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The sentence is pretty terrible. Lets look at your use of "even". I assume this is intended to reflect that getting a black belt at 14 years old was a high achievement. You should use "only" instead, e.g. When she was only 14 years old, she earned a black belt in karate. The second sentence can be understood, but sounds clumsy. I would write it as: ...


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With regard to to your question Does the meaning of a sentence ever change between these two alternatives of ', which' and 'that' or is this just a style choice? there is a famous instance from the 1984 Republican Party platform drafting debates that illustrates the significance that the choice between the two forms can have on sentence meaning. A ...


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First of all, do you have any issues with The means with which you can create your art are available to you. or with: The means which you can create your art with are available to you. ? They are both available. Also available is this pair: The means with which to create your art are available to you. The means which to create your art with are ...


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Shoe has already answered. Here is some additional information that may or may not clarify things further. The first important thing to understand is that the relative pronoun is part of the relative clause, not of the main clause. Recently, even some native English speakers seem to be getting confused about this, as some weird new practices around who/whom ...


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You are starting from a false premise if you believe that there is a position where the preposition "is supposed to be", particularly if you think that the correct position is "at the end of the sentence" (called preposition stranding). Indeed, there are some people who regard this as an error. In fact, the position of the pronoun in relative constructions ...


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I'd use another punctuation: This is a serious problem, which ranges from elementary school teachers to adjunct professors such as those here, and deserves far more attention than it receives. The bolded is the parenthetical part, the non-restrictive clause. Commas around it. The rest is the main. I've changed that -> which as this is what Bryan ...


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The terminology you are trying to use is called "restrictive" and "nonrestrictive" relative clauses or "parenthetic expressions." Non-restrictive relative clauses are separated by two commas: The Baker's son, who is an accomplished piano player, fell and broke his legs on the ski slopes yesterday. The main thrust of the above sentence is the Baker's son ...


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Your instincts are good about when and when not to use commas, and your sentence is punctuated correctly. The comma here does not terminate the non-essential clause "that ranges from elementary school teachers to adjunct professors such as here," but rather marks where the main, independent clause ends and where the second clause begins. This second ...



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