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8

The correct form would be: Do you know where we can get puff pastries from? Or, slightly reworded (however, it means the same thing): Do you know from where we can get puff pastries? Your underlying question hinges on know where, so you can't just shudder to a halt after "know". You could even just go to: Where can we get puff pastries? if ...


4

The second way is correct: How long is the meeting tomorrow expected to last? Alternatively: How long is tomorrow's meeting expected to last?


2

This (what your friend said, not your post) is a fundamentally confusing style of question: any choice of "yes" or "no" will potentially cause confusion, although in this case most people would say "No, it's not available" if it isn't in fact available, and if it is available would be a bit confused about how to answer. If anyone ever asks me a question ...


2

If your teacher can't explain why one word is better than another, then she didn't teach you; and so has no right to expect the correct answer. The nuance between 'maybe' and 'perhaps' is too fine to make one 'incorrect'.


1

The second, or "how long is the meeting going to last tomorrow?"


1

You can only have one interrogative structure, starting with Can you tell me, so everything else is in the affirmative: Can you tell me if there's anything you don't have any doubts about?


1

People do things in different ways, and the answer to "How do you do this?" might be different from "How do I do this?". For example if you asked an international weightlifter "How do you lift those weights?" he might say "I get a good grip, focus on the weight and lift.". If you asked "How do I lift those weights?" he would say "You can't, unless you do ...


1

The correct answer, originally, is that no question mark should be used and that instead, a full stop should. Since the main idea is that "I wonder", which is just a normal 'stating' clause and not a questioning one, and also since you are technically not expecting an answer, a question mark should be absolutely unnecessary. However, the contemporary usage ...



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