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18

Your example is a recursive sentence of, relating to, or constituting a procedure that can repeat itself indefinitely a recursive rule in a grammar (MW) I don't know about the use of recursion in sentences or paragraphs, but there are a number of recursive acronyms used in the IT industry, some notable being PHP (PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) and ...


8

That is specifically an example of recursion, where something is contained inside itself. It is an foundational concept in the fractal mathematics that form the core of chaos theory, but it would be impossible to ever actually use it in spoken English, at least in the fully expanded form. You could achieve it by reference, as in "This is the sentence I'm ...


6

How NOT to create your own company sounds better to my ears.


3

I wonder whether different examples can shed some light:    How can you say [that] it's wrong? There doesn't seem to be anything odd about the nominative subordinate clause "[that] it's wrong".  To my eye, it looks like an direct object.  It's the thing that can be said. The part that seems odd is that "how can you" and "why ...


2

It is a sentence (with some implied words), but the part of speech that the symbol is fulfilling in the sentence is open to the interpretation of the reader. It is most likely functioning as a verb or noun. The symbol represents the word "copyright," which can fulfill 3 different parts of speech: copyright. [ˈkäpēˌrīt] As a NOUN: the ...


2

The "that" makes it an indirect content clause/reported speech. The "that" is necessary to avoid the possible implication that "It's wrong" is exactly what was said. This is an expression that would appear in print only in dialog. It is essentially colloquial. "What do you mean" is an idiom (not a simple assembly of the meanings of its components). It is ...


1

The OP has asked about the following interrogative, which seems perfectly grammatical to me (AmE, Upstate NY): What do you mean (that) it's wrong? In particular, the question concerns the syntax of the phrase "that it's wrong." I think the best way to approach this question is by setting aside the interrogative for a moment and considering its simple ...


1

As long as you don't capitalize it, it's fine: Could you please provide me the details? It's not at all necessary, though, and in fact the word "please" can convey a sense of impatience or insistence. So it ironically could be a bit more polite to just say Could you provide me the details? Beginning the request with "Could you..." is actually ...


1

No it is not correct. Saying "and in a small part" is rather odd (as you are duplicating part) and probably isn't what you mean. I think I'd say "..in large part.." or perhaps "largely based on" and then follow it up with a "to a smaller extent". Alternatively "largely items in this category" and then "and also" or "perhaps also" If I had to rewrite it I'...



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