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The final consonant sounds in the question are called plosives and they have two phases when pronounced: first, a closure phase, where air pressure builds up behind a complete obstruction in the oral cavity (formed by the lips, by contact of the tongue tip with the alveolum, or by the tongue dorsum with the palate). For p, t and k, the vocal folds are not ...


4

Following up on user2512's answer, I quote Online Etymology Dictionary's entry for cocoa in full: cocoa (n.) powder from cacao seeds, 1707, corruption (by influence of coco) of cacao. The printing of Johnson's dictionary ran together the entries for coco and cocoa, fostering a confusion that never has been undone. Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the ...


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It should be /ˌhɑɪpoʊˈkaɪmənɒn/ “high-poe-KIME-uh-non". Explanation: The pronunciation of the consonants is unproblematic. The stress is clearly on the third-to-last syllable, as all the relevant languages involved agree on this (Greek, Latin and English). The prefix “hypo-” already has an established pronunciation in English, which I would advise using ...


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In accents in the north of England, where there happens to be no foot-strut split, a majority of speakers use /ʊ/, realised as [ö], in words like love and cup. This is the same vowel that RP speakers use for the word soot. I have no idea if this is related in any way, but in many accents in the north of England there is a preference for the vowel /ɒ/, ...


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I'm British. I would say that very few speakers of English make two separate tongue 'clicks'. I have heard a few people that do - I'm pretty sure there's a British politician that does it. I'll try to remember who. Experimenting for myself, I can say that I make the tongue movement only once, however I can easily distinguish between "goodtime" "goodime" and ...


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/juːzd/ is the past tense of the verb "use". /juːst/ with "to" following (but pronouncing only one of the /t/s) expresses an habitual or customary past tense of a following verb.


2

I'm English and I learned Spanish with a Castilian (central Spanish) accent from a CD. The CD was specifically about pronunciation and not about vocabulary. Answer Even though my Spanish is not very good, people consistently remark on my Spanish (rather than Latin American) accent. It must be weird for native speakers. Because my accent is so good they ...


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Some of the answers and comments here seem to say that the /k/ in asked is not elided in standard Englishes. To counter this misconception, as well as to through some light on masked and risked, I thought it might be a good idea to put some information here from vetted published sources, and world-renowned professional phoneticians of English. The following ...


2

In some dialects in Britain (particularly around the Thames Estuary) you will hear for example asked pronounced without the 'k'. Example 'I never said as 'ow 'e shouldn't; I only arst yer if it was the sime.' 'Yea, thet's 'oo I mean.' ''Is nime is Blakeston—Jim Blakeston. I've only spoke to 'im once. Liza of Lambeth: By Somerset Maugham Note: In the ...


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After your edit and the clarification the comments to the question have brought about, it is now much clearer what it is you’re asking here. The simple answer is no. Generally speaking, plosives in English are mandatorily aspirated [pʰ tʰ kʰ] when they come at the start of a stressed syllable, or (usually) word-initially. In all other cases, they are ...


2

In hopes of answering this question, I investigated Google Books search results to see where and when the (presumably phonetic) spellings baloney and boloney—as well as the standard spelling bologna—arose in English and who used them. The results are intriguing. Early instances of 'baloney' By far the earliest occurrence of the spelling baloney in a ...


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Yes, but details of just exactly when [t] will drop will differ from person to person and according to how casual speech is. A general governing principle for this and other contextual phonological rules is the Law of Similarity, which here requires [t] to be lost when preceding and following sounds are most similar to the [t]. In the phrase "act tired", ...


2

Native US English speaker here: A standard US accent would link the two words together holding the airflow on the "d" and releasing it on the "t". Essentially, it become a hybrid sound that starts softly and ends sharply, by increasing the pressure of the tongue against the roof of the mouth. The position of the tongue does not change, just the pressure. ...


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"Cosmic" -- from the cosmos. "Extraterrestrial" -- from anywhere other than Earth. "Space" is the space between places, so it doesn't lend itself readily to being used as an origin. Anything in Space must have come from somewhere else ...


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These two vowel sounds are pretty similar, the difference between them is that the /ə/ is used in weak (unstressed) syllables & the /ɜ/ is used in the stressed ones. Yes, these two sounds are the central ones and the position of the speech organs seem to be correct in your description. Speech therapists also recommend raising the back of the tongue a ...


1

The way I pronounce wikinames is /'wɪkiˌneimz/, where the first syllable has the same vowel as wick and is stressed.


1

The dropping of /t/ or /d/ in English is technically known as alveolar plosive elision. This phenomenon is completely different from the substitution of a classical /t/ with a glottal stop. In cases where we use a glottal stop, the stop can be considered an allophone, in other words an alternative form of /t/. In the case of elision, there is no substitute ...


1

A merger of the phoneme /æ/ with /ɛ/ is uncommon in native English accents. That is, it is rare for a single speaker to pronounce "land" and "lend" the same way. There is a lot of phonetic variation in this sound, though: one speaker's "land" might sound like "lend" to a speaker of another variety of English. Beyond this, for many speakers of North American ...


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No. Some people may not always pronounce these words clearly, some people do. If you want to come up with a rule for others to follow (good luck with that!), how about "pronounce words clearly so they are not confused with other words". For the record, I have never heard masked pronounced as mast, though the difference can be subtle and those for whom ...


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It's pronounced like Bee-Otch. First syllable the same as a "bee", second rhymes with "botch". Let Jesse demonstrate (on 0:21): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVR476WHmR8


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It is an alternative spelling for biatch. There is little or not much difference in pronunciation. Note that, since the stress is on the first syllable, the second syllable may be an intermediate sound between 'a' and 'o', perhaps a schwa. Here is the definition (and pronunciation) from en.wiktionary.org biatch Pronunciation (US) IPA(key): /bi.ˈɑtʃ/ ...


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I pronounce the t's in the words you mention as glottal stop (the last consonant in "Hawai'i"), not as d, and I think my pronunciation is common. I have heard d here, though. A good friend of mine who grew up in California's Central Valley said d in this position. Phonetically, the d is easy to understand (easier to understand than my glottal stop), since ...


1

Yes, some online dictionaries have a vocal feature. That does not demonstrate that there are rules, it only shows that every word has a fairly uniform pronunciation in a country (with certain regional variations.) English spelling often bears little resemblance to pronunciation. There are dozens of "rules", and thousands of exceptions. Sorry. You can ...


1

I do not know what you mean by "As per phonetics 'go' is pronounced as 'go-v'". I can think of no English accent in which "go" has a /v/ (voiced labiodental fricative) sound. However, in many accents the vowel in 'go' is a diphthong, in which the second element is a mid-high rounded approximant /ʊ/ (roughly, the vowel in 'look' or 'put'): is that what you ...


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According to http://www.pronunciationtips.com/syllables2.htm, steps and glides describe the nature of pitch changes in a sentence, for example, the falling tone at the end of a declaration. The rule, which I evaluate as a native speaker and it seems entirely plausible, is that at the end of a sentence, the pitch glides downward if the last word is a single ...


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Well, there is never a break between words unless you make one. You could say first the word "was", stop making sounds, then say "starting", if you chose to make that break. If there is no period of silence between them, the [zs] pronunciation is just a [z] followed immediately by [s]. If you happen to be an English speaker who customarily devoices ...


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I can only answer for UK. Your first is universal (for adjective, noun and Name of place) in UK. Listen here: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/serpentine The second is given by the American Merriam-Webster. Listen here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/serpentine


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The name of the symbol in AT&T patent filings is "octothorp," but no one ever says this. If it precedes a number, say "number" as in "#2 pencils." If you're talking about a telephone key pad or if it follows a number say "pound" or "hash" (if you are using US or UK English respectively) as in "enter your password followed by the # sign" or "a 5# bag of ...


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In Britain it's generally pronounced hash, and in America I believe generally pound. Pound in Britain more commonly refers to the currency. Pronunciation varies depending on the context. In a tweet it would be pronounced hashtag as is "Off to the bake shop #buyingsomecake" which would be pronounced "Off to the bake shop, hashtag buying some cake" In ...


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For Cambridge Dictionaries Online, at least, part of the answer may be to do with syllabification. First note that the transcriptions are phonological, as indicated by the slashes //, not phonetic, which would be indicated by square brackets []. That means that the phonetic realization might be identical even if the phonological representation is different ...



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