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16

English doesn't have a standard way of framing a question whose answer is an ordinal number. (Although, which and what can be used but they don't cover all the cases. Some familiar examples are: What grade are you in?, On which floor is your apartment?. You can try framing the question in several ways but it doesn't guarantee that the answer will include an ...


10

Navigating the complexities of modern families with English semantics and syntax can generate a bevy of interesting question and answer combinations. An excellent foundation for the queries posted would be the interrogative: What is your place in the birth order of your family? Various complexities of the family dynamic would still need to be sorted ...


6

Preface Given how important the ordinal birth number would be for birthrights, especially where the concept of primogeniture was involved, I thought that would be a good place to start research. Unfortunately my cursory glance at The Bill of Rights of 1688 and The Act of Succession 1700 did not reveal much and I'm not sure what other traditions factored ...


5

I think it's ok but maybe move the "not" and change "what" to "which" Which of the jobs do students not like very much? or perhaps better Which of the jobs do students like the least? Eplanation: Removing the contraction "don't" to "do not" becomes "do not students like" which sounds wrong. It's very yoda speak. "Which" is preferable to "What". ...


5

I've done some research: What cardinal number child are you ?                 sounds off-putting This question is perfectly fine, but sounds unpleasant in a conversation. What number child are you ?                      acceptable Although informal, you can expect an answer with this question. Chronologically speaking, which child are ...


4

The final consonant sounds in the question are called plosives and they have two phases when pronounced: first, a closure phase, where air pressure builds up behind a complete obstruction in the oral cavity (formed by the lips, by contact of the tongue tip with the alveolum, or by the tongue dorsum with the palate). For p, t and k, the vocal folds are not ...


3

Prevaricate : to avoid telling the truth by not directly answering a question - Merriam Webster Hence the noun: prevarication. or Equivocate : to use unclear language especially to deceive or mislead someone. -Merriam Webster thus: equivocation


3

Oral and Verbal: ( grammar.about.com) The adjective oral means pertaining to speech or to the mouth. The adjective verbal means pertaining to words, whether written or spoken (though verbal is sometimes treated as a synonym for oral). Usage notes: Oral communication is speech, conversation. Verbal ability is one's skill with words, ...


2

It may be somewhat informal, but I would ask What number child are you? What number daughter are you? Answered with: I'm number two. I'm the second daughter. This might not be appropriate on some formal documentation for example, but in everyday conversational English I think it has the most immediate meaning to the subject, over ...


2

Normally, the format of multi-clausal questions is with commas in between, and a question mark only at the end: Is it where my heart is, where my family is, or wherever I feel most at home? You can make each clause a new sentence if the genre is informal (or perhaps for rhetorical effect), if you deem sentence fragments acceptable. But I have to say ...


2

FTR I'm going to go ahead an give you a useful answer, which I believe is correct. There is no good phrase for that in English. Quite simply, it's one of those things in English where we all know there's no good clear phrase for it -- what you normally do is bumbling out something such as "So, like, you have older brothers - sisters I mean - or young or ...


2

Answer: Today, I met an old colleague on the way to work. Question: Who did I (you) meet today on the way to work? You would say, "I met an old colleague" here, because the meeting occurred (simple past) today. On the other hand, you would say, "I have met him often on my way to work." (present perfect) Affirmative versus Interrogative forms: I meet - do ...


1

According to http://www.pronunciationtips.com/syllables2.htm, steps and glides describe the nature of pitch changes in a sentence, for example, the falling tone at the end of a declaration. The rule, which I evaluate as a native speaker and it seems entirely plausible, is that at the end of a sentence, the pitch glides downward if the last word is a single ...


1

From an etymological standpoint, verbal means 'pertaining to words' and oral means 'pertaining to the mouth'. The two can have different meanings in some cases (e.g. the other connotations of oral) but overlap in their common usage to mean spoken word. In this meaning, the two are synonymous and used interchangeably, as reflected by Oxford's definition of ...


1

I would say that if using it in writing it would have to be in a fairly informal context, e.g. dialogue between two characters, or in a short informal conversation, however in these instances I would either drop the 'are' or contract the 'you are' to 'you're' e.g. You're going to the stadium tomorrow? Sounds perfectly natural to me NB. Just had a ...


1

Do you know what the good things are [to do around here]?" Do you know what the good things to do around here are?" The Original Poster's second example (#2 above) might be considered to be the canonical version of the sentence. This is the version where all the phrases are in their normal positions. The embedded interrogative clause in the ...


1

The phrase "I don't know what time you left yesterday." would be better than both of those phrases. Your second phrase is completely incorrect because it mixes a present tense with a past word form. I leave yesterday* This sentence is incorrect, for your present form, "leave", clashes with the past form, "yesterday". The first sentence is heading in ...


1

Pretty sure your friend's right: leave is PRESENT tense (i.e. I don't know when you leave today), whereas left is the PAST tense of leave (i.e. I don't know when you left yesterday). Hope that helps.


1

Suppose you have spent the whole morning preparing a meal for your girlfriend. When you are sitting at the table, you ask her whether she thinks it is good, but when she tries it, she discovers that it tastes terribly. Maybe she doesn't want to lie, but she doesn't want to utterly crush you either, so she could say "well, it is something different..." ...


1

One could say he sidestepped the question. That does not seem to have nearly as negative a connotation as prevaricating, obfuscating, dissembling, or evading.


1

Your response: I am the third daughter (or son) of my parents. OR I am the third child of my parents. My question: (Concise and to the point) "What is your filial order of birth, to your parents?"


1

"Where [does] [subject] [come|fall] in [order] ?" This is an attempt at a generic answer to the question of framing questions for which an ordinal answer is required. [subject] is the specific subject of the question. It could be 'you', or a name, or something else that identifies who or what you want the ordinal number of. Use the form of 'do', ...


1

whichth (Was this Jimmy's answer? I couldn't quite tell.)


1

What number child are you among your siblings?



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