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7

look at here What is the reason for not using the preposition at before here? Is it because here is an adverb and it is wrong to use a preposition before an adverb? What if we use here with its nominal meaning, as in "get away from here", or "It's really hot in here", and then say "Look at here" meaning "Look at this place"? If it is wrong and ...


5

As far as I'm concerned, there's no "correct" way here... Both of those, plus - what I would argue as the most popular option - "Sometimes I can" are all OK in my book. I can sometimes see the future but it's not working today. I sometimes can eat an entire pizza alone. Sometimes I can spell complicated words without needing the spellchecker! ...


5

The answer is rather complex. There are some rules that regulate the position of an adverb of frequency, such as: sometimes, often, occasionally, always etc. subject aux/be adverb main verb object/place/time I *often* go swimming in the evenings. He doesn't *always* play tennis. We are *usually* ...


4

To eliminate the repeated is, which is acceptable even if it is awkward, you can place the parenthetical phrase, as it is, before the noun phrase it modifies: We know that, as it is, Einstein's gravity model is not normalizable at D=4.


3

The first sentence listed, "I got to go now." Is a generally acceptable slang variant of the second sentence listed, "I have to go now." They both mean the same thing, which is, "I need to go now." have to and need to are more correct, but got to is common enough that no one will misunderstand you, and only the most pedantic among us will ...


3

You need [to practise your proofreading]. One test to see if a phrase is an Object in a clause is to see if the phrase concerned can become the Subject of a passivised version of that clause. If it can, even if the result is awkward, then it is definitely an Object. If it can't then it is much less likely to be an Object -- but it still might be. ...


2

John Locke (Is it?) No, in fact Jean-Jacques Rousseau strings together four rhetorical questions to describe aspects of life and society where people have surrendered their "natural" rights and freedom. The semi-colons show the end of each question. In each case he asks, 'How have people let this happen so willingly?' By what art/ technique did anyone ...


1

"Sometimes" is bad toward the middle: sometimes the fish must have been being eaten for hours the fish sometimes must have been being eaten for hours the fish must sometimes have been being eaten for hours the fish must have sometimes been being eaten for hours *the fish must have been sometimes being eaten for hours *the fish must have been ...


1

What a lot of wrong answers! (Except for John's, of course.) In "You need to practise your proofreading.", the subject of "need" is (as you say) "you", and the object of "need" is "to practice your proofreading". A test for objects is whether they can be passivized, and here we have "To practice your proofreading is needed". A test for noun phrases is ...


1

Both are possible, but mean different things. Consider these simpler examples: This phenomenon has been observed in the atmosphere, where condensation almost always forms around dust particles. In the atmosphere, a phenomenon has been observed where condensation almost always forms around dust particles. The first sentence refers to a phenomenon ...


1

All the best (or Good luck) for your new life in the USA! And, 'Bon Voyage!' Please note, "the USA", always.


1

All junior developers are very similar in terms of potential. Junior developers who work with recruiters cost more money to hire, because employers need to pay the recruiter. Junior developers who work with recruiters don't even receive the extra money it costs to hire them.


1

If what you want is to avoid the double "which" – it is not wrong but it is unaesthetic to many – you have several options. You could go, "The town bordering the school, which is (etc.)" or turn it around as "The town, exclusively populated by immigrants, bordered the school", or do yet other things along the same lines. Though what seems a little odd to ...


1

Your i) is ungrammatical. But ii) is pretty good, though sounding a bit archaic. I googled "Does not the sun" and got some hits, including "Just as a hydrogen bomb explodes instantly, why does not the sun explode entirely at once?" here.


1

Today, if you want to avoid using contractions, you would write these as Does he not go to school? Does the sun not give us light? Putting the "not" after "does" or "do" is considered ungrammatical currently in standard English. Both positions were acceptable historically (possibly explaining why the contraction is allowed in these sentences), ...


1

A correct answer to your question as written is "A sentence may contain a word." I think I may know what question you are really trying to ask but I'm not sure. But I'm pretty sure it is not the question you asked. I think you are not asking 'what parts may be included in a sentence (among possibly others)' , but 'what may a sentence may comprise?' That ...



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