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kæn kən ðæt ðət The strong forms of the words can and that both have the TRAP vowel in RP. This is the same vowel as in the word cat /kæt/. These forms of the words are shown in examples (1) and (3) repsectively. The auxiliary verb can is usually only strong when stressed or when stranded (ie when not followed by another verb). The subordinator that and ...


6

The king who is known to have had a speech impediment was King George VI, father to the present Queen, who reigned from 1936 to 1952. The matter of his speech impediment was dramatised in the film The King's Speech (2010) written by David Seidler, in which Colin Firth plays the part of the King. This clearly has nothing to do with the formation of the ...


2

It strikes me as quite unlikely. American and British sounded much alike until and after 1783, from then on they may have branched away from each other. George III, on the throne between 1760 and 1820, suffered from a progressive mental condition but is not known to have had a speech impediment. The two sons that followed him on he throne, George IV and ...


1

I'd point out that, in England in particular, there is a continuum between the 'precise' pronunciation, 'dyook' and the perhaps more common 'juke' (as in juke-box). In Britain, I don't think the American 'dook' is common - maybe some people in East Anglia say it that way (?) I would say, for the most part, it is older members of the aristocracy that tend to ...



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