Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Shelving is usually something you say about a beach, It slopes evenly down from the high tide line into the water, so you quickly get to swimming depth without stumbling. This poor misery is on top of a metaphorical mountaintop that shelves away on each side. He has everything (including hot and cold running water ! (in 1895) ) so what is there left to ...


3

A complex sentence has more than one clause, and a clause requires a subject and verb. "At her age" is a prepositional phrase, which doesn't contain a verb, so your sentence remains simple. Conjunctions may be omitted. Punctuation may take their place: Minggay Awok was lonely; her only companions were a few charcoal black chickens. His business ...


3

This is from "The Bottle Imp" a story by Robert Louis Stevenson (actually first published in 1891), and "shelves" here is a verb meaning "to slope down and away from." The OED says "gently," but one of the exemplars uses the word "precipitously." The narrator has just fallen in love and thinks that he's reached the peak of happiness in his life and that ...


3

From context, what I'm getting is that the subject is at the peak of what's good for his life, from here, his life can only get worse. I believe the shelf he is talking about is a ridgeline or a cliff top or similar: In this context, I think either he's using shelve as: a verb, in the sense of 'a ridgeline (a shelf) extends along'. a plural noun, in ...


2

Get him on board with the project is the popular phrase for introducing someone to a project. on board if someone is on board, they are working with an organization or group of people A new financial director has been brought on board to help us assess the cost of the project. We hope to have a new doctor on board by the end of the month. ...


2

I believe complex sentences don't always need a conjunction. For example, the sentence which precedes this one is conjunctionless yet complex.


1

It is correct. I read it as "(at the past instant that we are imagining) he had gone eighty-four days now (emphasing that we are to imagine that particular instant)" without taking a fish. The effect of the sentence is to place the reader firmly with the man at that moment in the past. Your alternative is a correct construction but gives no such feeling, ...


1

Yes, this is correct. What you've done with the 's is omit the noun that's being modified, i.e.: A society so vibrant and diverse as America's society is bound to dominate. You can also omit the 's, which would imply that American is a society rather than having a society (which, to be honest, kind of mean the same thing). However, the second sentence ...


1

I believe your friend is correct. The easiest way I've found to interpret it is to break it into the two thoughts that it's trying to express. Infrared emissions radiated from Earth's surface. This radiation would otherwise be transmitted back into space.


1

It's an archaic construction, inverting the verb and the subject, and using the (nearly obsolete) subjunctive form of the verb, to convey a conditional. It survives much more in the past (where, apart from were, the subjunctive is the same as the ordinary past). So: Had I known ... = If I had known ... Had he seen it, ... = If he had seen it, ... ...


1

As Dan Bron said, the phrase What <name> said! means that you agree with what they said, or that you would say the exact same thing. In some cases, this is used by someone who was asked a question, but is interrupted by another person. For example, Johnny asks Wendy, "How could he possibly fly all by himself?!" Bob interjects, saying, "The answer is ...


1

From a purely native speaker's (non-linguist) perspective: there is essentially no difference in the 'meaning' of these sentences. Basically they both say It is better to show you my work(s). Would in English is a softening word, that is, a word or phrase which makes us sound less demanding. For comparison, Turn down that music. Would you turn down ...


1

I am reading them as they are posted. Because "documents" is plural, you need to use "them" and "they". Because the sentence is in the present tense, you must use "are", which is the present tense form of the verb "to be". This may seem confusing, since "being" is also a form of "to be", but it is the progressive tense form, which is used to highlight the ...


1

The first one is correct. I'm reading them documents as they are being posted.


1

You can certainly use sheer beauty in this way. Sheer beauty, in this sense, means that the film is very beautiful and that its beauty can be considered on its own. So, your friend is saying that the film is so very beautiful that, irrespective of its other virtues or faults, it incites repeat viewings. However, there are some errors in your sentence: it ...


1

gave is the past tense, so it should only be used if teachers no longer give children time for play and sports. If the practice is ongoing, the present tense give should be used.


1

Perhaps the best comparison is with move for (/ move that) move for: move for something to make a parliamentary or legal motion in favor of something. I move for dismissal of the case against my client. My lawyer moved for a recess of the trial. [McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002] move that: move 11. ...


1

The two sentences are often used interchangeably and you should never assume a literal distinction. However, in the literal sense, "I am not talking science here" would mean, "I am not using scientific jargon that you would not be able to understand," while "I am not talking about science here" would mean, "I am not talking about the scientific subject, I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible