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6

Yes, your friend is right. You can't say "What degrees is it outside?". What you can say is: How many degrees is it outside? What's the temperature outside?


5

Although the two sentences have little, if any, difference in meaning, there are contexts where one variant is more natural than the other. For example. A: There are 10 boxes in the room. Some of them are on the table. B: How many boxes are on the table? Here, "How many boxes are there on the table" would be slightly awkward. On the other hand, ...


4

Okay, the concept of "times" or "factor" is - if I've read all your comments correctly - critical. So how about: How many times the required number of engines does this airplane have? Or: By what factor does this airplane’s number of engines exceed the requirement? The answer to both questions cannot be: The airplane has eight engines. Nor can it be: ...


4

Quirk et al (A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, 1985.1025) prefer the term Indirect speech, about which they say simply "Typically, indirect speech is used to report statements" and (p. 1029) "Our examples have so far been of indirect statements; but all the main sentence types (questions, exclamations, directives as well as statements) may be ...


2

The punctuation marks an author uses can help readers distinguish between (1) a simple inquiry ("so you're going to be famous?"), (2) an excited combination of question and exclamation ("so you're going to be famous?!"), and (3) a triumphant prediction ("so you're going to be famous!"). They can help readers in this way, but many authors do not use ...


2

I am hoping you get an answer from a real linguist, because I am unable to find a truly authoritative source to answer your question. I will attempt to provide some insight from my perspective as a native speaker, backed by some less-than-stellar sources. Those sources do cite others, which might be of more use to you. When conveying what someone (you or ...


2

I think the exact question is: How many times as many engines does the airplane have as it requires? or The airplane has how many times as many engines as it requires?


2

I have extensively edited this question. The original indicates that you would benefit from our English Language Learners site. As regards your question it is option 2 which is correct. The first might just about be considered grammatical but sounds very awkward indeed.


2

The specific criterion for the syntactic construction called reported speech (or indirect speech or indirect reported speech) that is satisfied by the two questions (Did she say if I'll be invited? and Will I be invited, did she say?) is that both contain the reporting verb "say" - either in the matrix clause or in what the CGEL (p1204) calls a ...


2

From rhetoric.byu, apophasis means “The rejection of several reasons why a thing should or should not be done and affirming a single one, considered most valid”. Of rhetorical terms I've seen, this term is closest in sense to what the question asks for. Note, however, that rhetoric.byu's definition conflicts (or, at least, gives a different sense) with ...


1

I would remove the interrogation mark (usually called a "question mark," in my dialect) at the end of "Did you know that...?", leaving only the interrogation marks at the ends of the list items. When I read a list like this, I imagine the ellipses (... marks) as drops of glue that will be used to stick pieces of a sentence together. The pieces Did you ...


1

What might the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant genetic resources be? What might be the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant genetic resources? In the first question, the subject is the consequences of the loss of diversity of plant genetic resources. The interrogative word what is the complement of the verb BE. Because ...


1

How many more engines than it requires does this airplane have? The answer to this question, as per the Original Poster's request, is: -It has twice as many engines as required.


1

If the answer is: "The airplane has twice as many engines as it requires." The question might be: "Does the airplane have twice as many engines as it requires?" or: "What is the plane's reserve engine capacity?"The point we are attempting to make is that if we need two engines for a particular mission, we will fly with four. Thus if two engines fail, ...


1

The first sentence could become correct if you replace the semi-colon with a colon. "Our experiment set out to answer the question: Is running fruit under water an effective way to reduce the number of surface microbes?" In that case, either sentence would be suitable. Alternately, you could avoid the issue all together by rephrasing it. For example, "Our ...


1

The comma is the accepted punctuation in English for tag questions, such as the ones you listed.


1

Number 2 is the correct enquiry/inquiry. I assume your context involves asking someone when a project/assignment/application (or something else) is due or is needed. Here are some other ways of expressing your enquiry: When is _________ due? What is the deadline for __________? When does ___________ need to be completed/submitted/finished? When ...


1

No, it isn't correct to ask "What degrees is it outside?". You have several options to find out what temperature is. You know the temperature outside? (coloquial) What's the temperature outside? If it is very cold: "How cold is it outside?" If it is very hot: "How hot is it outside? In the last two examples, even though you're not ...



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