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1

Check this idiom: The pot calling the kettle black From Wikipedia: The phrase "The pot calling the kettle black" is an idiom used to claim that a person is guilty of the very thing of which they accuse another.


2

One relevant term is "hypocrisy", "The practice of engaging in the same behaviour or activity for which one criticises another." (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hypocrisy) It does miss, though, the point where you're innocent; someone can justly indict another for vice and still be a hypocrite. Another related term is "gaslighting", from a 1938 play, which ...


7

Regarding which rhetorical devices the author used, No matter in what language his doom may have been pronounced; no matter what complexion incompatible with English freedom an African or Indian sun may have burnt upon him; no matter in what disastrous battle his liberty may have been cloven down; no matter with what solemnities he may have been devoted ...


7

"that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die," "Die" here is a noun: Die noun (plural dies) 2 A device for cutting or moulding metal into a particular shape. Example sentences In the sealing module, seal grids can be snapped in and out of the sealing-grid die to change the shape of the package seal. ...


3

I believe that the phrase “might want no fact of distinguished die” is confusing because we automatically interpret "die" as a verb. I think the passage is correctly interpreted as involving a noun, perhaps the singular of "dice". dice NOUN (plural same) A small cube with each side having a different number of spots on it, ranging from one to ...



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