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32

It is spelled with one 'n' because it comes from "gone" (not from "gonna" - going to) as in earlier expressions like gone goose or gone coon. Goner (n.): "something dead or about to die, person past recovery, one who is done for in any way," 1836, American English colloquial, from gone + -er (1). From earlier expressions such as gone goose (1830), ...


17

Rhotic English is a term to describes varieties of English in which orthographic R is usually pronounced, even at the end of a syllable. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic R is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double R or not in the orthography: car / ka: car ...


12

Yes. It's spelled goner. slang One that is ruined or doomed. Someone or something that is going to die or that can no longer be used. Gonner is a spelling variant.


7

Whether or not 'r' sounds that don't precede a vowel are pronounced is called 'rhoticity'. Some dialects (Most of those from England, Australia, and New Zealand for instance) are non-rhotic and only pronounce 'r' before a vowel. Dialects from Scotland, Ireland, and North America are mostly rhotic and pronounce 'r' whether or not it precedes a vowel. ...


7

There might be exceptions to the statement in the title of your question, but I'm not going to quibble. The simplest reason for the lack or scarcity of word-initial ð in English (for words of all grammatical classes, whether nouns, adjectives or verbs, outside of a small closed set of "function words") is because there is no regular historical source for it. ...


6

The letter J in English has always being pronounced the same way since it was introduced. It replaced the Old English letters cg which had the same sound: In English, ⟨j⟩ most commonly represents the affricate /dʒ/. In Old English the phoneme /dʒ/ was represented orthographically with ⟨cg⟩ and ⟨cȝ⟩. Under the influence of Old French, which had a ...


6

The word you would stress depends on what you mean. What time is it? Stressing "what" often means that you are confused about what time it is. Maybe you've been told two different things. Maybe you're shocked at what time someone just told you it was, and disbelieving your own ears, you're asking again. What time is it? This is how people ...


6

The pronunciation of "bald" as /bɔ:ld/ is older. What seems to have happened historically for some speakers of British English is phonemic shortening of the sound /ɔ:/ to /ɒ/ in some cases when it comes before a consonant cluster /lC/ (where C stands for any consonant). This change, and the resulting variation in pronunciation, is described in the following ...


4

One hundred and twelve thousand, one hundred and seventy seven. One hundered and ninety six thousand, four hundred and fifty five. The format is ...,xxx,yyy,zzz. For zzz you say the z hundred and whatever zz is (which has many exceptions). For yyy, it's the same, but say z thousand instead of z hundred. Beyond thousands, it's millions, billions, etc.


4

Generally speaking, when referring to the letter of the alphabet "A," it's pronounced /ei/, but when referring to the word "a" that appears as an article before words, such as "a car" or "a boat," then it is almost always pronounced /ə/. The word "a" is occasionally pronounced /ei/, but only when the speaker wishes to give it special emphasis. For example: ...


4

Regarding the history, Old English did have contrastive consonant length, although long consonants were not as common as single ones and were more restricted in position (they could not come at the start of a word, for example). This is related in fact to the use of "double" consonants to indicate vowel quality in the modern English writing system. (This is ...


4

A yod is another name for the sound/j/, the first sound in the word yes. Very many varieties of English have a yod, the sound /j/, in the word stupid. For example, the transcription for stupid given by the Cambridge English Dictionary is: /ˈstjuː.pɪd/ ("styoopid") For many speakers there will be coalescent assimilation between the /t/ and the /j/ ...


3

Three cases pertain: speaking, handwriting, typing. For speaking, say "small oh". Handwrite a distinct small oh. Use a font that produces a distinct small o, or use an inline graphic for the entire company name. If needed (for customers who use email without inline graphics capability), follow the inline graphic with the company name in parentheses (ia2o ...


3

There are arguably 3 different phenomena involved in your examples, and your term "intensification" is appropriate for the one you say is due to emphasis. The other two are not affective (like emphasis, type 3), but are due to consonants having a length attribute, type 2, (as some languages, like Latin, have long vowels), or clusters of two like consonants, ...


3

The farther east you go from Manhattan proceeding over Long Island through Nassau County, the farther right the natives get on the pronunciation scale from "tahk" to "tooawwk." TW is emphasizing the Nooo Yawwk accent.


3

In the North-west and North-west Midlands of England, the /g/ is regularly pronounced in words like 'sing' and 'string'. As far as I know, everywhere else in the Anglosphere it is not pronounced separately, and the final sound is /ŋ/.


3

For the name Calvin, it's like the a sound in 'callous'. I've never heard any British person pronounce it the other way.


3

One approach might be to decide how you want your word to sound. Of course, anything can be learned, but the default idiomatic pronunciation for a vowel preceding 'lium' is different to the same vowel preceding 'llium'. Reading metalium for the first time I might say - /mɛteɪlɪəm/ (cf. alias - /ˈeɪlɪəs/) Reading metallium for the first time I would say - ...


3

I think there are several heuristics you can use: Pronunciation The pronunciation seems to me like it could go either way for metalium, but not for metallium, as I said in the comments beneath Dan's answer and Armen Ծիրունյան's answer . For example, the word nobelium is pronounced both as /noʊˈbɛlɪəm/ "no-BELL-ium" and as /noʊˈbiːlɪəm/ "no-BEE-lium." The ...


3

I think that the honest and direct answer to the question is that native English speakers will guess, probably painfully incorrectly to a Vietnamese ear, "lee" or "lay," and "bow" (as in "tow"). Americans will sound dipthong-y in most variants. If the native speaker is American, older, and (probably) male he may assume that the pronunciation he remembers ...


2

There is a very basic 3rd grade rule of pronunciation that most people have internalized, even if they don't know it: The vowel of an "open" syllable is pronounced "long" while the vowel of a "closed" syllable is pronounced "short". Like most "rules" of English this one is honored by being frequently dishonored, but it still carries some weight. Thus ...


2

There are many regional differences in pronunciation, in particular with "r", for speakers of English (as well many as other languages), that there really is no simple answer, other than perhaps Rhoticity : "Rhoticity in English refers to the situations in which English speakers pronounce the historical rhotic consonant /r/, and is one of the most ...


2

There are many different accents in North American English. In some of those accents, it might be quite comfortable for the speaker to say “a apple.” Either because of the way they are putting their syllables together, or perhaps because they are from a region where people tend to speak very slowly. It might be “a [pause] apple.”


2

Essentially the same question was also posted on the linguistics stackexchange, several months after the posting of the present question here on the English stackexchange. As of Jan 14, 2016, here is what we have learned there: At the present time, there does seem to exist a subgroup of adult native English speakers who pronounce the "th" as voiced. It is ...


2

For pronunciation: “linmy” = LIN-mee [ˈlɪnˌmi], “linmys” = LIN-miss [ˈlɪnˌmɪs]. In general, adding a consonant at the end will give the Y a pronunciation of short I [ɪ]. And in fast speech, /nm/ will be reduced to /mː/, like “LIM-mee”. Am I correct in assuming you’re Chinese? With Western names, the family name is written last, so most speakers would expect ...


2

In French and Portuguese, the Latin palatal glide /j/ came to be pronounced with audible frication, /ʒ/, so that is how the letter came to be pronounced in those languages. This has also happened to /ʎ/ (written 'll') in some American varieties of Spanish. This may have arisen in a similar way to the phenomenon in modern French, where in a word like 'oui' ...


2

Walker's Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language (London, 1828) says that volatile and textile end the same way as lentil. The Student's English Dictionary (London, 1865), by Ogilvie, says that textile and volatile end the same way as file. So it looks like the Brits stopped eliding it some time in the 19th century. (I'm sure that it happened ...


2

A fortis consonant is a consonant which we think of as typically voiceless. A lenis consonant is a consonant that we think of as typically voiced. In general in English lenis consonants become devoiced when not surrounded on both sides by voiced sounds. So in the string bed time the /d/ will tend to be devoiced, either partially or fully, because it has a ...


1

It would be too prescriptive to say it is pronounced one way or the other. I looked into some dictionary IPA spellings and they have the shwa for that 'uh' sound. Vowels are tricky things though. It might be shwa in the dictionary, but that's not a strict guideline. You might not notice it, but even you might say is as p'uh'tential if you are talking really ...


1

It is normal in the majority dialect to make the first syllable of "potential" unstressed, since the second syllable is stressed, and the first syllable has a lax vowel and is open. And generally, unstressed non-high vowels reduce to schwa. All the same, I often hear tense and unreduced "o" and "e" in such initial syllables in American English. ...



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