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This feature is called intrusive r, as others have pointed out. Bryan Gick, from Yale University, writes: Intrusion typically refers to the presence of a non-historical consonant between two heterosyllabic vowels. ... All dialects having intrusive r also seem to require two subordinate processes: r-vocalisation (the reduction or apparent complete loss ...


4

According to John Kelly of the Washington Post (Catching the Sounds of the City), he claims: "warsh" is the predominant characteristic of what linguists call America's midland accent. The accent can be found in the swath of the country that extends west from Washington, taking in Maryland; southern Pennsylvania; West Virginia; parts of Virginia; southern ...


3

I can only offer this bit from the venerable alt.usage.english group: Many nonrhotic speakers (including RP speakers, but excluding most nonrhotic speakers in the southern U.S.) use a "linking r": they don't pronounce "r" in "for" by itself /fO:/, but they do pronounce the first "r" in "for ever" /fO: 'rEv@/. Linking "r" differs from French ...


3

As far as I know, in casual speech, the intrusive 'r' is a feature of many non-rhotic English dialects, but I'm pretty sure that there's not any rhotic dialect that has it. Seems to be a hiatus repair strategy. It occurs only in words ending with a non-high vowel when followed by a word beginning with a vocalic segment. There's some work by Hartmann & ...


2

Warsh was used frequently in Quyon and Mayo, West Quebec for at least two generations of Irish Canadians. My father and his siblings spoke what I though was simply bad English, however I now realize that it was an accent transported from Ireland (a la The Great Famine). They also said 'he's an arse', 'Warshington' and 'that'd be a fine how-do-you-do'. Clear, ...



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