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21

Teachers sometimes refer to this kind of question as a trap: From The Pragmatics of Mathematics Education by Tim Rowland: One common perception is that the questions teachers ask their pupils are not searchlights focused to reveal truth, but traps set to expose ignorance. Rowland was quoted in Teacher-student Interaction by Alandeom Wanderlei de ...


15

If you are trying to educate, instead of expose, the answerer, I would say Socratic.


15

Teachers and politicians sometimes call these "gotcha questions." Here's an excerpt from a discussion of gotcha questions in a Daily Caller article: The infamous “gotcha” question is something politicians always rail >against. But what exactly defines a “gotcha”? “I suppose a gotcha question is one that’s fundamentally unfair because it has a ...


3

I think the closest term to what you're looking for is a trick question, defined by Wiktionary as: A complex question, whose wording hinders the ability to answer it correctly. Basically, these are questions designed to make the person answering fail. For example: - When did Elvis Presley die? - Is that a trick question? The King's not dead!


3

A pointed question; one that cannot be answered with a vague generalization, but only precisely. BTW "asking a rhetorical question" doesn't mean that you suspect the hearer(s) don't already know the answer. It means you are making a statement (perhaps of something that is obvious) more emphatic by expressing it as a question, for example "Do you want to be ...


3

While I am unable to offer a noun, there are a couple of adjectival descriptions which typify questions designed to achieve certain ends, which could prove useful, i.e., “tactical”, “calculated”. tactical adjective: of, relating to, or constituting actions carefully planned to gain a specific military end. • (of a person or their actions) showing ...


3

I think the best option would be a disingenuous question. Brainstorming some more ideas: Trick question. A question designed to show someone up. Insincere, testing question. A question designed to catch someone out or show their ignorance. Malicious question. Uncomfortable question.


3

test \ˈtest\ noun -MW 2,a : (2) something (as a series of questions or exercises) for measuring the skill, knowledge, intelligence, capacities, or aptitudes of an individual or group If (underlined) If you happen to be a troll, this question was a test of our gullibility; seeking the knowledge of if we're unbeknownst to your trollishness and how far ...


2

I saw it wasn't listed so it took me an hour of googling to find this specific word for you. Depending on your intention of use this is a word that captures a different but similar meaning to what you said you are trying to find. Shibboleth A shibboleth (/ˈʃɪbəlɛθ/[1] or /ˈʃɪbələθ/[2]) is a word or custom whose variations in pronunciation or style can be ...


2

Both sides of this question have been argued in the linguistic literature. "who" could be a topic, and then the sentence structure would be [who [ __ hears a noise]] on the analogy of other wh-questions with a wh-word moved to the top of the structure and leaving a gap, __, where it once was. Or, perhaps questions whose subject is a wh-word simply ...


2

I don't think the preposition under is commonly used to refer to being enrolled in a course. If you want to write the question without ending it with a preposition, you use the same preposition, but simply move it to the front: In which course are you enrolled? However, despite the exhortations of some grammar mavens, there's nothing wrong with ending ...


1

Perhaps it would help to point out to them that in French, the expression "il y a" has nothing to do with anyone who /has/ anything. In the same way, in English, /there is/ has nothing to do with where anyone is. It's an idiom, and that's that! The question is: "Are there a lot of people in the shop." The question is formed exactly as any other question ...


1

Q: What is the subject of this sentence? A: What is the subject of that sentence.


1

I think a "trick question" usually means what you are asking about. While it is a colloquial phrase, it usually means a question which offers a choice of answers none of which is the correct one. It forces the person answering the question to pick one of the answers thereby exposing the fact that he does not know the true answer.


1

Just as those who are sent on and attempt to accomplish “a fool’s errand” are doomed to failure and ridicule, for the errand's goal is impossible to obtain; those who are asked and attempt to answer “a fool’s question” suffer similar fates, for "there are no answers to a fool’s question."



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