Hot answers tagged

8

Synonymous means equivalent in meaning. The concept can be applied to words, phrases, declarative sentences, imperative sentences (that is, commands), and interrogative sentences (that is, questions). Synonymous questions are thus questions which are equivalent in meaning. This phrase has some currency, as evinced by this Google books search. ...


6

You would say "Since" rather than "while". "While" has almost the opposite meaning to what you want in this context: it implies that the experts aren't a good choice to answer the question but you're obliged to ask them anyway.


3

Normally, adjectives are turned into adverbs by adding the -ly suffix to them. But some words are used as both adjectives and adverbs, with no discernable difference in their form. For example, I like fast cars. [adjective] He drove fast. [adverb] They played a clean game. [adjective] They played clean. [adverb] "Loud" is an example of a word that can ...


2

An example of what the OP is asking about (as I understand it) would be: Alice: "Didn't you hear about the party?" Bob: "No, I didn't hear about it." Here, Alice's question is in the negative. Bob says "no", but this actually confirms that he didn't hear about the party. If he wanted to say that, contrary to what Alice suggests, he had heard about the ...


2

A rhetorical question (of a question) asked in order to produce an effect or to make a statement rather than to elicit information: Examples: the general intended his question to be purely rhetorical It might be a rather petulant rhetorical question, or he might just be trying to keep me on the phone. Kyle didn't offer him the time to answer the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible