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Short answer Only the matrix clause in a sentence requires subject-auxiliary inversion to make it interrogative (and not if the wh-word is part of a Subject phrase). In other words, all other things being equal, we use subject-auxiliary inversion to mark sentences, not subordinate clauses as interrogative. We only use the auxiliary DO, when some ...


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"Where America is" is not grammatical as a question. In a question with a WH word ("who", "what", "where", "why", "how" etc) we always invert - put the auxiliary (or the verb if it is "be" or sometimes "have") before the subject.* When we embed the question in a larger sentence, then we don't invert: Ask him where America is. [* For yes/no questions, ...


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In English, you used to be able to form questions by inverting the verb and the subject. So Shakespeare could say where go you with bats and clubs? We no longer do this: If the main verb has an auxiliary verb (is, do, can, will, etc.) we invert the subject and the auxiliary verb. But if there's no auxiliary verb, then unless the main verb is a form of ...


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When asking "How does it look?", we often expect an answer of the other person's evaluation, for example when trying on a new hat or dress. Example: How does it look? I think it suits you. When asking "What does it look like?", we are asking the other persons opinion on the object’s similarity with something else. Example: What does it look like? ...



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