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5

The proper usage (by dictionary definitions) are both metaphorical: You "flush out" birds to make them fly out so you can shoot them. This can metaphorically mean that you are trying to make many small unnoticed things more apparent. You "flesh out" something, as Stoney B notes, by putting extra flesh on something bare boned. Metaphorically, you're filling ...


5

This type of word is a heteronym, which per Wikipedia is: A heteronym (also known as a heterophone) is a word that is written identically but has a different pronunciation and meaning. In other words, they are homographs that are not homophones. Thus, row (propel with oars) and row (argument) are heteronyms, but mean (intend) and mean (average) are not ...


4

You might have misheard people saying righto http://australiandictionary.net/righto I think part of the reason for mishearing in this case, is because Australian pronunciation often involves pronouncing letter t when it is inside a word, like a quiet letter d. That's something in common with American and Canadian accents. You can learn more from the ...


4

Palatalisation is less a matter of rudeness or incorrectness, and more a matter of carefulness and social identity — in terms of social class and geographical location. And it matters which word we are talking about too. As you can see, this is not a straightforward issue. PALATALISATION NORMAL. If you consider a word like literature, most ...


3

How do you pronounce 'Meijer' ? I pronounce it like Meyer. Does it sound like 'mire' ? I used to shop in a Meijer store and the pronunciation my ear heard is like Meyer rather than mire. However, it's possible the ads, announcements, etc were using the latter pronunciation and that I wasn't hearing the difference. In some accents the two ...


3

The answer is all of the above, any of the above, or none of the above. There is no single set of rules for the pronunciation of taxa, and no single interpretation of such rules as some have attempted to compile. As Michael G. Simpson notes under "Pronunciation of Names" in Plant Systematics (2006), Although scientific names are universal, their ...


3

"Can" is usually pronounced /kən/ (with a schwa sound): as in "I can (/kən/) ride a bike". It is treated as a function word and as such, is unstressed. "Can't" is pronounced /kæn?/ (with a glottal stop replacing an expected /t/ sound) as in: "But, I can't (/kæn?/) ride a horse." The distinction for the listener is the unstressed schwa (/ə/) in "can" and ...


3

According to the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, the most common British pronunciation is ['mær əl ə bən], and the most common American pronunciation is ['mer əl ə boʊn], which to my ear match the audio files in the Oxford Learner's Dictionary, see here. Two of the less common variants are ['mær ɪ bən] and ['mɑːl ɪ bən].


3

Nine thousand, seven hundred and forty-nine How many other words are there for which we allow distinct pronunciation in English? The answer to your question is not 42 but 9,749 — insofar as the OED2 contains 9,749 head words with multiple allowable pronunciations. Glad to clear that up for you. However, you may want to reconsider your position that ...


3

Different vowels certainly have very different mixtures of overtones/formants. It's possible that this is what you're responding to. "Pitch", however, refers to the fundamental tone.


2

ODE gives two pronunciations: 'trapɪzↄɪd trə'piːzↄɪd I find the first one to be more common than te second pronunciation.


2

Etymonline has this to say: vineyard (n.) c.1300, replacing Old English wingeard, from vine + yard (n.1). Compare German weingarten. If it is a compound of vine and yard there would be little reason to shorten the i of vine. However, I can see two reasons why it would have shortened. The first would be that the "replacement" was really just a ...


2

Marralabone or Marrylabone. Hope that helps. I used to work in Marylebone High Street, so that's what we all called it at the BBC.


2

I will reiterate what Bjarne Stroustrup has to say: "char" is usually pronounced "tchar", not "kar". This may seem illogical because "character" is pronounced "ka-rak-ter", but nobody ever accused English pronunciation (not "pronounciation" :-) and spelling of being logical. http://www.stroustrup.com/bs_faq2.html#char


2

According to a reddit.com post, this usage “originates as a navy term for flag signalling”: A tackline is a length of halyard approximately 6 feet long; the exact length depends upon the size of flags in use. The tackline is transmitted and spoken as tack and is written as a dash (hyphen) "-". It is used to avoid ambiguity. It separates signals or groups ...


2

As a (former) north-Londoner, born to north-London parents married at Marylebone registry office, I would agree with @Amgine. Thus, borrowing @painfulenglish's phonetics, it is ['mærə ləboʊn] or ['mærɪ ləboʊn]. This was the only London district about whose pronunciation I had recurring doubt. I suspect that no single pronunciation can be pinned down as ...


1

According to the Longman Pronunciation Dictionary, the strong form is pronounced as [ɒv] (British) / [ʌv] (US), whereas the weak form is pronounced as [əv]. The informal short form, sometimes written as o', is pronounced as [ə]. There is no mentioning of any exceptions, suggesting that the of in "of course" (cf. other answers and comments) is pronounced in ...


1

There are very few reliable rules for English pronunciation. Even something as clear as the letter 'g' being hard before an 'a', 'o' or 'u' and soft before an 'e' or an 'i' has exceptions: "gear" and "gaol" for example. When presented with an unfamiliar word, one can make an educated guess as to its pronunciation, especially if one knows related words, or ...


1

The rolled or trilled R in question is a form of classical English pronunciation. Before Elizabeth II modernised her pronunciation, the trilled R was quite commonly spoken. In Britain, even to this day, dramas schools teach the trilled R as part of their voice exercises, and some choirs will not admit someone if they cannot rolled their Rs. Mr Brett's ...


1

That clicking noise is coming from your tongue going to the back of the mouth when pronouncing the 'r' and then racing forward to the teeth to pronounce the 'th'. Americans tend to have a longer first 'r' sound in words like brother so the tongue moves more slowly and doesn't make the clicking sound. It's possible that it's more accentuated by forming the ...


1

The simple answer is, you read out "hyphen". Generally not "dash" or other options. So, that's the answer! em-dash would be "E M Hyphen D A S H". No mystery! Anglo-Saxon would be "A, N, G, L, O, hyphen, S, A, X, O, N" For comparison, "it's" would be "I, T, apostrophe, S". (Just for your information, almost nobody knows what an "em-dash" is: it is a ...


1

Emphasis always depends on context, so clean answers are not possible without more of the dialog. 1) If you are beginning a conversation, it would be "How do you do?" with more emphasis on "do" than on "how". If you are reciprocating the same statement from someone else, emphasis would be on "you". 2) This one depends on what you thought you had heard ...


1

I'm majoring in linguistics and last semester I took a class on the English sound system. What we learned is that unstressed vowels reduce to a schwa in English. We mostly focused on General American since my school is in the USA. The rule may be different in your particular dialect. There were some phonetic transcriptions in that class that I had to ...


1

PronounceNames.com which calls itself a "Dictionary of Name Pronunciation" has a good list and also takes requests (though its unclear how much time it would take to post a answer/suggestion)


1

happy. spa. In American English, the vowel matches the short "o" in rock, not the schwa in "ruck". Similarly, "ma", "pa", and "da", but not "momma" or "poppa". http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spa lists the following words as rhyming with spa: bra and schwa. spaghetti. http://pronunciationtips.com/endings3.htm lists: twenty, thirty, forty, ...


1

I think it is self-persuasion. Personally, I think it is a narration property that is a positive attribute. Personally, monotone narration seems less desirable regardless of the content.



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