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8

Chicago's position The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (2003) asserts this broad rule against combining question marks (or exclamation points) and commas (or periods): 6.123 When to omit comma or period. Neither a period (aside from an abbreviating period) nor a comma ever accompanies a question mark or an exclamation point. The latter two marks, ...


4

"Also" followed by a comma, indicating an intonation break, tends to be interpreted performatively, but without a comma is interpreted declaratively. A performative concerns the saying of something, while a declarative concerns what is said. "Also," at the beginning means, roughly, "in addition to what I have just told you, I am in addition telling you ...


4

The ditto mark, (also known as double quotation marks) would seem appropriate The ditto mark (〃)1 is a typographic symbol indicating that the word(s) or figure(s) above it are to be repeated. Wikipedia


3

'To show this' is adverbial, so the first comma makes sense. Then there is a list of imperatives. Commas are fine for separating them. Do not mix commas and semicolons at the same nesting level. (You might use both semicolons and commas if some of the list items have 'parenthetical' nesting.) 'It then follows that ...' is not part of the list. It ...


3

I believe there are two factors in play here. One is that, most grammar rulebooks (for example this site) indicate that it is acceptable to omit the comma if both of the independent clauses are short, and some also feel that it is acceptable to omit it if just one of the two independent clauses is very short. Second, many authors write with the intent to ...


3

No. All the semicolons should be commas. See this wonderfully handy resource, The Punctuation Guide. Semicolons go Between independent clauses when a coordinating conjunction is omitted Between independent clauses linked by a transitional expression In lists with internal commas In elliptical constructions This sentence doesn't contain any of these ...


2

According to the Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.) the period should not be omitted. In the section on multiple punctuation marks it says, "When an expression (such as an abbreviation) that takes a period ends a sentence, no additional period follows. Of course, when any other mark of punctuation is needed immediately after the period, both the period and ...


2

Your sentence reads as follows and includes four separate reasons: Reasons a guest may be turned away include ... - being under the influence of drugs or alcohol, - exceeding the weight limit, - unable to understand or obey the rules, and - are physically unable to traverse the obstacles. I have broken it up like that to show you that the ...


2

References: http://ss64.com/jargon.html http://ss64.com/bash/syntax-pronounce.html " \!* " is pronounced bash-bang-splat SPLAT n. 1. Name used in many places (DEC, IBM, and others) for the ASCII star ("*") character. 2. (MIT) Name used by some people for the ASCII pound-sign ("#") character. 3. (Stanford) Name used by some people for the Stanford/ITS ...


2

When a single adverb -- I'm not going to get into adverbial phrases because you didn't ask about them -- introduces a sentence, appearing in advance of the subject and verb of the main clause, the rule is to follow it with a comma. The exception to this rule is when the adverb is also being used somewhat conjunctively. Example: John went to the store ...


2

The most common solution is to say definitions, as in According to the definitions of "child-friendly" in the user manual, the safety sheet, and the online product description, the item is safe for children under three years old.


2

Punctuation doesn't have rules per se but guidelines to improve the reader's flow and comprehension. Your use of two em-dashes seems perfectly fine without a comma. However, there are extraneous words which slow your readers down and your through ... through construction distorts the comprehension. It's fine for a speech where the speaker would know where ...


2

Typically, the "dash" you're looking for is represented by two dashes, or more properly by the actual em dash character, where that is available. Since the dash indicates a break in the thought of the sentence, a comma (which does something similar, but not as strongly) isn't necessary. When the break occurs between two clauses, there's no need to add a ...


2

If you start looking for grammatical errors in signs, you're going to see them all over the place. Just wait until you start noticing the abuse of apostrophe's. So, sure, those words should probably be hyphenated if you were worried about grammar. But most people who write signs aren't very worried about grammar. The goal was to communicate that they're ...


1

Marshal Plan has a great book named "The Marshall Plan for Novel Writing", Wherein he has recommended the use of ITALICS for the inner thoughts In inverted comas- referred to by you as double quotes. : http://www.dailywritingtips.com/dealing-with-a-characters-internal-thoughts/


1

Wikipedia--Hart's Rules When an abbreviation contains more than one full point, Hart's Rules recommends putting the s after the final one. Ph.D.s M.Phil.s the d.t.s This is subjective; there's no formal rule for how a bullet point should look


1

If the quotes are actually being used correctly, they mean that the shirt literally reads "Search and Rescue". Like this one: Though, technically, the above shirt would be a "SEARCH AND RESCUE" shirt. So, if the person was wearing a shirt like this: Then it would be a "Metallica" shirt. Same is true with "Keep Calm and Carry On" t-shirt. The quotes ...


1

It's correct to put a comma before "but also" whenever what ensues contains its own subject and verb because "but" is a coordinating conjunction. Whenever any of the seven coordinating conjunctions (and, or, but, for, so, yet, nor) introduces to the sentence a coordinate clause—a type of main clause—grammar requires a comma. As for the situations when what ...


1

You could blockquote it as admin or preformat as admin The password is admin You can also use a colon to get rid of the sentence structure. The password is: admin


1

Not sure where I learned it from -- maybe AP? but I like having spaces before and after an ellipsis for the simple reason that it's clear and easy to see -- and not get caught up in thinking there are only 2 dots instead of 3, which happens to me sometimes when reading prose that eliminates those spaces (Chicago Manual).



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