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1

(Good heavens, what a sentence.) Here's a modified version: The choice of a chestnut tree thus symbolizes a potential reinvigoration of the marriage that we later find gestured towards. Which means that a potential reinvigoration gets hinted at, or gestured towards, later in the passage.


2

As mentioned in the comments, the "In what" is not here its own entity. The statement could have been expressed as "In a failure by Japan to live up to its responsibilities..." However, the author desired to express the idea that not everyone see this as a failure by Japan, rather that only some see this as a failure. Thus, they insert this idea into ...


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Whether a relative clause is defining or non-defining (some writers say integrated or supplementary) is really more about semantics than punctuation. The first relative clause in the Original Poster's example is probably just an unconventionally punctuated non-defining relative clause. The clause neither explains which money it was that was given nor is an ...


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Given a set of relevant items Q={q1(x1), q2(x2), q3(x3),..., qn(xn)}, Equation 3 will efficiently calculate f(t) when we add qn+1(xn+1) to Q.


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A woman who fell 10 meters from High Peak was lifted to safety by a helicopter. My first question: why doesn't above sentence use the even though it is using an adjective clause? In this case, the adjective clause is describing the woman, as opposed to distinguishing her from other women. If this apparent news article was continued, the ...


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A woman who fell 10 meters from High Peak was lifted to safety by a helicopter. This is news. We haven't heard about this woman before. The woman who fell 10 meters from High Peak was lifted to safety by a helicopter. This is an update. We know the woman fell, now they are telling us what progress has been made. The books that have red ...


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I do not sense any ambiguity here regarding the subject. Your sentence consists of two coordinated clauses, linked by the coordinating conjunction and. In the second clause, the subject is left out which means that it has the same subject as the first clause (Jim). There could be ambiguity about the object of both clauses though. The it in the second clause ...


4

I think there's very little ambiguity. The sense follows naturally. If the amulet is in the bag, it has to be the bag that's hooked. Writing the sentence the first way implies a quickness and ease of action, which I think is what you want. It's written as one continuous action (is it meant to be surreptitious?). You're right, the second way is clunkier. ...



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