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2

No, none of those semicolons work. A semicolon is used to connect two independent clauses (i.e. things that could be a complete sentence) that are related to each other. If you have only a sentence fragment on one side, a semicolon cannot be used; normally a comma or a dash would be called for there. In several cases, you have a topic fragment and then a ...


2

These questions are grammatically correct. In written English, there is nothing wrong with indicating an interrogative solely by putting a question mark at the end. In spoken English, intonation is used for this purpose. There is no requirement that the interrogative mood be clearly expressed in the words used. You can certainly start a question with "you" ...


2

The second one is not proper English, but is commonly seen in African American Vernacular English, which is an English dialect that has roots in the South American English dialect.


2

Linguistically, only the second form is directly inferrable from the question.


2

On purely semantic grounds, OP's example usage is simply not valid English. It should be... "I reject Maria in favor of George" Note this definition from dictionary.com... favor Idioms, sense 18 in favor of a. on the side of; in support of: to be in favor of reduced taxation. b. to the advantage of. c. (of a check, draft, etc.) payable ...


1

This usage seems confusing, to say the least. Having a look at Merriam-Webster online, we find this: 7 behalf, interest — in favor of [...] 3 : in order to choose : out of preference for turned down the scholarship in favor of a pro career In that example, the pro career was favoured, it was chosen. If I would write I turned down Maria ...


1

The number 2 is not grammatically correct if it's a question. The question formation is: QUESTION WORD + AUXILIARY + PRONOUN + VERB + REST (Example: Why did you eat the last piece of cake?) WHO + VERB + REST (Example: Who is the monarch of Swaziland?) OR WHO + AUXILIARY + PRONOUN + VERB + REST (Example: Who did you meet yesterday night?) AUXILIARY + ...



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