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16

Here you're using however as an adverb, meaning no matter how or in whatever way. Since you said that your intention is "no matter how you analyze the data, the output would remain poor", however is the correct choice. When one uses how ever, "ever" usually takes the role of an intensifier -- it increases the strength of the statement being made with "how". ...


5

The second sentence contains the inversion "is it" that signals a question. If you want to use a period, I suggest you remove the inversion to make it a conjecture: Maybe it is all simply a horrible accident.


4

Any expectation of a comma in the examples of the OP has very little to do with the subordinate clauses' restrictiveness, but rather, as the OP suggested, with an interruption of their natural flow. When leading a sentence with a subordinate clause, the comma does not force a "parenthetical / non-restrictive" interpretation. Simply, compare the meaning of ...


4

The output remained consistently poor how ever the data was/were analysed". (i.e., how ever you analyze the data, the output ...poor) When ever is used for emphasis after how or why, it should be written as a separate word. Thus it is correct to write ‘how ever did you manage?’ rather than ‘however did you manage?’ (as distinct from other uses ...


3

Mermin's guide on equations has a lot to say about this in the math domain. See: http://www.pamitc.org/documents/mermin.pdf The suggested practice is to include equations or snippets as if they were words in the sentence that flow inline in the text, obeying standard English rules for punctuation. For example, one might speak about the Pythagorean identity ...


2

comma, colon etc indicate rhythm and phrasing. In apostrophe s the ' is used as a diacritical symbol. It indicates in what way the s changes the meaning.


2

In your example, yes, the commas are definitely needed. This sentence is formed of two parts. "Take my aversion to horror films," is functionally separate from the fragment pointing out that it is an example. The commas indicate that separation. You could reword it, "As an example, take my aversion to horror films," which probably shows this separation ...


2

Commas often do no harm when put in places where they're not really needed. I think your choices are, in general, good. In #4 we could do without one after "though" and could use one after "sentence". Three out of four isn't bad. You should change your name to NotMrStupid.


2

How about separating the from ideas from the to ideas. Then treat the add-on idea with long dashes. (I've grown to love the long dashes, revealed to me by an editor long ago...) As in, "Response time has reduced from weeks or days, to hours — and even minutes — in some cases." In the second sub query, " ... from A or B to C and even D ...", it would follow ...


2

Technically no punctuation is necessary, but it might be helpful to add a few commas and parentheses: Response time has reduced, from weeks or days, to hours (and even minutes in some cases).


1

I think commas are typically placed after closed parentheses and within quotation marks. This creates a dilemma when all three are used together. The idea behind parentheses is they are not part of the sentence, and this is the first thing to bear in mind. If you don't, you are surprised that the verb does not agree with the sense of the whole ...


1

Suppose, for the moment, that the original wording of the piece from which you took the quoted fragments above was something like this: The next year will tell whether Joe regains control of the radio station or begins a long downward spiral into madness. Meanwhile, back in Smallville, his father, Elwood P. Dowd, continued to discuss philosophical ...


1

This is ultimately a style question, and style questions are the province of individual authors or of the publishing houses responsible for producing their work. At the magazines and book publishers where I've worked, we generally followed the "primary system" recommended in Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003): 6.3 Punctuation and font: ...


1

Here's how I would re-write two of them: (2) He was sent to the court, which ordered imprisonment (for) up to six months. (4) The judge pronounced the new sentence: “The court has decided to cancel the sentence. However, the father will be (kept) under surveillance.” Changes recommended: court, lower case; its repetition is avoided by the ...


1

In UK English as it was taught some years ago commas and conjunctions were used to divide adjectives - "He was young, dark and hansome". The same rule applied to long numbers - "Ten tousand, seven hundred and twenty-two." The commas are now often omitted and many writers are following US English in omitting the "and" as well.


1

You essentially have two independent clauses here separated by a conjunction. In those cases, a comma is necessary. ("As" can be many parts of speech, but in this case the use is that of a conjunction.) The word "fear" also takes a new meaning, as it comes to represent a more self-centered notion. The electric chair seemed an ironic choice of ...


1

The treatment of plural possessive Drs. Smith and that of attorneys general ought to be about the same. (Although the hyphenated British version is probably not applicable) The site Above The Law has some useful advice for the latter: In short they say, "Don't do it- rewrite it.": In American English, attorneys general is the correct plural form. The ...


1

I'm going to make an educated guess, which isn't necessarily the best option but: Technically, if you rewrite the phrase, you get: The house belongs to the Drs. Smith. Smith is singular, so the possessive form would be: The Drs. Smith's house. Similarly, if the sentence was: The house belongs to Drs. Joe and Jane Smith. The possessive ...


1

As @FumbleFingers points out, part of the issue with your first example is the asymmetry of your delimiters. "The youngest of us" is the subordinate phrase that should be removable while leaving the sentence intact. That being the case, you should use the same delimiter either side. Do remember that, unlike some languages such as German, English does not ...


1

Using a comma is the correct way. It creates an appositive out of an engineer in training which is being attributed to neildaemond, so neildaemond is now also known as an engineer in training. Using a colon here is technically also correct, but it shouldn't be used in a very short introduction like this. The colon simply says "What comes after me is what ...


1

Apostrophes, commas, semicolons and colons are all considered to be punctuation marks (along with several others). Commas, semicolons and colons could be categorised (grouped) together as pauses. Apostrophes could be categorised as indicators of omission (or something like that). The other member of this category is the ellipsis (...).


1

I agree with Buzz Mega that an "em" dash might help. In addition, it may allow you to remove the last "and" to make the last, and presumably the most important, clause stronger. Response time has reduced from weeks or days to hours—even minutes in some cases. The punctuation depends on what part of the sentence you want to place the emphasis.



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