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81

That looks like a caret symbol. From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caret ... The caret /ˈkærət/ is an inverted V-shaped grapheme. It is the spacing character ^ in ASCII [...] and other character sets that may also be called a hat, control, uparrow, or less frequently chevron, xor sign, to the power of, pointer [...] or wedge. Officially, ...


70

As a diacritic, this symbol is a circumflex. According to the linked Wikipedia article, hat, roof or house are used when the context is mathematics.


32

The answer depends entirely on context. If you're doing quantum mechanics, it's called a hat and signifies that the thing it's on top of is an operator (something that acts on a wave function to derive an eigenvalue). If you're reading French, it's a circumflex and signifies a miniscule prononciation difference that only native French speakers can hear. ...


22

A few symbols that look like ^: Well, ^ itself; in maths, I usually call it hat, but another answer says Wikipedia says it is also called roof or house; as a diacritic, I would call it a circumflex, or maybe even a hat; in French, it is called "accent circumflexe" (circumflex accent), or le petit chapeau (the little hat), so yeah, hat is just fine; There ...


11

The earliest occurrence in print of hackamore I have found, in this cowboy story from 1850 (very likely the source alluded to by Wikipedia and Etymonline), explicitly associates it with the Spanish term. ('Pete' is 'Dutch' or German, the 'old man' is apparently Mexican.) “When a broncho is lassed, he is fust choked down, then a hackamore is put on ...


7

In most cases, English didn't select the digraph "dj." The digraph is based on French orthography, like the spelling "Tchaikovsky." Although this convention originates in a foreign language, it has become part of the conventions of English spelling, and not only in names such as "Django," but also in some words such as "djinn" (also spelled "jinn"). The ...


7

Look at the spelling pronunciation key for dictionary.com. This tells you what all these strange spellings mean. Dictionary.com uses a non-standard phonetic respelling. You can also get the IPA (international phonetic alphabet) pronunciation by clicking the IPA/Spell button.


5

Walker's pronouncing dictionary of the English language, from 1828, says that gala should be pronounced gayla /geɪlə/, drama should be pronounced drayma /dreɪmə/, and stratum and strata should be pronounced straytum /streɪtʌm/ and strayta /streɪtə/, etc. Assuming that English adapted these words during Middle English, and pronounced them then in the Latin ...


5

You should always look up pronunciations in a dictionary to be sure, because no rules on this subject are accurate 100% of the time. In general, the rules for pronouncing vowels are strongly linked to the position of stress in a word in English (which unfortunately is not written). All English words with more than one syllable have a syllable with "primary ...


4

Pronouncing it as  "eye-eighteen-n" seems messy, though I guess (as earlier comment says) if your co-workers have a office standard better to go with the flow. However pronouncing it as "eye-eighteen-n" ... Since quoting Wikipedia, [...] 18 stands for the number of letters between the first i and the last n in the word “internationalization,” the term is ...


4

In Mid-Ulster English, admittedly far from Australia, /ʉ/ is possible before /r/ in floor, whore, door, board, etc. — Wikipedia Ulster English For pronunciation of /ʉ/ see Wikipedia Close central rounded vowel which has a link to an audio file.


3

In the INTERCAL programming language circa 1972, it's called shark or sharkfin. For describing its appearance in ASCII (or other early character sets) rather than its meaning in any specific context (like "xor operator", "raise to power") and noting that it's not really the printer's caret as explained in another answer, sharkfin actually does a very good ...


3

Only look at the pronunciation of the next word The choice of a or an is always based on the pronunciation of the word immediately following the article. The grammatical structure of the phrase is irrelevant. The spelling of the word is also irrelevant, except insofar as it relates to the pronunciation. Since there are a lot of cases where English spelling ...


3

As other people have mentioned in the comments, this does not in any way reflect a general process of vowel-backing in American English. In fact, almost the reverse is true: the phoneme /æ/ has actually been moving further back in many forms of British English (some transcriptions use the IPA symbol [a] to represent the British pronunciation of this vowel) ...


3

For a Southern Standard British English accent, the following words would work: Short vowels bid bed bad bod pud * bud Long vowels bead booed bard board bird Diphthongs bayed bide Boyd bowed (ribbon) bowed (genuflected) beard bared *as in short for pudding These cover the RP/SSBE vowels minus the schwa. Unfortunately there's no word with /b/ ...


2

I have never pronounced hexadecimal numbers in any way other than digit-by-digit, with numerals and letters pronounced as numerals and letters. If context had not been established, I always preceded the recitation with the word "hex."


2

It's hard to give answers to these questions that are both simple and true, because phonetics is a complicated topic. 1. /ə/ and /ʌ/ You don't need to worry too much about the distinction between /ə/ and /ʌ/. The two vowels rarely contrast; in most varieties of American English, they actually never contrast. It's hard for even native English speakers to ...


2

English verse is qualitative, not quantitative: it runs stress-to-stress rather than syllable-to-syllable, so an extra reduced syllable here or there is negligible. Moreover, English poets have great freedom to play against strict "meter" for local rhythmic effect. The pentameter line in the English tradition is predominantly iambic, but variation is ...


1

It's not "Greek". It's the IPA - International Phonetic Alphabet. The International Phonetic Alphabet (unofficially—though commonly—abbreviated IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet. It was devised by the International Phonetic Association as a standardized representation of the sounds of oral language. ...


1

There's actually a lot of interesting information in other places on the web about this topic, so I thought I'd post an answer summarizing some of it. Apparently, /dɪˈvɪsɪv/ ("divissive") is more common in Canada According to the post "The great divide" by Katherine Barber on her blog Wordlady, At the Canadian Oxford Dictionary we found that "di VISS ...


1

Am I the only person who thinks that the first vowel in "dah-ta" would be pronounced the same as the first syllable in "follow" rather than the first syllable in "batter"? I don't know how to write that out phonetically, but "dah-ta", to me, would be pronounced "dahh-tahh".


1

The only one am actually qualified to answer is the first one, so I'll leave the rest to more qualified sources till I find the book I require. Frankly, there is no phonetic difference between the two, and those who claim there is are often suffering from Bouba Kiki association. Don't strain your head over that, in the very least. The Wedge or Caret is ...


1

Robertson Davies, in The Lyre of Orpheus, gives the following sentence with what he claims are the twelve English vowels: Who knows ought of art must learn, And then take his ease. Of course, this may be Canadian English, given Robertson Davies' nationality. Also, the vowel of book seems conspicuously absent.


1

If one looks only at the first two formants of the vowels, then there are only two dimensions to wander through; but if one looks at the muscles then there are three dimensions (jaw: open..close, tongue: front..back, lips: stretched..rounded) so there is more of a 'stagger' to the lists. For example, your list could be two lists: (bad, bed, bid) and (bad, ...


1

logeek. US native. I hear it as "low geek." That kind of sounds like even less than a geek. Not like "low fat greek yogurt," but a kind of "undergeek," if you will. I'm imagining a geek who is kind of cast out from the other geeks. He only gets called for Dungeons and Dragons if literally everyone else is out of town or sick. The idea of logic is ...


1

Regardless of dialects, there will tend to be one "official" pronounciation of any word, and you should base your decision on this. I don't actually understand what the difference in pronounciation between "you-are-ell" and "u-are-ell" would be: saying that you pronounce "U" as "u" is totally redundant and doesn't tell us anything. If you are speaking, ...


1

From an English perspective I have not come across this notation. However, the British monarchy do not have surnames per say, but rather belong to a "house". If I had to speak this statement I would probably say: Elizabeth the Second of the Royal House of Windsor.


1

Have you been listening to a lot of British English? In British English, one of the major differences between /ɒ/ (not, hot) on the one hand and /ɔː/ (caught) and /ɑː/ (path) on the other, is that /ɒ/ is shorter. Most Americans don't pronounce the vowel in not any differently than the vowel in hot, but we often shorten the vowel in not, because it's a ...


1

Because of spelling conservatism and sound changes. The word "ewe" is not really pronounced "non phonetically" any more than words like betrayal (which is not "betra-yal") or wither (not "wit-her"). In modern English, "ew"/"eu" simply functions as a digraph that represents the sound /juː/ "yoo." Digraphs are sequences of two letters that are not pronounced ...



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