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It's strange I can't find a duplicate and I believe there is one. I will try my best to explain it, but it is not easy. The preposition with has a very important function as the below definition indicates: used as a function word to indicate an attendant fact or circumstance: 'He stood there with his hat on' The attendant circumstance means an ...


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The following relative clause "...who drove his car at another youth resulting in him being flung onto the roof of the car..." was used before the main verb "was given" in the sentence. Journalists are notorious for trying to cram as much information into their lead (often spelled "lede") as they possibly can, without much regard for whether the result ...


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Good question. Resulting is a participle, and normally a participle modifies a specific noun, usually the subject of a clause. However, in this case you could say the participle modifies nothing specific, or it modifies the entire preceding clause (who drove his car at another youth). It says something about the event described in the clause as a whole: the ...


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Alas, grammar cannot clear up semantic confusion, and indeed may contribute to it. The sentence has two problems: A basic structure of Don't do A unless you do B. Where A is talking about the greatness of the fatherland while pretending to be proud of the fatherland and B is the contrasting do something to make the fatherland great. This ...


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Based on the following definition of Hello, "Hello, World!" is an exclamation + a noun. Note that in this utterance, "Hello" is not a verb, and not a predicate. Hello, exclamation 1 Used as a greeting or to begin a telephone conversation: hello there, Katie! - ODO According to David Crystal's A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics (thanks, ...


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I agree with Barmar. It is correct to say : One only has to look at the size of Claire’s house to know that you can make a lot of money as a doctor. As one means anyone , but you refers to doctors. But the best to say : One only has to look at the size of Claire's house to know that doctors make a lot of money. Or You only have to look at the size of ...


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This sentence involves an interrogative word what which has been extracted from its normal position at the beginning of the subordinate clause to the beginning of the matrix (main) clause. The subordinate clause can be represented like this: [X ] is in the box. What is in the box? The subordinate clause is embedded as the Complement of the verb know ...


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Formally? No. It's missing a subject. But in informal settings it's fine. The subject is elided. Our department seems we could use some shaping from our building practices today. or It seems we could use some shaping from our building practices today. etc.


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Technically, "Hello, World!" is not a grammatically correct sentence since it takes the form of a dependent clause. Dependent clauses are parts of a sentence that cannot stand on their own, which makes sense in this case. "Hello, world!" cannot stand on its own as a sentence. There needs to be a independent clause joining that dependent clause to make this a ...


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"Stop." And "Go" are complete sentences because the declaration implies both subject and predicate. Following that logic, I would say that "Hello" implies that a person is speaking to the world, and their statement is the predicate. I would say that "Hello world" is a complete sentence.


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I don't currently have neither an Irish residence nor an Irish bank account yet. ...is incorrect English, 'don't ... neither' would be a double negative. (Exception: if uttered in a rich Irish brogue, 'don't ... neither' becomes charmingly emphatic.) I don't have an Irish residence and an Irish bank account yet ...also incorrect. It leaves the ...


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Predominantly, when two negatives are used in a sentence, it usually just cancels each other out resulting in the sentence having a weak positive meaning (Except probably in cases where you're using double negatives to emphasize something). Since you've already mentioned 'You don't currently have' which indicates a negative there is no need to use ...


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There should be a clear line of distinction between an intransitive and transitive verb. To begin is used as an intransitive verb as in: The story of my success began so. If you invert the above sentence to emphasize the adverb "so" (it is not an intensifier) which is used to mean "in the way described or demonstrated before", the sentence is changed ...


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The sentence is perfectly valid: the object is 'economy', not 'convergent', which is an adjective.


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Mohammed is definitely the one that has to make sure they deliver them on time. If the writer meant that the printers have to make sure themselves that they deliver on time, he/she would probably have said : "Maybe you can ask them to print twenty copies first and to make sure they deliver them on time." It is a bit heavier but removes any ambiguity.


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I believe that Sam is asking Mohammed to make sure that the printer delivers them on time, for example by checking with the printer a couple of times that they are on target to deliver them on time.


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1) "All manner of" is an idiom that you can not break up or rearrange. 2) "All manner of" sounds old fashioned and a little snobby in conversation, and possibly British in the traditional style. It is an idiom seen more often in writing. For example, it would be very literary to write: "All manner of strangers crept the dark streets at night." And if ...



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