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9

The term “helper/helping” might be "less professional," “old-school,” "primary school," and/or even "kindergarten level" compared to “auxiliary,” but that doesn’t detract one bit from its value as a clear and useful description of what these verbs do, so if you must use only one term, choose the one that best helps your students to visualize and eventually ...


9

Nowadays we call them 'auxiliary verbs'. The name 'auxiliary' has a similar meaning to 'helper'. However, we now recognize these words as a grammatical class of verb with specific properties, not just because they precede a main verb, because they have some modal meaning, or because we can't use them on their own. The properties just mentioned may apply to ...


6

maybe a bit of a stretch, but anyhow... stigmeology The art of proper punctuation -Grandiloquent Dictionary


5

The best answer as to why we use a three-dot ellipsis can be found in the book The Motivated Sign (Iconicity in Language and Literature), but allow me to explain briefly. ellipsis is derived from the Greek elleipein essentially meaning "to fall short" or "leave behind." The Viking language of Old Norse was one of the first known languages to use the ...


5

In clauses with a long subject such as lampooning a bad idea with humor, we do sometimes make a mini-pause in speech before the verb, which is why some pople would place a comma after humor. However this would be incorrect. One of the few absolute rules of English punctuation is that we must not separate a verb from its subject by a single comma.


4

The best way to think about a comma is a pause. Say the sentence out loud. Do you pause? If so, put in a comma. If you don't, no comma needed. Honestly, I wouldn't put a comma in that sentence. There are no grammatical rules that require a comma, and I don't pause at all when saying it.


3

Only the hyphen is correct. The two (or more) words combined form a compound adjective to describe one aspect of the video. Note the singular form of the full word (five-minute video - not five minutes video) despite the plural number: this is the clue a hyphen is needed, although the rule applies of all compound adjectives. Consider: 14-year-old boy ...


3

If you want a certain style guides opinion, then you italicize just the first occurrence: "7.49 Italics for unfamiliar foreign words and phrases Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers... If a foreign word becomes familiar through repeated use throughout a work, it need be ...


3

What you describe is the rhetorical figure known as anacoluthon (you can look it up on Sylvae Rhetoricae), which is the process of "beginning a sentence in a way that implies a certain logical resolution, but concluding it differently than the grammar leads one to expect." You begin by enumerating items in a list, but then break off to conclude, ...


3

Both are possible, as long as you stay consistent. Check out the Guid to Punctuation by Larry Trask (University of Sussex). About ¾ down the linked page ("Quotation Marks and Direct Quotations"), you will find this: Finally, there remains the problem of whether to put other punctuation marks inside or outside the quotation marks. There are two schools ...


3

In British English, yes. The comma placement is correct.


2

This is a style issue rather that a right-or-wrong issue. You can use a colon, or italics (but both would be overkill), or single quotes, or even go all retro and underline the title. None of them are wrong, but they are different styles. If it is for publication, check their style guide. If it is not, either choose a style guide to follow or just do your ...


2

You're attempting to represent a table with two columns (something like target and result) with punctuation, and there's not really a "correct" answer, but by far the most common convention is to use a colon. See for example the screen capture from a television commercial from the classic 1997 Mastercard "Priceless" campaign in this blog post, where "real ...


2

I would punctuate it as: "The church would be your hospital, the holy water your medicine, and the priest your doctor" on the basis that the commas are then separating items in a list. To be frank though, I think the option you rejected ("The church would be your hospital, the holy water would be your medicine, and the priest would be your doctor.") ...


2

In most U.S. English style guides, the decision about whether to double- or single-hyphenate a phrase such as "spherical Gaussian based approximations" rests on whether the first word in the string attaches primarily to the noun or primarily to the modifier closer to the noun. In other words, if you are talking about Gaussian-based approximations that are ...


2

Both periods are necessary: the first so that "etc" is a properly written abbreviation, and the second to terminate the sentence after the parenthesis. On the other hand, if the sentence had ended in an abbreviation (not inside parentheses), then two consecutive periods would not have been necessary.


2

You could rephrase "non-group-identity-affiliated-topics" as "topics that are not affiliated with group identity".


2

There should be a space between the value and the unit. Source: NIST - Rules and Style Conventions for Expressing Values of Quantities Edit: Hyphens should only be used if the symbol for the unit is not used. Occasionally, a value is used in a descriptive or literary manner and it is fitting to use the spelledout name of the unit rather than its ...


2

Both can be correct. It depends on how you want to say it. Do you want a pause after you or not? In other words it's up to you. Use the comma to represent a pause in speech. Omit the comma if there is no pause after you in the speech you are representing in written form.


2

Italicize in all instances. For example see mise en abyme here. ...Also "unheimlich" here. EDIT: I want to hedge my original response by pointing out that both the MLA and Chicago style guides seem to disagree with me. Both argue that only the first instance should be italicized, unless there is a very long space of text between them. It's not clear ...


1

That structure is called a zeugma. Use of a semicolon is inconsistent. The Wikipedia article cites two classics: Bacon, who wrote Histories make Men Wise; Poets Witty; The Mathematicks Subtill; Naturall Philosophy deepe; Morall Graue and Johnson, who quoted Cicero as writing "Lust conquered shame, boldness fear, madness reason." (Note, though, ...


1

Commas usually depict a small pause while reading. This is a mark of clarity while saying something. In your case, 'The French word entrailles means inward.' - this sentence is the most precise. You do not need to place entrailles between commas as it is evident that you are explaining the meaning of that particular word. As Dan Bron suggested in his ...


1

Well, the example you provide for programming languages is not completely correct. Most modern programming languages use the 3 dot ellipsis for specifying variable numbers of parameters in a function. The two dot ellipsis IS used in some older languages to specify a range, but now it is less common. Some differentiate, using the 3 dot ellipsis to omit the ...


1

Why not punctuation? He is a student/professor of punctuation.


1

The tendency in BrE is not to use a full stop after abbreviations, so there is no problem here. We write I love eating vegetables (carrots, peas, etc).


1

The first sentence could become correct if you replace the semi-colon with a colon. "Our experiment set out to answer the question: Is running fruit under water an effective way to reduce the number of surface microbes?" In that case, either sentence would be suitable. Alternately, you could avoid the issue all together by rephrasing it. For example, "Our ...


1

OK, I finally seem to have found a concrete mandate on this issue after digging a little deeper. Not sure if I should reference my source as a valid one since it's definitely not official but I'll let the readers be the judge. Here's the link: Quotation Marks: Where Do the Commas and Periods Go--and Why? To quote the article, universal American usage places ...


1

I was taught, lo, many years ago, that you should use a comma before the name of the person(s) you address. Therefore, "Hello, John" is correct. I've been looking through all of my manuals to find a source. I haven't found one yet, but I know that I will find it if I keep looking. If you're only communicating with one person, there is no need to use the ...


1

You picture a docile creature bah-ing contentedly in a pen. When you see the definition — to reprimand harshly — it always surprises you. The use of dashes here is confusing. It implies that "to reprimand harshly" describes the definition. The following has the same literal meaning: You picture a docile creature bah-ing contentedly in a pen. When ...


1

High poverty is a compound adjective in which the meaning is not significantly changed by a hyphen. You may choose to use a hyphen, in which case this becomes a hyphenated stacked modifier. The hyphen is not required because there is no significant difference between a high poverty noun and a high-poverty noun. (Contrast with the difference between a ...



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