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This is an interesting question. I haven't an authoritative answer, but I can sketch the historical development and make some suggestions for how it came to be. The first thing is that not is an anomaly in English: it is a kind of modifier that follows the word it modifies. This is normal in some languages, but unusual in English, where modifiers (such as ...


5

There are several rules involved here. Not-Placement, which puts not immediately after the first auxiliary verb. Auxiliary-Negative Contraction, which optionally produces a single contracted auxiliary. Question Formation, which inverts the subject and the first auxiliary verb. These first three rules all require an auxiliary verb. If there is none, one ...


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Question B is a follow-up question to A. Example usage: Having solved my previous problem with SOAP, I now have a follow-up question. When I try using this WSDL service link, I get an error: … Another example usage: Please help me with a follow-up question regarding authentication.


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There's nothing wrong with inserting a parenthetical question—for isn't that what you intended there?—that interrupts the flow of a declarative sentence. Do not use hyphens, however. Use em dashes: I was a little skeptical at first—what could be more straightforward than CSS?—but I use it in all my projects now. Some stylists prefer actual parentheses ...


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Something like this, I think: As explained in the previous question.... As described in the previous question....


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How goes it? is perfectably acceptable, if quirky, according to Urban dictionary. If your son is a Doctor Who fan you can show him this extract from the official site: River: Well then, soldier. How goes the day? The Doctor: Where the hell have you been? Every time you’ve asked I have been there. Where the hell were you today? Moving into the ...


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Don't you sleep? Do you not sleep? *Do not you sleep? (weird) Whilst it's a good question, the assumption in the Original Poster's discussion is kind of the wrong way round. It is not the case that "not" must contract when it appears directly after the auxiliary verb. What's happening is that, to make the sentence into a question, the ...



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