Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

No. How come is it doesn't make sense. How comes it is an example of an older syntax of English, which you can find readily in sources such as Shakespeare and the King James Bible. In modern speech this has been entirely replaced by How does it come, but we still use the older syntax with auxiliaries: how is it, how can you etc. I think that in Russell's ...


-3

Old English. Still not uncommon as a form of intellectual prose. Edit: I should say outdated English. Old English would be like: How cometh that human beings...


0

Your invitation does not need the word "either." The comma preceding "it'd" is grammatically correct. And "B" is the only correct version. The pronoun "me" is used in a prepositional phrase. The word "myself" is very often misused -- by uneducated and college educated people alike. See "The Goof-Proofer" by Stephen J. Manhard or "Goof Proof Grammar" by ...


1

'Kinds' is definitely the correct choice here. I don't know which specific kind of English speaker would use 'kind', because 'goods' indicates or implicates various objects. Never forget to pluralize. You would only use 'kind' if one were trying to refer to one specific object. In that case, a sentence would be formed using 'that kind of good'. Here, you ...


1

In American English, "kinds" is correct because "those" goes with a plural. From what I've seen, British English would be more likely to use "those kind," taking into consideration that "kind" refers to a group even though it isn't plural itself.


0

Your sentence is grammatically correct. We cannot say whether what it says is what you want to say. If you make clear your intended message using other words then perhaps we can tell you whether that sentence conveys your message. You say that you want to suggest to your manager that (someone) is, or should be, "making a new service". Your sentence does ...


3

Your use of "that" is alright; however, it puts that clause into the subjunctive mood, so you need to change the verb's conjugation: Can you suggest to them that Company Name develop the Italian version of the website? Edit As others have pointed out, that answer was written a bit too hastily; it was misleading in at least one respect, and I missed ...


4

It does mean that he's a nice guy. Look at the context. The piece is on an author's website, and is talking about an adaptation of one of his books. In the previous sentence, Spacey has paid the author a compliment with, "'this wouldn't have been possible without the brilliant material it was based on". Calling him "kind" is acknowledging that fact.


1

For me, I like the simplicity of Hemingway's style; simplify, simplify, simplify. "Had she slept last night, she wouldn't be exhausted today."


0

"Do you mind" is correct. "Do you want" is correct if you're asking for permission or are a bit submissive. "Do you object" is more appropriate when you use "me" instead of "my.""my" is also alright. "Do you disapprove" is also correct, but not totally appropriate as we use it with severe or subtle action that offend or hurt someone in some way. But "do ...


1

You can also use "had had" construction. Had she had a good sleep last night, she would have felt energized today.


1

The following context is absolutely grammatically correct : Had she gotten some sleep last night , She wouldn't have been exhausted today .


4

Yes, this is wrong. Not only is the sentence too convoluted to be readable even in a second attempt, but either the relative clause or its superordinate clause lacks a finite verb. Convoluted as the sentence is, it isn't worth anyone's time to try to reconstruct a valid relative or superordinate clause. I also wonder about the use of law without an article: ...


0

Handcuffed by the question, I have to say 'This video shows a heart transplant taking place.'It's correct but more elegant to say 'this video shows a heart transplant operation'. Sentences with cumbersome tenses and involved clauses beginning with 'that', 'which', 'what' and so on, I try to avoid in the interests of brevity, clarity and holding readers' ...


0

The correct version is taking place, because in the video, the event is continually taking place. To show "a heart surgery take place" is incorrect, though you might also say "a heart surgery that took place," because if there is a video of it, it clearly happened already.


1

Also, "onclick" event toggles the group in question on or off the "excluded_groups" list. toggle https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/toggle#Verb to alternate between two positions using a single switch or lever. Clicking a button will alternately toggle its light on OR off. to switch between alternate states. toggle to lower/upper case You can quickly ...


1

I believe that the following is the best solution: 'Also, "onclick" event removes the group in question from or adds it to the list.'


0

A more conventional way of saying "Build we won't" is "We won't build." But the verb build is put in front, ahead of the subject "we," for emphasis. Another way of expressing this is, "Build. We won't."


6

The phrase “Build We Won’t” is meant to echo (as tragedy or as farce) a once-popular U.S. phrase: “Dig We Must.” The origin of the latter phrase (which in full read either “Dig we must for a greater New York” or “Dig We Must for Growing New York,” depending on which source you believe) appeared on warning signs posted during the 1950s by Consolidated Edison ...


0

I ve left the house and notice she's gone out and left the garage door open. Let's illustrate with variation of the sentence. I am leaving the house and notice she's gone out and leaving the garage door open. Matching present tenses: I am leaving the house and leaving the garage door open and notice ... I left the house and noticed she's gone out and ...


1

Following only logic, there's no way to know with elements given (the sentence). The grammar leaves both possibilities open for who's the subject of the last action (...left the garage door open). In a "real situation", though, the context would very likely have been enough to assume the intended meaning. By context I mean knowing the people involved, the ...


1

To me, this says he has left the house, and (because he is outside and can thus see the garage) noticed that 'she' (whoever she is - wife? mother? sister?) has left the garage door open. It is impossible to infer from the message if he left the door in that state, or whether he closed it. Presumably if the expected state of the garage door when no one is at ...


1

Not a very common use: Idioms & Phrases : would that I wish that, as in Would that I could stop working and go hiking with you. For a synonym, see if only.


1

I think the sentence would be easier to understand if it was moonlight they were standing in. But anyway, it is a single sentence with some words elided (which isn't wrong) They stood in the (light from the) streetlight (that was coming in) through the kitchen window (that) there’d never been much point putting curtains over I've never heard ...


3

It's perfectly grammatical and normal. In this case, because of the complexity of the sentence, it's not very clear, but it's still grammatical. The rules on who/which and that to introduce relative clauses are, roughly: You can always use one of them You can never use more than one of them If the noun phrase to which the relative clause is attached is ...


1

It's a direct quote from a real book, but that doesn't make it "right". It is a bit hard to understand. The full quote is They stood in the streetlight through the kitchen window there'd never been much point putting curtains over and listened to the thumping of the surf from down the hill. (Some nights, when the wind was right, you could hear the surf ...


0

This missing words are implied: "It's imperative {that} you {do} not sing when your voice hurts." This can further be simplified into a command: "Do not sing when your voice hurts."


0

Consider: Thus, a highly-accurate automatic fall detection system is likely to be a significant part of the living environment for the elderly. Such a system can expedite and improve the medical care and allow people to retain autonomy for a longer period.


0

He was my student in Microprocessor and Interfacing, and Professional Ethics. (When speaking, you would use a pause to separate the two class names. The comma serves the same purpose. Personally, I would also say "and in" rather than "and" in this case, for the same reason... but that's officially optional.)


0

In a non-searchable and potentially ephemeral comment to the original posting, John Lawler presented the following answer: Yes, but it’s very complex and convoluted syntactically, and will take anybody some time to parse. And, given the current degree of grammatical knowledge among English speakers, about half would judge it ungrammatical anyway, ...


2

To answer your question, yes, it is grammatically correct. Replace "conditions being unfair" with "it" and you will see what I mean. As mentioned above, though, it would be better to simply reword the sentence.


0

This is how I understand it. The simplest form of your question is: a. Is X an issue? X can be singular or plural because the question is about X being an issue. In a school staff meeting, I can imagine the kitchen director asking, b. Is peanut allergies an issue we need to deal with? and teachers of children with such allergies saying, How is ...


5

Please don’t consider Google Translate your friend. He is a most treacherous and dangerous friendship to make. Consider him more of a casual acquaintance who is occasionally useful in minor matters (and who must always be independently verified). Accelerate is used to refer to making a process move faster, possibly in order to move something ahead in time; ...



Top 50 recent answers are included