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7

It doesn't. If it did, spectre (pronounced /ˈspɛk.təɹ/ and spectra (pronounced /ˈspɛk.tɹə/) would be exact homophones, and they aren't, although they do sound similar. Similarly, we don't think Dexter and extra are perfect rhymes, although you could get around this in a humorous poem by pronouncing extra as exter. Maybe some aspect of your native ...


6

There are several interesting phonological and phonetic aspects of Adele's pronunciation of this line: Think of me in the depths of your despair Of course, the pronunciation of a sentence will never be the same twice. Here is the version I'm working from. It's from Youtube. This lyric begins at 1.26. Two of the things that make Adele's singing ...


5

Considering that there is no such thing as “the actually 100% correct pronunciation for almond in American English”, it is not possible to provide you with that. There are, however, at least different six pronunciations in common use: [ɔlmənd], with the first syllable homophonic with the common word all and the less common work awl. [ɔmənd], as before but ...


4

It is an English phonetic adaptation of Greek words: There are a number of Greek onset clusters imported into English: 'gn-' as in 'gnostic' 'pn-' as in 'pneumonia' 'pt-' as in 'pterodactyl' 'ps-' as in 'psychology' The 'g' and 'p' are not silent in Greek. But /gn/, /pn/, /pt/, /ps/ are not legal onsets in English phonology. English speakers ...


3

Some people (including me) have /ɛ/ in catch (this is listed as the second pronunciation by Merriam-Webster) although for me the vowel in this word is more variable than the one in many and any (I might say /kætʃ/, while I would never say /æni/). The past tense of eat, which is standardly spelled "ate," may be pronounced /ɛt/ (see this map from the ...


3

The Longman Pronunciation Dictionary lists the following pronunciations for American English: /ˌɑːlmənd/ This is listed as the "main" pronunciation, recommended as a model for learners. /ˌæːlmənd/ /ˌɑːmənd/ /ˌæːmənd/ These three are alternative pronunciations which are also in use, although perhaps less frequently. As you can see, there are ...


3

Hmmm...when is the last time any of you said the word "ink" in a sentence (before reading this question)? The last few instances I can remember myself are: "The printer needs ink." "My pen's out of ink." "Do you sell printer ink?" Now try saying: "pink ink" "color ink" "squid ink" "India ink" Do you pronounce "ink" the same way in each variation of ...


3

With regard to the concept of 'correctness' of individual language elements, there are two competing views and these two views will affect how to differentiate varieties. There is describing scientifically what is out there, what people actually say and how their individual way of speaking can be categorized with others, and then there is systematizing ...


2

The "standard" pronunciation of miracle that you will see transcribed in any dictionary is with the vowel of mirror or irritate or tyranny (this vowel can be transcribed in various ways: in the International Phonetic Alphabet, it might be /ɪ/ or /i/, and in North American dictionary respelling systems it might be \ĭ\ or even \ē\). However, I just learned of ...


2

The reason to have two different pronunciations is to better differentiate the words in normal speech, where there are no pauses between words. Try saying "the only" quickly a few times. If you use "thuh", then the sound of the two words runs into each other, and unless you introduce a pause, you get something like "thonly". Pardon what? If you use "thee ...


2

The trouble with names is that they're ultimately pronounced the way the owner wants them to be pronounced. You can try to apply rules, but there'll always be an exception somewhere. That said, the word could be pronounced /hɪndz/ - consider wind and winds, both as the blowy thing in the air and the way to put cotton onto a reel - so Hinds could follow the ...


2

I'm not sure why you're even asking this question, but it's possible that you've seen other measurements written like "6 foot four inches" and think that you can apply the same style to "4.5 metres". (Note - if you're talking about the unit of measurement, it's "metres", not "meters": a "meter" is a measuring device, eg "speedometer", "thermometer" etc.) ...


2

How would you have it pronounced? Throughout most of the US it's pronounced, as Silenus suggests, LEE-VIES (or LEE-VIZE, as a different spelling for the same sound), where VIES rhymes with "eyes". The term comes from the Levi Strauss company, which has always been pronounced LEE-VIE (rhyming with "eye"). (They once ran a chain of dry goods stores ...


1

They're different for me as well. The pronunciation of duel, cruel, gruel, fuel, jewel etc. with /u:l/ is a simplification of historical /-u:əl/. This is not a feature of all accents, but I believe it's reasonably common. Wikipedia describes it under the broader category of "vile-vial merger," but I'm not sure if this is really a unified phenomenon. ...


1

When most people speak, I hear the same vowel in pink and pit. There are definitely some people from California who say peenk and keeng. And from the links you give, some people from Michigan do the same thing. For these speakers, the phoneme /ɪ/ changes to /iː/ before /ŋ/. This really isn't a problem for comprehension, because /iːŋ/ isn't present in any ...


1

I'm also born and raised in Kalamazoo, MI. From my understanding of NCVS, I don't think I have it (can't entirely decide), but I'm sure my parents don't. Considering my friend group of people who are from the cities (excluding suburbs) of Chicago, Detroit, and New York (the Bronx), I find NCVS: very noticeable from New Yorkers not at all noticeable from ...


1

I, being a Kiwi, think I use both. With a preference towards Mos-cow.


1

His full name would be "Tenpin Boleyn", as in ten pin bowling


1

From Oxford Dictionaries Online: There are two possible pronunciations of the word controversy: one puts the stress on the con- and the other puts it on the -trov-. The former pronunciation is the more traditional, but the latter is now more widespread in British English. As to why this is the case? I can guess. The prefix con- is quite common in ...


1

In British English, idempotent is pronounced as /ˌʌɪdɛmˈpəʊt(ə)nt/ or /ʌɪˈdɛmpət(ə)nt/. In American English, idempotent is pronounced as /ˌīdemˈpōt(ə)nt/ or /ˈēdemˌpōt(ə)nt/.


1

Bhavana, your name hints at the right answer. I would assume that your home language is a North Indian one. In North Indian languages there are two sounds that sound to an English speaker like the English 't'. On the other hand, they don't have the sound of 'th' in 'thumb' or 'threat'. One of the Indian sounds often sounds to English speakers like the 'th' ...


1

The standard American pronunciation stresses the final syllable /kæˈfeɪ/, whereas many speakers of “Insular English” (that is, English from the British Isles) move the stress to the first syllable as is their wont in borrowings from Romance that are not normally stressed initially. This movement of the primary stress in the word also somewhat reduces and ...


1

If you reduce 'on', you get syllabic 'nn', which is the same as you get when you reduce 'in'. Since there are many contexts where either is possible, to avoid clashes, we refuse to reduce 'on': no matter how low the stress, the vowel quality will always remain. Of course, we could have chosen to do this to 'in' instead. But it's a question of conserving ...


1

The Old English word habban did have a short vowel in all of its forms. However, I would expect the vowel to be lengthened in some forms of the word during Middle English due to open syllable lengthening. For example, this is the reason why we have a long vowel in shave, from Old English sceafan. (The forms with -bb- do not seem to have survived to Modern ...


1

Having just heard this on BBC radio 4 I'm a little stumped, as the main presenter would pronunciate it as /ˈɪs.juː/ and second one, covering the particular topic, as /ˈɪʃuː/. I can't say if one of them wasn't British, but, additionally, during the same news, it occurred once more, this time regarding breast cancer tissue. Youtube gives me conflicting ...


1

Actually, I haven't found xenocide listed as a normal word in any dictionary. It is the title of a novel by Orson Scott Card, in which it is used as a word. So let's look at another, more common word with the prefix xeno-: xenophobia. Onelook Dictionary Search reveals that the vowel can be pronounced either /ɛ/ or /iː/. This kind of variation in vowel ...



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