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32

Apparently, the writer's intention was always to mean "it is," not "its." (A hasty conclusion and a sweeping statement, yes.) Comparing "for all it's worth" and "for all its worth" with "for all it is worth," and considering that apostrophe use for the genitive was in fact an after thought. nGram: The arrival of the apostrophe as possessive ...


6

Depending on whether there is an apostrophe, the phrase has two quite different meanings, and that is what needs to be explored further. 'For all it's worth' suggests the thing is not worth much. And what you are intending, 'for all it's worth', is a way of minimising the importance of the task. When you 'use something for all its worth', the thing may ...


5

How about: I'm shocked ─ shocked! ─ that StackExchange would answer my question.


4

"For all it's worth" wins in my opinion as it is more adaptable to other sentences also. "For what it's worth" for example doesn't make sense if changed to "For what its worth". That might make one wonder "For what, its worth?" It ultimately depends on what "it" is. Does it own the worth? Or is it simply worth the worth?


3

Certain adjectives also have a potential role as intensifiers of other adjectives that can verge on the adverbial. This applies both to some that have positive connotations, such as nice, good, bright; and to some with less positive connotations, such as silly, fat, crappy. When they are used in this way, they are not separated by commas from the adjectives ...


3

I think it depends on the context. If you're referring to specific attributes of the object and its value, then you use "its". Usually these values are not defined by units like money, and are subjective. However, if you're referring to the object's overall value - for example, its value on the market - then you use "it's". However, I really do not think ...


2

There's a subtle difference in meaning with and without the comma. There is certainly no rule to put a comma before every "because", because the same sentence can be correct both with and without comma, with different meaning. "This might be because another algorithm was chosen." The software was twice as fast as expected. We don't know exactly why this is ...


2

The "and" is not wrong, but it is much less common than commas, except when the adjectives all come from a fixed expression like "salt-and-pepper hair" or "a fat, dumb, and happy audience". Other than that, it's mostly used for euphony: I will not cease from mental fight, Nor shall my sword sleep in my hand, Till we have built Jerusalem In ...


2

There is a difference in meaning... (A) means that you finally recommend something. (B) means that you finally explained something.


2

I agree that the generally-accepted correct comma usage is A. There've been some cases in my own writing where I find sentences that seem to work without the comma after the introductory word, but I've yet to find an exception to the general rule of the Purdue OWL. Introductory phrases also set the stage for the main action of the sentence, but they are ...


2

Since these are simply nouns and noun phrases, not complete sentences, there is no clear answer. The examples seem to imply the rule, "Use a period at the end of a clue, but not at the end of the answer." That's as good a rule as any other, as long as it's applied consistently


1

It would be cleaner to say: Parents, and children under the age of 18 that live in the same residence[, ...]


1

The simple answer is, you read out "hyphen". Generally not "dash" or other options. So, that's the answer! em-dash would be "E M Hyphen D A S H". No mystery! Anglo-Saxon would be "A, N, G, L, O, hyphen, S, A, X, O, N" For comparison, "it's" would be "I, T, apostrophe, S". (Just for your information, almost nobody knows what an "em-dash" is: it is a ...


1

You can use quotations or possibly even bare, but I think the best option would be to use italics, since that's more common for when talking about words as words (in this case, it's a name as a word): “Yeah, I agree with you there. Jon is pretty common, but the same could be said of Jeffrey, too” “I could go with the name Jon, sure, but I prefer Jeff ...


1

It definitely belongs outside the quotes. The ? is in the scope of the sentence, but outside the scope of your emphasis on stuff. <-- period goes outside, see?


1

The APA Style Guide is not a legal text trying to cover all bases in a final way. You are quoting the word stuff in the sense that you are putting quotation marks around it. Unless you are quoting the question Stuff?, the question mark is obviously not part of the quoted material. Also, the APA Style Guide is only for dubious cases. Since there was never a ...


1

There's no hard and fast rule, but many people use quotation marks for technical or unfamiliar words used for the first time (and defined either explicitly or in context); also, for highlighted or colloquial terms, which in these cases some sources might similarly recommend only putting in quotation marks the first time while others may allow that they ...


1

(1) Is it necessary to capitalise 'what'? I believe the following is from Aarhus University (but sadly can't link); while the example is slightly different, only a prescriptivist would argue that the reason for choosing not to use the capital does not apply equally here – there's no confusion about where the question starts if it's put in italics: In ...


1

In my opinion, you are "simply" dealing with nothing more than a sentence - that is to say, just as with a spoken quote - within a sentence. What is the correct punctuation when quoting a question in the middle of a larger sentence? IMO the answer is just: The previous results cannot provide an answer to questions like, "What is the probability of X ...


1

Hyphens aren’t necessary here. You’re combining “just as X as ever” with “(as) clear as mud”. I can see how you might be thrown off by the repetition of “as”—a lot of spoken constructions simply look odd in writing. In that case, you could make a slight change in wording: It’s clear as mud, as ever.


1

Unless finally is modifying having been..., then a comma is needed.


1

This is mostly a matter of distinguishing between having worth ("all its worth") and being worth something ("all it's worth"). I can only find subjective arguments for the value of either case over the other.


1

Instead of trying to convey it through typing characters, I would write: "Mother", I said with clenched teeth, word by word/stressing each word, "I said I don't want to talk about it." Then again, there are other ways such as the ones mentioned above.


1

"Like many others" here actually refers to both characteristics: "like many others who love to read, a desire to write grew inside me too". The "like many others" here is a rationale, of sorts. It's building up a modus ponens: 1) Those people who read a lot often develop a desire to write ("as everyone knows"). 2) I, myself, read a lot. ∴ I ...


1

No, you don't need to put a comma before every instance of because. In the context of your question, a comma is used to separate two independent clauses joined by a co-ordinating conjunction (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet) which may be where your corrector is getting the idea that because too should have a comma. Other uses for commas are to set off ...


1

Thorpe The -thorpe comes from octothorpe. Its origins are unknown. The other words are rare and likely variations after octothorpe. Octothorpe The OED says of octothorpe: The term was reportedly coined in the early 1960s by Don Macpherson, an employee of Bell Laboratories: 1996 Telecom Heritage No. 28. 53 His thought process was as ...


1

Does there need to necessarily be a separation? What if each bullet were considered a complete sentence, such as: The following students have made prayer requests: Iris is asking for prayers for her older sister to make right choices in life. Velzi hopes for her family to remain united. Personally, I find the full sentence more intimate ...


1

I frequently find myself writing lists of this sort, in which each item is what computer programmers call a key-value pair. Unfortunately, there is little standardization for how such lists should be formatted in ordinary writing; the Chicago Manual of Style, which is probably the foremost authority on writing style in the US, is silent on the subject. ...


1

(a)+(b)[1]: I like tea, especially chamomile tea; however, I prefer coffee. This is the most correct form. Another alternative is to move "especially chamomile tea" into parentheses: I like tea (especially chamomile); however, I prefer coffee. You can also move "however": I like tea (especially chamomile); I, however, prefer coffee. But the ...


1

"including but not limited to" is lawyer-speak, and comes from a lawyer's need to make sure that no one can ever, in any way, under any circumstances, think that "including" is all-inclusive. Merriam-Webster online says "including" means "to have (someone or something) as part of a group or total : to contain (someone or something) in a group or as a part of ...



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