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15

etymonline is a great resource for looking up specific words. If you are at a university, you might have OED access, which is the most in-depth and hardcore etymology resource (if you can get to it). Take Our Word For It is a fun website for browsing through and learning about etymologies in a more entertaining, less structured way.


12

Origin: The term “the pot calling the kettle black” is usually used in the sense of accusing someone of hypocrisy. The origins of the phrase date back to at least the 1600s, when several writers published books or plays which included wordplays on this theme. Despite suggestions that the phrase is racist or nonsensical, the meaning is actually ...


10

Mama British English \mə-ˈmä\ (American English \ˈmä-mə\ or \məˈmɑ) Origin: 1545–55; mama (also, mamma) nursery word, with parallels in other European languages, probably in part inherited or borrowed, in part newly formed; compare Latin mamma, Greek mámmē breast, mama, French maman, Welsh mam mother Etymology Dictionary says mamma, ...


6

I think in my neck of the woods it'd be more idiomatic to speak of a (vast) sea of knowledge. But a (great) ocean of knowledge is okay, indeed if you google around you will see many many people using it.


6

If you find material in document A that quotes document B, you must reference both documents in your cites. The rationale for this is that selecting what's important and relevant is work and you must give credit for that work. From the Yale College Writing Centre: If the source you’re reading quotes another text, and you want to use that quoted ...


5

Johnny Carson, "What I Have Learned," 1991: “Before you criticize a man, walk a mile in his shoes. That way, if he's upset, he's a mile away and you've got his shoes." Handey did start on SNL in 1991 but I don't know when/if he did this gag, which I've also seen attributed to Billy Connolly. I know about the Carson date because I was his head writer, ...


4

Well, I googled "never judge walk mile shoes mile away have his shoes handey" and got this, which says the quote is Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them, you are a mile away from them and you have their shoes." – Jack Handey My technique was to specify a subset of the quote that I ...


4

Is it really necessary to inform the reader of who prepared the table? I think the best solution is to restructure such sentences to avoid having to refer to the agent at all. For example: It is likely that this will produce several improvements. and For a better explanation of the features and functionality of this product, see Table 1. After ...


4

A handy source online is The Phrase Finder: http://www.phrases.org.uk/


3

A body of knowledge is a collection of all concepts and ideas within a particular field. The word "body" doesn't imply massiveness on its own, but the full term is typically understood to refer to a mass of information sufficiently large to describe an entire domain of knowledge, which must inherently be quite large.


3

Universe of Knowledge is another metaphor: "Universe of knowledge" is a metaphor that has been important in library classification theory. Source: http://www.iva.dk/bh/Lifeboat_KO/CONCEPTS/universe_of_knowledge.htm


3

It is quite acceptable to use the personal pronoun--singular or plural, as the case might be--when attributing specific actions to yourself as author or to yourself and your colleagues as coauthors. In fact, this is preferred over a convoluted passive-voice construction. Thus, your second shaded example is perfectly acceptable. This accords with APA 6th ed. ...


3

If you are concerned about using a "personal" possessive determiner for something which is not a person, don't be. their determiner 1 belonging to or associated with the people or things previously mentioned or easily identified: parents keen to help their children [ODO] (my emphasis) Note that it isn't a possessive pronoun: a pronoun is a ...


3

WiseGeek, the source of Benyamin Hamidekhoo's answer, rightly notes that both the pot and the kettle "turn black with use." That is, they start out a silvery or grayish or coppery color and gradually turn black through exposure to the heat and smoke of the fires or heating elements that they are set above. However, I disagree with WiseGeek's contention that ...


3

When you are presenting the table, you are doing it now, i.e. in the present time. The clue is in the word PRESENTing. But the table itself contains data that has already been collected - in the past. So you are correct in presenting the table in the present tense, but discussing the previously collected data in the past tense.


2

There is absolutely no need to avoid progressive and perfect constructions. It would be difficult to write a paper without them. Perhaps you should ask the reviewer for details on what the objection to progressive and perfect constructions might be.


2

The idiom or something like it is attested in writing as early as 1620 The pot calls the pan burnt-arse (1639). I am from the US and I learned the expression from my mother at the age of 8--10 therebouts.


2

I would recommend not referring to yourself, unless it is somehow required. It seems to me that since you are writing the entire paper, it is obvious that you are preparing and providing each part of it. So I suggest: In order to better explain the features and functionality of this product, a table has been prepared that simplifies and broadens the ...


2

As the comment above notes, the SI brochure states: In both English and in French, when the name of a derived unit is formed from the names of individual units by multiplication, then either a space or a hyphen is used to separate the names of the individual units. In Section 7.80, "Hyphens and readability," the Chicago Manual of Style advises ...


2

General purpose: Online Etymology Dictionary Google Books, set date range and sort by date* Google Ngram Viewer Bill Mullins has a giant list of Full Text Databases Internet Archive Project Gutenberg HathiTrust Digital Library Topsy for Tweets The Right Rhymes: hop-hop slang defined Rap Stats by Rap Genius gives an idea of earliest use, but cannot be ...


1

Some other good online resources: Online Etymology Dictionary (often has phrases within entries for individual words) World Wide Words (Michael Quinion's archive of well-researched articles) Wordwizard (excellent discussion-based site with a focus on word and phrase origins) and ditto to @Robusto's answer. . .(usually)


1

I recommend Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable now at 16th edition.It is a bulky one -1326 pages


1

I recommend that you study his interviews and try to identify when/how he starts to lead the interviewee towards his own opinions regarding something that is being discussed, perhaps a comment about a given location, rules or social group that implies (perhaps demands) a biased answer from the person that is being interviewed. This might seem kind of vague ...


1

I suggest you introduce this section as follows: "In order to better explain the features and functionality of this product, the [your designated role in the project], [your name], has prepared a table that simplifies and broadens the information regarding the aforementioned subjects." For instance: "In order to better explain the features and ...


1

To cite a website according to MLA: Last name, First name. "Article Title." Website Title. Publisher of Website, Day Month Year article was published. Web. Day Month Year article was accessed. < URL >. On the home page of the site in question there is a link to email the webmaster. In this case, if you wish to formally cite the author, it would be ...


1

First a general comment; I would use Singaporean English rather than Singapore English, in the same way that one refers to American English and not America English. Your number 1 sounds acceptable to me with the addition of an article: "In the literature ...". Number 2 sounds ungrammatical. Number 3 seems to have an element of tautology; 1997 is clearly ...


1

Google works BEST always for me. :) especially their ngram. You can do all sort of stuff with it like their part of speech tags and even their different language tags. More info on ngram here. This is what Google says about it: When you enter phrases into the Google Books Ngram Viewer, it displays a graph showing how those phrases have occurred in a ...


1

“Keep it simple” […] try to stay with present simple and past simple tense is in general good advice; I imagine the reviewer isn't implying you can't use progressive and perfect constructions, but instead that they've noticed a problem with your use or overuse of progressive and perfect. (It is also possible the reviewer is merely trying to force his ...



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