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13

These types of symbols are generally called ornaments or sometimes typographic ornaments (see here and the comment below for more info and alternate names). Your example is specifically a page ornament. I would not call this a dash. If you want to use it, you should probably search through various ornament packs (some fonts even have their own sets of ...


4

You ask: Is there a style guide (preferably for Australia or the UK) that addresses this? Or is it just an overlook on Word's part? Consider the (Australian) Monash University style guide on Dashes (dots inserted here primarily for formatting): At Monash, we use en dashes ( – ) rather than em dashes (—). ... En dashes within sentences have one ...


3

Whether a comma is required depends on the intended meaning. Inserting the comma in "bold, fresh voice" would give 'coordinated' modification, so "voice" is modified by a coordination of adjectives, giving the meaning "voice that is both bold and fresh". By contrast, omitting the comma in "bold fresh voice" would give 'stacked' modification where there are ...


3

I will quote sections from the Chicago Manual of Style (13th edition). This is an American source. Em dash (—) is used: for a break in thought (§ 5.83) for an element added to give emphasis or explanation (§ 5.84) for a defining or enumerating complementary element (“He could forgive every insult but the last—the snub by his ...


3

No. A semicolon should be used in one of the following situations: To separate two linked sentences (note: as they are sentences, they must contain a verb) To separate list items that contain commas In your original sentence, the second part is not a sentence (it contains no verb) and it means nothing standing alone. It does not work to use a semicolon ...


2

As sumelic notes in a comment above, you need to use an apostrophe (’) when you are indicating the loss of part of a number or word, as with ’16 for the year 2016 or ’twixt for the word betwixt. The answer that user21820 provides covers this aspect of the question thoroughly, so I want to focus my answer on Microsoft Word's autocorrect behavior, which the OP ...


2

In numbers that have been abbreviated, such as: in the ’90s Dean’s List ’15-’16 The apostrophe denotes the presence of abbreviation, much as in: I’ll, let’s, where’d, can’t, ma’am, e’en, ... ’tis, ’em, ’cause, ... There is also: o’clock (for "of the clock"; according to the Online Etymology Dictionary) I also found this Oxford ...


2

Scope and Summary The question concerns the punctuation ‘rules’ for insertion of spaces at the either sides of em-dashes, and in particular whether adjacent quotation marks influence this. Australian or British usage is requested. Valid criticism of my initial answer provoked me to survey the different typographic styles of dashes employed as pauses in ...


2

Bryan Garner, Garner's Modern American Usage (2003) has a useful discussion of this problem in his lengthy coverage of phrasal adjectives: E. The Compound Conundrum. When the first or last element in a phrasal adjective is part of a compound noun, it too needs to be hyphenated: post-cold-war norms, not post-cold war norms. Otherwise, as in that example, ...


2

If you were writing this sentence from scratch, it would be preferable to reword it so as to avoid the punctuation problem. For example: There is still so much that I do not know about college. How do I pay bills?Which classes should I take? What do TA's do? How do I write a college essay? And so on. However, we're sometimes called upon to ...


2

Josh61's answer citing The Oxford Guide to Style (a British publication) neatly summarizes the difference between predominant UK and US English punctuation styles regarding double and single quotation marks. Beyond that various U.S. style guides offer similar analyses and some interesting sidelights on the predominant U.S. style. From The Chicago Manual of ...


1

From the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., p. 64, § 3.04: Within a paragraph or sentence, identify elements in a series by lowercase letters in parentheses. The participant’s three choices were (a) working with another participant, (b) working with a team, and (c) working alone. I personally ...


1

There should be punctuation added and an "and" inserted before the final factor, thus: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: 1) technologies that were going to stay, 2) those that were going to stay but be upgraded, 3) things that were going to come to the new house, 4) technology that will be taken to the new ...


1

Instead of actual numbers, you could use "first of all", "secondly", etc. Fifthly (or any final thing in the list) would be interchangeable with Finally in the below example. You could use semicolons or comma-separated lists. The below example uses semicolons: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: First of ...


1

OK, thanks is a comma splice and is the typical form. I would say that the reason it is used over OK; thanks is simply convention. Semi colons are rarely used in English literature or common writing such as emails. I only ever really use semi colons to separate email addresses.


1

Personally, I would re-write the entire sentence so that it does not use a direct question, and also to remove some of the 'jargon'-type words (e.g.: Why use "individuals" when the shorter word "people" will do?). [Changes from original shown in italics.] A quantitative study will be conducted to address the question of whether bi-lingual people from ...


1

Remember that punctuation is a matter of style. The "rules" are those recognized by the various style manuals, and those vary between manuals, which themselves allow for exceptions and the judgment of the author. Which isn't to say that there aren't some universally recognized directives (like putting a period at the end of a complete sentence). If you're ...


1

The ellipses are not the answer, and incidentally there is never a case where one uses more than one ellipsis in a row. Unfortunately I'm not sure what to recommend. Your example is very unusual - you say it's not a telephone conversation, but then why does it only have one person's words with the intervening responses left out? If this person is ...


1

According to the Chicago Manual of Style (my go-to style guide), 13.48 ELLIPSES DEFINED An ellipsis is the omission of a word, phrase, line, paragraph, or more from a quoted passage. Such omissions are made of material that is considered irrelevant to the discussion at hand (or, occasionally, to adjust for the grammar of the surrounding text). ...


1

What does your style manual say? The Chicago Manual of Style makes this a typographical issue, noting that when two different marks appear at the same location, only the stronger is retained. (Exceptions occur for certain instances involving quotation marks, parentheses, brackets, and dashes, but none of those is germane here.) Another typographical ...


1

First of all, it is true that the and in this sentence does not connect clauses, but it is not true that this sentence contains an "and that does not act as a conjunctive in a compound sentence." I went to the nearby cafeteria, and ate quite a lot of food is a compound sentence because it contains two predicates, which are connected by the conjunction ...


1

Your friend is right - the comma is correctly placed. 'Today' is an introductory prepositional phrase, meaning it should be set off with the comma. The comma after "Reddit", interestingly, is also right, though doesn't sound so: "Dear Reddit" is an addressed subject, and addressed subjects should always be set off with a comma and nothing else.


1

What you have are two examples of so-called garden paths, sentences that are arranged to mislead your reader into making the wrong parse. In the first sentence, your reader might expect a third crime instead of a consequence: He was convicted of murder and human trafficking and driving on an expired license. In the second sentence, your reader might ...


1

First of all, your text consists of two sentences run together. You should split it before 'Additionally'. Other than that, you need additional commas before and after the parenthetical phrase 'meaning higher prices' and another one after 'Additionally'. By the way, 'goods' can't be turned into the singular 'good'. Rather say 'commodity'.


1

Honestly, most of English grammar is subjective. The choice to put a definition in parenthesis is perfectly valid - at most it is a stylistic choice. Despite this, it is generally more widely accepted to offset a definition using an appositive phrase than to awkwardly integrate it into a sentence using parenthesis.


1

Both of your examples are not actually full sentences. The first example has a subject and two subordinate clauses, but no main verb. Do you want one of the main clauses to become the main verb? (Online collaborative assignments)SUBJECT (that provide an opportunity for online and in-person classes to work together,)CLAUSE and (that enable students in ...


1

The correct answer, originally, is that no question mark should be used and that instead, a full stop should. Since the main idea is that "I wonder", which is just a normal 'stating' clause and not a questioning one, and also since you are technically not expecting an answer, a question mark should be absolutely unnecessary. However, the contemporary usage ...


1

The former is correct. Compound nouns within compound adjectives are not themselves hyphenated; only the other word boundaries are.



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