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55

The exceptions come in two categories: Greek words that were originally pronounced with an "f" — diphtheria, diphthong, ophthalmology, phthisis — but have come to be pronounced with a "p" by no process I understand. Compound words — uphold, saphead, peephole — that are just a word ending in "p" run up against a word beginning with ...


33

Also : flophouse loophole peephole uphill and Stephen.


25

Shepherd -- it's technically a compound word, but a pretty old one.


25

diphtheria -- and then any compound word like uphold or saphead.


15

The following words come to mind: "Stephen" - A masculine given name pronounced /ˈstiːvən/. e.g. Stephen Crane, the writer; Stephen of Blois, king of England. "Stephens City" - A small town in Virginia, USA, pronounced /ˈstiːvənz/ I might add words such as "uphold" (a junction of two words), "nephew" (which can be pronounced /'ne.viu/ in the U.K.), and ...


10

This will be a fairly common pronunciation. It is caused by the influence of the /r/ which follows afterwards. In the word /ˈɡroʊsəri/ there's a schwa between the /s/ and the /r/ - in bold in the transcription. This weak vowel can be omitted altogether. When this happens our mouths will be preparing for the forthcoming /r/ before we actually make the /s/. ...


9

One more: Haphazard: lacking any obvious principle of organization.


9

Ones that haven't been mentioned: upholstery upheld upheaval I took this further and ran the following fairly simple command in Linux that tries to solve this problem, I've commented each part of the command on the right in the interest of readability: look . | grep ph | # List words and filter out ones with ph. while read word ; do # Set ...


7

The operating system is ultimately named after the valley, just like the national park, and Sam. The valley, in turn, is named after the Central Miwok name for the Ahwahneechee people, yoṣṣe’meti ‘the killers’ (apparently from the root yoṣ- ‘kill’ enlarged by a relativising agentive suffix -e ‘one who’ and the plural suffix -meti). The English pronunciation ...


6

According to Wikipedia, this phenomenon is called the initial-stress-derivation , where the noun is an initial-stress-derived noun. Initial-stress derivation is a phonological process in English, wherein stress is moved to the first syllable of any of several dozen verbs when they become nouns or adjectives. (This is an example of a suprafix.) It is ...


6

First we must set aside oar, board etc. (i.e. where the oa is followed by r). Then there are no rhymes for broad in my Penguin rhyming dictionary that are spelt --oad and aren't derived from broad (/brɔːd/ according to Collins) itself. So there aren't any reasonably common words with that spelling and pronunciation in the last syllable. Because that only ...


5

Phthisis /'θaɪsɪs, 'taisɪs/ and derivative phthisic /'θɪzɪk,'tɪzɪk/. But British dictionaries (apparently somewhat grudgingly) license /'(f)θaɪsɪs/, /'(f)θɪzɪk/ as well.


5

I just took an unscientific poll of North American professional actors (read: searched the web for eczema commercial), and "egzema" /ˈɛɡzɪmə/ was the most common, followed by the similar "eksema" /ˈɛksɪmə/. I hadn't heard "egzeema" /ɪɡˈzi:mə/ until today. A TV ad for Elidel (pimecrolimus) cream 1% calls it a prescription drug to treat "egzema". Another ...


5

As a speaker of Southern Standard British English (RP), these two words are homophones for me. They are both pronounced /kə'rɪə/. However, SSBE is non-rhotic - we only pronounce /r/ before a vowel sound. For speakers of rhotic Englishes, for example General American, or some regional varieties of British English, (e.g. speakers from Scotland or the south ...


4

Xmas is an abbreviation of ancient origin for Christmas, the Greek letter chi (Χ) being the initial letter of Christ (Χριστός), and the same in appearance if not pronunciation to the English letter X. As it is neither an acronym nor an initialism, I would ordinarily expect this abbreviation to be pronounced in full, just as I would expect to hear Lt. Col. ...


4

t/d/n become flaps when they are (1) after a vowel or glide (including r but not l), (2) before a vowel, and (3) at the end of a syllable. (Condition (3) is stated with the assumption that an intervocalic consonant before an unstressed vowel goes at the end of the preceding syllable.) "Entertainment" has a rather involved derivation. After nasalizing the ...


3

The relevant rule: Elision of alveolar plosives /t/ /d/ In rapid, casual speech the alveolar plosives are commonly elided when preceded by the following consonantal sounds: In the case of /t/ preceded by /s, f, ʃ, n, l, p, k, tʃ/ ... In the case of /d/ preceded by /z, ð, n, l, b, g, dʒ/ Working with Words: An Introduction to ...


3

Simple answer: no. There is no phonological rule that I’m aware of that requires ‘doubling’ any final glides (or making a diphthongal offglide out of a long monophthong) in any variety of English. It’s certainly true, however, that many speakers (not just of American English, but also of other dialects) add a brief [ə] between any high vowel and an [ɫ], but ...


3

You're correct. We call it 'Zed', even though ZEE TV has been around for ages. We don't associate the company's name with the letter's pronunciation. Some of us aren't even aware that Americans call the letter 'Zee'. However, 'Zee' is slowly becoming popular due to the influence of American English here. For example, people with names starting with 'Z' can ...


3

To start with, what DanBron said. You are going to have problems if you leave it at that. In my considerable experience of being a furriner with an accent, I find that it takes two to tango: that is, you have 1) the quality of the furriner's pronunciation and the effort zie puts into it, but also 2) the courtesy and the effort put into it by the native ...


2

My first thought is that I would tend to use DE-tail as a noun and de-TAIL as a verb, usually in the past tense. That's an irrelevant DE-tail. She de-TAILED her problems for us at great length. However, I don't see any backup for this in the dictionary, so it must be regional (or familial!) for me. In fact, the accent on the second syllable ...


2

One area I see non-native speakers have trouble with fairly often is correctly making the count/uncount distinction on nouns. For example, misusing "advice" as a count noun: "Do you have any advices" instead of "do you have any advice?" "Information" is another word like this.


2

You are right. However if you expand the sentence to "I am sorry to keep you waiting." then you can choose which of "sorry", "keep" and "waiting" you stress in order to modify the intended meaning. Do you, the speaker, want to stress how sorry you are, or that it's not the waiting but the prolonged nature of it that is bad, or that waiting itself is just ...


2

As an American, I would say I pronounce the word quite differently than your rendition: en'-ter-teɪn'-ment With both "t" sounds. However, please note, neither is actually between two vowel sounds. A better example would be letter. led'-er


2

I recall at university there was an (achingly politically correct) S/he Society, whose members prounounced it Shehe. But outside such specific contexts, you will always have to decide which pronoun you wish to use for a singular person of unspecified sex: he, he or she, singular they? S/he is a written version of the second, and as such is to most people ...


2

I’m pretty sure that sh/e is pronounced /ðeɪ/ in English. However, the more-inclusive version, sh/e/it, has a rather more vulgar pronunciation. But that’s what political correctness gets you: vulgarity.


2

You may want to check here: http://howtopronounce.co/eczema The cons: it doesn’t indicate the location of the speakers. The pros: they are professional speakers.


2

There is a basic rule for the pronunciation of /r/ in non-rhotic varieties of English, for example Southern Standard British English. We only pronounce /r/ if it precedes a vowel sound (sound, not letters are the important factor). So in standard British English we see the following: kærət (carrot) rəʊd (road) pa:k (park) In the words above we see ...


2

The majority of English speakers do not exactly pronounce a "w" at the end of a syllable like "show" or "fellow". There is a written w, and a consonantal "w" sound did indeed exist in these words historically. However, because of the historic tow-toe merger, the sound in these words is now identical for speakers of most dialects to the "long o" sound used in ...



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