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I do not sense any ambiguity here regarding the subject. Your sentence consists of two coordinated clauses, linked by the coordinating conjunction and. In the second clause, the subject is left out which means that it has the same subject as the first clause (Jim). There could be ambiguity about the object of both clauses though. The it in the second clause ...


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I think there's very little ambiguity. The sense follows naturally. If the amulet is in the bag, it has to be the bag that's hooked. Writing the sentence the first way implies a quickness and ease of action, which I think is what you want. It's written as one continuous action (is it meant to be surreptitious?). You're right, the second way is clunkier. ...


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This is a matter of style. "Nevertheless, such a generalisation does not take us far towards an understanding of why the revolution broke out when it did, and why it took the remarkable road it did." Let me reproduce the later part of the sentence and rephrase it so we may take a closer look: "... why the revolution broke out when it broke out, and why ...


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I would have expected, Nevertheless, such a generalisation does not take us far towards an understanding of why the revolution broke out when it did, and why it took the remarkable road that it did. This can be paraphrased with the somewhat redundant sentence: Nevertheless, such a generalisation does not take us far towards an understanding of why ...


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Perhaps it will help to transform the clauses to their equivalents that better show the syntax. "That's the store where I bought my computer." becomes Where did I buy my computer? or I bought my computer there. No prepositions of place are required with words like "where" and "there" that contain the notion of a place in their meaning. "That's the ...


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Simple answer: yes. It can be used if you are merely a participant at the gym or sports center, or if you have a gym of your own at your personal residence. If you are rich and famous, you may even have a gym named after you, (at a school or university, for example,) in which case you can still claim it as 'my' gym.


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Strictly speaking, it should be whom, because, as you note, the pronoun is the object of trust. In fact, however, the use of whom is essentially optional in less-formal registers of modern English, except when the pronoun is the object of a preposition and directly follows the preposition. Excerpts from the usage note for who from the American Heritage ...


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Where to go is the question. Let us look at the subjetive phrase in parts. "Where", an adverb of place like 'here', ' there', 'near', 'above' etc. "To go", a simple infinitive verb modified by 'where'; and infinitives are, amongst others, used as subject of a verb. Together the subject phrase is adverbial in construction. It explains the 1st.question. ...


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Modern is as Modern does, so forever shall confusion reign! A phrase used to be a phrase, a clause used to be a clause, and a sentence used to be a complete thought. Those days are long gone! There are now so many re-interpretations of so many supposedly 'pointless and useless' grammar rules that everything that used to be known is known no longer. I can ...


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Modern grammarians consider such constructions clauses, not phrases. What traditional grammarians called infinitive phrases are now called infinitival clauses, a type of nonfinite clause.


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I don't know whether the given explanations are convincing. They are complicated and far-fetched. As I am German, I compare English that with the German definite article der, die, das. These forms also have demonstrative power as in English. You can say Das ist mein Haus. That is my house. In low/ northern German: Dat (hus) is min hus. This is the house ...


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The answer (which I had some difficulty accepting, but now agree with*), is that that is not a relative pronoun at all, but a complementiser. It is the same that as in He said that he was going So, on this analysis The house that you bought and The house which you bought have different structures, and both relate to a (now obsolete) form ...



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