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19

Yes, there is someone - your friend. All variations I've encountered have the "L", though the strength of it may vary. I dare say there is some dialect where you can barely hear it. Generally speaking, it's not a good argument for the pronounciation of a word to say "I've heard it said like that once". The aim of language is communication, and it will ...


6

In this case, when the vowel a is pronounced long and capitalized, A is an ordinal. The A Team is superior to the B Team. (you rarely hear about the C or later teams.) A-team: A group of elite soldiers or the top advisers or workers in an organization. Oxford Dictionaries Online B-team is usually derogatory Derived from high school varsity and ...


5

Is it "acceptable"? Strictly speaking, if the people he's talking to understand him, then it's acceptable. That's how language evolves. Is it commonplace and likely to be understood around the world? No. Certainly personally I've never heard that before and would consider it quite strange. And I'm a native speaker so I don't know what kind of native ...


5

Latin potare "drink" is from a Proto-Indo-European root *p(e)h3- meaning "drink" (De Vaan), so it is not related to the root *pet- "to rush" that you mentioned for potamos. The Greek omikron in ποτᾰμός (potamos) is short and would be pronounced short in Latin. The ō in Latin pōtare, however, is long, so the two o's are pronounced differently in Latin. As ...


5

Background info on pronunciation of Latinate words in English Latin vowel length very rarely has a direct effect on the pronunciation of English vowels in Latinate words. (Since Latin vowel length affected the placement of stress, and the placement of stress affects how we pronounce vowels in English, it can have an indirect effect.) This Wikipedia article ...


4

Not all honorifics are noun adjuncts having singular and plural forms. For comparison, consider Honorable, an adjective honorific. As adjectives do not have singular and plural forms, we would say 1. the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg and perhaps ?2. the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sandra Day O'Connor but never *3. the Honorables ...


3

The correct pronunciation of sale is the widespread one, viz. sail. It is hard to perfect foreign accents, especially when you are used to speaking something one way thru out your life. Your teacher is only a human and can make a mistake, don't fret.


3

The article a is pronounced in many ways, but it is rare to pronounce the letter A in any way besides the ay from "play". Using the International Phonetic Alphabet, the capital A is almost always pronounced as /eɪ/. The article a may be prounounced as /eɪ/ ("play"), or it may be relaxed to /ʌ/ ("run"), also known as the schwa. In general, you will find ...


3

Oxford Dictionaries lists locale as /ləʊˈkɑːl/. You can click on the recording there. It sounds like "low karl", which is presumably the standard British pronunciation. That's how I pronounce it as a speaker of Australian English, which typically follows British pronunciation. The American pronunciation of /loʊˈkæl/ is closer to the French pronunciation of /...


3

I think you are referring to the Th-fronting: it refers to the pronunciation of the English "th" as "f" or "v". When th-fronting is applied, /θ/ becomes /f/ (for example, three is pronounced as free) and /ð/ becomes /v/ (for example, bathe is pronounced as bave). Unlike the fronting of /θ/ to /f/, the fronting of /ð/ to /v/ doesn't occur in any ...


3

The Original Poster has found an enormous typo/display problem in the Cambridge Dictionary. The type of British English described in the Cambridge Dictionary is Southern Standard British English. This variety of English is non-rhotic, which means that we only pronounce R when it occurs directly before a vowel sound. The correct pronunciation is /ʃɔː/, not /...


3

No. Most (but not all) of England and Wales (but not Scotland) is non-rhotic, which means that a final /r/ is never pronounced unless the word is followed in the same breath-group by a vowel-initial sound.


3

In first-language English pronunciation . . . are there any words with the /e/ (or /ɛ/) sound in "bed" /bed/ at the end of a word? [P]lease specify if they're limited to a certain dialect, region or accent. Yes, there's kitteh, which is common in lolspeak. You can hear it pronounced here (in both American and British English) or here (I think maybe ...


2

English verse is qualitative, not quantitative: it runs stress-to-stress rather than syllable-to-syllable, so an extra reduced syllable here or there is negligible. Moreover, English poets have great freedom to play against strict "meter" for local rhythmic effect. The pentameter line in the English tradition is predominantly iambic, but variation is ...


2

References: http://ss64.com/jargon.html http://ss64.com/bash/syntax-pronounce.html " \!* " is pronounced bash-bang-splat SPLAT n. 1. Name used in many places (DEC, IBM, and others) for the ASCII star ("*") character. 2. (MIT) Name used by some people for the ASCII pound-sign ("#") character. 3. (Stanford) Name used by some people for the Stanford/ITS ...


2

We Americans speak different dialects, and we don't all pronounce things the same way. This means that this vowel can be pronounced in two ways, even among people who don't have the cot-caught merger. However, it doesn't mean that these two pronunciations are equally common. Use the first one if you need to choose between them; it's usually the most common&...


2

According to a pronouncing dictionary that I've owned for 40+ years, it's perfectly-correct British English to drop the H, except after a pause or when particularly emphasized, in the word the pronouns 'he', 'him', 'her', and in the word 'have' when unstressed.


2

In many cases the initial "h" will not be silent after a consonant in common US speech. This very morning I told my waiter that, "I will have green ham and eggs". I pronounced both "h" clearly. The gentleman showed no raised eyebrow at my manner, and indeed my ham and eggs arrived safe and sound, and tasty, and, of course, quite green. Note, however, that in ...


2

If you're talking about "a team," (lower case), you are talking about a "random" team. (The a is pronounced as in America, which is to say as a "short" a.) If you're talking about "the A team," you're talking about a "non-random" team that is "the best" or "number 1." The letter "A" (upper case) is synonymous with this, since A comes first in the alphabet. ...


1

You should have a dictionary that shows which syllable is stressed. The vowel in a stressed syllable will be pronounced in full, and the vowel in an unstressed syllable will be reduced (pronounced with /ə/ or a short vowel). If you know French and Latin, a good rule of thumb is that the word will be stressed on the same syllable that it was in French or ...


1

There is a tendancy for English speakers to pronounce foreign loan-words with unusual vowel or consonant sounds, in order to emphasis the exotic origin. So many people will pronounce locale as "lo-KAAL", when lo-KAL" is arguably more correct as being closer to the original French. My personal perception is that American English speakers make this error ...


1

Just check out Youglish site. They have US/UK accent, as well as tags support. Generic: http://youglish.com/search/local US version: http://youglish.com/search/local/us UK version: http://youglish.com/search/local/uk software related: http://youglish.com/search/local%20%23software Obama says it: http://youglish.com/search/local%20%23obama etc.


1

I have seen this problem before in a friend of mine. She consistently pronounces all /ŋ/ as /n/ in word-final positions. She's from Colorado, so it doesn't appear to be region-specific. I'm assuming you can pronounce /g/ just fine, since you didn't mention it. If you can pronounce /n/ and /g/ separately, then there's nothing stopping you from pronouncing /ŋ/...


1

It pretty much depends on the speaker, aside from the general factors you already mentioned. An older pronunciation that I don't think is used anymore was /ˈspiːʃiiːz/ ("spee-shi-eez"); this stems from the same variation in syllabification that affects words like fascia (which can be pronounced /ˈfeɪʃiə/, /ˈfeɪʃə/, /ˈfæʃiə/, /ˈfæʃə/). The pronunciation ...



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