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3

The usage of "which were a size too small" is correct in this sentence- Mr Boxell had deliberately sold the man a pair of shoes which were a size too small, knowing he would return them next day! "A" here indicates one size small. If you take a look at this lifestyle blog, there is a similar usage of "a size too small"- Ever go to the store ...


2

Nothing seems wrong with word order in 'Which were a size too small.' Substitute the word "one" for "a" to get implied meaning. The second choice which could be written as "which were too small" is less specific. How many sizes too small?


2

He is saying that the shoes were one size too small (e.g. were a size 10 instead of the size 11 that the customer required). Your other example could also be used, but would have to be whose size was too small, but the wording in the original sentence is more correct.


3

What there is a reason to do... What there is a right to do... Can be parsed as The things [for which there exists a reason to do them]... The things [for which there exists a right to do them... What the author says is that what should be done is not the same collection of things for which there is a reason for them to be done. Let's say ...


1

" she was one of the several children who were sold at the auction." Here , "Who" refers to the "children" (plural) . Because of that , the correct verb is "were" .


1

I interpret 1) "I pity them who lost their money in gambling" as a reduction of 2) "I pity them -- those who lost their money in gambling" or, with a minor variation of punctuation, 3) I pity them, those who lost their money in gambling. Your query sentence 1) may not be regarded as Standard English written usage, but I think it's ...


0

In addition to what others have said, have a look at this article by Donald Knuth. Look for the term wicked whiches. (The sermon intentionally oversimplifies, because it can sometimes be helpful to do so.) Rule 22. Don’t say “which” when “that” sounds better. The general rule nowadays is to use “which” only when it is preceded by a comma or by a ...


1

If you omit the comma, the relative clause is likelier to be read as restrictive: you had a number of pizzas to choose from, and ate only the nice one. The distinction between restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses depends more on that comma than on the choice of relative pronouns, and many now dismiss as a superstition the idea that one should use ...


0

It isn't a clause connector, it's more of a reference on the feeling which the marble colouring brings. Eg. That feeling you get when you hear a sound in your house in the middle of the night.


4

My guess would be that it is a slight inaccuracy to say that this type of clause reduction can only be done with passives—rather, it can only be done with verbal forms that use be as their auxiliary. Basically the reduction is about removing the subject and verb in a copular clause, leaving the subject complement behind, whether that be a pure adjective or a ...



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