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I recommend it for a good read.


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As rightly explained by Brian, "feeling well rested" is a phrase. A phrase is a group of words giving incomplete meaning. Phrases are to be viewd from the point of construction as well as from that of function.In your phrase-- feeling well rested-- 'feeling' is a particple(partly verb + partly adjective). Your phrase is a participle phrase by construction ...


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No, I do not see it that way. I think you're focusing so much on independent and dependent clauses that you perceive everything as one or the other. This is not true. ", feeling well rested" is not a clause. It is an adverbial phrase, modifying "woke. It tells _how_he woke. That's all there is to it. Nothing about I vs. D clauses.


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I believe your friend is correct. The easiest way I've found to interpret it is to break it into the two thoughts that it's trying to express. Infrared emissions radiated from Earth's surface. This radiation would otherwise be transmitted back into space.


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It's an archaic construction, inverting the verb and the subject, and using the (nearly obsolete) subjunctive form of the verb, to convey a conditional. It survives much more in the past (where, apart from were, the subjunctive is the same as the ordinary past). So: Had I known ... = If I had known ... Had he seen it, ... = If he had seen it, ... ...


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This is from "The Bottle Imp" a story by Robert Louis Stevenson (actually first published in 1891), and "shelves" here is a verb meaning "to slope down and away from." The OED says "gently," but one of the exemplars uses the word "precipitously." The narrator has just fallen in love and thinks that he's reached the peak of happiness in his life and that ...


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Shelving is usually something you say about a beach, It slopes evenly down from the high tide line into the water, so you quickly get to swimming depth without stumbling. This poor misery is on top of a metaphorical mountaintop that shelves away on each side. He has everything (including hot and cold running water ! (in 1895) ) so what is there left to ...


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From context, what I'm getting is that the subject is at the peak of what's good for his life, from here, his life can only get worse. I believe the shelf he is talking about is a ridgeline or a cliff top or similar: In this context, I think either he's using shelve as: a verb, in the sense of 'a ridgeline (a shelf) extends along'. a plural noun, in ...


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The phrase,"It was performed nonprobability sampling . . " is not good English. No native speaker would ever use this structure. One correct structure would be "Nonprobability sampling was performed.." "Non-probability sampling" seems to be the preferred term. If you Google "nonprobabilistic sampling," most of the entries use the term "non-probability ...


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In this example, the phrase placed between the em dashes is supposed to be read in parallel with the phrase "encouraged the transmission of." The sentence structure enables the author to compress two sentences into one, and to indicate that the second follows from the first. (I belatedly noticed that, in a comment beneath the OP's question, Jim says much the ...


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The concept of "race" is contested. Many, including me, will argue that there is no such thing as race. The author is trying to avoid taking side in this debate by saying that even if "race" is a myth, the author's thesis is about prejudgements against specific ethnic or cultural groups that the general public opinion perceive as belonging to a "race". ...


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Part of the reason that the rest of the paragraph maintains its coherency is that this is a parenthetical aside (various punctuation marks are used for those). The information is possibly useful and fits the context but its' not the main point of the sentence and hence, may technically be ignored at the reader's careful discretion. I was going to write ...


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change it this way in your mind: racially-based negative prejudgments that are against a group generally accepted ... a group that are generally accepted as a race (including the blacks)


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the bold part means that " the stability of black family has been very important in keeping / continuation of the heritage,too" (other than its transmission)


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So the original sentence is technically correct: Have you ever felt discouraged by many corrections on (insert website name)? None of your three answers are correct, as they all use the slang "have gotten". I might change the original to something like: Have you ever felt discouraged after receiving several corrections on the website? Finally, ...


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"The main point is that ...", "The problem is that ..." are perfectly fine. The alternatives you mentioned are inferior, if not incorrect. The Corpus of Contemporay Amercian English returns 2391 results for "the problem is that", while it only gives 124 results for "as the problem", none of which are used in the style that you (or to be exact, the reviewer) ...


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Darwin was using the language of his day, in which the term "race" meant subspecies, or even specific population. Since modern humans, Homo sapiens, are all one species with no recognized subspecies, Darwin could not have been referring to human "races", which are a social and political, not a scientific, construct. His argument was that in the "struggle ...


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The five sentence structures you list in your post are only a small part of possible sentence structures. A. S. Hornby, a grammarian, lexicographer and pioneer in ELT ( English language teaching) developed what later became known as Advanced Learner's Dictionary. He also developed a survey about sentence structures, which he called verb patterns. In older ...


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Punctuation aside for a moment, as Mr. Ashworth has noted in comment, the construction is illogical. If there's always going to be that one more thing to fix, then you never can fix everything and you'll always have something to do. How does this sound? There's always going to be something that needs fixing. But even if you could fix everything, then what ...


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If the sense is that the fixer will have lost his reason for existence, I'd say "... what will become of you?" If the sense is that the fixer will have lost his occupation, I'd say "... what will left for you [to do]?"


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The OED finds two basic meanings of conform -- to make in accordance with and to become in accordance with. The latter is used with the preposition "to," as in "I will conform to the dictates of the Church." The former is transitive and can be reflexive: "I will conform myself to the dictates of the Church." Another example from the entry is from Richard ...


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Welcome to the site. In my experience it's more idiomatic to say there will (sometimes contracted to there'll), instead of there's at the beginning, as the sentence conveys a definite sense of future that is better expressed by there will than by there is. There's not anything really wrong with the comma after fix, but my personal style is to make that ...


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It looks OK to me, I don't know about having '...to be that one more thing', to me it sounds better just as 'to be one more thing'.


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(1) "I well understand something" strikes me as somewhat old fashioned, or formal. (2) "I understand well something" is ungrammatical, due to a prohibition on adverbs coming between verb and direct object. However, if you have in place of "something" some long and complicated phrase, then this becomes the preferred place for "well". (3) "I understand ...


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It's the "something that is giving me the problem. If you understand "it" that well, tell us what it is. Normally one would say, " I could well understand. . ., but it doesn't work with "something". One would say: I understood something well, that . . . or I understood one thing well, that. . . The normal rule, (often broken for effect or 'tone') is to ...


2

The second and the third sentences make it clear that the boys are not the diva[s] of the class, while the first one does not. An appositive is a noun, noun phrase or a noun clause that renames another noun right beside it. The second and the third sentences use clauses(clauses that specify that the girl is the person being referred to as 'diva') while the ...


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This grammatical structure should have a name, but of course, in grammars it often goes without any name. You can't even be sure where in a grammar you will find it. I just had a look at Longman English Grammar and looked through the chapter Adjectives, comparisons, but found nothing. In the register I found it under the: the ... the (clauses of comparison). ...


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There are several names for it listed in a page on the subject here, which favors the term comparative correlative, since it asserts correlation by using comparative forms of two adjectives: The comparative correlative is also known as the correlative construction, the conditional comparative, or the “the . . . the” construction. For a a ...


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It just depends on the context, or what you want to convey about the context. If you say to me "It had been done yesterday", I'll try to think of something that happened earlier today before which you're saying it was done. Because this is what the construction demands -- a previous temporal anchor. Say, for example, this morning someone criticized me for ...


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Sentence 1 is correct. Sentence 2: As a single sentence it is not correct, as Past Perfect is the "pre-past" in relation to a past. Here we have only one event in the past time, not two with one event before the other.


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Moving the adverb immediately in front of the verb instead of the sentence eliminates the ambiguity, and also produces a structure that sounds like something a native speaker of English, and not a Martian, might generate **: "Students who rigorously study physics learn math". Incidentally, the assertion that in the sentence "Rigorously, students ...


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The complex NP constraint, a grammatical principle discovered by John Ross, prohibits moving something from within a relative clause (RC) to a position outside the NP which contains the relative clause. So, starting from [S [NP students [RC ... rigorously ] ] ... ] to get to [S rigorously [NP students [RC ... __ ] ] ... ] would require breaking ...


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This is an example of elision: Both sentences use the past participle, but elements of the sentence have been left out for the sake of brevity in the first example. The rather terse style of #1 seems much like that of TV news shows, which generally try to cram as many stories into a programme slot as possible. Consider that you could insert the phrase "by ...



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