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4

There is nothing necessarily wrong with this sentence. However the grammatical version may not be what was intended by the speaker. This sentence is grammatical if the phrase 'Moving to a new town and making new friends' is intended as a single action. In other words: "[The action of both] moving to a new town and making new friends is hard for people ...


4

This sentence involves an interrogative word what which has been extracted from its normal position at the beginning of the subordinate clause to the beginning of the matrix (main) clause. The subordinate clause can be represented like this: [X ] is in the box. What is in the box? The subordinate clause is embedded as the Complement of the verb know ...


3

There should be a clear line of distinction between an intransitive and transitive verb. To begin is used as an intransitive verb as in: The story of my success began so. If you invert the above sentence to emphasize the adverb "so" (it is not an intensifier) which is used to mean "in the way described or demonstrated before", the sentence is changed ...


1

Based on the following definition of Hello, "Hello, World!" is an exclamation + a noun. Note that in this utterance, "Hello" is not a verb, and not a predicate. Hello, exclamation 1 Used as a greeting or to begin a telephone conversation: hello there, Katie! - ODO According to David Crystal's A Dictionary of Linguistics and Phonetics (thanks, ...


1

Formally? No. It's missing a subject. But in informal settings it's fine. The subject is elided. Our department seems we could use some shaping from our building practices today. or It seems we could use some shaping from our building practices today. etc.


1

It's a stylistic pecadillo at best. One shouldn't mix points of view in the same piece of writing. It's syntactically awkward to use one and you interchangeably, since it may cause the reader momentary confusion and create an undesireable ambiguity. As a matter of formality, old-school stylists like Warriner say that using "you" in a general sense - in ...


1

I think it's acceptable. One and you are not referring to the same hypothetical person, so they don't need to agree with each other. One refers to the person who is coming to the conclusion based on looking at the house, while you refers to doctors. As Rob Ster points out, mixing points of view in a single sentence is awkward, so it might be better ...


1

Good question. Resulting is a participle, and normally a participle modifies a specific noun, usually the subject of a clause. However, in this case you could say the participle modifies nothing specific, or it modifies the entire preceding clause (who drove his car at another youth). It says something about the event described in the clause as a whole: the ...


1

The following relative clause "...who drove his car at another youth resulting in him being flung onto the roof of the car..." was used before the main verb "was given" in the sentence. Journalists are notorious for trying to cram as much information into their lead (often spelled "lede") as they possibly can, without much regard for whether the result ...



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