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15

Yes, (2) is ungrammatical. You gave him the book is You gave the book to him after it goes through Dative alternation. After flipping the direct object and indirect object, the to preposition disappears. You can't do this with questions, so you need the to.


7

1)/You gave the book to him/ is the declarative form of: To whom did you give the book? A standard English formal form 2)/You gave him the book/ is the declarative form of: Did you give him the book That said, in colloquial spoken English, nowadays, people will often say:Who did you give the book to? for 1)


7

Saying "Whom did you give the book?" is rare seems to me an understatement; I haven't found any actual examples of sentences like this. (As far as I know, who can always be used instead of whom, so I'm treating "Who did you give the book" the same way in this answer.) Despite the rarity, I have found conflicting statements from grammar experts about whether ...


5

"tautological question" Quoting Confucius: A Guide for the Perplexed By Yong Huang In other words, for Toulmin, the question “why should I be moral,” just like the question “why are all scarlet things red,” is a tautological question. To answer this question, we can only ask a rhetorical question, “What else can scarlet things be?'


3

You say the clock is stopped.


3

To be syntactically correct, although just as rude: What do you know about grammar, you idiot? Insert a comma after the word grammar. After all, this is not a sentence you want to get wrong, grammatically or otherwise. Having said that, I would find a nicer way to convey the sentiment. You are, after all, not truly interested in what they know about ...


2

In journalism, the common questions to be answered about a subject one is writing about are: Who, When, What, Where and So What. That should answer the question. Who and what can be seen as subsets of that basic rule of thumb. Of course, one could answer the question other ways, to wit: "What are you?" I am a proofreader. I am a beer drinker. I am an ankle ...


2

When who is used as a "question word" at the beginning of a sentence, it's always treated as singular. This may be by convention, but it's an easy rule. Even when addressing a crowd of clamouring children all yelling, "Me! Me!", all of whom might receive something, one still asks "Who wants..." When who is used as relative pronoun then its number and the ...


1

Do you take on new students? or Are you accepting new students? or I wish to learn. Would you teach me?


1

If I may/can ask, can you give me your office hours, please?


1

In general, "Who is Obama" is an opened-ended question that can be answered many ways, and only one is "President of the United States". "What is Obama" is somewhat incomplete. "What is Obama's position?" is asking about "the President of the United States". If someone states "Obama is a Martian", you may colloquially ask "What is Obama?" in reference is ...



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