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The answer is rather complex. There are some rules that regulate the position of an adverb of frequency, such as: sometimes, often, occasionally, always etc. subject auxiliary/be adverb main verb object, place or time I *often* go swimming in the evenings. He doesn't *always* play tennis. We are *usually* here in ...


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"Sometimes" is bad toward the middle: sometimes the fish must have been being eaten for hours the fish sometimes must have been being eaten for hours the fish must sometimes have been being eaten for hours the fish must have sometimes been being eaten for hours *the fish must have been sometimes being eaten for hours *the fish must have been ...


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As far as I'm concerned, there's no "correct" way here... Both of those, plus - what I would argue as the most popular option - "Sometimes I can" are all OK in my book. I can sometimes see the future but it's not working today. I sometimes can eat an entire pizza alone. Sometimes I can spell complicated words without needing the spellchecker! ...


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Yes. Subject/Verb: You need Infinitive: To pratise Object of the infinitive: Your proofreading Your proofreading is the object of the infinitive phrase to practise. However, the entire phrase to practise your proofreading is the object of the verb need. Quick answer: There are two objects. One is the object of the infinitive. One ...


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What a lot of wrong answers! (Except for John's, of course.) In "You need to practise your proofreading.", the subject of "need" is (as you say) "you", and the object of "need" is "to practice your proofreading". A test for objects is whether they can be passivized, and here we have "To practice your proofreading is needed". A test for noun phrases is ...


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You need [to practise your proofreading]. One test to see if a phrase is an Object in a clause is to see if the phrase concerned can become the Subject of a passivised version of that clause. If it can, even if the result is awkward, then it is definitely an Object. If it can't then it is much less likely to be an Object -- but it still might be. ...


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Proofreading is the object. The possessive pronoun "your" may be the reason why you think there is no object. Assuming the sentence is made without "your"-You need to practise proofreading. It becomes more obvious that proofreading is the object.


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John Locke strings together four rhetorical questions to describe aspects of life and society where people have surrendered their "natural" rights and freedom. The semi-colons in the text show the end of each question. In each case he asks, 'How have people let this loss happen so willingly?' By what art/ technique/ magic did anyone manage to .1. ...


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I am a native English speaker, writer and editorial professional, and my opinion is that one relatively long, well-constructed and correctly punctuated sentence is often just as effective as two shorter sentences. That said, I think that more concise, punchier sentences tend to work better than longer ones in certain types of writing, for example, newspaper ...


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The first sentence listed, "I got to go now." Is a generally acceptable slang variant of the second sentence listed, "I have to go now." They both mean the same thing, which is, "I need to go now." have to and need to are more correct, but got to is common enough that no one will misunderstand you, and only the most pedantic among us will ...


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All the best (or Good luck) for your new life in the USA! And, 'Bon Voyage!' Please note, "the USA", always.


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All junior developers are very similar in terms of potential. Junior developers who work with recruiters cost more money to hire, because employers need to pay the recruiter. Junior developers who work with recruiters don't even receive the extra money it costs to hire them.


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If what you want is to avoid the double "which" – it is not wrong but it is unaesthetic to many – you have several options. You could go, "The town bordering the school, which is (etc.)" or turn it around as "The town, exclusively populated by immigrants, bordered the school", or do yet other things along the same lines. Though what seems a little odd to ...


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I suppose you are talking about this post. "as", here, is used for "being currently" and begins a nominal clause, separated from the main clause by commas. You can move the different clauses of the sentence to understand better : Focusing evaluation on such inflexible terms leads us to adopt utilitarian rather than academic motives, as scientists at ...


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The subject is the term to the left of the copula; the term to its right is the subject complement. Thus “All you need” is the subject of the sentence; what you need — a good pair of glasses — is the subject complement. When there is a difference in number between subject and predicate, the verb agrees with the term to the left of the copula. This is ...


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The subject is you. We can simplify this sentence for easier understanding like so: You need a good pair of glasses. In this sentence, the verb is need. Hopefully this is already apparent. Next, to identify the subject you need to ask, "Who/what is needing something?" The answer is you. You need glasses. Now for the object, "What is needed?" The ...


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Your i) is ungrammatical. But ii) is pretty good, though sounding a bit archaic. I googled "Does not the sun" and got some hits, including "Just as a hydrogen bomb explodes instantly, why does not the sun explode entirely at once?" here.


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Today, if you want to avoid using contractions, you would write these as Does he not go to school? Does the sun not give us light? Putting the "not" after "does" or "do" is considered ungrammatical currently in standard English. Both positions were acceptable historically (possibly explaining why the contraction is allowed in these sentences), ...


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The word "were" must be a typo or mistake. The only way that sentence makes sense is for it to be "where". Model A is a combination of model B and C where model B is used for (..)


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A correct answer to your question as written is "A sentence may contain a word." I think I may know what question you are really trying to ask but I'm not sure. But I'm pretty sure it is not the question you asked. I think you are not asking 'what parts may be included in a sentence (among possibly others)' , but 'what may a sentence may comprise?' That ...


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To eliminate the repeated is, which is acceptable even if it is awkward, you can place the parenthetical phrase, as it is, before the noun phrase it modifies: We know that, as it is, Einstein's gravity model is not normalizable at D=4.


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Both are possible, but mean different things. Consider these simpler examples: This phenomenon has been observed in the atmosphere, where condensation almost always forms around dust particles. In the atmosphere, a phenomenon has been observed where condensation almost always forms around dust particles. The first sentence refers to a phenomenon ...


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look at here What is the reason for not using the preposition at before here? Is it because here is an adverb and it is wrong to use a preposition before an adverb? What if we use here with its nominal meaning, as in "get away from here", or "It's really hot in here", and then say "Look at here" meaning "Look at this place"? If it is wrong and ...


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As it turned out, the answer I gave did not answer the question. I have hazarded a guess at what the answer might be in a comment below, however.


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Use a proper dictionary, which indicates whether a noun is countable or uncountable, e.g., http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/business As you can see, some of the meanings there are listed as countable, some as uncountable. Yours is 2: busi‧ness 2 company [countable] an organization such as a company, shop, or factory that ...


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As Edwin Ashworth explains in his extremely well-informed comments above, the wording "look at here" simply isn't used in standard idiomatic English. But it certainly has been used in various nonstandard and informal varieties of English. Harold Wentworth, American Dialect Dictionary (1949) has this relevant entry: Look-a-here, Lookit(here), Looky ...


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The possessive pronouns that end in the sound /-s/ or /-z/, spell it <-s> with no apostrophe (with the exception of whose and one's). However, not all possessive pronouns end in the sound /-s/ or /-z/. In the case of her(s), we use her before a noun, and hers on its own: This is her watch. This watch is hers. Hers is the red one. It ...


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Business can be an uncountable noun, when referring to the activity in general. But it can also be a countable noun, when referring to a specific instance, like a corporation or a single-proprietorship. "He has/owns many businesses" would be correct if using the second sense.


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Mostly no commas around the 2nd "perhaps" these days. See at Google Books: "Perhaps you have" "or perhaps you" e.g., A Primer of Mathematical Writing: Being a Disquisition on ... - Page 104 Steven George Krantz - 1997 Perhaps you have had a fight with the candidate in question and feel that you cannot offer an objective opinion; perhaps ... ...



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