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11

"Please welcome" — he pauses for effect — "our very own John Smith!"


3

This kind of sentence would usually be stated like this: The announcer said, "Please welcome," then, pausing for effect, "our very own John Smith!"


3

This is an example of the use of the gapping comma (ie the comma in its gapping-comma role). Commas: The Gapping Comma The gapping comma is very easy. We use a gapping comma to show that one or more words have been left out when the missing words would simply repeat the words already used earlier in the same sentence. Here is an example: ...


2

Yes, absolutely. It's a vocative construction: Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! Some languages have special forms for the vocative, but we have to make do with intonation, as indicated by commas. Wikipedia has a discussion of vocative: "Modern English lacks a formal (morphological) vocative case. English commonly uses the nominative case ...


2

I would not use a comma after the and and have I am no king and this woman, no queen. Essentially you're using the comma after "woman" to stand in for "is" and provide pause and hence emphasis. Given that it's a poem, you have poetic license.


2

I don't see any advantage in putting a colon after "that is" in the first example. A colon or semicolon generally indicates a more-significant break in the flow of a sentence than a comma does, but in that first example the biggest break in continuity occurs just before "that is," not just after—and since you've relied on a comma there, it doesn't make much ...


2

In your sentence you have two separate and independent "phrases" and they should be separated by a semicolon, dash or a period. The first one is the following affirmation: I am in the process of renewing my insurance policy. The second one is started with a introductory clause however, so a comma should come after it (as stated in 2 in the reference*): ...


2

I'd say that it's counted just the same as "he said" within a sentence. "Please welcome," he says, "our John Smith!" "Please welcome," he drawls, pausing for effect, "our John Smith!" "Please welcome," he pauses for effect, "our John Smith!" This last seems wrong, to me, sadly, whether you surround it in commas, braces, brackets or em-dashes. He doesn't ...


2

You're better off leaving it as-is. The commas are not needed, and would be inappropriate because they would create a false appositive, linking a plain noun (cat) with a possessive one (Luke's).


2

The general rule for bullet points is consistency: Punctuate bullets consistently. That is, if one bullet ends with a period (full stop), end all with a period, following these rules: a. If all bullets are sentences, end each one with a period (full stop). b. If all bullets are phrases or fragments, use no end punctuation. See more at: ...


2

You’re looking at a bad scan. The original has no full stop there as you are citing. The actual text reads: and St. Paul (1 Cor. vii. 9) does not say, “If they cannot contain, let them marry;” but he says, “If they do not contain, let them marry,” where he speaks not of such as have vowed chastity, but of other Christians, whom he advises rather to ...


2

Typically, an apostrophe is used with plurals only when leaving it out would cause confusion. For example, in the sentence All the students got A's, you'd use an apostrophe to make A plural because otherwise it'd be the word as. M&Ms, on the other hand, is clear in meaning without the apostrophe, so using one isn't necessary.


1

Your M&Ms example is just a regular plural so no apostrophe.


1

The first version is like this: The first one contains the score; the second one contains the name. For the second version there are two possibilities: The first one contains the score, the second one the name. The first one contains the score; the second one, the name. This kind of construction has two names: zeugma (ZOYG-muh) and syllepsis ...


1

When you finish vacuuming the rugs, please mop the floor. If you finish early, we can go to the mall. It helps if you say it aloud and take the pauses at the commas


1

"He pauses for effect" is like a stage direction, and a commonly used convention is to put stage directions in italics and to isolate them somehow, perhaps by putting them in brackets, in parentheses, or outdenting them. E.g. Please welcome [he pauses for effect], our very own John Smith!


1

The approach you take to introducing and punctuating a numbered list is purely a style decision. The style that I see used most often is the one endorsed by the Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), which discusses both numbered lists (of the type you use) and unnumbered lists (of the same type) under the category name "vertical lists": ...


1

What you have is the colon being used in two entirely different ways, and, together, they will seem a bit odd to some people (though I don't find the combo that upsetting). Colon can be used a the end of an introductory sentence or phrase to mark the end of that and the start of the thing being introduced. (Eg, "I have a question: What the heck were you ...


1

There is nothing wrong with the "three colon" usage in most cases, although it might not conform to the style guide of some particular organization. It's largely a matter of personal preference, though I must confess it's not my personal preference, particularly in the use of the colon after the numbers in the numbered list. There my preference would be to ...


1

Yes, you use a comma to set off a direct address from the rest of a sentence. For example: Happy Anniversary, Jane & Henry! Where are you going, Dad? Susan, I need to talk to you. Mr. Smith, the doctor will see you now. Grammarbook has a good list of rules for comma use. The one this question pertains to is Rule #5.


1

In each of the OP's listed examples involving then or so— And then that's when you went to the store? Then at McDonald's you were only there for a year, year and a half? So, if we talk over each other, it won't be clear. So, the last seven years you worked for Dollar General, correct? —ElendilTheTall's comment (above) that including ...


1

If find the Oxford comma to give fair representation to how people speak. When listing items in speech, equal pause is given between each item. For me, the Oxford comma emphasizes that there is, indeed, a pause before the 'and' preceding the last item of the list. I think the Oxford comma also indicates the direction of the sentence -- it makes it clear ...



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