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Off point here but to a point: Antony's soliloquy says - there's gonna be trouble - big trouble; but the phrasing and imaginings are superb and pure poetry. It's a pleasure to serendipitously encounter such masterful language synthesis.


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It's simply a case of the writer being an idiot. The writer in question has seen intelligent people using the aside "pun intended!" or "intentional pun!" and the writer thought he would try to use that device, but unfortunately, it became only a situation for the stupidity and illiteracy of the writer in question to be displayed. There's a common humorous ...


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I think the pun is on "plot" as a storyline vs a conspiracy. In one sentence, the speaker says both: Caesar may be a military guy, but he isn't exactly sophisticated. He wouldn't recognize a good play if it hit him over the head Caesar is so full of himself, he wouldn't recognize a conspiracy against him Edit: I don't think the speaker used the wrong ...


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the pun I would say is not on a double meaning of the word "plot" but on the second half of the common idiom "couldn't ------- to save his life" ie the pun is on the phrase "to save his life" This phrase is usually used in very banal circumstances to describe someones lack of ability but not one that would ever be a matter of life or death. Such as "He ...


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This doesn't really feel like a pun at all to me. It's just a phrase that is jammed in another phrase with little effect. If the band were named Fish Out of Water, or to be a bit more real Fall Out Boy, there would be more of a pun. Puns take work, and even just a verb-based band name, like Train, wouldn't make this a pun. Do you Train just feels like a ...


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I would suggest there might be three verbal ambiguities: to save his life: a metaphorical set phrase about lack of skill or a literal statement, as mentioned by others plot: the historical conspiracy against Caesar or the storyline of Shakespeare's play plot to save his life: there was no plot aimed at keeping him alive so the conspiracy killed him ...


35

The pun is on 'couldn't (do something) to save his life'. Usually 'to save his own life' is used metaphorically, meaning that he couldn't do X very well. Except here the X, 'discovering a plot', is what he couldn't do and he literally could not save his own life because of it, the plot was to kill Caesar. As everyone else said, it's not a particularly ...


11

" He couldn't run to save his life;" "He couldn't swim to save his life;" morphed into such phrases as "He couldn't play bridge to save his life." "...fry eggs..." "...tie a reef knot..." Here R R finds himself using the phrase literally. I think that is the play on words that catches him by surprise, an informal phrase in a real context. ...


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Another consideration: instead of referring to to word plot, maybe he's referring to the idiom "to save his life." It's used to colorfully describe one's inability/incompetence with regard to the described action: It's like saying "He's so bad at X, that even if his life depended on his doing X, he still wouldn't be able to it adequately." It's a common ...



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