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5

As you've discovered, the ordinary order of English declarative sentences is subject first, verb following, but there are a number of rhetorical or informatic reasons to invert that order. One is that speakers tend to put old information before new information, and another is that speakers prefer to place weightier (i.e., more grammatically-complicated) ...


2

I have only heard "debris is/was" and if there are many, use "pieces/piles of debris are/were". From ncsu.edu (styling mine) Debris doesn't have a grammatical plural in English. If you want to talk about a lot of debris—or if you want to pick it up—you have to gather it into plural piles. You may be wondering how a grammarian can tell ...


2

As Hellion mentioned, the sentence was designed to be confusing by reversing the order in English to verb-subject. Normally, our sentences are ordered by subject-verb-object. If you set the order to our normal usage, the meaning is clear. "Backward ran sentences until reeled the mind," turns into, "Sentences ran backward until the mind reeled."


2

It's a matter of emphasis, or drawing the reader's attention to a particular aspect of the sentence. One definition of "but" is synonymous with "only", and using "only" here draws the reader's attention to the fact that the subject of the sentence (the stream in Brookfield) is not unique. "Brookfield was one of many feeding streams." - simple statement ...


2

In this case, but is used to mean merely/just/only. Brookfield was only one of many feeding streams. See: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/but "adv. 1"


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Personally, I would re-write the entire sentence so that it does not use a direct question, and also to remove some of the 'jargon'-type words (e.g.: Why use "individuals" when the shorter word "people" will do?). [Changes from original shown in italics.] A quantitative study will be conducted to address the question of whether bi-lingual people from ...


1

First of all, these are two separate questions. Secondly, they probably belong in English Language Learners. But here are some answers anyway. You would just say "It would make him a good person." I'm not sure what "placement" means in this context, but assuming it makes sense, it should be "It will turn the placements on their heads." (Each has its own ...


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Just to clarify: the difference between the two sentences is the order of the two phrases as needed, and on your hosting account. I would say in this context there is no difference. The servers are both launched and discarded, both as needed and on your hosting account. Unlike for adjectives, there is no general order of multiple prepositional phrases.


1

It was written so. It began so. The sentences above have so as an Adjunct. We can front the Adjuncts. If we do we get: So it was written. So it began. However, we cannot have: *So it was began. (ungrammatical) Why? Well there is no auxiliary BE in sentence (2), so there is no reason to insert one in version (4). Notice as well that after the ...


1

It makes sense. It doesn't require punctuation if the intent is accomplished without it. Punctuation obviously alters the meaning or accent. I am seeing myself age, well rounded and full in form. I am seeing myself age well, rounded and full in form. I am seeing myself age, well, rounded and full in form. I am seeing myself, age well rounded and full, in ...


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"You cannot deny the fact that you were given an ample amount of time." The speaker is saying that the listener was given enough time ("an ample amount of" means "enough"), and is saying that there's no (reasonable) way that they could argue that they needed more time. This is a sensible usage: the speaker could be a college professor, and the listener a ...


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Answer This phrase is ambiguous and it is not possible to use hyphens to rescue it. It should be rewritten. If you insist on retaining this phrase as it stands then use three hyphens (computer-crime-targeted) or none (1). However, the hyphens in the resulting phrase will no longer fullfill their original purpose, which was to remove the ambiguity in a ...


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My family and I like to take it easy at the weekend. 'weekend' http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/weekend#translations


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My family and I like to take it easy at the week-end.


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First of all, your text consists of two sentences run together. You should split it before 'Additionally'. Other than that, you need additional commas before and after the parenthetical phrase 'meaning higher prices' and another one after 'Additionally'. By the way, 'goods' can't be turned into the singular 'good'. Rather say 'commodity'.


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There is no 'difference'. They are both 'habitual' present. 'I am speaking' would convey the present (progressive). Many other languages do not make this distinction.



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