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19

Definition of caramelize That word is caramelize, to cook something until its sugars turn to caramel at around 410° F. Recipes will often call for sautéing onions until they caramelize, for example. The Wikipedia article on caramelization from which the image above was taken says that it is: the browning of sugar, a process used extensively in ...


6

When speaking, you can distinguish between them more easily by stressing a different syllable: 17 = sev en TEEN 70 = SEV en tee


4

I know no authoritative reference for this. In educated and uneducated speech I have heard calm with no l as in harm, calm with as strong l, and variants inbetween. All may be considered correct.


4

At the time this imprecation was common wound was variously pronounced, with either /ɑu/ or /uː/,† so both pronunciations are attested. OED 1 reports these spellings: ‹zownes›, ‹zoones›, ‹'zons›, ‹zons›, ‹dzownds›, ‹sownds›, ‹zwounds›, ‹zauns›, ‹'zoons›, ‹zoons›, ‹'dzwounds›, and ‹zounds› † Regular sound change would call for wound to end up ...


4

kæn kən ðæt ðət The strong forms of the words can and that both have the TRAP vowel in RP. This is the same vowel as in the word cat /kæt/. These forms of the words are shown in examples (1) and (3) repsectively. The auxiliary verb can is usually only strong when stressed or when stranded (ie when not followed by another verb). The subordinator that and ...


3

Following up on aparente001's suggestion (in a comment above) to consult Leo Rosten, I offer this brief entry from his Hooray for Yiddish! (1982): challa khale (standard) Pronounce it KHOL-leh, with a German or Scottish kh. The braided white bread, glazed with egg white, which is a Sabbath delicacy. Rosten is evidently giving the Yiddish ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


3

The distinction between these two sounds, both generally represented by the letter "t" in English, is actually also made for "p" and "k." Each of these sounds is transcribed /t/ /p/ /k/ in "broad" phonetic transcriptions, but in a "narrow," more detailed transcription, there are two main types that are recognized by phoneticians. We call one type ...


2

This comes with the usual warning about rules for English: Rule .1. -ive makes s sound S. But -ion creates ZH unless after ss then SH. massive s, (im-)passive s but (com-)passion sh, invasive s, but invasion zh, adhesive s, but adhesion zh, divisive s, but division zh, derisive s, but derision zh (per-)missive s, dismissive s, derisive s, ...


2

It’s because it never had an afficate there. We spelled it renegue for some time, and some people still do. But just because we dropped the u for ease in spelling doesn’t mean we would change the sound. The OED has: renegue, renege /rɪˈniːg/, /-ˈnɛg/, /-ˈneɪg/, v. Forms: 6–7, 9 reneague, 7–9 renegue, (6 ri-, 7 -neigue, 9 dial. -nague); 7, 9 reneg, ...


2

TLDR: Seventeen is /sɛvənˈtin/ but seventy is /ˈsɛvənti/. (However, those are not phonetic transcriptions.) Edit Regarding your edit, you are right than the stress varies in seventeen. Normally its last syllable is stressed, but sometimes other factors can change this. For example, when it forms part of a recited sequence of numbers like when counting ...


2

You asked for sources. Americans pronounce fractions with denominators ending with 1, 2, 3, as in twenty-firsts, twenty-seconds, twenty-thirds. For confirmation, here is a definition from Merriam-Webster, one of the canonical American dictionaries. thirty-second 2 : the quotient of a unit divided by 32 : one of 32 equal parts of anything <one ...


2

I feel that while "a thirty-second" is a perfectly good way to express 1/32, it's ambiguous and unusual. I would want to add the slightly archaic "part" onto the end: "a thirty-second part of this pizza" etc.


2

Judging by the range of alternative spellings for digne, and the pronunciations of the same word in Icelandic and old Danish, I'd say it was pronounced with a soft 'g', with a sound as the 'y' in "yoke". deeyne Using the same deduction, I'd agree with your suggested pronunciation of na: nay


2

As mentioned in the comments, every language has its own inventory of sounds. English has a relatively high number of different sounds, and many of its sounds are rare in the languages of the world (the English "r" sound, for example, is very uncommon). When a word is borrowed into a new language (or a new dialect), it sometimes gets absorbed into the ...


2

At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


1

Aussies say k-g but it depends if it's ok to use slang in the situation.


1

Kilograms can be referred to using the terms "kilos" or "kaygee". In Ireland we use kilos instead of kaygee. Never heard of "kayem" before, but "kays" is used as slang for kilometres.


1

That's how i'd pronounce it: ʃəbɑːɾdʒdəʳwe(ɪ)θɾuːðəʃɒpɪŋkɾɑʊdz P.S. The Brits would drop all the Rs in there. Hope it helps


1

Short answer In General American English, a /t/ will tend to be voiced when it occurs after a nasal and before a weak vowel. This sounds a bit like a /d/ to many listeners. If you're looking at an IPA transcription in a good dictionary, such as Cambridge Dictionaries Online you should see that the /t/ has a little diacritic underneath. The symbol will look ...


1

To avoid any ambiguity I'd use the first pronunciation (the one with the t sound) because almost every single dictionary (including Jones pronouncing dictionary) says it's t in the transcription


1

No one knows for sure when reading (even hearing) another language how its words are accurately pronounced so they use their own pronunciation rules. So for 'challah', similarly written words like 'gila', 'Allah', 'Scilla', 'megillah' (note two of those are semitic), whatever their pronunciation is in the original, do not have stress on the last syllable. ...


1

To understand the potential for variation, I recommend that you start out saying "caw". During this, your tongue will naturally stay at or near the bottom of your mouth. Now say "caw-m". Your tongue stays at the bottom of your mouth as your lips close for the "mm" sound. Now say "call" ("caw - ll"). To make the L sound your tongue has to move from the ...


1

His name is Louis like Lewis and his nickname is Louie.


1

The words “now” and “snow” have never rhymed in the history of English. These two sounds are spelled the same way only by coincidence. The basic elements of Modern English spelling date back to Middle English, where we can already find the digraphs "ow" and "ou" used in many of the same words as in modern spelling. They are used in manuscripts of Chaucer's ...



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