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34

If you delete the most of all and rewrite it as a bulletted list, the problem becomes clear: We hope you will find our Qualifications to be: well-organized concise to exceed your expectations Your sentence treats well-organized, concise and to exceed your expectations as being in the same grammatical category. well-organized and concise ...


26

Voicing Assimilation is the technical term for what happened here. In English (and Latin, and most Indo-European languages, among many others), /b/ and /p/ are identical in pronunciation (both are bilabial stops), differing only in their Voice parameter; /b/ is Voiced, while /p/ is Voiceless. It is a fact about the human vocal tract that consonant ...


20

Basically, English vocabulary is a mix of mostly proto-Germanic and proto-French, the languages in use by the Saxons and Normans respectively during the Norman invasion and occupation of the British isles. To this was added hefty dashes of classical Latin and Greek, and then Romanizations of words from all over as words were borrowed from British colonies ...


14

In general the suffix "-ee" is productive, and usually has the meaning of "person to which xxx is done" - I find "dragee" a little strange because it is not a person. But beware: there are a few words where the "-ee" denotes the person who does rather than the person who is done to. A prominent example is "attendee", but also "returnee". I think this use ...


14

Rule: Use a Dictionary Yes, there is a rule, and that rule is that you must look them up in a dictionary if you are not a native speaker. That’s because words beginning with re- in English can, depending on the word, be pronounced with any of eight different vowels: /ra/ /rɑ̃/ /rɒ/ /re/ /rə/ /rɛ/ /ri/ /rɪ/ The last three or four at the end of that ...


11

Sentences 1 and 3 are both correct. Sentence 1 is a counterfactual conditional sentence, and sentence 3 is a factual conditional sentence. Factual: In these constructions, the condition clause expresses a condition the truth of which is unverified. Counterfactual: In these constructions, the condition clause expresses a condition that is known to ...


11

There aren’t really any words with this property. It is a rule of English phonology that nasals assimilate in place before stops, so all nasals before /k/ and /g/ are velar nasals—that is, it is always the case that words which are written “-nc-” or “-nk-” will be pronounced with the “ng” sound, the velar nasal. It is possible, in careful speech, to ...


11

In both of the examples in which that is optional, the relative pronoun is the object of the embedded clause. Long books [that] religious people like tend to be Bibles. [Religious people like long books.] Water tanks [that] fish need are spacious. [Fish need water tanks.] In your other examples, the relative pronoun is the subject of the embedded ...


10

Alliaceous is used botanically for plants of the garlic/onion family; might it fit the bill? (It’s much more standard than allial, I think, going both by dictionaries and google.) Now I want to go out and order something big and garlicky at a restaurant, just so I can smack my lips and say “Mmmmm! Alliaceo-licious!”. Or, not quite, because it would just ...


9

The main reason is most likely pronunciation. There is another example of this, where the difficulty may be more prominent: describe. It would be rather difficult to say describtion, as compared to description, which flows off of one's tongue rather nicely. The same goes for absorption; it is simply easier than absorbtion. Etymonline suggests that this ...


8

There aren’t any simple rules per se, and most people, when asked why you use one preposition over another in a particular case, will usually give an explanation by analogy with a more simple example. But it can be hard to invent these analogies if you don’t already know which word to use. Fortunately there is a good tool you can use when you are wondering ...


8

Well, the rule isn't true at all. There are more exceptions to the rule than that follow it. According to QI, 923 words have cie (against the rule), 23 times more than cei (following the rule).


7

It certainly used to be a rule, but there are grounds for ignoring it. This would be strongest where you were uncertain of the number of children (not the case here). But you can certainly argue that in logic, there is an oldest of 1, 2, or more children. So, your mother is almost certainly correct about what she was taught. Whether that stricture still ...


7

Yes, this is for real. No, there really is no rule. There used to be a rule in Latin, though. Etymonline explains in more detail: -ancesuffix attached to verbs to form abstract nouns of process or fact (convergence from converge), or of state or quality (absence from absent); ultimately from L. -antia and -entia, which depended on the vowel in the stem ...


7

Sure, there are plenty of words like that: income inculcate encode encomium And so on.


7

It's a variety of Conjunction Reduction, used to avoid repeating material that's already been said. In this case, it's morphological instead of syntactic, but it's got the same purpose and works much the same way. Generally, though, once it's been reduced, there is a preferred order for such oppositional phrases as high- or low-budget; low- or high-budget ...


7

Just use a colon instead: There's a typo in the third paragraph: "through" should be "thorough". And never put non-literal punctuation in literal strings. That's screwed up, and screws things up.


7

According to the definitions laid out here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_prefixes: prefix description example de- reverse action, get rid of deemphasise un- reverse action, ... release from undo, untie For this reason, both are semantically valid, since both prefixes state that the verb is to be reversed, ...


7

If you use suffer with a direct object, you are generally referring to a single negative experience. For example: She suffered a heart attack on her 80th birthday. The company suffered a setback when its CEO resigned. Suffer from, on the other hand, is generally used when referring to the continuing consequences of a negative event or experience: ...


7

Based on context, Qualifications would have to be taken to be some kind of written document, but none of the senses of the noun "qualification" in e.g. Merriam-Webster could be construed to refer to a document. So either it's some kind of jargon, or it's a wrong use of the word "qualification." If it's some kind of jargon, that would need to be explained for ...


6

No, she isn't right. The younger of two children is also the youngest. (Of course, both are correct, so if she prefers "younger" in her own letter, that's perfectly reasonable.) Indeed, there's a joke about referring to the only member of some category with a superlative (the joke being that the sole member is both the most X of its type and the least X ...


6

I were, used in the kind of contexts Irene has mentioned in her comment, has traditionally been regarded as a subjunctive from. It is certainly grammatical. The authors of ‘The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language’, however, refer to it as 'irrealis, indicating that it conveys varying degrees of remoteness from factuality.' Their view is that the ...


6

The /ə ~ ən/ rule, like the /ðə ~ ði/ rule, depends completely on the individual sound that follows. What word starts with this sound, or what its meaning or part of speech may be, does not matter at all. The rules are very simple to state in their entirety: /ə/ or /ðə/ before Consonants; /ən/ or /ði/ before Vowels "5" is pronounced /fayv/, and that ...


6

As far as Java and Android SDK are concerned, they're proper nouns. Object-oriented programming is often written as OOP. Perhaps the author of the sentence thought it should be capitalised because the abbreviated form OOP has capitalised letters. The proper way of writing it would be 'object-oriented programming', since it is in the middle of a sentence. ...


6

It is an example of anacoluthon: a sentence which starts using one grammatical construction and ending with a different one. (Just like that.) ... find our qualifications to be... to exceed your expectations. A simple grammatical fix is: We hope you will find our qualifications to be well-organized and concise, and most of all, to exceed your ...


5

It turns out that you don't need to worry too much: it's something in the order of 100 times more likely that the base word ends in -y. Common exceptions are: a few common monosyllabic words ("die", "lie", "tie", "pie") and compounds ("untie", "underlie"...); a few loanwords from French ("sortie", "crêperie", "cameraderie"...) plus one or two older loans ...


5

(The key elements of the answer to this question are given in the comments following it. This answer ties them together and adds some more detail.) If you look at a fuller range of examples— calf, calve; grief, grieve; half, halve; life, live; proof, prove; safe, save; serf, serve; strife, strive (with some meaning drift); thief, thieve; advice, advise; ...


4

Apart from deliberately quirky usage, I think not. You'd be a recycler. Things can always change, but I don't think there's really a case for accepting recyclist as a valid English word just yet.



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