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62

I use an apostrophe to indicate the place where letters have been omitted. What'll I do (' = wi/sha) I'd say (' = woul/shoul/coul) How ya doin' (' = g) Ya is an alternative form of 'you' (- regional or colloq. = you pron.(OED)) Since there are no letters missing in 'ya' there is no apostrophe.


18

It doesn't make sense to put an apostrophe after "ya", because no letters have been omitted. And that's what apostrophe indicates — it isn't a general clue that a word is shortened in some way. In "ya", the "ou" vowel has been replaced with "a". We don't have punctuation to indicate that, so we just write it. This is also generally the case where a ...


7

General rule of thumb with compound adjectives like this is to hyphenate them if they are made up of words which modify the base adjective and couldn't be used independently. The best way to gauge this is to write the sentence out with each word making up the adjective individually and see if they all still make sense: My 13 God daughter Obviously ...


5

This question, like all matters of punctuation, is a matter of style, and as such, you should be guided by your manual of style. There are two basic philosophies, close punctuation and open. Roughly speaking, the former advocates placing marks whenever there is an occasion to emphasize the syntax; the latter requires the marks only when unavoidable ...


4

This is a matter of style, like all issues of punctuation, and as such you should consider adhering to the the rules of your manual of style. Since you've already decided to confuse your reader by salting your prose with "a little poetry," you may well decide to adopt your own idiosyncratic standard of punctuation. I, myself, prefer the Chicago Manual of ...


3

"No can do" means "I can not do that", and there is an implication "It might be possible, but I'm not willing to try." It does not have a comma. I think the phrasing is meant to imply simplified English, as if speaking to a non-native speaker. I've never heard anyone use "No, can't do".


3

Whether to add a comma after viz.—or, for that matter, after e.g. or i.e.—is a style question that different style guides answer differently. For example, The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) has this: Do not confuse 'e.g.' (exempli gratia), meaning 'for example', with 'i.e.' (id est), meaning 'that is'. Compare hand tools, e.g. hammer and screwdriver with ...


3

In spoken English, people say things like What was really amazing is that the house had a little balcony. and no one has any trouble understanding the idea that those speakers are trying to convey. In written English, the landscape is somewhat different: Since writers have the opportunity to edit their thoughts before sending them out into the world, ...


3

It's a shortened version of "A friend of Steven's friends". That is, one of the set of people who are friends of Steven.


3

When you use verbs of saying or thinking, you're going to be hard pressed not to leave the impression that you're reporting a direct quote, which as the comment above and most manuals of style note looks like "How did you do that?" she wondered. If you want to make sure you're not quoting, use indirect reporting She wondered how you did that. I ...


3

Punctuation is a matter of style, so the comma isn't so much right or wrong as it is either in accordance with your manual of style or not. These manuals, which can differ in their recommendations, do not use "clunkiness" as a measure of punctuation's effectiveness. They strive to give rules for using the marks that will reliably enforce the proper parsing ...


3

Mr Osbourne wants a golden age in British politics, something that is sorely missed. comes from Mr Osbourne wants a golden age in British politics, which is something that is sorely missed. by means of Whiz-Deletion, which deletes unnecessary Wh- is strings at the beginning of a relative clause (in this case, a non-restrictive relative ...


2

In general, BrEng prefers putting the comma outside of the quotation marks, while AmerEng puts them inside. Because of this, neither is universally accepted as correct.


2

Nowhere, you're informal and/or in a hurry so adding apostrophes on proper places defeats the purpose in my opinion (unless there's some other purpose like writing a book or something). disclaimer: now I'm not native speaker and this is not an advice about grammatical correctness


2

Should a comma go after a one-word answer to a question? Yes, put a comma afterwards when what ensues flows directly from it and sums up the answer. Should a comma go after a one-word answer to a question? No. Say the following sentence does not flow in direct response to the question. Say that it does not sum up the basis for that answer. In ...


2

W3C has a clear guideline on this regard, assuming that "Internal Clients" calls the user to action. According to that, your sentence becomes To view your mail, visit the Internal Clients section where "Internal Clients" is written in title case and is hyper-linked to the section. Update: Answer updated according to OP's context. A non clickable text ...


2

"It's not important, I just thought you should know." and "It's not important, I just thought you would like to know about the phone call." are both comma splices, as you suspected. In each case, the comma should be replaced with a semicolon, except in informal writing including personal email, where the use of a comma would be considered ...


2

You really have two problems. The first is a matter of punctuation, and as such this is a matter of style, so the answer to it will depend on what manual of style you use. Mine is the Chicago Manual of Style, which recommends that a request "courteously disguised as a quesiton" not be terminated with a question mark but a period. Thus May I request you ...


2

The basic mnemonic rule, which is called the Eleven-Year-Old Boy Rule, is one-word modifiers precede the noun they modify modifiers of more than one word follow the noun they modify. One way of making a modifier of more than one word into a one-word modifier is to hyphenate it. Like an eleven-year-old boy versus a boy eleven years old. Of course, that's ...


1

These are called ditto marks, and were traditionally represented by a quotation mark (") or a double prime mark (''). In the modern era we have Unicode which has assigned the character U+3003 (〃) as the ditto mark for CJK scripts* and U+2033 (″) for western scripts. Chinese, Japanese, Korean


1

There a couple of misconceptions here. The first is about reduced participial phrases. Generally this means transforming a clause, which has a finite verb, into a phrase with a non-finite verb. Thus I came to work today while I was wearing my new suit becomes I came to work today, wearing my new suit Secondly, I don't know what grammar is ...


1

If would be voiced as a question it should end with a question mark. If it would be voiced as a command (eg, a stern teacher telling a student what to do) then it is not a question, regardless of the literal wording, and the question mark is not appropriate. The question mark serves to indicate the tone of voice, and what that tone implies.


1

Punctuation is a matter of style, and as such, you should be guided by your manual of style. I use the Chicago Manual of Style, which addresses your construct, the appositive. An appositive is a noun phrase (like the error message in your post) that follows and renames a noun (the word "error" in your post). Appositives that merely add supplementary or ...


1

Look and tell me what you see. This is perfectly correct as a statement, and you would only need to add quotation marks if this is dialogue or a direct quote from somewhere. However, the statement Look, and tell me what do you see? is INCORRECT unless this is dialogue. To clarify, what you're doing here is combining a statement and a question without ...


1

The term "zareba" is familiar to me as a description of the line of three asterisks used in modern print to signify a break of some kind. I think I learned the word in the writing of P. G. Wodehouse. Wodehouse (1881-1975) was a British comic writer. He wrote in several media, including as a magazine columnist, and I think he referred to the line of ...


1

I would suggest that at least in some dialects, the phrase "are you" is (informally) spoken as something between "ee-ah" and "eh-ya", which is distinct from "ya" meaning "you"; I would suggest 'ya (with the apostrophe) as an orthography for shortened form of "are you", since any other notation for that initial vowel sound would be apt to cause confusion. In ...


1

First, you wouldn't put quotes around "yes." You would merely say, "A chorus of yeses was heard." Second, the rules for citing a quote within quotes varies by style and varies between the UK an the US. However, unlike many other languages that increase the number of marks from single, to double, to triple, etc., the standard for English is fairly ...


1

Often in technical publishing, single quotes are reserved for literal references. Contextual punctuation in this usage is kept outside the single quotes. ‘A’,  ‘B’,  . . . means the following list:   A   B   . . . Whereas ‘A,?’,  ‘,,B,,’,  . . .   ...



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