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3

The second one would be more correct: "Which triangle, A or B, has a larger area?" However, a better way (in my opinion) to phrase it would be simply "Which triangle has a larger area?", if there are only the triangles A and B to choose from.


3

I've amended the focus of the question to the auxiliary verb because it's not hurt which is being asked about: it's whether to use Are you or Did you get (or maybe its near-relative, Were you). If someone is hurt at some indeterminate point in the past, then the question you ask says something about their present state. It doesn't matter how far in the past ...


2

The first one is not really a well-formed question in English. Placing the verb right after the interrogative word is the usual way to create an interrogative sentence. Thus: "Why am I studying?", "Where is the station?", "How does this device work?", "Who can lift the stone?" The other word order would make sense in a clause, but not as a stand-alone ...


1

Would you not open the door? I wonder if you would mind not opening the door? I want you to not open the door. You can also add please. ;-) And you can use I would like instead of I want. These are a bit more polite: Would you please not open the door? I wonder if you would mind not opening the door, please? I would prefer that you not open the door, ...


1

Your question, "In common everyday usage is there any difference..." Answer: there is no difference. You could say that "have" is a little more weak/polite tone of voice; "know" is a little more decisive/strong. (If you wanted to be "more polite, less decisive" you'd go on to something like "May I suggest...") Note 1 as Edwin points out, "I know an ...


1

The expression suggests a command especially when used by itself with a question mark at the end. When used as in the sentences you show it suggest more a kind of polite request (much more common ) . Both usages dates back to the beginning of the 19th century and their usage has been increasing since then especially as a polite request form. Why don't ...


1

@tchrist is correct, for two triangles one has a larger area (we are assuming they don't have the same area). Hence Erik Kowal's, larger vs. largest is most definitely not pedantic. Although using the word largest and most of the responses here would likely be understood by the hearer/reader. The phrase: Which triangle has the larger area, triangle a or ...


1

The second choice you present is correct as you present it. The first choice would be improved if you eliminate the "of" and enclose "triangle a or trianble b" with commas. The "of" in the first choice as you present it implies that triangle a has more than one area.


1

The only proposed question I see which is a problem is the next-to-last one, where "someone could" should probably be "could someone". Otherwise, I don't see any that are particularly wrong, provided the verbs of the final sentences comply with rules about agreement between subject and verb.


1

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? As I understand it, people add “not” to questions in this way for one of two reasons: The asker believed she knew the answer but now is unsure The asker knows the answer and is proving a point In the first example, imagine a parent who instructed his child to finish her homework before playing ...


1

The lack of a different "yes" makes negative questions indeed a tricky thing in English. In French, but also in German (doch) and surealy other languages, there is a possibility to give a positive answer to a negative question. In English, it often leads to confusion. One way to deal with it was what my Indian colleague did, very consequently: she would ...


1

You can go with a question mark (1), a comma (2), or an em dash (not a hyphen). A semicolon (3) is not an option.


1

There can be a difference between have and know, especially with regard to game shows or teaching. In these cases, having an answer doesn't necessarily imply knowledge of an answer. The host or teacher may ask: May I have an answer? Which of course is the proper question as the host is soliciting a response to his question. Whether he has knowledge of ...



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