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93

The 't' in student is not pronounced like a 'd'. You just think it is because there is a mismatch between the consonants in the Chinese language and the consonants in English. Pinyin uses the letter 'd' for an unaspirated voiceless alveolar stop (represented /t/ in IPA), and the letter 't' for an aspirated voiceless alveolar stop (represented /tʰ/ in IPA). ...


16

Those are not typos. Native speakers of British English do use bath as a transitive verb. Bathe on its own suggests swimming, and probably specifically seaside swimming — not even in swimming baths (which are swimming pools these days anyway). Bathe is almost poetic: something might be bathed in light. Apart from bathe a wound, to hear it used ...


12

When I was living in Calgary, Alberta, in the early 1970s, a student fresh from Toronto (where she had grown up) enrolled in our high school—and I would swear that she pronounced Toronto in two syllables: ˈträn-ə. Admittedly (1) the pronunciation may have changed or (2) our transfer student may have had an idiosyncratic pronunciation or (3) even though I ...


11

Peter Shor's comment is right: that second 't' is silent, in the stereotypical accent, so it's something like, "te-rah-na" ... eh? Also Wikipedia gives /ˈtrɒnoʊ/ so the first vowel, too, is elided. I'm not sure whether the first vowel is there or not. I think it's something like /tɨˈrɒnoʊ/ with a reduced first vowel and more stress on the 'R' than on the ...


10

Just some observations and Ngrams. The results on the American English corpus indicate that the verb to bath is rarely used if at all. Whereas the expression to wash the baby seems to be overtaking its counterpart to bathe Meanwhile the British English corpus shows the slow upward trend for to bathe the baby which has been picking up momentum since the ...


5

The answers given so far have correctly identified the elision of the first vowel and of the second "t", but one additional element being overlooked is (for many speakers) the significant palatalization of the first "T". /trano/ is certainly an accurate phonemic analysis, but the phonetic realization for many speakers is much closer to [ˈt͡ʃrɒnoʊ], or what ...


5

As you've discovered, it is a valid British usage. I would like to confirm that "to bath" is never used in any American dialect I've heard. If you're preparing students to speak American English, they can safely ignore that usage :)


5

A lot of people omit the "'ve" from "You've got to be careful" in 'folksy' dialects. But in general, including it helps interpretation, and sounds proper. The 'got to' already forces the perfect tense on you. No one omits the "'d" from "I'd like to" because "I like to" means something slightly different. The former, with the 'would', refers to a specific ...


5

If you're speaking of the Louisville in Kentucky, when I was last in those parts it was pronounced approximately /ˈlʊəvl̩ /, with a syllabic /l/ and the first syllable just barely a diphthong. The one in Tennessee has a more definite diphthong: /ˈlʊivl̩ /.


5

This is an example of an intrusive R, which people who speak non-rhotic dialects (i.e., they tend to drop the r sounds at the ends of words) often insert between a word that ends with a vowel and another word that begins with a vowel. This avoids the need for a glottal stop, which can be a bit awkward to pronounce. Interestingly, the intrusive R happens even ...


5

Take a look at the information I link to on this page, which I have titled The geography of America's dialects and cultural affinities compared. In particular, visit the links for the dialect maps produced by Rick Aschmann, where you will find both audio and video clips illustrating how various sounds are typically pronounced in different regions of the ...


5

The "d" in student is called a 'voiced dental'. It is produced with the tongue pressed up against the roof of the mouth behind the two front teeth. But there is also a sound produced in the vocal cords at the same time as the air is forced out; thus, it is 'voiced'. The 't' at the end of the word is a 'voiceless dental'. The tongue position is the same but ...


4

You pronounce an obscure name just like you pronounce any word you've never seen before: by taking your best guess at it. If you are subsequently corrected, you correct yourself. In the case of Kaiomi specifically, until you are corrected, you are free to pronounce it /keɪ'ɔ:mi/, /kəɪ'oʊmi/, /kɑi'omi/, /kə'iəˌmaɪ/, or in a dozen other ways. In the case ...


4

I pronounce and stress the two quite differently as a native speaker; I usually have no problem distinguishing them. Prince's - prin-sz Stress on the first syllable Ends in a hard S Princess = prin-sess Stress on the second syllable Ends in a soft S


4

The happy vowel, as it is known,/i/, is not a feature of all Englishes. In Australian English, for example, this vowel is subject to lengthening in open syllables. In British English, the happy vowel may be realised with the quality of either /i:/ or /ɪ/, and variation between speakers can be observed. However, younger speakers in more recent years are ...


4

We have a tendency to think that speakers of languages that have a similar consonant phoneme must pronounce it in the same way, but this is not so. For example, both Czech /p/ and /English /p/ are unvoiced labial stops, but the prevocalic English /p/is aspirated, and the Czech is not. As a result, Czech speakers producing the word pan with an initial Czech ...


4

Since the actual question here is very easy to answer (the answer is no, there is no truth whatsoever in her statement), I will instead comment a bit on why it really is that methane has two varying pronunciations. Note that this is not merely a BrE vs. AmE thing—while AmE generally only has the pronunciation with the short e, BrE has both. Methane is ...


3

'Trawna' if we're both from there, 'Trawn-toe' if we're speaking to someone who isn't from there.


3

I think there might be slightly different versions of correct pronunciation, but here is one I know: /ɔːˈriːliəs/


3

No, those are just typos. I have never heard a native speaker of American English use bath as a verb. It is bathe or take/give a bath. (Indian English, at least, and so British English I guess, they do use bath as a verb.)


3

The pronunciation differs in both the second vowel sound and the final consonant. Prince's -> "prin-sizz" Princess -> "prin-sess"


3

My first thought was the same as LightMikeE (ie I said "...a dot html" in my head), but then read his first example as "an html extension". My brain skipped the . in .html because it didn't 'see' it as ending a sentence, so it somehow didn't mentally 'count'. So I'd say follow normal rules - if the extension starts with a vowel, use 'an', whether you ...


3

I think it depends on the user and the context. If you are referring to the extension itself, such as: Then save the file with a .html extension Then, since you're referring to the ".html" extension, which needs a DOT to differentiate between a specific extension and an ambiguous file type, use "a dot html". In this case, you CANNOT call it "a html ...


3

Shifting second-syllable stress to the first syllable is characteristic of Southern (US) accents. Indeed, it's a trope, reaching #59 on the Stuff Southern People Like blog: How to Sound Southern: Accent the First Syllable … HALLoween, THANKSgiving, TEEvee, UMbrella, and JUly The THANKSgiving pronunciation is also covered in a Language Log post which ...


3

It is absolutely standard in British English to use "double" for repeated letters when spelling words, and sounds odd not to do so. It is also common for repeated digits when reciting numbers digit by digit. My observation is that the usage is much less common in American English, and may indeed be misheard as "W".


2

This word is derived from old German. In the German alphabet the letter s is pronounced with a "sh" sound, and a double s is pronounced "es". The double s in German is ß and sounds like our English s. That having been said, the word gets pronounced thresh-hold and not thres-hold.


2

The problem disappears if you translate the street name less literally, and more in accordance with one of the conventions used in Britain when royal or aristocratic titles are included in street names. Thus: Prinsens Gate --> Prince Street For that matter: Kongens Gate --> King Street Dronningens Gate --> Queen Street If, for some reason, you ...


2

As a native English speaker (albeit with a regional accent) I make the following suggestions based on my experiences with learning a little Polish, Japanese and Italian. The primary way of improving our pronunciation is to mix and speak with the people who speak as we aspire. Addition free methods that help Watch and speak with classical movies such as ...


2

When a word ending in a vowel comes at the end of an utterance, it tends to be longer than when it is followed by a consonant, and longer when followed by a voiced consonant than by a unvoiced one. [See Cruttenden(2001.95), Gimson's Pronunciation of English'] A spectrogram will show that the bolded vowel of [1] below is longer than that in {2], which is ...


2

Pronunciations vary regionally, by class and subgoups. Here is a link to a page showing standard pronunciation symbols for what I take to be your two options, as well as sound recordings which are quite helpful: http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/fragile I am from Toronto, have a doctorate in the Humanities, and use the first ...



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