishes to question, the previous statement of an interlocutor. His new Ferrari is hot! -- Hot it is! Wish I had one. His new ...


2

Hot she is is a very unusual construction. Exactly what the speaker meant to convey by using such odd syntax would depend completely on the context: there is no general answer.


0

I'd rephrase this way: As the world economic situation becomes more complex, the search for business optimization methods becomes more active. It puts the two actions in parallel and the word order feels more natural.


0

The easiest way to simplify the phrase that bothers you is to change "Even with this considered," to "Even so,"—but I suspect that you shied away from that option because the paragraph already begins with "So." In my view, you would achieve a better overall result by changing that first "So" to "Therefore," or "Thus," or Consequently," and then using the ...


1

Because your example exhibits other issues than those you ask about, you may wish to ask questions in Writers stackexchange or in English Language Learners. (For example, drop the phrase “an extensive training”. For one thing, no article should be used there. For another, it may be better to refer to study, education, or coursework rather than to training, ...


1

How about: 'At XYZ, I received extensive training in mathematical disciplines like measure theory and stochastic process, and statistical prognostications like time series and GLM.' 'Like' is less formal; and some people say that it implies comparison rather than inclusion; but, then again, it solves your awkward language problem; and, besides, whoever ...


1

The embedding of multiple lists in continuous prose is inherently a somewhat awkward device. If the individual study topics referred to in your sentence are important enough to justify being mentioned separately, I would be inclined to present the main branch of study in the body of the text, and then list the individual topics under bullet-point headings ...


0

So, an act could be seen as wrong owing to a different account of morality such as that of Kant’s or even utilitarianism. Even with this considered, Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim about what makes an act wrong is that wrong acts are wrong because they are unjustifiable to others. Instead, you could write: ... Even having ...


1

This is just another form of ellipsis, which is the omission of syntactical elements when the meaning is understood. As such, there's nothing wrong with omitting being in a sentence provided the meaning remains clear. The phrase pattern Absent [noun] is heard quite a bit: Absent evidence, we must conclude the defendant did not commit the crime. ...


0

My first suggestion is don't write "It-cleft" sentences. Try these instead: I made you happy. You broke the pen. The poem was one you read. You read the poem (needs context) You called me Monday. He hid in my room. Her stupidity made me dislike her. I did not like her stupidity.


-1

"I had such a great time." sounds better. "I had so great a time" is awkward, and leaves one slightly wondering, because "so great a time " can be construed as comparative, or at least correlative (as opposed to the implied superlative in the stressed SUCH in "SUCH a great time(!)", which almost cries out for an examation point); so the sentence with 'so' ...


0

I doubt there is any historical connection. Perfect tenses are widespread in Indoeuropean languages and have roughly the same structure (i.e., a conjugated form of "to have" or "to be" together with a past participle of the main verb), but with widely varying word order. Adjective order also varies widely. In the romance languages, an adjective generally ...


2

Something like this, I think: As explained in the previous question.... As described in the previous question....


3

Question B is a follow-up question to A. Example usage: Having solved my previous problem with SOAP, I now have a follow-up question. When I try using this WSDL service link, I get an error: … Another example usage: Please help me with a follow-up question regarding authentication.


2

As I parse this, it's option number two. Context dictates the way I fill in the ellipsis. "The more [we are], the merrier [we are]" and "The more [we have], the merrier [we are]" are two obvious possibilities. I perform the same sort of analysis on the ellipsis in your question title: "If [it's] not [that], what [is it]?" The only justification I have ...


-3

It is just slang, a colloquialism. "The more [participants], the merrier [the event]". It's that shorthand we use communicate common sentiments. Another example: mañana (meaning I'll do it tomorrow). So no, it is not a sentence, but the communication is clear.



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