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The primary problem with both sentences is a dangling modifier. A dangling modifier is a grammatical phrase that isn't directly followed by the noun it modifies. In this case, the participial phrase filling in a custom field should be followed by the noun it modifies - i.e. the subject that filled in the field. In the first example, this will add ...


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If something moves forward and then restarts from the beginning isn't that also called a loop? Oxford Dictionaries loop: a structure, series, or process the end of which is connected to the beginning. Wikipedia has an article on infinitive loop An infinite loop (or endless loop) is a sequence of instructions in a computer program which loops ...


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The commas in this situation show a kind of side note to give the reader more information and thus helping the reader understand the entire situation. It's as if to give additional information in the middle of the sentence. This is very normal and a typical use of commas. Here are two examples given side by side. Jon and Kathy had a serious ...


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In the example sentence structure, the comma in question is not the usual stand-alone comma (pause-indicator punctuation), but part of a pair of commas forming a delimiter for a parenthetical phrase: However, it should be noted that, at extremely high or low levels of anxiety, the data for sick role and for preventive health behaviors are similar; &...


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It is a sentence (with some implied words), but the part of speech that the symbol is fulfilling in the sentence is open to the interpretation of the reader. It is most likely functioning as a verb or noun. The symbol represents the word "copyright," which can fulfill 3 different parts of speech: copyright. [ˈkäpēˌrīt] As a NOUN: the ...


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I'm not even sure the first is a proper construct. "I feel myself unhappily" would be valid, albeit probably changing the meaning. "myself unhappy" is not a proper prepositional phrase, and the verb feel now has two noun (pronoun and noun) objects trying to occupy the same space. I'd rather see "I feel myself to be unhappy." Even though a bit clunky, it ...


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Your example is a recursive sentence of, relating to, or constituting a procedure that can repeat itself indefinitely a recursive rule in a grammar (MW) I don't know about the use of recursion in sentences or paragraphs, but there are a number of recursive acronyms used in the IT industry, some notable being PHP (PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) and ...


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That is specifically an example of recursion, where something is contained inside itself. It is an foundational concept in the fractal mathematics that form the core of chaos theory, but it would be impossible to ever actually use it in spoken English, at least in the fully expanded form. You could achieve it by reference, as in "This is the sentence I'm ...


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"It is he who..." and like sentences are grammatically correct. This question deals with the case of a pronoun after "to be," which is a complicated subject in English. Basically, the "traditional" rule is to use a pronoun matching the case of the antecedent before "to be." This rule prescribes usage like "It is he" and "I knew it to be him." The details ...


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"Is largely" It's to do with parsing the sentence, rather than grammar, I think. Consider "Reading a book is largely an indoor activity." - this is broken down into Reading a book is largely an indoor activity. On the other hand, "Reading a book largely is an indoor activity." runs the risk of being parsed as Reading a book largely is an indoor ...


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Both are correct, but that usage of "information" is pretentious, it makes the speaker sound like a weaselly government official, perhaps one with access to cohorts willing to act like spies. "I have some information that there is a guy with a gun in the building." This might mean either: that a source which the speaker believes to be reliable has ...


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In an informal conversation, no one would think twice if you used that structure. In a formal setting, on the other hand, I would recommend throwing in a more active word. For example, the Merriam-Webster dictionary follows information with about or on in all of their example sentences. You might could try switching "information" to some conjugation of to ...


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If I had to decide between a complement and an adjunct, I would say that "that it's wrong" in the OP is a complement of the verb "mean", not merely an adjunct. But let's consider this: A: It's wrong. B: What do you mean that it's wrong? A1: I mean that it's not a right thing to do. A2: *I mean that it's not a right thing to do that it's ...


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I wonder whether different examples can shed some light:    How can you say [that] it's wrong? There doesn't seem to be anything odd about the nominative subordinate clause "[that] it's wrong".  To my eye, it looks like an direct object.  It's the thing that can be said. The part that seems odd is that "how can you" and "why ...


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The "that" makes it an indirect content clause/reported speech. The "that" is necessary to avoid the possible implication that "It's wrong" is exactly what was said. This is an expression that would appear in print only in dialog. It is essentially colloquial. "What do you mean" is an idiom (not a simple assembly of the meanings of its components). It is ...


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The OP has asked about the following interrogative, which seems perfectly grammatical to me (AmE, Upstate NY): What do you mean (that) it's wrong? In particular, the question concerns the syntax of the phrase "that it's wrong." I think the best way to approach this question is by setting aside the interrogative for a moment and considering its simple ...


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How NOT to create your own company sounds better to my ears.


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There is nothing wrong with the original sentence. Consider: Fred sits at his desk, searching the Internet for clues. Answers arrive in a piecemeal fashion. As Josh English suggests, there is a larger context. If, as my example illustrates, the sentence is in the middle of a paragraph describing a process, and if the other sentences in that ...


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To me, what may be what's causing the sentence to sound slightly off is that it's missing an object. Where or to whom do the answers arrive? e.g., answers arrived at my inbox in a piecemeal fashion answers arrived from the simulation in a piecemeal fashion (etc)


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Comments seem to provide the answer, so I'm summarizing them so this question can be marked as answered. The first sentence is incorrect because a leading participle clause without a subject is deemed to take the subject of the following main clause as its subject. The second sentence seems to be well worded and clear. Please consider the target audience ...


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As long as you don't capitalize it, it's fine: Could you please provide me the details? It's not at all necessary, though, and in fact the word "please" can convey a sense of impatience or insistence. So it ironically could be a bit more polite to just say Could you provide me the details? Beginning the request with "Could you..." is actually ...


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No, the use of the word please implies both respect and having manners. However whether or not you should use please depends on the position you're in. For example, you wouldn't tell your boss to give you the details, you would ask for the details. Since this is your boss you would show respect, in which case please would be included in a proper response. ...


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No it is not correct. Saying "and in a small part" is rather odd (as you are duplicating part) and probably isn't what you mean. I think I'd say "..in large part.." or perhaps "largely based on" and then follow it up with a "to a smaller extent". Alternatively "largely items in this category" and then "and also" or "perhaps also" If I had to rewrite it I'...


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As usual with the indefinite articles a and an, it depends on the pronunciation of the next word. I would read your example as: "a hundred-and-twenty pound robot", but "a one-hundred-and-twenty pound robot" would be equally valid. On the other hand "an a hundred-and-twenty pound robot" would be just wrong. You can't have "an a" together like that. In your ...



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