New answers tagged

0

You're asking someone to choose a date and time, which is fine, but you're also asking them to choose a time zone. This isn't correct - people don't choose a time zone, they're just in one whether they like it or not. So, you need them to choose a date and time, and tell you what time zone they're in, so you can adjust that date and time to your own ...


1

I would say it would be correct with different punctuation: "Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible; it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal". or "Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible - it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal". With just a ...


1

Yes, it's a very common mistake, even among native speakers. What you're doing is called a comma splice: A comma splice is the use of a comma to join two independent clauses. For example: It is nearly half past five, we cannot reach town before dark. You either need to separate them into two individual sentences, or you need to connect ...


4

All of the current answers explain that "season after season" can be replaced by "after many [consecutive] seasons", but I wanted to add the origin of this construction. "[time word] after [time word]" is a very common English idiom, and it takes many forms: "Time after time" "Day after day" "Week after week" "Month after month" "Year after year" (as you ...


2

The phrase may make more sense if "parsed" as follows: "Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short (season after season) with their current crop of attackers." "Season after season" means "for many seasons." But it is basically a "parenthetical" to the main sentence. ...


10

"Season after season" is a phrase meaning "over many seasons" or "repeatedly". If you substitute "repeatedly" for "season after season" in the sentence it should be easily understandable. Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short repeatedly with their current crop ...


3

Season after season means the same as after many seasons. "after falling short season after season" The second "after" means that Arsenal was falling short after the season, after many seasons. "...they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short after many seasons..."


0

As others have said, when spoken sincerely it's a perfectly fine thing to say. But if you're worried that you will be mistaken for insincere, then there are other phrases like "thanks for your interest" or "thank you for taking the time to ask" that would seem less flip.


5

A Google search for "He's quite dead. I assure you." (which as expected shows more hits than the "I'm" version, if not many more) only gives examples of your versions B and A. Comma splices are not wrong per se, as discussed in this previous thread. And I'd say that version B is the best here ('I assure you' is best not analysed as an independent clause ...


1

You use "has gone" rather than "is gone" since your "point of view" is retrospective -- you're looking back at the past, so a past tense form of the verb is needed. ("Today went well" would work too, but "has gone well" has a more musical flavor to it, and would often be preferred. Plus I'm sure there's some convoluted technical reason why it's preferred.) ...


0

You don't need a comma if there is no confusion and the sentence is short. "For the past ten years I've been ill."


2

Yes you can, but a comma is optional. For the last ten years, I have been doing my PhD. "For the last ten years" is a introductory prepositional phrase, and "I have been doing my PhD" is an independent clause. A comma is optional to separate introductory prepositional phrase from the rest of the sentence. In this case, I would use a comma, because the ...


0

The sentence is unambiguous without a comma after "noted that." Therefore I would not put a coma there. For the same reason, I wouldn't put a comma after "bumps." I don't like commas unless they do something.


1

From personal experience it's improper to use "!" in any sort of formal email.


0

To answer your title question shortly: No, it isn't. You can't have metaphor and comparison at the same time. Let me put an example for the explanation. To express my freedom I could say a) I am like the bird in the sky. [simile], or b) I am bird in the sky. [metaphor] When speaking in the known context (freedom), both will work, but the comparison ...


1

"After filling in a custom field, a new field will be added..." There are two ways I would address this. First, if I want to stress the filling of the custom field as a cause in a cause/reaction, I would use the word, "Once," instead of the word "After." "Once a custom field is filled, a new field will be added..." But, I would usually rather ...


1

"Simple present" is a reasonably good name for this construction.  There is only one word in the complete verb, so it makes some sense to call it simple.  I prefer to call it "present indefinite".  Many textbooks lump all the properties of a verb construction under the heading "tense".  I find it easier to explain those properties ...


0

A man like me has trouble understanding this question.  As a native speaker, I cannot understand the confusion. As the example above shows, the prepositions "like" and "as" are not limited to forming similes.  They have literal use.  There is nothing that prevents the literal, ordinary use of such preposition within an extended metaphor:...


0

This theory, "There are no metaphors with the words 'like' or 'as'" is a hard thing to prove, as "proving" that something doesn't exist really just means "I wasn't able to find it yet". It's definitely a good general principle, but it is rock-solid true? I can't find any on the following pages I found which list metaphors. I'm putting that forward as ...


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I think you should avoid clogging your resume with this kind of detail. It just slides off the brain of the reader without sinking in, and it bogs everything down. Just pick the best company, the most relevant one, the most impressive one, and go with that. If you are ever questioned, you can always elaborate (enthusiastically -- "Yes! What a great job! I ...


1

I immediately thought of Joe Gargery's contorted language in Dickens' Great Expectations; though to my surprise I find only one example of exactly this: "Well!" said Miss Havisham. "And you have reared the boy, with the intention of taking him for your apprentice; is that so, Mr. Gargery?" "You know, Pip," replied Joe, "as you and me were ever ...


-1

Reference: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/soused The term "Soused" has a lot of meanings and definitions; the meaning varies whether it is used as a noun or verb. One of its definitions as a noun (referring to the link above) is: 'something kept or steeped in pickle, especially the head, ears, and feet of a pig.' Reference: http://www....


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In my MA thesis, The English preposition WITH, pp. 60-, I described this "with" as expressing the subject of an absolute "be" sentence. I take absolute constructions as subordinate clauses with the precise adverbial relationship to the main clause left unspecified.


0

The primary problem with both sentences is a dangling modifier. A dangling modifier is a grammatical phrase that isn't directly followed by the noun it modifies. In this case, the participial phrase filling in a custom field should be followed by the noun it modifies - i.e. the subject that filled in the field. In the first example, this will add ...


0

If something moves forward and then restarts from the beginning isn't that also called a loop? Oxford Dictionaries loop: a structure, series, or process the end of which is connected to the beginning. Wikipedia has an article on infinitive loop An infinite loop (or endless loop) is a sequence of instructions in a computer program which loops ...


0

The commas show a side note to give the reader more information, thus helping the reader understand the entire situation. It's to give additional information in the middle of the sentence. This is a very normal and typical use of commas. Here are two examples given side by side. Jon and Kathy had a serious headache in the morning. versus ...


2

It is a sentence (with some implied words), but the part of speech that the symbol is fulfilling in the sentence is open to the interpretation of the reader. It is most likely functioning as a verb or noun. The symbol represents the word "copyright," which can fulfill 3 different parts of speech: copyright. [ˈkäpēˌrīt] As a NOUN: the ...


0

I'm not even sure the first is a proper construct. "I feel myself unhappily" would be valid, albeit probably changing the meaning. "myself unhappy" is not a proper prepositional phrase, and the verb feel now has two noun (pronoun and noun) objects trying to occupy the same space. I'd rather see "I feel myself to be unhappy." Even though a bit clunky, it ...



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