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In English, word order affects the meaning of a sentence. When asking a question, the understood constituent order is generally: {Interrogative} [Auxiliary] <Subject> (Verb)? There can be other constituents in more complex questions, but for the purpose of your post, one correct word order would be: {What} [might] <that impression> (be)? ...


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Is 19:00 PM ok for you? Yes, it is correct as a colloquial form, please note that usually there are full stops, since they are abbreviations: "P.M., p.m." The form without fullstops is usually the lo-case one . "pm" Obligatory is correct, you can use also mandatory thank you so much, but I want to ask my supervisor if he had time, I want a very ...


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The phrase is more often "To be clear". Most likely you would not use this phrase in conjunction with an interrogative phrase. Normally it is used with a declarative phrase which states your current understanding (even if you phrase the whole sentence as a question). To be clear, the thesis is the most important requirement for the project?


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Cost = to require the payment of (in this context) This book costs ten dollars. = This book requires the payment of ten dollars. The understanding of the exact meaning of the word 'cost' shall help us figure out its proper usage. A question to enquire about its cost would begin with 'How much'. When a sentence begins with 'How much', an ESL student may ...


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This is simply a question. However, the meaning behind it and what you're asking becomes very unclear when you add the question mark. What you're saying is confusing me. This is a statement. You are telling someone they are confusing you. What you're saying is confusing me? The statement is now a question that could be interpreted a few different ways. ...


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Technically, you are correct. Practically, it is confusing either way. Clearly, you feel it is OK to answer with a qualified Yes or No. My suggestion is that you do not have to answer in the negative or the afformative; that is, leave out the Yes or No: [Actually,] a lion is faster than a gazelle.


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It is not incorrect but typically one would respond simply, "Separate colored clothes from whites." Or, "Just separate ..."


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With a question like that where a simple "yes" or "no" would be ambiguous, the person answering would most likely attach a tag to it: "No, I didn't." (No, I didn't enjoy it.) "Yes, I did." (Yes, I did enjoy it.) Some languages have different words for "yes" and "no" depending on whether the question asked is positive ("Did you...?") or negative (Didn't ...


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The responder may have actually meant "It's going! (LOL)" In this case it would be a friendly, humorous reply that is non-specific, except that it hints of "If you only knew! But, I'm handling it, things are cool."


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Of course. There's no grammar rule that requires/limits specific punctuation at the end of a sentence with a semicolon in it.



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