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British Broadcasting Company's (BBC's) No, I have never seen anyone do something like this. It's confusing. British Broadcasting Company (BBC)'s No, again, I have never seen this used. Imagine if there was a line break between "Company" and "(BBC's)," that would also be confusing. Therefore, "The British Broadcasting Company's (BBC) policy ..." is ...


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The Chicago Manual of Style recommends a nonbreakable space before and after an ellipses when the intention is to trail off a sentence. 13.52 Ellipses with other punctuation. Placement of the other punctuation depends on whether the omission precedes or follows the mark; when the omission precedes it, a nonbreakable space should be used between the ellipsis ...


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People have mentioned in the comments that, yes, in the past, a small (non-breaking) space was inserted before an ! and a ? These must never start a new line. The space is also a small space, very clearly much more than the space between letters of a word, but much less than a sentence-ending space. See, for example, this: And: From an 1899 edition of ...


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"At the end" is an introductory clause (although it can be placed at the end of the sentence). An introductory clause, as such, requires a comma before the main clause. The tunnel is dark. At the end (of it), you will find some light. As for the preposition before "the end", if you are talking about the end of something previously mentioned or ...


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If you use a comma as decimal separator, you use another punctuation mark (or no mark at all) as thousands separator. This way there is no ambiguity. You can check the table on Wikipedia for some examples.


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If you want to do put everything in one set of quotation marks, no one can tell you not to! But it's not standard English, it's some kind of experimental project ;) It would usually be punctuated something like this: "Why?" "Because a thief had tried to steal a handbag--" "--Which should never have been left unattended in the first place--" "You have to ...


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The two excellent comments from Dan Bron and StoneyB have given you your answer: the famous quote from A Tale of Two Cities is an example of a skilled author making a stylistic choice, not an error. As Dan Bron noted: "Certainly it's deliberate, no question of that, but I'd opine that the primary device being employed is anaphora, rather than the comma ...


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Do not eliminate the period before a question mark. It doesn't make any sense to remove it in this instance. Therefore, this is correct: "What time are you going to Q.N.?" You, do, however, collapse periods at the end of a sentence: "I love the U.S.A." not "I love the U.S.A.." I searched through my AP Stylebook for a reference, but I didn't find ...


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The parenthetical (the difference narrowing the longer women had the vote) is not a complete sentence; it's an aside describing the gap between the number of women who vote and the number of men. Women's participation is lower than men's, but the difference is larger just after women attain suffrage. Thereafter, the difference becomes less. The ...


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As EA wisely points out, punctuation incorporates a degree of arbitrariness, so the answer will depend on the style guide you choose (or the one chosen for you). If it's any comfort, The Chicago Manual of Style places a period after Ms. and includes it as an abbreviation. Your unease may arise from the fact that Ms. is not an abbreviation for any honorific ...


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The first set is correct as written. The question of commas becomes necessary with direct quotation as opposed to indirect quotation. Indirect: He thought [that (implied)] it was hilarious. (No commas are called for.) Direct: He thought, "It was hilarious."


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Typically commas indicate a pause in a sentence indicating another thought is starting. None of these are required. I would only tend to use commas in a case where you really wish to indicate an idea break. Here's an example. In short be careful with commas in these cases. Lack—or overuse—of punctuation (especially commas) can alter the meaning and/...


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The figurative meaning of "turning away" came first, from which the mark showing where a letter has been omitted: apostrophe (n.): mark indicating omitted letter, 1580s, from Middle French apostrophe, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos (prosoidia) "(the accent of) turning away," thus, a mark showing where a letter has been ...


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I like the last one. "Get started - get sorted with British Widgets" It provides a sense of movement and connection. A call to action usually would have a exclamation mark though. Perhaps "Get Started! Get sorted with British Widgets." I would be wary of using two exclamation marks in a row but that could be an option too, depending on how forceful you ...


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As the question in question (lol) is not a complete sentence, it cannot be made into a correct sentence unless some words are added. Assuming that you are going to add a clause after that dependent clause, you could modify like this: "After all the trouble I went through to make it, [I didn't want to eat the cake anymore.]" After this, add whatever you ...


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OK, thanks is a comma splice and is the typical form. I would say that the reason it is used over OK; thanks is simply convention. Semicolons are rarely seen in English writing, news articles or conversational writing such as emails. I only ever really use semicolons to separate email addresses. However, (comma :) having said that, I've noticed a few ...


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That comma is not correct. The sentence is one very long clause. It should be broken up -- either into two clauses, or two sentences. Some parents say one should restrict TV watching. I agree, mostly because children don't have the willpower to self-regulate. Children don't have the willpower to regulate themselves, so I agree with parents who restrict ...


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Personally, I would re-write the entire sentence so that it does not use a direct question, and also to remove some of the 'jargon'-type words (e.g.: Why use "individuals" when the shorter word "people" will do?). [Changes from original shown in italics.] A quantitative study will be conducted to address the question of whether bi-lingual people from ...



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