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32

You were right and your editor was wrong. Your question was Can anyone tell me X? and you properly expressed X as a free relative clause, which always acts as a nominal constituent. You asked, in effect, if anyone could tell you an answer. Your editor inverted the auxiliary verb and the subject of the free relative clause, transforming it into a ...


11

I posted a question somewhere that said: 1.) Can anyone tell me how I can solve this? but someone edited it to: 2.) Can anyone tell me how can I solve this? and it was accepted. That's wrong isn't it? Can someone explain how that's wrong? The difference between the two versions is that the subordinate interrogative ...


6

Intentional: done deliberately; intended deliberate: done with or marked by full consciousness of the nature and effects calculated: undertaken after careful estimation of the likely outcome premeditated: characterized by deliberate purpose, previous consideration, and some degree of planning I would call this behavior insidious (stealthy, subtle, cunning, ...


3

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yes_and_no#The_Early_English_four-form_system, 'yes' and 'no' used to be for answering negatively phrased questions. 'Yea' and 'nay' were used for the positive.


3

Could you? Sure. But no, you shouldn't. Separate the sentences or move the clarification within. I am wondering if you know any publications, blogs or websites -- particularly those interested in tech or the cloud, big data, mobile applications, info graphics, etc. -- who are seeking new writers right now? or I am wondering if you know any ...


2

You use the word "also" when you are in positive agreement. In this case the sentence is a negative one and you would use either instead. Can't you sleep either? Also: I can sleep, can you also sleep? Yes, I can also sleep. Either: I'm not sleeping well, can't you sleep either? No, I can't sleep either. This link has a pretty good explanation about ...


2

As pointed out by user F.E. in the comments: Your question actually involves two major issues: (1) verb agreement in an existential construction, (2) response to a question. Answer for #1, there is no need for verb agreement in an existential construction--even though grade schools and pop-grammarians push bogus "rules" at you. (The rule ...


1

There's a distinction between: tell me, [2ndary part of sentence follows] - emphasis is on tell me tell me how [main sentence goes on] - emphasis is on how Imho, the guy who corrected your original version would be right, had inserted a comma: Can anyone tell me, how can I solve this <- 2ndary is more stand-alone, and would sound bad in the form like ...


1

Your initial question was perfectly formed. The revised question, though understandable, is not English as she is spoke, at least, not in the UK. The revised question actually contains TWO questions: Can anyone + how can I? I get the sense this is a translation from a native language syntax into English.


1

Yes, this usage is grammatically correct. "Now", here, is being used in a completely separate form from its standard definition. The classification of this usage varies depending on where you look it up: now — sentence connector used as a transitional particle or hesitation word: now, I can't really say used for emphasis: now listen to ...



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