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6

Short answer When we move from a nasal consonant /m, n, ŋ/ to a /f, θ, s/ or /ʃ/, we often accidentally make a /p, t/ or /k/ between them. This is because our tongue is making some kind of /p, t, k/ articulation left over from the nasal sound while the nasal cavity is simultaneously blocked for the articulation of the following sound. Such consonants are ...


5

There are five sounds that we classify as /t/ in English: the t's in "top," "stop," "pot," "potter," and "button." They aren't identical, but we do think of them all as /t/. You can test some of the difference by putting your hand in front of your mouth as you say them; the amount of breath coming out is different. These different sounds all classified ...


5

1. Is 'bronc' now the primary term in the bronc/bronco/broncho series of variants? Merriam-Webster’s decision to put the main definition of the term under the bronc entry took effect in the Ninth Collegiate Dictionary (1983). Both the Seventh Collegiate (1963) and the Eighth Collegiate (1973) have this brief entry for bronc: bronc n : BRONCO and this ...


4

Since you use slashes for the transcriptions, I assume you're asking about the phonemic form of "conscious", not the actual pronunciation. Right? (Because if you were asking about the pronunciation, the answer would be different.) Assuming that's what you mean, I favor the phonemic form without a /t/, /ˈkɑːnʃəs/. If there were a /t/ there, I think it ...


3

It's not. The phonemic (in the sense underlying) form is /sɔːɹtəv/ which is from combining /sɔːɹt/ and /əv/. Because it is at the end of a word, the /t/ is also at the end of a syllable, and syllable final /t/ after a vowel, a glide, or [ɹ], and before a vowel, in many American English dialects changes to a flap. So the pronunciation is [sɔːɹɾəv]. There ...


3

I am not a native speaker, but I see a major difference between arch- in archenemy or in archaeology and even another one to archipelago, which would explain the different pronunciations. In the first case it is used as a prefix. Enemy is still a word by itself, as bishop or diocese are. The arch- prefix is used to emphasize the relevance / importance / ...


2

"Put" and "cut" rhymed historically if you go far enough back; this is why they are spelled similarly. In some modern accents, they still rhyme. So in this sense, the spelling is not arbitrary; nor is it particularly illogical (although it is somewhat inconvenient for people who pronounce these words differently). As you say, in standard British and ...


2

As a Brit I can only take the BBC as an example of correct pronunciation; they have departments for these things. Though the fin/fine thing does occur, it seems to me both versions of the word are generally pronounced "fiynancial".


1

English words often have a primary and a secondary stress, especially when they are long (4 syllables or more). In your example, "pen" has the primary stress, and "tra" has the secondary stress.


1

To augment the answers given already (specifically sumelic's answer), you have to take account of the fact that for most of the history of the English language most people were illiterate. Which means if the pronunciation of a word (like "knight") for example, gradually changes over time, the original spelling isn't in the back of the speakers mind pulling ...


1

I can only answer for UK. Your first is universal (for adjective, noun and Name of place) in UK. Listen here: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/serpentine The second is given by the American Merriam-Webster. Listen here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/serpentine


1

The name of the symbol in AT&T patent filings is "octothorp," but no one ever says this. If it precedes a number, say "number" as in "#2 pencils." If you're talking about a telephone key pad or if it follows a number say "pound" or "hash" (if you are using US or UK English respectively) as in "enter your password followed by the # sign" or "a 5# bag of ...


1

In Britain it's generally pronounced hash, and in America I believe generally pound. Pound in Britain more commonly refers to the currency. Pronunciation varies depending on the context. In a tweet it would be pronounced hashtag as is "Off to the bake shop #buyingsomecake" which would be pronounced "Off to the bake shop, hashtag buying some cake" In ...


1

/juːzd/ is the past tense of the verb "use". /juːst/ with "to" following (but pronouncing only one of the /t/s) expresses an habitual or customary past tense of a following verb.


1

For Cambridge Dictionaries Online, at least, part of the answer may be to do with syllabification. First note that the transcriptions are phonological, as indicated by the slashes //, not phonetic, which would be indicated by square brackets []. That means that the phonetic realization might be identical even if the phonological representation is different ...


1

The final consonants usually are being pronounced, but through some allomorphs that make them harder to hear. "but I": In this case the /t/ is being pronounced as either a flap or a glottal stop. "out of": The /t/ will be pronounced as either a flap or maybe an unaspirated consonant /t/. "don't exist": The tongue is in the same place for /n/ and /t/. You ...


1

None that the OED records through its paper supplements.


1

Ghoti would not be considered an "Easter egg" word. It was made up to make a point about English pronunciation. Regarding specifically "Easter eggs" within the language itself, none are widely documented, if they do exist. I've never heard/read of one, before. When looking for them, take into consideration the risk of confirmation bias in regards to ...


1

Your objective is to get people to pronounce your name the way you pronounce it. So, what matters isn't what might be technically "correct", but what you could write which will make people look at the word and make the right sound. Unfortunately, I don't think there's anything which fits the bill. The most accurate mark is probably the diaeresis (Noë), ...


1

One possibility is ah-ko-ah, but clarity of meaning is key here. If there's a standard usage, then I would suggest following it; I also imagine, however, that some people whose parents were alcoholic might resent being "reduced to a label".


1

When you say an acronym you should spell out each letter individually. The only exception to that is when the acronym is well-known enough that there can be no confusion, for example NATO, FIFA or CERN, or when there is an accepted pronunciation (such as "Fannie Mae" for FNMA) or when the initialism forms an already-accepted word. Some organizations like ...


1

It's definitely pronounced 'naught' (sounds almost like "not"... or the beginning of "naughty" without the "ty" on the end). At least this is true for American Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics. Naught, as a living word, is more British than American, however, and rarely would an American ever be heard saying the word naught (outside of a ...


1

Debrett's recommends us to pronounce Ma'am to rhyme with Pam. In my variety of British English, that is /Pæ:m/. My dialect exhibits the bad-lad split and "mam" has a long vowel. I pronounce Pam, palm, cat, and mum with four different vowels. I've never used the word ma'am in any context and I've never heard it used by any British-English speaker (except in ...



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