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19

I guess the easiest explanation is that the vowels that are represented by the English e are different in the Greek words. beta => βήτα meta => μετα As you can see in the link that Josh61 mentioned in his comment, they are pronounced in different ways.


6

It's not mere poetic licesce. Words ending in -ed are pronounced /id/ if they serve as adjectives. In case of verbs, the syllable is dropped unless the verb ends in -d or -t I learned the truth. He was a learnED man He crooked a finger for the waitress. His teeth were yellow and crookED Also note jagged, wicked, rugged etc... This "rule" (like every ...


4

No one will bat an eye if you refer to the bird with either pronunciation, but the Ford automobile is never FALL-con. (US)


4

Looking at Wikipedia, we see that a variety of pronunciation respellings have been used in English, but this sound has no consistent representation. Following English conventions, the sound is usually represented as -ye or -ie, or eye when it is a syllable on its own. However, these representations only really work when syllables are separated by something ...


4

As a native speaker of standard Midwestern American English, "I muhnuh" sounds perfectly ordinary, to me, hearing it from another American English speaker. However, if I knew you were not a native speaker of English, there might be a problem. Since it's very unusual for a non-native speaker to have a native-like command of casual conversation, I might not ...


3

When the phoneme /p/ occurs at the start of a stressed syllable in English, it is aspirated with a little puff of air, making it a [pʰ]. Contrast hospital with a [p] with husband with a [b]. Hear the difference now? It is subtle, but you can have a loss of aspiration without having to gain voicing at the same time. But people mistake this in hearing. Per ...


3

Spelling a word depends on hearing it, and in your list, with the exception of 'vanguard', the "simpler" words employ largely conventional phonetic orthography. Consequently, even upon hearing them for the first time, someone can intuit their spelling using knowledge of phonetic orthographic conventions; the more "difficult" words, OTOH, have uncommon or ...


3

There are no hard rules for the pronunciation of adjectives/participles on -ed. Normally, they are all pronounced -d/t, like striped, except those ending on -ted and -ded. But there are many exceptions pronounced as -id, like naked. The exceptions are almost all adjectives, or participles used as adjectives: true verbal participles are almost always ...


2

In the UK, it is nominally fall-con, but in practice that means that people with non-RP (received pronunciation) dialects pronounce it in their corresponding versions-- fælkən in the North of England, falkən in the Southwest, etc. Dictionaries list only one pronunciation for British English, and in the past other dialects were essentially considered ...


2

What you are noticing is a "migration to schwa" that is common in English. Most unstressed syllables in English assume a schwa sound, a neutral vowel sound. Similarly, you're noticing a lack of consonant enunciation. Because the speaker is being a bit lazy, they are not interrupting the voice when reaching the voiceless consonants. Nonetheless, a native ...


2

The paper I cited in the comment to the OP advances the thesis that the "same" sound can be subject to very different phonological processes depending on whether it appears in word-initial position, or foot-internally (in an unstressed syllable). So if gh in word-initial position and gh in word-internal position had the same historical source, it would be a ...


2

In practice, there is very little difference between short i and schwa. You could imagine a spectrum of pronunciations of the vowel sound in that syllable. You can say it either way and people will understand you just fine. To have a clear, understandable pronunciation, it is important to get the rhythm and the intonation right. Stressed syllables are ...


2

The old 50s rules for US English pronunciation hold that an "open" (vs "closed") syllable yields a "long" vowel sound. A long I is pronounced "eye", and a short I is pronounced (roughly) "ih". An open syllable is one that ends with the vowel, or one that ends with a consonant and the letter "E". Even though these rules are (apparently) no longer taught, ...


2

It does not make any sense to talk about “hard” or “soft” here. Language can easily be any of these and more, depending on the speaker: [ˈlæŋwɪdʒ] [ˈlæŋwədʒ] [ˈlæŋgwɪdʒ] [ˈlæŋgwədʒ] [ˈleŋwɪdʒ] [ˈleŋwədʒ] [ˈleŋgwɪdʒ] [ˈleŋgwədʒ] Other variants include: a diphthongization of the initial vowel into [eɪ]. opening the initial vowel from [e] to [ɛ] or from ...


2

Totally random guess, but what about "nor their stated aim is to return the president to power"?


1

P turns into B very easily, since the difference between them is just unvoiced versus voiced. Folks may substitute one for the other without realizing they've done so... including people like myself who pronounce it as P when we're paying attention My advice would be to continue to use the P but not worry about it. You'll learn how sloppy you can be and ...


1

I'm English and we pronounce can't like are, for example car-nt so just say car with nt on the end carnt or c-are-nt


1

Hard/Soft G is more variable at the beginning of words, but G (or double G) is always hard in the middle of these longer words if it is also so in the root. "Singer" could be hard or soft, depending on if you mean "one who sings" or "one who singes." The only common exceptions I can find are the words that use the word "get" like "forgetful" and a long list ...


1

Often, I hear this in casual speech: Clothes turns into "close" (especially in a word like "clothespins") February turns into "feb-you-ary"


1

Although mischievious isn't listed as a variant spelling in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary, you could make the case that it is one and that people who say "mis-CHEEV-ee-us" are pronouncing that variation of the word correctly, rather than pronouncing mischievous incorrectly. Here is an Ngram chart tracking occurrences of mischievious in the ...


1

Both [æz] with stress, and [əz] without stress, sound fine, to me (I'm a native English speaker). But the stress does matter. You can't stress the [əz] version and have it sound like normal American English (I can't say about other dialects). I've used brackets for your examples instead of slashes, since the variation between the vowels [æz] and [əz] that ...


1

There is probably no real reason, but I think the following interesting extract can help understand: Both have come in to American English, or gotten POPULAR or WELL KNOWN in American English, at very different times. ... Remember that 500 and 600 years ago, education (European, but also British -- 'American' hadn't been invented yet :-) and ...



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