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5

If you are quoting a chunk of French then it is no longer an English document: it is a mixed English and French document. For the French parts you should follow French rules, and for the English parts, English rules. You should no more change the French punctuation rules to correspond to English punctuation rules than you should change n’existe pas to ne ...


3

It certainly not wrong. Setting "in part" off with commas like that make it seem parenthetical. If you are intending to acknowledge that the explanation is partial without discussing other explanations, the commas strike me as correct, almost obligatory. So: It was controversial, in part, because of the lying. but It was controversial in part ...


2

You're better off leaving it as-is. The commas are not needed, and would be inappropriate because they would create a false appositive, linking a plain noun (cat) with a possessive one (Luke's).


2

The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) offers this reasonably straightforward style advice under the general category "Parentheses": 6.103 With other punctuation. ... A question mark, an exclamation point, and closing quotation marks precede a closing parenthesis if they belong to the parenthetical matter; they follow it if they belong to ...


2

The use of a colon here would change the emphasis, as the em dash is being used to set off a parenthetical statement. He could also have written it like so: On the sled, securely lashed, was a long and narrow oblong box. There were other things on the sled (blankets, an axe, and a coffee-pot and frying-pan), but prominent, occupying most of the space, ...


2

He intended to group the coffee pot and frying pan together for the reader. Presumably, he did this because they are both cooking vessels.


2

The apostrophe in yours' is incorrect. See this question for a good explanation. Otherwise the sentence is correct, but it's open to several interpretations. It might be clearer, albeit more long-winded, to rewrite it thus: Thank you for your letter about the items missing from your home and from your mother's home. Update: As well as the ...


2

With expository prose, punctuation is a matter of convention and the preferences of the house style sheet; with literary prose, it's a matter of authorial/editorial preference. I take the original question to be an example of the latter. There, one could dispense with the commas and italics could be used instead of quotation marks if one liked: The ...


2

AmE Well, it should have a period at the end. (Or if you'd rather, an exclamation point!) As for the hyphen: use whatever you please. You can find someone here to defend whatever symbol and spacing you use, and to quote a reputable style guide to back them up. So I could give advice on this, but it seems to raise tempers here. Let's just say that if ...


2

Offset "their new uniforms shining" with a comma because the sentence is complete with out the modifying phrase.


2

Well, "Thanks" can't be called an independent clause, thus comma is OK too. Otherwise you'd get a comma splice. Thus, all three are OK.


1

Using a comma in this case is comma splicing, an error involving joining two independent clauses with a comma (but no conjunction). Had you used but (a conjunction) versus however (an adverb), comma splicing would have been avoided an your sentence would be correct. Veterinarians suspected that the animals had died from the disease called "blackleg," but ...


1

In regard to your first quote, nothing is special about it other than that you are considering the latter portion as a subject of "was his reply." But since the quote is two sentences long, why are you not considering both sentences its subject? That being said, with dialog we usually do not consider the attributive portion as a predicate, although I suppose ...


1

The first sentence: “I did what I needed to do.” He lowered his head to look at my face. ..is grammatically correct. However, being two distinct sentences implies that the character lowered his head after he spoke. I think that in general, the second sentence would precede the first: He lowered his head to look at my face. “I did what I needed to ...


1

In this case, "and" is a coordinating conjunction connecting two independent clauses, so a comma is required; #2 is correct.


1

The sentence you quote is not a question. It is equivalent to: So if you score 50% on the test then you have passed, thanks for that. That's just a statement. Clearly from context the speaker disagrees with the statement; it could be considered that there is an implied "You think that..." at the start, but neither of those turn it into a question. ...


1

A stamp cost three cents; a gallon of gas, twenty.


1

I checked the BNC (British National Corpus), and found the example: ...but he had been a frequent visitor at the Stevenses' home... I think you can use both variants. In one way, you can leave Rogers or modify to Rogerses because Rogers is already carries in a way the plural meaning as it is the family, which consists of several persons, name. Rogers ...


1

I'm not sure you're going to find an authoritative answer for this question. And I'd assume that it boils down to a matter of style (preference) rather than constraints. You could use bullet points, but perhaps you'd prefer a more flowing style. Personally. I'd choose your first version, with an 'or' after the second semicolon. I prefer the ...


1

"The first king" in your sentence is an appositive, a noun phrase that further identifies a noun. If an appositive comes at the end of a sentence, as in your example, it needs a comma before it: He was the first of his kind, the first king. If an appositive is at the beginning of a sentence, it needs a comma after it: A Pulitzer-winning novel, For ...


1

I do frequently use colons to end partial sentences that introduce lists. Such uses as the one in your example, though legitimate, are informal, and occasionally give the reader more pause than is necessary. Your sentence (or sentences), in my opinion, works well enough; but if you are picky, you might think it better constructed as a dependent clause ...


1

This is, of course, purely a style issue, and I was somewhat surprised at how few style books directly address the OP's question. The best (and only direct) coverage of the question occurs in Words Into Type, third edition (1974), still a major reference book in U.S. publishing, despite its age. Here is the relevant entry in Words Into Type: Measures, ...


1

There is no universally binding set of rules, but consider the following: An ellipsis is a set of three periods ( . . . ) indicating an omission. Each period should have a single space on either side, except when adjacent to a quotation mark, in which case there should be no space. Ellipses - The Punctuation Guide This resource well explains the ...


1

I would write it: "I left the oven on. Rats", he said. "Rats! I left the oven on," he said. Or as @Erik Kowal suggested: "I left the oven on. Rats!" He said.


1

The first version is like this: The first one contains the score; the second one contains the name. For the second version there are two possibilities: The first one contains the score, the second one the name. The first one contains the score; the second one, the name. This kind of construction has two names: zeugma (ZOYG-muh) and syllepsis ...


1

There are situations where use of the Oxford comma will make or break a sentence. Choose a style and be consistent. When you run into a situation in which your choice suggests a misinterpretation of the sentence, rewrite it in another manner to avoid the confusion. Consider these two pairs where the Oxford comma makes (1) or breaks (2) the intention: ...


1

You would place a comma after the interruption if the first quotation was not a complete sentence, but dialogue doesn't have to use complete sentences. Using the period in sentence 1 amounts to deciding not to use complete sentences within the dialogue.


1

I was drawn to this question by edits that I made on other SE sites, constantly being re-edited and commas being added after an "e.g." that I had added, without the comma. After the umpeenth time, I decided to check whether I was wrong, and had been making the same mistake for 40 odd years. I was quite sure that the use of a comma was incorrect and had not ...



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