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There is no clause in the sentences. The first infinitives in both sentences are adjectival which cannot be separated from the noun phrases which begin the two sentences to form the subjects of to be verbs is and is respectively. The second elements after to be verbs are infinitive phrases which perform the functions as the complements to the subjects. There ...


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To me, "the apples and oranges[, which / that] were rotting" can only be applied to both fruits as the lack of a separate determiner causes me to parse it as the (apples and oranges). By adding an extra determiner, the situation changes, and in most cases, the clause would be applied just to the latter: (the apples) and (the oranges) and the clause would ...


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The Wikipedia article on English determiners contains: Relative determiners: which (quite formal and archaic, as in He acquired two dogs and three cats, which animals were then...); also whichever and whatever (which are of the type that form clauses with no antecedent: I'll take whatever money they've got).


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He noticed the apples and oranges, which were rotting, in the room next door. This is not very ambiguous and means that both the apples and the oranges were rotting. If you wanted to single out the oranges you could say something like: He noticed the apples and oranges, the latter of which were rotting, in the room next door. This feels awkward ...


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In the cited excerpt, the author adjusts the focus of the narrative in midsentence, from "the ghastly white tombstones" to "that peculiar loathsome whiteness" of the marble from which the tombstones are carved. The substance of the sentence wouldn't change if we reworded the first part of the sentence as follows: Only, she began to be afraid of the ...


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First, I don't think you should you use "which" as a restrictive clause. At the very least, the phrase should be . . . a belief system that was true to him, and he to it. As for your actual question. Items in a list should be parallel and therefore grammatically interchangeable. What is the first item on the list of which "he to it" is the second? ...


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The usage of "which were a size too small" is correct in this sentence- Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! "A" here indicates one size small. If you take a look at this lifestyle blog, there is a similar usage of "a size too small"- Ever go to the store ...


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Nothing seems wrong with word order in 'Which were a size too small.' Substitute the word "one" for "a" to get implied meaning. The second choice which could be written as "which were too small" is less specific. How many sizes too small?


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He is saying that the shoes were one size too small (e.g. were a size 10 instead of the size 11 that the customer required). Your other example could also be used, but would have to be whose size was too small, but the wording in the original sentence is more correct.



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