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5

1 is wrong because using it gives two finite predicates joined only by a comma. Bracket out the modifiers and here's what you end up with: Jesse Jackson's Rainbow PUSH Coalition was established for this reason , was created in 1996 in this way. 5, however, subordinates the established clause, so you have only one finite predicate: Jesse Jackson's ...


5

We would say: That guy will make all those girls fall in love with him. If we leave out "with him", he could simply be a sort of love deity who makes people fall in love with each other. With respect to "make"; notice how "him" comes between "make" and the complement "shake in his boots": The approaching tiger made him shake in his boots. We do not say ...


4

You can't swap "51,000 people" (a plural) for "that" (a singular). If you swapped it for a simpler pronoun instead, it stops working: "This is what they looks [sic] like." But it works because of the reasons in chasly's comment. You are referring to the entire crowd of 51,000 as a single entity. "This is what a crowd of 51,000 people looks like." You ...


4

It formed inside him an ambition to teach his students all the more. It formed an ambition to teach his students all the more inside him. He kept in the book bag an apple. (awkward or marked) He kept an apple in the book bag. The differing acceptability of these examples is due to a phenomenon known as HEAVY NOUN PHRASE SHIFT. It gives us ...


4

Normally, the word 'raise' is associated with cattle. For crops (vegetables, grains, etc.) we use the word 'grow'. You can use the phrase 'raise mushrooms' but it sounds really awkward. 'Grow mushrooms' on the other hand is natural and suitable. For a quick reference, see n-gram from Google showing usage of the two phrases.


3

The word "are" signals that a participle is required. This will be the present participle ("-ing") to show the progressive tense for continuing action. So your choices are "rising" or "raising." "Rise" means to go up. It's intransitive (i.e., it cannot take an object, like "mushrooms"), so it won't do. "Raise" is transitive and takes an object, telling ...


3

The purpose isn't to dance like an elephant. The purpose is to not dance like an elephant.


3

The words are acceptable but the punctuation is not. Your two options for correct comma placement would be: "Could you, please, let us know when …" "Could you please let us know when …" The version with two commas is somewhat outmoded; the version with none is readily understandable and more contemporary. One comma alone, however, is incorrect.


2

Why is a part from a B777 being analysed by Airbus? Because it is not. The word "because" is used to introduce a reason. "it is not" does not provide a reason for the part being analysed. Instead I suggest, "Why is a part from a B777 being analysed by Airbus? It isn't!"


2

The Louvre Museum merely has 300,000 objects [Kaplan and Haenlein, 2010] all told, 0.4% of the 70 million photos and videos sent on Instagram daily.


2

One simple way to indicate unambiguously that "It is incorrect to say that "dance like an elephant" is the goal" is to reorder the sentence as Dancing like an elephant is not the purpose [or goal] of this exercise [or whatever]. One simple way to indicate that "The objective is to prevent dancing like an elephant" is to say The purpose [or goal] is ...


2

It's grammatically fine to use two "doesn't" in the same sentence so long as they don't form a double negative. Without the full context of your sentence it's hard to understand what "it's" referring to in this sentence, but there's nothing that says you can't use two contractions in the same complex or simple sentence. If you're attempting to say something ...


1

C implies that the giraffes stayed alive for the purpose of passing the trait to their offspring; maybe true from some biological standpoint, but probably not what the giraffes were consciously doing. E uses the present tense instead of the past tense. B should use "their" instead of "its", since the subject is not a single giraffe.


1

Most of the comments seem obtuse or sarcastic. The straight-out answer is that for the most part, this type of construction is now rare, and as you guessed, more likely to be used in a poetic or literary setting, "for dramatic effect". I could imagine the grave-voiced movie ad narrator: IN A WORLD NOT THEIR OWN, WHERE BIONIC MONSTERS LURK AROUND EVERY ...


1

Yes, both are grammatical. In the first sentence, were serves as the primary verb. It's connecting the subject ("six security monitors displaying black-and-white versions of the restaurant") to the present participle ("hanging on the wall") to form the past progressive. In the second sentence, displayed serves as the primary verb. It's connecting the ...


1

Your first sentence is absolutely fine, and I like it without the conjunctions -- it feels more tiring for some reason. The basic "the _ the _" construction is explained here. Some might suggest that you have to set up a second comparison: The more he walks, the less energy he has; the less energy he has, the more tired he gets. But in the second part of ...


1

If this is for an online review, perhaps you should consider making the paragraph into a list: In this book I found a variety of grammatical and textual errors such as the following: irregular verb tense problems - especially lie/lay, sit/set and run lack of subjunctive mood - e.g. "He wished he was" instead of "He wished he were" repeated ...


1

The "at at least" word string is not inherently impossible. For example: Her little dog, Toto, has snapped at at least three bicyclists in the past month. As other answerers have pointed out, the phrase "differ at" may sound less natural than "differ on" or "differ in" in the sentence "They differ in/on/at/from at least one position," depending on what ...



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