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I agree that the first sentence takes less time to understand, and I also agree with jimm101's alternate phrasings. I might say, "This sector can account for up to 70% of GDP in developed countries," just to keep your specific phrase in there, for argument's sake. Although, "up to" sort of already suggests the idea that 70% is the highest amount and ...


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I think in the second, gained from is wrong in this context. You could try due to. In the first, to my ear the more natural flow requires moving sometimes, and tweaking the wording: This sector sometimes accounts for as much as 70% of the GDP of developed countries. Or, more succinctly, This sector can account for as much as 70% of a developed ...


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These are two entirely different ideas, and which is 'better' is a matter of which fits the facts, not which is more 'natural'. Grace is no substitute for accuracy. Your sentence says that in developed countries the portion of GDP which this sector accounts for is in some cases as high as 70%; but you say nothing about how frequent these cases are, or what ...


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Yes, it does. It's in territory that's often misused, so you'll have to account for the writer's skill in deciding what was intended, but consider this: "Therefore, the proposition of this essay is flawed" versus "Therefore, the proposition statement of this essay is flawed" The two are clearly different statements. One's addressing the ...


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The word "proposition" itself refers to a statement that proposes some idea that - for e.g., in the case of an essay question - is intended to be further discussed or debated. From Google: prop·o·si·tion ˌpräpəˈziSH(ə)n/ noun 1. a statement or assertion that expresses a judgment or opinion. "the proposition that all men are created equal" ...


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These glasses are the cheapest I have ever used has an implicit which or that before I, starting the subordinate clause and acting as the object. In this example, the relative pronoun can be written explicitly or not and the meaning will stay the same either way. I is the subject of the subordinate clause. This disease is likely to spread around ...


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Perhaps separate your points by simply saying, "I am also a quick learner. For example, I was able to learn Python in two days." Also since you're writing a resumé cover letter, you might want to qualify that you learned "the basics of Python" in two days rather than "everything there is to know about Python" which is what your statement seems to imply. ...


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Two meanings: I am also a quick learner; I was able to learn Python in two days. to mean and, use the semi-colon to mean consequently, use the colon It depends on what you want to say, actually.


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I think you are confused by what "keep the difference" means. Two of the definitions of difference are: the state or quality of being unlike 7a. the result of the subtraction of one number, quantity, etc, from another He doesn't mean 1: expect rate Y to continue, even though it is different from X. He means 7a: Retain possession of the ...


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This means that your client would like to pay you at X USD per hour. Since he overpaid for this he would like you to take the remaining money and apply it to the next bill.


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The extra amount that you received for your previous work will be subtracted from your next paycheck. In other words, if you make $500 a week and were paid $600, expect $400 next week. However, given that it's an issue of payment, it never hurts to clarify further.


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No, that is not an example of Epistrophe. Epistrophe is rhetorical repetition that occurs across different sentences, phrases, or clauses. Your example is repetition for meter and emphasis, not for rhetoric. It doesn't occur in different sentences or clauses, but repeats the end of one sentence. You are correct to observe that "you, you, you" does not ...


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The Rate refers to the natural unemployment rate. The second and third clauses of the sentence could be written more clearly like this, at the cost of added wordiness: America's jobless rate has fallen below most estimates of the natural rate of unemployment. The natural rate of unempoyment is the rate below which inflation has taken off in the past. ...


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One search on Google gives you (in some ways) the answer to your question: https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/epistrophe + http://examples.yourdictionary.com/epistrophe-examples.html


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What about 'at each point of the supply chain' or even 'at different (or many) points of the supply chain', as you wrote in your explanation? 'Across' sounds somewhat vague to me.


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The word "pipe" is being used here analogously- similar to a water pipe or a gas pipe, a "data pipe" is a fixture that carries data from a producer to a consumer. Carrying on with this analogy, I live in a community where I pay a fixed quarterly fee to be connected to the township water supply, regardless of the amount of water used in my home. In other ...


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"the data pipe rather than the message" states that charges are based on the Internet being provided, instead of by usage. An analogue to this would be limited/unlimited mobile plans - limited plans are billed by how many messages you send or minutes you use in a period of time, while unlimited plans are billed not based on how much you use the service, but ...


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You would likely have been spared your confusion had the writer been troubled to refer to "the holders" as people (to whom) rather than as objects (to which).


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"He is forbidden wine" is acceptable but it's better to just say it completely, i.e. "He is forbidden to drink wine" or "He is forbidden from drinking wine", to avoid confusion. "Wine is forbidden him" sounds awkward and can be confusing.


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I think the confusion is the use of found as the past participle of find, and found in terms of to set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence and to provide a basis or ground for Think of foundation, which also comes up in a legal context. Find in a legal context can specifically refer to a finding, which is The result ...


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Generally, we use the least informative expression which unambiguously refers to what we intend to refer to. Otherwise the sentence sounds off. For example, one would never say "Xavier and Yvonne came home. Xavier and Yvonne cooked dinner." They would instead say "Xavier and Yvonne came home. They cooked dinner." Similarly, after you say "Let X and Y be ...


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About this is a prepositional phrase that functions as an adjectival (adjective) phrase that post-modifies a noun phrase a bad feeling. If you say, "I have a bad feeling," people could never know what your bad feeling is about. A bad feeling has not been specified yet. However, if you include a prepositional phrase, it is specified and people could know ...


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Couldn't it be either? You can say The bad feeling that she had about John ... where it seems to be modifying have. But you can also say And yet I couldn't shake a bad feeling about the whole thing, where it is certainly modifying feeling.


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In spoken English, people say things like What was really amazing is that the house had a little balcony. and no one has any trouble understanding the idea that those speakers are trying to convey. In written English, the landscape is somewhat different: Since writers have the opportunity to edit their thoughts before sending them out into the world, ...


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If you're wanting to add emphasis or bring attention to how amazing it is, you could write it like so: What was really amazing, is that the house had a little balcony. However, encasing is that between two commas is likely not what you intend to do.


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As far as I know, it is perfectly okay to follow "forbidden" or "permitted" with a noun, such as, "He has forbidden wine" but not without an indicative.


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The difference between a simple sentence and a complex sentence is the number of clauses they contain. A simple sentence has only one clause, but a complex sentence has more than one clause. A clause is a portion of a sentence that contains both its own subject and its own verb. Simply having a verb isn't enough. Both subject and verb must be present for ...


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There is no problem with the adverbial "huffing along behind his beleaguered friend." It is what is called an absolute phrase. It is completely proper as written and needn't be preceded by a subordinating conjunction. It describes the manner in which the fellow stammered. As for "stammered" and "huffing," I'm not sure what you're driving at with "dense ...


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We do not use who or that when describing where something or someone is placed or located. Try this: It was my room in which he hid. For sentences 6 and 7 ("It was her stupidity (that) I did not like"): If we were talking, and I said, "What about her didn't you like, her stupidity or her overall personality?" You might answer, "It was her stupidity ...


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Every linguist has this problem, especially in talking about syntax to non-linguists. I only use the term phrase to refer to constituents; but there is syntax for non-constituents, too. Conversational Deletion, for instance, chews away at the beginning of a sentence, producing utterrances like these, which lack some initial sequence of predictable words: ...


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The definition of "phrase" is any grouping of two or more words. As such, if it's language, it's either a word or a phrase. It could be more than a phrase, like a clause, but it will always at least be a phrase if more than one word is present. "I will recognize" is a phrase that is a subject-verb pair. The subject is "I." The verb is "will recognize." ...


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Combining the example in your question with the example in your comment shows a bit of a misunderstanding about the difference between clauses and sentences and therefore the answers to your question. In English, (any variety) each clause with a verb must have a some kind of verbal inflection (there are some counterexamples to this generalization but for ...


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I would suggest that you be consistent: "People have been taught have faith and trust — or have not faith and trust not..." This isn't using infinitives, but the imperative form: "have (faith)" and "trust." "People have been taught to have faith and to trust — or not to have faith and not to trust..." This uses the infinitive forms of the ...


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Compare: Lake Erie borders Ohio on the north. Ohio is bordered by Lake Erie on the north. Clearly, the second is the passive of the first. Clearly, there is no action involved, and no actor or recipient. Since "bordering" is not ordinarily a process, there is no corresponding progressive aspect: *Lake Erie is bordering Ohio on the north. ...


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The problem is caused by the fact that "subject" and "object" are not equivalent to "doer of the action" vs. "receiver of the action". Subject and object are syntactic configurations and are independent of the semantics of the phrase in the position. So of course stative verbs can have passives independent of whether they have "doers" or "actions". The ...


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Yes. What you are referring to is called subject-complement agreement. When you have a subject and complement that differ in number, the conjugation of the verb is determined by the number of the subject, not the complement. Example 1: One of the things is feelings. ("One" - singular subject; "is" - third-person singular) Feelings are one of the things. ...


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Ability and Agility are different kinds of concepts. Ability is strictly a binary (yes/no) thing. You are able to do it, or you are unable to do it. You have the ability, or inability to do something. You should not, in good English, have a "low ability" to do something. Agility is different. You can have it to a greater or lesser degree. Thus you can have ...


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The OED sets out several operational senses of dis-: Undoing (disown) Depriving (disarm) Reversing (dishonest) Imputing a negative feeling (disapprove) The prefix un- (from Old English) almost always signifies a simple negation and often distinguishes itself from its Latin cousins in-, im-. So to be unmoral (i.e, to be amoral) is have no ethical ...


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I'd definitely re-cast the sentence and use a current English word instead of inventing one. Sluggishness? But to address the question, the Anglo-Saxon "un" would originally have applied to actions (verbs, mostly) like "undress" or "undo." The French "dis" would be for separation, splitting -- "disjoint," say. However, over the centuries these distinctions ...


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When Orwell said, "When once," it meant the same thing as if he had simply said, "Once," but with added clarification. While it may seem redundant, it really isn't. In the text you provided, the "when" clarifies that Orwell didn't mean that "they" did it once, or one time, and the "once" clarifies that Orwell didn't mean while they did it, or they did it ...


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I don't think it's pleonastic, though it might well be obsolescent. I think once can still be read as an adverb here: "when they had done this even once". I'm guessing that this construction when once is what led to once being reanalysed as a conjunction.


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"Now that I am approaching graduation, I want to plan for..." The above sounds fine if it's what you mean. The wording doesn't sound un-smart per se. Syntactically, semantically, and grammatically, it's perfectly sound. However, is it what you mean? Is it really? The first issue I question has to do with the word 'now'. The way you say it, people ...


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You wrote: "During the meeting that Dr. Edward Smith coordinated last month, I had the chance to meet with you and hear the possible projects ..." is grammatically correct but not quite idiomatic to a native American English speaker. You might want to say instead, "During the meeting that Dr. Edward Smith coordinated last month, I enjoyed having the ...



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