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The trick to knowing how to use of which, at which, in which, to which, from which is to analyse the prepositional phrases, phrasal verbs, verbs and prepositions: He /spoke of/ war and peace and many other topics that day. The topic /of which he spoke/ were complex. The verb here that means to speak about is /to speak of/: to mention The party /at which/ he ...


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Probably easiest to explain through examples. Each phrase simply means "the thing that we've already mentioned", e.g. The box in which the books are kept The town of which we were speaking The time at which we will arrive The destination to which we were heading I'm sure there's a grammatically-correct term, but they're really just the correct forms of ...


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When you replace where with that or which, sometimes you need to add a preposition. For example, This is the company where he works, becomes This is the company that he works at. How do you figure out which preposition? Rearrange the relative clause so it forms its own sentence. You can't say You were there the story, so you need a ...


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In the first example (the story where...), 'story' is thought of as a place in which some events happened, and we want to talk about the events that happened in the story, not the story itself. That's what where does here: it ushers us into the story, (which is metaphorically thought of as a place,) to show us what goes on in there. That's why a where ...


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The following relative clause "...who drove his car at another youth resulting in him being flung onto the roof of the car..." was used before the main verb "was given" in the sentence. Journalists are notorious for trying to cram as much information into their lead (often spelled "lede") as they possibly can, without much regard for whether the result ...


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Good question. Resulting is a participle, and normally a participle modifies a specific noun, usually the subject of a clause. However, in this case you could say the participle modifies nothing specific, or it modifies the entire preceding clause (who drove his car at another youth). It says something about the event described in the clause as a whole: the ...


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Based on my understanding of what you are trying to say you should actually use the past perfect "had fought" not the present perfect because FM is no longer fighting thus, you are talking about a finished time in the past or you can use the past simple "did FM fight..." Also, "Whom who" should never be used as such because "who" is used as the subject and ...


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"I want to question whether Floyd Mayweather has fought any boxer during the boxer's best, so is it okay to use the relative clause 'who was in his prime' to describe the word 'whom?" No. It would be better to use some variation of TrevorD's suggestion, "Which boxers, if any, has Floyd Mayweather fought while they were in their prime?"


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I'm not sure what you mean by a 'second relative clause' because there is only one 'relative clause' at the end. There are some grammatical errors in your sentence which makes it difficult to understand. It should read: Even though she was a successful businesswoman before her marriage, she expanded her business contacts by using someone from her husband's ...


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I'd advise strongly that you rewrite the sentence. Writing that is engaging uses a wide variety of sentence structures and a rich, varied vocabulary. What makes writing tedious is repetition. It becomes a chore to wade through repetition. One possible fix: Because gas is becoming expensive, automobile manufacturers are producing smaller cars, which ...


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Found this thread by looking through my logs (links to my site). This looks like a typo to me; it's missing a comma. It should look like this: The Oldest repertory theater still existing, the Comedie-Francaise in Paris, was founded in 1680. Which book is this from?



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