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2

The original is probably eliding a word. I think this works: You are she whom I love. 'are' is a linking verb here; 'whom' is introducing an appositive phrase and is the object of 'love'. What's missing in the original is the predicate pronoun ('she', 'he', etc.).


4

Any expectation of a comma in the examples of the OP has very little to do with the subordinate clauses' restrictiveness, but rather, as the OP suggested, with an interruption of their natural flow. When leading a sentence with a subordinate clause, the comma does not force a "parenthetical / non-restrictive" interpretation. Simply, compare the meaning of ...


0

Grammatically, # 2 is fine, but stylistically, it's awkward, though whether that matters or not depends on the context in which you're using it.


0

I think perhaps it should be There's the room; the man is not in the room.


0

Unless there are rules which make is an exception, I think your sentence is fine, if a little odd-sounding. For comparison, let's replace is with lies. In the room lies the man. In the room, the man lies. There's the room, in which lies the man. There's the room, in which the man lies. They all sound fine to me. But the fourth one sounds more idiomatic, ...


0

I think none of these expressions are in the usual, everyday word order, but all of them can be used in a poem, for example. It's about what you want to emphasize. Your third phrase is difficult to imagine on it's own; it would require something like "There's the room, in which is - THE MAN!" You would build up a suspense in the sentence, at the end of which ...


1

Your sentence is correct aside from a small grammatical error. Correct version: Most people, who drink cold water, I knew, have never gotten sore throats. Parenthetical analysis is useful to understand why it's correct. Replacing the outer commas of the clauses with parentheses makes this: Most people (who drink cold water, I knew) have never gotten sore ...


2

Okay, my 60 francs cfa is that "that" is for identifying more closely the thing you want to talk about in contradistinction to other things, while "which" tells you something else about the object that you didn't know before. Imagine: "Officer, please find the white Mercedes that made off with my little boy!" (not just any old Mercedes but that one – a ...



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