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16

Such questions are usually hyphenated as thought-provoking questions, and if you're going to delete elements in conjoined multiple consecutive xxx-provoking usages like this, standard practice is to at least repeat the hyphen... I encourage thought- and discussion-provoking questions by students. Personally I would not advise reversing the order of ...


7

The usual mantra is 'A parenthetical is deletable without the matrix sentence's syntax, usually expected punctuation [and certainly basic meaning] being compromised'. Few would object to Can you book a room in advance (because otherwise we'd be in trouble)? but this changes the emphasis from that in the version using the comma. But you could argue ...


5

There are certain mandatory rules of English grammar. If you want to indicate that someone was engaged in the game of soccer, you must follow the English grammar rules of word order and construction and say something along the lines of "He was playing soccer." If you say, "Playing will he being soccer," you haven't said something coherent. We can talk ...


5

Aside from the direction of text, it's also worth noting that ancient Hebrew did not include punctuation as we know it in English. Including it in quotes therefore can look doubly odd. Therefore, although (American) English places the punctuation inside the quote, I recommend breaking with this when using quotation marks around Hebrew text. For example, ...


4

I would use thought-provoking, so I would interchange discussion and thought: I encourage discussion and thought-provoking questions by students. You are trying to imply discussion-provoking, which isn't idiomatic and is causing the confusion. My suggestion is intentionally ambiguous, because I personally feel students should be permitted to initiate ...


2

The sample phrases you included look good to me except the last one: my guess is non-zero energy mode is more common. Others have given you the things to think about when deciding whether to use a hyphen or not. Keep in mind, though, that in your field, certain combinations of words become commonplace, and the hyphen sometimes gets dropped. There are two ...


2

Your friend says this: I should put question mark inside of quotation mark (?") if the question is only part of the sentence That's true. Your friend also says this: I should put question mark outside of quotation mark ("?) if the whole sentence is a question. Either your friend is wrong, or else you misunderstood your friend, and thus your ...


1

From Punctuation in Dialogue (source: The Editor's Blog) Dialogue interrupted by dialogue tag Dialogue can be interrupted by a tag and then resume in the same sentence. Commas go inside the first set of quotation marks and after the dialogue tag (or action). “He loved you,” she said, “but you didn’t care.” “He loved you,” she said, ...


1

There needs to be a comma if there is a clause following it. I'm a copy editor, and in AP style, dialogue looks something like this: "I was excited to hear about Stack Overflow's 10 millionth question," Randall Flagg said. "I only wish I had started answering questions sooner." If the attribution precedes the quote, than a period (or other ...


1

This may be a case in which the most common American English style and the most common British English style diverge. In U.S. style, it is quite common to place the end punctuation (the period) within both sets of close quotation marks: "The victims are showing what the doctors described as 'adverse symptoms.'" This comports with the general ...


1

Do you really intend to say that you only encourage a question if it provokes both thought and discussion? Fumblefingers' answer is the standard way to elide a repeated part of a hyphenated expression, so I encourage thought- and discussion-provoking questions by students means the same as I encourage thought-provoking and discussion-provoking ...


1

One of the key requirements stated by the OP was that he/she wanted to encourage questions that provoked both thought and discussion. Unfortunately, there is no existing punctuation to enforce this requirement. In printed form we can bolden the words, as I have here and emphasise them in speech, but this is not really punctuation. In practice, we have to use ...


1

What is wrong with using something about the frequency detuning of the qubit from a resonator mode ? I'm afraid that no matter how you hyphenate qubit–resonator-mode frequency detuning, it's not going to be comprehensible. It's a noun pile-up, like air bag malfunction safety recall follow-up notice, and those should be avoided.


1

I'd say you have two options: Do whatever you want, but be consistent throughout the document(s). Treat the lists as complete sentences, following appropriate sentence structure. For example, if I were to treat your example as a sentence, I would write: We need to resolve dependencies, manage problems, build the system, and release. And as a list: ...


1

This is a matter of style, and you should consult your style manual, either the one you've adopted or the one thrust upon you. I use The Chicago Manual of Style, which dictates that a comma should separate conjoined independent clauses "unless they are short and closely related." You have two independent clauses -- "people aren't" and "it enrages." Here's ...


1

You don't have a second clause conjoined with "and" to the first. You have a two-part compound predicate: (is a scam)1 and (has been exposed)2. Ordinarily, commas do not separate the two parts of a compound, but leaving out the comma will leave you with a problem of style, what Steven Pinker calls a garden path -- a construct that will mislead the ...


1

To avoid this comma conundrum you might want to rewrite the sentence: "Whether you own a dog, cat, or fish, owning a pet provides many mental, physical and emotional benefits." I've removed "can allow" because it's not good English. Multitude is unnecessarily wordy, and mental emotional doesn't make sense. In the future, if you face these kinds of things, ...


1

This "from to" formulation is wrong, because the from-to construction indicates 2 extremes and can’t really be used to denote a list in this fashion. "From dogs and cats to fish" is more acceptable.


1

This is a matter of style. Consult your style guide, either the one you've adopted or the one thrust upon you. I use The Chicago Manual of Style: When two different marks of punctuation are called for at the same location in a sentence, the stronger mark only is retained. Example: Who shouted, "Up the establishment!" The question mark that ...


1

The punctuation at the end of an ordinary quotation is to end the sentence as a whole. Even if you are quoting another language, you are still ending the English sentence or clause it is a part of with a comma or period. The quotation marks signify the beginning and end of the use of a foreign language as they would signify the beginning and end of direct ...


1

In both sentences, you have two-part parallel constructions. As a general rule, don't put a comma in the middle of a two-part structure: From Professor John Fleming at DeAnza College: B. Two of any parallel structures other than independent clauses are separated by a coordinating conjunction only: Fred and George want to see Mary. (nouns) Mary got in her ...


1

If this is for an online review, perhaps you should consider making the paragraph into a list: In this book I found a variety of grammatical and textual errors such as the following: irregular verb tense problems - especially lie/lay, sit/set and run lack of subjunctive mood - e.g. "He wished he was" instead of "He wished he were" repeated ...


1

(It seems pretty weird to me, but) I'm willing to accept for the sake of the argument that you might be able to get away with putting a parenthetical preamble at the beginning of a sentence if the sentence proper began with a proper noun or with the pronoun I, since in that case the sentence would retain the appearance of completeness if the parenthetical ...


1

Also, it is bad form to end a parenthetical fragment with punctuation. The ending parenthesis takes care of any separation that the comma would otherwise be needed to indicate. I disagree. However, if it is a mid-sentence parenthetical fragment, an exclamation mark or question mark might be necessary. Furthermore, a comma is often required after a ...


1

I've been looking all over for the answer to this. Although this usually refers to a decorative line, the generic term for a graphic that splits up a page is called an ornamental rule. Most people call the space between a scene break. Some of the other people here seem to have the specific name for * * * I hope you found what you are looking for.



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