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51

It is appropriate when you have simply flipped the clauses: I stayed inside because it was raining. Because it was raining, I stayed inside. What the teacher was trying to teach was that a a subordinate clause is not a complete sentence: I stayed inside. This is a complete sentence. Because it was raining. This is not; the conjunction ...


38

Small children have a particular writing style that teachers often mark as wrong. We had a field trip. And we went to the zoo. And we saw monkeys. And they were funny. And then we went home. And the bus was noisy. Nobody thinks that's a well-written story. So the teacher circles all the "And"s and says "don't start a sentence with and". But somehow we ...


35

What makes you think this is an error? All the greatest writers of English have started sentences with and. Mark Liberman, linguistics professor at the University of Pennsylvania wrote about this mythical “rule” in Language Log in 2005: There is nothing in the grammar of the English language to support a prescription against starting a sentence with and ...


34

It is perfectly all right to begin a sentence with a conjunction. It is a special form of emphasis, used to elevate a clause to a position of more emphasis and importance. I hold that all beets are red. And I will stick to that belief until you show me a green beet. We were tired, hungry, and exhausted. But we were home. It can also be used as a ...


31

Brand names You should never change a brand name. 'iPhone' should always be spelled as 'iPhone,' no matter where in the sentence it is. 'IPhone,' 'iphone,' 'I-phone,' 'i-phone' or 'I phone' are always wrong. 'iPhone' is the only good one: Good iPhones are the best selling smartphones. Wrong IPhones are the best selling smartphones. Terrible ...


21

The Grammar Girl has a good article on this topic, basically: It is fine to use however at the beginning of a sentence; you just need to know when to use a comma. If it means "to whatever extent", don't use a comma: However wrong it is, I will say it loud and clearly. If it means "nevertheless", use a comma: However, I don't give a ...


19

Yes. Sentences start with capital letters; abbreviations are no exception. A possible* exception is when a proper name starts with a lower case letter. E.g., if I changed my name to matthew then "matthew is awesome." would be correct. This is because the word is intended to be lower case. E.g., on the other hand, has no such association with it. * Don't ...


17

Certainly, it is correct to begin a sentence with also. All adverbs (also inclusive) can be used at the beginning of a sentence with the proper punctuation. For instance, the first sentence in this answer begins with an adverb. Other examples are: Furthermore, we have exhausted all the other options. Definitely, you can use my car. Surely, he ...


15

It is helpful to consider in each case whether the emphasis of the sentence should be yourself or something else. I've struggled for a while now to completely purge the passive from my own writing, and by swinging completely the other way, I ended up with awkward sentences that failed to get my point across in some instances. I suggest emphasizing "I" when ...


13

I'd rather write your example using since like: Since I'm not feeling well, I'm unable to work. "Hence" is a synonym of "therefore", "consequently", "because of that", etc, and being a conjunctive adverb that connects a main clause and a subordinate one, it should appear within the subordinate: I'm not feeling well; hence, I'm unable to work. You ...


12

I think this advice comes from the (somewhat strange) idea that sentences should have one complete idea. If your sentence begins with the conjunction "however", then it's an extension of the idea in the previous sentence and is therefore not a "complete idea". The same reasoning is behind advice not to begin sentences with "or" and "and". Of course this ...


12

While I'm not aware of a particular grammatical rule that would prohibit this, as a matter of style, I would prefer not to do what you're suggesting there, especially with something like ASP.NET AJAX. I would suggest something like: Instead, you’ll use a higher-level model called ASP.NET AJAX. This toolkit gives you a set of server-side components and ...


12

You can use hence at the beginning of a sentence, but not like that. Because it means "therefore", it needs to come after the cause. If you want a conjunction that can come before the cause, use since. Since I am not feeling well, I am unable to work. I am not feeling well, hence I am unable to work. I am not feeling well; therefore, I am ...


11

Well, with certain words it's simply impossible to start a grammatical sentence: one such word that comes to mind is "ago". It always comes after other words (e.g. "one hour ago"), never at the beginning of a sentence or clause. [Before someone points it out: note the use-mention distinction. A sentence like 'Ago' is a word you cannot start a sentence ...


11

I'll admit to possibly having been an accomplice in the perpetuation of this Zombie Rule. When I taught writing to third grade students I did use the NIC proscription [I believe I can use this construction to mean the rule that proscribed IC.] I did so because without it a large percentage of my students would consistently compose paragraphs such as this: ...


11

From Paul Brians’ book named "Common Errors in English Usage": “Anyways” at the beginning of a sentence usually indicates that the speaker has resumed a narrative thread: “Anyways, I told Matilda that guy was a lazy bum before she ever married him.” It also occurs at the end of phrases and sentences, meaning “in any case“: “He wasn’t all ...


11

It's grammatical to start a sentence with a variable but the latter variant, "The variable Φ is treated in a special way", is less confusing in the following ways: The latter variant makes it clear that you're talking about the variable Φ and not about anything else, such as the sentence Φ or the function Φ. The latter variant makes it more explicit that ...


11

Starting a sentence with as is not a problem, and never was. The Corpus of Contemporary American English has 150000+ cites for sentences starting with as, across all registers and contexts, including academic writing. Your boss is completely alone in this. However, what your boss might actually be objecting to is the so-called dangling modifier. ...


10

"I mean", like other discourse particles, is tough to nail down. But every discourse element does serve a function, it is just normally a function that is a bit different from other types of words. Here is some current theory on what "I mean" means. All of my information comes from Fox Tree & Shrock (2002). The paper has a slightly different focus, ...


10

You are correct; while should not have a comma after it in these situations. It is being used as a conjunction, with a meaning of "in spite of the fact that". If you substitute that series of words in for the while, it should be obvious that a comma is not called for: In spite of the fact that, it looks warm outside, there is actually a cold breeze... ...


10

It should not be capitalized. If you're trying to make your documentation useful, don't introduce unnecessary complexities. Use the lowercase int (in fact, use it in a different font, preferably monospaced) for the titles. And comment on the fact that it's lowercase, the first few times you use it, and explain why you're using it. If you're writing about ...


10

The problem is not that you used due to at the beginning of a sentence. The problem is that due to must be followed by a nominal phrase, since to is a preposition and prepositions are (almost) always followed by nominal phrases. For this reason, you need to use a verbal noun or a gerund after to: Due to having less features than an actual standard ...


9

So is supposed to be used in something like, "The grass is tall, so it will be mowed." The use expanded to "The grass is tall. So, it will be mowed." Now, so is commonly used at the beginning of a sentence to mean "as a result" as it was traditionally used, but also with the same meaning as "uh," as an initial attention-getter. For example, "So, do you want ...


8

Rather than share your reactions to things, why not make statements about the things themselves? Make the subject of the sentence the topic of discussion, not yourself. Most people enjoy sharing their own experiences, but that can lead us to say "I" compulsively, and it can definitely get a little repetitive. So if your writing sounds stilted when you ...


8

This usage seems like a discourse marker, a way of saying "right then, pay attention, I'm about to give you the answer". Seamus Heaney, in his fantastic translation of Beowulf, uses it so: Conventional renderings of hwæt, the first word of the poem, tend towards the archaic literary, with ‘lo’, ‘hark’, ‘behold’, ‘attend’ and – more colloquially – ...


8

Combo of my and @FumbleFingers' comments, which I believe would constitute an answer: While one couldn't empirically insist that a sentence cannot begin with i.e., doing so would unnecessarily raise some eyebrows. Might I suggest a couple of alternatives? How do we handle the case when the list is empty (i.e. the filter matched no entries)? How do ...


7

Well, it is a context marker, showing that you are launching a story. Examples of context: "Did you do your homework today?", "Yes" is an acknowledgment of dialog. "Did you do your homework today?", "Well, yes" means you want to shift to a story. "Did you do your homework today?", "Uh, yes", another context marker, means that your answer is unofficial, ...


7

I would say it is one of those errors that is coming more into accepted use, especially in e-mails, but since most people continue to consider it an error, you are best off avoiding it. And In addition, it is easy to correct, you can almost always replace it with a more formal term, or just omit it, e.g: And, we hope to see you at the party on Tuesday! ...


7

Wikipedia suggest that eBay is the correct usage. eBay announced that starting in March 2008, eBay had added to... However, I would be interested to see if the same convention applies with abbreviations like mRNA Again, Wikipedia suggests the same. mRNA is transcribed from a DNA template, and carries coding information... However, that's not to ...



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