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11

Tomb: c. 1200, tumbe, early 14c. tomb, from Anglo-French tumbe and directly from Old French tombe "tomb, monument, tombstone" (12c.), from Late Latin tumba The final -b began to be silent about the time of the spelling shift (compare lamb, dumb). Pronunciation: The reason the 'o' is pronounced as [u:] is thanks to the Great Vowel Shift ...


11

The Youtube video was broadly correct. Your daughter may have a slightly unusual accent for an American, or her perception of the sounds may be influenced by the spelling. I say "broadly correct" because for most American English speakers, the sound used in a word like "little" is actually not exactly a [t] (voiceless alveolar plosive) or a [d] (voiced ...


5

Here are the etymologies of the 2 words. You might want to look further back then just the french to find an explanation. Notice how the greek and latin sounds match the current pronunciation. The following is from Google - doing a search for bomb+etymology and tomb+etymology. Subsequent checking on etymonline.com backs up Google.


5

Considering that there is no such thing as “the actually 100% correct pronunciation for almond in American English”, it is not possible to provide you with that. There are, however, at least different six pronunciations in common use: [ɔlmənd], with the first syllable homophonic with the common word all and the less common work awl. [ɔmənd], as before but ...


4

It's a speed thing. Say "little" slowly, and it's ['lit(ə)l], say it faster, and eventually it becomes ['lid(ə)l]. Saying ['lid(ə)l] slowly is associated with "baby talk", most adults publicly avoid that.


4

Likely not. Here's a rundown of the commonly accepted account of each word: Illicit 'Illicit', like 'elicit' has Latin origins. The original Latin derivative is 'illicitus' meaning il- (not) -licitus (allowed) or simply 'not allowed' (and its a second declension adjective if you'd like to know). We might with more accuracy, considering connotations and ...


4

I think you may be imagining differences that don't exist in the minds of native speakers. The actual amount of air released there will vary with every utterance and occasion. No one hears these as one bit different from one another. Or perhaps you have not heard enough examples. If your first language considers the two sounds to be completely different ...


3

He's dropping the h to sound British, and slurring it together with the y from my. The “pop-punk voice” or “pop-punk accent” has a very interesting history. (That article references “I Miss You,” though not that line.) In large part, it's about emulating a particular British accent that's associated with early punk. From the article: As an ode to the ...


3

With regard to the concept of 'correctness' of individual language elements, there are two competing views and these two views will affect how to differentiate varieties. There is describing scientifically what is out there, what people actually say and how their individual way of speaking can be categorized with others, and then there is systematizing ...


3

The 'c' is always soft before a 'y'. Soft c: When “c” is followed by: e, i, y it is sounded as “s.” The letter “c” has two sounds, hard “c” and soft "c". The hard sound of "c" occurs most often (cat = kat). When "c" is followed by (a, o, u) it is sounded as "k" (hard c). When "c" is followed by (e, i, y) it is sounded as "s" (soft c). ...


3

We don't pronounce xenia with /ks/ because it would violate English phonotactics (the way sounds are put together in English words) and graphotactics (the partially regular relationship between sounds and spellings), and English speakers generally prioritize these above fidelity to Greek pronunciation. English has its own sound system which does not allow ...


3

The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary lists the following pronunciations for American English: /ˌɑːlmənd/ This is listed as the "main" pronunciation, recommended as a model for learners. /ˌæːlmənd/ /ˌɑːmənd/ /ˌæːmənd/ These three are alternative pronunciations which are also in use, although perhaps less frequently. As you can see, there are ...


2

"Kwee-ree" /kwɪəri/ is listed by more dictionaries The most common pronunciation of query seems to be "kwee-ree." Looking it up in a bunch of online dictionaries using the OneLook Dictionary Search, I found that: all of the dictionaries with pronunciation guides list "kwee-ree" (in IPA: /kwɪəri/, /kwɪərɪ/ or /kwɪri/) as either the only or the first ...


2

There are several commonly used ways of showing stress, but none of them use "h." a stress mark ˈ (a short raised vertical line) before the stressed syllable. This is used in the International Phonetic Alphabet, and in many dictionary transcription systems. A lowered version ˌ is used for secondary stress. acute accent ´ (a short raised slanted line) after ...


2

J or Ch vs Z and Z Sounds Perhaps I should have labeled this one “Z vs J”: the problem occurs when Asian speakers pronounce the letter “z” like a “j.” The same problem applies to “tz” and “ts” sounds. A word like “pizza” ends up pronounced as “peach-eu,” for example. Again, if you’ve got an allergy to peaches, you’ll be in serious trouble! Another example: ...


2

If you are looking for the most likely correct pronunciation of a word, I suggest you check youglish site. US pronunciation of miracle (1303 results): http://youglish.com/search/miracle/us UK pronunciation of miracle (105 results): http://youglish.com/search/miracle/uk ps: you may also check how Obama will tell that by adding hashtag obama to your query. ...


2

"Is the explanation as simple as bomb came from later French?" That's correct; tomb and bomb come from both different periods, and somewhat different dialects of French. The word bomb seems to show the effect of a later sound change in French that did not affect tomb. Deducing the earliest pronunciations in English The Oxford English Dictionary (OED)'s ...


2

The answer is complicated and requires knowing the etymological and phonological history of English. Doubt for instance comes to English ultimately through the Latin verb dubitare (to hesitate), in which the "b" is not silent. But it first took a detour through the Old French word douter, which had lost the letter "b" and its sound. The OED notes that ...


2

As I have heard these pronounced, one says "Es" and then the following particle name, Es Fermion. On a side note, the "on" receives the same pronunciation as the "on" in "proton."


1

Before I clicked that link, I had never heard it pronounced "kweh-ree" or as it sounds in that video, "kw-air-es". I have always heard and said it as "kwee-ree" or "queer-e"


1

Is there a way to treat Rhotacism in adults aged 20+? Learn how to position your tongue to pronounce a clear 'R' sound. So, after wading through some useless info on short palates, I learned the word "rhotacism," and then took the hop skip and jump internet links to Youtube, where I often end up it seems. And so, literally 20 minutes of Youtube videos ...


1

I am from India and here is my two pennies worth on the topic. It is a very commonly occurring mistake here in India to mispronounce zee/zed as (i)zehd which I feel is kinda close to izzard. Now I am not too sure if the two are connected. But there sure is a similarity in the pronunciation.


1

The writer is out of luck. A native English speaker will stumble. The letter combination “radchaai” is not merely a non-English word. It is actually an illegal combination of letters in English. There is no sound corresponding to “aa” in English. There are a small number of words spelled with “aa”. Unfortunately they have varying pronunciations. They are ...


1

Trilobite literally means divided into three sections (lobes) - tri-lobite. So you might think it's pronounced try.LUH.bite, but it's actually pronounced TRY.luh.bite. But that information should be available in a dictionary, which is probably why someone voted to close this question.


1

Having just heard this on BBC radio 4 I'm a little stumped, as the main presenter would pronunciate it as /ˈɪs.juː/ and second one, covering the particular topic, as /ˈɪʃuː/. I can't say if one of them wasn't British, but, additionally, during the same news, it occurred once more, this time regarding breast cancer tissue. Youtube gives me conflicting ...


1

The Old English word habban did have a short vowel in all of its forms. However, I would expect the vowel to be lengthened in some forms of the word during Middle English due to open syllable lengthening. For example, this is the reason why we have a long vowel in shave, from Old English sceafan. (The forms with -bb- do not seem to have survived to Modern ...


1

Such a word is part of your Reading Vocabulary : This vocabulary refers to the words we recognise when we read any text. We read and understand many words, but we do not use them in speaking vocabulary. If a person is a reader then this type of vocabulary happens to be the second largest vocabulary. Needless to say, vocabulary grows with reading. ...


1

I believe the rule these dictionaries are following is to put the /r/ with the /ə/ if the next syllable is completely unstressed. At least, this accounts for all of your examples. I don't know whether this rule is justified by any linguistic studies. (It doesn't hold for me. I pronounce marine and serene as /mə'rin/ and /sər'in/, so they don't even quite ...


1

You need to distinguish between the phonemic form /hɪs tə ri/ (or perhaps /hɪs to ri/) and the phonetic form [ˈhɪs tər i]. The phonemic form is the basis for stress assignment, and the fact that the medial syllable is phonemically open is one factor that allows it to remain unstressed. Since it remains unstressed phonetically, the [r] is pushed out of the ...


1

Bhavana, your name hints at the right answer. I would assume that your home language is a North Indian one. In North Indian languages there are two sounds that sound to an English speaker like the English 't'. On the other hand, they don't have the sound of 'th' in 'thumb' or 'threat'. One of the Indian sounds often sounds to English speakers like the 'th' ...



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