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21

Because the grammar is incorrect. It should be "him and his wife" as you correctly say. This is probably an example of hypercorrection. The speaker has been corrected at some time for using 'him' instead of 'he', e.g. "Him and me did it." He has misunderstood the grammatical rules, over-generalised and gone to the other extreme.


15

You have to understand that this novel is written from the perspective of a youth who speaks largely in slang and colloquialisms and the imperfect grammar is part of his persona. That said: Correct grammar would dictate that the pronoun used as an object of an action (here the action is waking up) should be "him". So correctly the phrase would include "him ...


10

The speaker is Holden Caufield narrating his life. Holden is the rebellious protagonist of the novel, and if you've read much of the book, you'll know that Holden doesn't get along in school. J. D. Salinger is trying to capture how such a character would sound. "Helluva" is a phonetic rendition of "hell of a," meaning a remarkable example of something. ...


5

The idiom "X let alone Y" means to consider Y in contrast to X, making Y the object of the verb "let," which puts Y in the objective case. Thus: I am not going, let alone him.


4

The following examples may be helpful: This car is more expensive than what you drive presently. This car is more expensive than you think. In the first example, there's a comparison of two cars, viz., "this car" vs "the one you drive" - "what" is necessary and its omission will render the sentence incorrect. "what" serves as a ...


3

It's a rare instance in which English applies an article to a proper name to identify an individual. But English requires the article to precede an adjective with a possessive sense, which is what has happened with "The Tutoring Center," which is a type of location or franchise, making an uncomfortable juxtaposition of "a" and "The." Rephrase to attach ...


3

Your two should be spelled out. I cannot imagine any style editor anywhere demanding a numeral there. It's not a cardinal number in that context. Use words to express numbers that occur at the beginning of a sentence, title, subtitle, or heading; for common fractions; for accepted usage and numbers used as pronouns;... AMA Manual of Style: A ...


2

John Lawler is right when he says "as long as the sentence ends here it can end with either me or I". When the sentence goes on with a verb form only "I" is right. The question is what was originally the correct case. I suppose the correct case was subject case. At some time the manner came up to use the object case me instead of the subject case I when the ...


2

From the point of view of the owner of The Tutoring Center, who is looking for potential franchisees, it's important to use the full name of the company (including the opening The) at every opportunity, as a matter of branding. So, to the extent that you are representing this owner, you are well advised to follow the recommendation of deadrat and restructure ...


1

In theory, the number of a verb can be unknown. But I would rather phrase it thus: in theory, there can be multiple interpretations of the number of a particular verb form. In your example, the number may be open to two interpretations to the audience, but it is probably known to the speaker. She must have had either one or more people in mind, even if she ...


1

If Wikipedia can be trusted, it appears that there is no clear consensus on this topic. Wikipedia's pronoun page says: Possessive pronouns are used to indicate possession (in a broad sense). Some occur as independent noun phrases: mine, yours, hers, ours, yours, theirs...Others must accompany a noun: my, your, her, our, your, their...Those of the ...


1

To me, None is synonymous with Not One or with Not Any. It follows that None, like One and Any, may be considered respectively singular or plural, depending on context. Your sentence makes sense from all these viewpoints, although Saw is both singular and plural, so we need not debate the verb form, as we might if your example included "none is/are ..." ...


1

It's just as you've said: his is referring to the dark form (the owner of the coin pouch, and Vin's opponent). they is referring to Vin and her opponent.


1

"That's him swimming" is the only form I've heard in my life in any of the varieties of English I've heard. I've never heard "that's he swimming" in any situation.



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