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Origin: The term “the pot calling the kettle black” is usually used in the sense of accusing someone of hypocrisy. The origins of the phrase date back to at least the 1600s, when several writers published books or plays which included wordplays on this theme. Despite suggestions that the phrase is racist or nonsensical, the meaning is actually ...


6

If you find material in document A that quotes document B, you must reference both documents in your cites. The rationale for this is that selecting what's important and relevant is work and you must give credit for that work. From the Yale College Writing Centre: If the source you’re reading quotes another text, and you want to use that quoted ...


5

Johnny Carson, "What I Have Learned," 1991: “Before you criticize a man, walk a mile in his shoes. That way, if he's upset, he's a mile away and you've got his shoes." Handey did start on SNL in 1991 but I don't know when/if he did this gag, which I've also seen attributed to Billy Connolly. I know about the Carson date because I was his head writer, ...


4

Well, I googled "never judge walk mile shoes mile away have his shoes handey" and got this, which says the quote is Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way when you criticize them, you are a mile away from them and you have their shoes." – Jack Handey My technique was to specify a subset of the quote that I ...


3

When you are presenting the table, you are doing it now, i.e. in the present time. The clue is in the word PRESENTing. But the table itself contains data that has already been collected - in the past. So you are correct in presenting the table in the present tense, but discussing the previously collected data in the past tense.


3

If you are concerned about using a "personal" possessive determiner for something which is not a person, don't be. their determiner 1 belonging to or associated with the people or things previously mentioned or easily identified: parents keen to help their children [ODO] (my emphasis) Note that it isn't a possessive pronoun: a pronoun is a ...


1

To cite a website according to MLA: Last name, First name. "Article Title." Website Title. Publisher of Website, Day Month Year article was published. Web. Day Month Year article was accessed. < URL >. On the home page of the site in question there is a link to email the webmaster. In this case, if you wish to formally cite the author, it would be ...


1

WiseGeek, the source of Benyamin Hamidekhoo's answer, rightly notes that both the pot and the kettle "turn black with use." That is, they start out a silvery or grayish or coppery color and gradually turn black through exposure to the heat and smoke of the fires or heating elements that they are set above. However, I disagree with WiseGeek's contention that ...


1

First a general comment; I would use Singaporean English rather than Singapore English, in the same way that one refers to American English and not America English. Your number 1 sounds acceptable to me with the addition of an article: "In the literature ...". Number 2 sounds ungrammatical. Number 3 seems to have an element of tautology; 1997 is clearly ...


1

Google works BEST always for me. :) especially their ngram. You can do all sort of stuff with it like their part of speech tags and even their different language tags. More info on ngram here. This is what Google says about it: When you enter phrases into the Google Books Ngram Viewer, it displays a graph showing how those phrases have occurred in a ...


1

“Keep it simple” […] try to stay with present simple and past simple tense is in general good advice; I imagine the reviewer isn't implying you can't use progressive and perfect constructions, but instead that they've noticed a problem with your use or overuse of progressive and perfect. (It is also possible the reviewer is merely trying to force his ...



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