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49

Joe is one of those people who thinks he is "always right." It's a joke. It's common to talk about "Mr. Right" (meaning, the ideal man for marriage). On the other hand, people who are "full of themselves", who talk to much, who always think they know best - they have an "I'm always right" attitude. Note that if your name was "Something Right" (say, John ...


46

Stay Hungry. Never be satisfied, and always push yourself. Stay Foolish. Do (or be willing to keep trying) the things people say cannot be done.


38

Firstly, this is only American convention — in Britain for instance you wouldn't use it (except for a few publishing houses). Secondly, this is not logical but typographical: a convention arising out of early American printers' opinion that typesetting the punctuation inside quotes looked better. This convention is slowly eroding in some areas and being ...


30

Unlike the earlier reply, I would interpret that sentence with the quotes around "cure". I think they were probably added as an afterthought, after cure had been uttered, to indicate that it was not really a cure that was being described. It is unclear what is intended when the quote...unquote are adjacent, but it is often used that way. I would try to ...


25

That's exactly what it means. The desires and plans of evil people ("evil will;" "will" in this case being the noun relating to intent and desire) often ("oft") ruin ("mar") the cause of evil. That is, the phrase says that evil people are selfish, petty, and short-sighted, and that this quality in evil individuals often impairs the grander world-embracing ...


24

The British put them outside the quotes, which seems much more logical. The American style is to put the punctuation inside the quotes. The American version is often known as "Typesetter's Quotes". As you can see, I go with the British version, at least in informal writing. Interesting fact: They are called typesetter's quotes because when typesetters ...


22

In this case ... for an end is used to mean "for a purpose". Another example of this use case is "to what end", or "means to an end". Knowing this, the meaning of the quote is clear: If you become friends with someone in order to get something (or any purpose other than friendship), that friendship will not last life-long (or as the quote says, ...


20

In English, people more commonly put the "quote unquote" before the item that is to be quoted. However, your example seems to put it after what is being quoted. This is meant to say that slowing disease doesn't really cure aging. You will still age even if you have no diseases. Therefore it isn't a cure, but a "cure". Here are some quote unquote quotes from ...


17

These are used to indicate that a direct quote has been edited — to fit the surrounding information, or to add context that does not show up within the scope of the quote. This page has a more detailed description: Square brackets are used around words that are added that are not part of the original quote. For instance, you might have a source that ...


17

The meaning of the utterance itself is (of course) quite clear: he is asking if you do or do not want to have your life go on forever (or as clear as forever or infinity can be to us). The utterance is a rhetorical question, though, which is doubly evident since it has a false premise: every adult knows he can't live forever, and so has no such choice. The ...


17

some can also carry the meaning of remarkable or impressive. So 'Some Chicken! Some Neck' ...in this instance means 'A remarkable Chicken! A remarkable Neck!' ...implying that it would be difficult to be able to wring such a neck as England's.


16

I'd use a bulleted list and drop the quotation marks, like so: This poses questions such as: How should I punctuate it? Are the quotes necessary? Are the commas in the correct place? Should I have used a colon, or a semi-colon? Such formatting would look out of place in a novel or other prose, but would look very natural online or in ...


15

Stay hungry can be interpreted as "stay eager", and stay foolish can be interpreted as "be ready to try new things" or "be ready to step out of your comfort zone".


15

Your third example is correct. Quotes are composed of two parts; the speaker tag to identify the speaker, and the actual quote itself. For example: Einstein said "A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new." Or for your example: Sally said "I went to the movies." But you can also paraphrase what they said and integrate it into the ...


14

"Strained" is a Shakesperean-era term for "forced or constrained"; it means mercy must be freely given. You can grasp this by seeing the quote in context: The quality of mercy is not strain'd, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blest: It blesseth him that gives and him that takes. Portia is importuning ...


13

Based on my experience: If accompanied by air quotes, the term is definitely unquote. If it's referring to the punctuation mark, end quote is definitely correct. If it directly follows the word "quote", it's unquote. (In other words, the phrase is "quote unquote", not "quote end quote".) In a formal context, if you must use the words (rather than using ...


12

Whoever said "The Chicago Manual of Style (6.8) says that When my friends ask, "What do you want for your birthday?," I never know how to respond. is the correct form." was most likely mistaken. To begin with, they are probably referring to the 15th edition, where section 6.8 addresses periods and commas inside quotation marks, rather than the current 16th ...


12

As Chris Behrens says, if you do quote a grammatical error, then [sic] is the standard way to disclaim it. However, in many cases it’s also perfectly fine to silently correct the error when you quote. There are a couple of main criteria: Might you be changing their meaning? In this example, there’s no ambiguity as to what the intention was, or what the ...


12

Let's break it down. Ah! This is an interjection that the poet uses to show us that he's very happy with what is to follow. a blessing beyond all fate. Here the poet calls his beloved a blessing, and not just an ordinary one — he feels so blessed by the love of his beloved, that it's like he's been granted extra-special favor by God, as if ...


12

This phrase purposefully uses negative adjectives in a positive way. This is what gives this phrase its "punch." Taking a word, phrase, or situation and contrasting how it is normally used versus how it is used in a given case is a common rhetorical device. Hungry here means "wanting something more", as in "He was hungry for a raise." Jobs is putting ...


12

Yes, Jack is refering to the game of golf — no metaphors involved. In the game of golf, several people hit their balls toward the hole several hundred yards away. The balls each come to rest somewhere hopefully close to the hole. Golfers are very particular about people interfering with their ball. They don't want anyone to move it farther from the hole ...


12

"Avoid like the plague" is an idiom which means to ignore or keep away from someone or something totally.. Refer http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/avoid+like+the+plague


11

Use the word "sic", which is Latin for "thus". It indicates that the error was in the source material. But beware - it can be considered rude. I would quote the passage thusly: the term used for a pregnancy that ends on it's [sic] own, within the first 20 weeks of gestation.


11

The sentence It is you who are mistaken is a Cleft sentence, derived from the base sentence (shown here with focussed subject You) You are mistaken by the Clefting process, which extracts the focussed NP (you) to be the predicate of a dummy clause with It subject and some form of be as verb (generating It is you in this case), and then making the ...


11

One generally does not place an ellipsis at the beginning of a quotation to indicate the omission of material, because it is usually evident (as in your example) that the quotation is only part of the original. However you should use an ellipsis if the words as they appear in your quotation could be mistaken for a complete sentence, but in the original are ...


10

My husband of nearly 39 years was English, and I lived in London for a total of 5 years from 1970-76. 'Neck' is slang for audacity, shortened from 'brass neck'. One's anatomical neck is a very vulnerable part of the body which, if it was brass, would offer significant protection against injury, thereby imparting an audacious courage to say provocative ...


9

Apparently there is an archaic sense of 'owe' meaning to possess or to own: owe in merriam-webster. The object of 'Owedst' is the sleep, which the subject enjoyed (or 'owned'), not the concoctions that he could have ingested.


9

If you know yourself, but do not know the enemy, you will lose (at least) as often as you will win. You will win (at most) 50 battles out of 100. However, if you know both yourself and the enemy, you will win many more battles, perhaps all 100 out of 100, so you shouldn't be afraid to fight them. In short: if you know your enemy, don't be afraid to fight; ...


9

For the original context, here's Lewis Galantiere's full translation of the first two paragraphs of the third chapter (The Tool) of Wind, Sand and Stars: And now, having spoken of the men born of the pilot's craft, I shall say something about the tool with which they work-the air-plane. Have you looked at a modern airplane? Have you followed from ...



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