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Understated encouragement, equivalent to "you could hardly do better than". Indeed, reviewing LB's now somewhat classic oeuvre would be a most profitable study -- for all sorts of reasons, particularly if the person advised wished to know more about stand-up comedy.


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It means "there are many things you could do that would be less useful than to review some of Lenny Bruce's material". You'd need the context to know exactly what's intended, but it generally is more of the latter (compliment) than the former (suggestion): you don't literally need to review the material, but there are worse things that you could do (i.e. ...


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I researched this a bit more and I came to the conclusion that I guess there isn't a specific name for this sort of technique. At the end of the day, it doesn't really matter if you do not specifically name the technique (you won't get marked down in an essay) Although a polyptoton is similar to the technique, a polyptoton is more to do with the repetition ...


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Towards a term or phrase specifying the insincere usage of the inclusive we to promote a feigned consensus, and by the nose thus lead groups astray... Pseudo-Formal: The inclusive first person plural in absentia. Informal: The rogue's we. The Machiavellian we. We-selling. We-hawkin'. We minus one.


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The OED lists it as sense 2 of nosism. See below, with a recent example. With reference to an individual: the use of the word ‘we’ in stating his or her own opinions. rare. 2010 B. Zimmer in N.Y. Times Mag. 3 Oct. 18/2 Given the accumulated resentment of ‘nosism’ (using we for I, from the Latin pronoun nos), it’s little wonder that ...


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In Aristotle's conception of rhetoric, you would call this an appeal to the ethos of the speaker -- in this case, the credibility Churchill contends that he's built through a history of plain-speaking. It's not so much the speaking of difficult truths that constitutes a rhetorical maneuver here as his highlighting an authority-conferring quality that is ...


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There are multiple levels here, as you would expect from a politician. On the surface he is engaging in plain speaking plain speaking - Adjective Talking in a frank, outspoken, or blunt manner www.oxforddictionaries.com However, he is also highlighting this as a quality of himself to persuade the audience that he can be trusted in his ...


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This approach to rhetoric could be aptly labelled as honesty: The quality of being honest It is a rare thing to find in political oratory, but is a stratagem by which the speaker incurs the cost by being truthful in one matter, increasing the trust of his audience, so that they are more apt to believe in what he says next.



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