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The OED sets out several operational senses of dis-: Undoing (disown) Depriving (disarm) Reversing (dishonest) Imputing a negative feeling (disapprove) The prefix un- (from Old English) almost always signifies a simple negation and often distinguishes itself from its Latin cousins in-, im-. So to be unmoral (i.e, to be amoral) is have no ethical ...


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Every linguist has this problem, especially in talking about syntax to non-linguists. I only use the term phrase to refer to constituents; but there is syntax for non-constituents, too. Conversational Deletion, for instance, chews away at the beginning of a sentence, producing utterrances like these, which lack some initial sequence of predictable words: ...


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In spoken English, people say things like What was really amazing is that the house had a little balcony. and no one has any trouble understanding the idea that those speakers are trying to convey. In written English, the landscape is somewhat different: Since writers have the opportunity to edit their thoughts before sending them out into the world, ...


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I think the confusion is the use of found as the past participle of find, and found in terms of to set up or establish on a firm basis or for enduring existence and to provide a basis or ground for Think of foundation, which also comes up in a legal context. Find in a legal context can specifically refer to a finding, which is The result ...


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I'd definitely re-cast the sentence and use a current English word instead of inventing one. Sluggishness? But to address the question, the Anglo-Saxon "un" would originally have applied to actions (verbs, mostly) like "undress" or "undo." The French "dis" would be for separation, splitting -- "disjoint," say. However, over the centuries these distinctions ...


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The extra amount that you received for your previous work will be subtracted from your next paycheck. In other words, if you make $500 a week and were paid $600, expect $400 next week. However, given that it's an issue of payment, it never hurts to clarify further.


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Ability and Agility are different kinds of concepts. Ability is strictly a binary (yes/no) thing. You are able to do it, or you are unable to do it. You have the ability, or inability to do something. You should not, in good English, have a "low ability" to do something. Agility is different. You can have it to a greater or lesser degree. Thus you can have ...


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Yes. What you are referring to is called subject-complement agreement. When you have a subject and complement that differ in number, the conjugation of the verb is determined by the number of the subject, not the complement. Example 1: One of the things is feelings. ("One" - singular subject; "is" - third-person singular) Feelings are one of the things. ...


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Combining the example in your question with the example in your comment shows a bit of a misunderstanding about the difference between clauses and sentences and therefore the answers to your question. In English, (any variety) each clause with a verb must have a some kind of verbal inflection (there are some counterexamples to this generalization but for ...


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Couldn't it be either? You can say The bad feeling that she had about John ... where it seems to be modifying have. But you can also say And yet I couldn't shake a bad feeling about the whole thing, where it is certainly modifying feeling.


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Two meanings: I am also a quick learner; I was able to learn Python in two days. to mean and, use the semi-colon to mean consequently, use the colon It depends on what you want to say, actually.


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Perhaps separate your points by simply saying, "I am also a quick learner. For example, I was able to learn Python in two days." Also since you're writing a resumé cover letter, you might want to qualify that you learned "the basics of Python" in two days rather than "everything there is to know about Python" which is what your statement seems to imply. ...


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The word "proposition" itself refers to a statement that proposes some idea that - for e.g., in the case of an essay question - is intended to be further discussed or debated. From Google: prop·o·si·tion ˌpräpəˈziSH(ə)n/ noun 1. a statement or assertion that expresses a judgment or opinion. "the proposition that all men are created equal" ...


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You would likely have been spared your confusion had the writer been troubled to refer to "the holders" as people (to whom) rather than as objects (to which).


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The word "pipe" is being used here analogously- similar to a water pipe or a gas pipe, a "data pipe" is a fixture that carries data from a producer to a consumer. Carrying on with this analogy, I live in a community where I pay a fixed quarterly fee to be connected to the township water supply, regardless of the amount of water used in my home. In other ...


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No, that is not an example of Epistrophe. Epistrophe is rhetorical repetition that occurs across different sentences, phrases, or clauses. Your example is repetition for meter and emphasis, not for rhetoric. It doesn't occur in different sentences or clauses, but repeats the end of one sentence. You are correct to observe that "you, you, you" does not ...


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The Rate refers to the natural unemployment rate. The second and third clauses of the sentence could be written more clearly like this, at the cost of added wordiness: America's jobless rate has fallen below most estimates of the natural rate of unemployment. The natural rate of unempoyment is the rate below which inflation has taken off in the past. ...


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The problem is caused by the fact that "subject" and "object" are not equivalent to "doer of the action" vs. "receiver of the action". Subject and object are syntactic configurations and are independent of the semantics of the phrase in the position. So of course stative verbs can have passives independent of whether they have "doers" or "actions". The ...



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