Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

This may fall to a matter of opinion, but I would say that number 2 is not an example of diacope. As a rhetorical device, its action stems from very specific choices of wording. A diacope is specifically the repetition of an identical word. There are related devices (epizeuxis and epanalepsis) that differ by the distance between the repeated words. As Kris ...


0

This is not actually a quote-within-a-quote. The only quoted words here are "every effort". … Bank declined to interview, but in a phone call said, "We are making... is actually all part of the newscaster's statement. The words quote and unquote are used here to denote that the two words contained therein are a direct quote, i.e. the specific words ...


1

Even TVTropes does not have a specific name for this, but rather sorts it under Finishing Each Other's Sentences: Closeness and familiarity aren't the only reason for [Finishing Each Other's Sentences]. Others include: [...] Last-Second Word Swap (especially when the audience was expecting it to rhyme): Alice: That sexy young farmer has an ...


2

I'm not an English speaker, but using Portuguese logic I believe it could be called "abrupt rupture". When you start to explain something and your ideas are broken, it makes a rupture in the dialog, starting another one.


1

Yes, it is correct as written. It is a stylistic choice used to draw attention to some portion of the sentence. This is the rhetorical device called anastrophe, itself a type of hyperbaton. Anastrophe is defined by the OED as: Inversion, or unusual arrangement, of the words or clauses of a sentence. Poetic Use As mentioned here, Coleridge uses ...


2

You're right, this is an older usage. It looks like the object was fronted or "topicalized" to the front of the infinitive. This no longer works in English but I guess it used to! Similar rules exist is German and other Germanic languages.


0

Hope this helps: To "hedge" means to avoid making a definite decision, statement, or commitment. "Hedge" as a noun means a calculatedly noncommittal or evasive statement. If you hedge a statement or question, then you are turning it down by not making a statement or doing something else to avoid making a committment. Look it uo on MW or OED.


0

Cold Reading wikipedia Cold reading is a series of techniques used by mentalists, psychics, fortune-tellers, mediums and illusionists to determine or express details about another person, often in order to convince them that the reader knows much more about a subject than they actually do.[1] Without prior knowledge of a person, a practiced cold reader ...


2

The rhetorical technique is Appeal to False Authority. They could also be accused of being pretentious.


0

Though not a common usage, but I think that in your case arrogance is used as a rhetorical device: Arrogant Having or displaying a sense of overbearing self-worth or self-importance. Having or showing feelings of unwarranted importance out of overbearing pride; "an arrogant official"; "arrogant claims"; Rhetorical figures arrogance.


3

This isn't actually a fallacy, because there's no argument being made, the question is simply being dismissed, and I don't believe there's any more apt phrase for this that just dismissing the question. If the other person offers reasons for the dismissal, that would constitute an argument, and thus potentially a fallacy, but which one would depend on what ...


0

Searching through Google Books and then again through Google for the phrase "intending * to disturb" (that is, for the word "intending" followed by the phrase "to disturb", optionally separated by other words), I got three types of result: intending to disturb intending [adverb or adverbial phrase] to disturb; for example "intending not to disturb", ...



Top 50 recent answers are included