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5

According to the The Oxford Guide to Style British usage of single vs double inverted commas differs from the US one: Quotation marks, also called 'inverted commas', are of two types: single and double. British practice is normally to enclose quoted matter between single quotation marks, and to use double quotation marks for a quotation within a ...


3

If the adverb applies to the verb specifically, as in I loved her passionately then no comma is required. If the adverb applies to the adjective from which it is separated (in your examples, many and long), a comma would be preferable. Your first example means How many employees work here, roughly? and without the comma, the sense is that the ...


3

No. A semicolon should be used in one of the following situations: To separate two linked sentences (note: as they are sentences, they must contain a verb) To separate list items that contain commas In your original sentence, the second part is not a sentence (it contains no verb) and it means nothing standing alone. It does not work to use a semicolon ...


2

The way you have it: "the works" is fine.


2

You might consider reordering the sentence like so: "Returns the value of the function, according to the current state, as if it were attached to this attribute and under a fast evaluation." Without context, I'm not sure if the bolded and should stay or be removed.


2

In numbers that have been abbreviated, such as: in the ’90s Dean’s List ’15-’16 The apostrophe denotes the presence of abbreviation, much as in: I’ll, let’s, where’d, can’t, ma’am, e’en, ... ’tis, ’em, ’cause, ... There is also: o’clock (for "of the clock"; according to the Online Etymology Dictionary) I also found this Oxford ...


2

As sumelic notes in a comment above, you need to use an apostrophe (’) when you are indicating the loss of part of a number or word, as with ’16 for the year 2016 or ’twixt for the word betwixt. The answer that user21820 provides covers this aspect of the question thoroughly, so I want to focus my answer on Microsoft Word's autocorrect behavior, which the OP ...


2

This headline comes from the Onion, a satirical publication. The use of scare quotes around dies in the headline is supposed to be a funny nod to Derrida's focus on (and deconstruction of) language. Apparently the use of scare quotes in referring to Derrida and his work has become a meme (see the first entry here where multiple words, including the ...


1

Nouns of address -- those naming the person or thing to which the sentence is addressed -- should always be set off from the rest of the sentence by commas. This applies whether they appear at the beginning of the sentence, English sufferer, pay attention! in the middle, You, English sufferer, should make a note of this. or at the end. Have ...


1

Both of your examples are not actually full sentences. The first example has a subject and two subordinate clauses, but no main verb. Do you want one of the main clauses to become the main verb? (Online collaborative assignments)SUBJECT (that provide an opportunity for online and in-person classes to work together,)CLAUSE and (that enable students in ...


1

The sentence is not an interrogative sentence as the subject is "I" and the main verb is "wondered". "What was going on with that" is an object of the verb to "wonder". It is a declarative sentence which is inverted for emphasis from the following sentence: I wondered what was going on with that. It would be better to use quotation marks (double ...


1

You could possibly use brackets like so: These paradigms are grouped into three categories: wisdom (consisting of right view and right thought); ethical conduct composed of (right speech, right action, and right livelihood)... This is probably how I would go about it. Or, you can use dashes: These paradigms are grouped into three categories: ...


1

Personally, I don't think that either a semi-colon or an en-dash is appropriate in your examples. I would use a colon or an em-dash. (I also don't think that an en-dash v. and em-dash is an American v. British issue: they have different purposes (see http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/qanda/data/faq/topics/HyphensEnDashesEmDashes/faq0002.html).) A ...


1

Your paragraph correctly punctuated: I find an airplane's symbolic freedom appealing - whether it is soaring through the sky, industriously filling and disgorging passengers(,) or exultantly defying gravity on take-off, it remains independent and far-reaching in all of its manoeuvres. In English, semi-colons are only used as a way to separate linked ...


1

Yes. As explained here, ellipses in dialogue text are often used in that way. They usually indicate a pause in speech or a trailing-off effect, so the way you used them in your example is perfectly appropriate.


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I would argue that your second format is the more logical format (and I think it is probably the more comment format in more modern British English). The outer (double) quote marks (or 'inverted commas' as we often refer to them in British English) encompass the entire sentence, and therefore include the capital letter at the beginning and the full stop at ...


1

We'll be creating a simple login screen with two input boxes for email address and password and a sign in button. This is right because we are stating two things to be added: 2 input boxes and a sign in button. Furthermore, we are stating the use of each input box.


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I would likely write it as: We'll be creating a simple login screen with input boxes for an email address and a password as well as a sign in button. The use of two is redundant in my view.


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Instead of actual numbers, you could use "first of all", "secondly", etc. Fifthly (or any final thing in the list) would be interchangeable with Finally in the below example. You could use semicolons or comma-separated lists. The below example uses semicolons: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: First of ...


1

There should be punctuation added and an "and" inserted before the final factor, thus: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: 1) technologies that were going to stay, 2) those that were going to stay but be upgraded, 3) things that were going to come to the new house, 4) technology that will be taken to the new ...


1

From the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., p. 64, § 3.04: Within a paragraph or sentence, identify elements in a series by lowercase letters in parentheses. The participant’s three choices were (a) working with another participant, (b) working with a team, and (c) working alone. I personally ...



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