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10

"Season after season" is a phrase meaning "over many seasons" or "repeatedly". If you substitute "repeatedly" for "season after season" in the sentence it should be easily understandable. Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short repeatedly with their current crop ...


5

A Google search for "He's quite dead. I assure you." (which as expected shows more hits than the "I'm" version, if not many more) only gives examples of your versions B and A. Comma splices are not wrong per se, as discussed in this previous thread. And I'd say that version B is the best here ('I assure you' is best not analysed as an independent clause ...


4

All of the current answers explain that "season after season" can be replaced by "after many [consecutive] seasons", but I wanted to add the origin of this construction. "[time word] after [time word]" is a very common English idiom, and it takes many forms: "Time after time" "Day after day" "Week after week" "Month after month" "Year after year" (as you ...


3

Season after season means the same as after many seasons. "after falling short season after season" The second "after" means that Arsenal was falling short after the season, after many seasons. "...they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short after many seasons..."


2

Yes you can, but a comma is optional. For the last ten years, I have been doing my PhD. "For the last ten years" is a introductory prepositional phrase, and "I have been doing my PhD" is an independent clause. A comma is optional to separate introductory prepositional phrase from the rest of the sentence. In this case, I would use a comma, because the ...


2

The phrase may make more sense if "parsed" as follows: "Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short (season after season) with their current crop of attackers." "Season after season" means "for many seasons." But it is basically a "parenthetical" to the main sentence. ...


1

I would say it would be correct with different punctuation: "Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible; it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal". or "Their signature- Lime drink is also incredible - it is refreshing and healthy, indubitably would assist you in completing a perfect meal". With just a ...


1

Yes, it's a very common mistake, even among native speakers. What you're doing is called a comma splice: A comma splice is the use of a comma to join two independent clauses. For example: It is nearly half past five, we cannot reach town before dark. You either need to separate them into two individual sentences, or you need to connect ...


1

You use "has gone" rather than "is gone" since your "point of view" is retrospective -- you're looking back at the past, so a past tense form of the verb is needed. ("Today went well" would work too, but "has gone well" has a more musical flavor to it, and would often be preferred. Plus I'm sure there's some convoluted technical reason why it's preferred.) ...


1

From personal experience it's improper to use "!" in any sort of formal email.


1

"Simple present" is a reasonably good name for this construction.  There is only one word in the complete verb, so it makes some sense to call it simple.  I prefer to call it "present indefinite".  Many textbooks lump all the properties of a verb construction under the heading "tense".  I find it easier to explain those properties ...


1

I immediately thought of Joe Gargery's contorted language in Dickens' Great Expectations; though to my surprise I find only one example of exactly this: "Well!" said Miss Havisham. "And you have reared the boy, with the intention of taking him for your apprentice; is that so, Mr. Gargery?" "You know, Pip," replied Joe, "as you and me were ever ...


1

"After filling in a custom field, a new field will be added..." There are two ways I would address this. First, if I want to stress the filling of the custom field as a cause in a cause/reaction, I would use the word, "Once," instead of the word "After." "Once a custom field is filled, a new field will be added..." But, I would usually rather ...



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