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9

It may not sound as "natural" but indeed the correct* version is: the moon is as beautiful as she. She is a predicate nominative which is indeed in the subjective case. If you expand the sentence, it becomes clear: the moon is as beautiful as she [is]. Alternately if you said she is as beautiful as the moon. It is clear. Note that ...


5

Don’t worry, Luis. It’s not just you. This sounds strange to everbody’s ears. :) It is possible to use the same as a substantive instead of as an adjective. However, it is in my opinion not necesssarily advisable outside of specialized fields like law and linguistics. Here are the two main substantive possibilities: Used absolutely (that is, without ...


5

Both are correct, as while the "as her" version is considered not strictly grammatical, English is not a strict language. In English, grammar is descriptive not prescriptive, so whatever is accepted as correct, is correct. In common speech, it is much more usual to say "as her" or "as me" rather than "as she" or "as I". Good grammar, but unusual in ...


2

Despite as used in these sentences is a preposition Without being affected by; in spite of [Oxford Dictionaries Online] The words that follow despite are objects of the preposition We had a good time despite him being ill. [him pronoun object, being ill participle modifier of him] We had a good time despite his being ill. [being ill gerund ...


2

Grammatically, yes. Semantically, no. The first sentence has program as the subject of input, with token being the object. Since the following sentence uses the same word in an obviously parallel manner, we unambiguously deduce that the subject is the same, especially because tokens do not usually input anything in programs. As Edwin shows in his comment, ...


1

Use it for humanity: “Humanity lived thousands of years in an environment without any source of electric power, but in an environment with radiation it will be dead in a few days. However, to my ears, “Humanity” sounds more like “the state of being human” . She showed her humanity when she cared for the wounded. For the sentence in the question, I ...


1

Your first sentence has the impression that there were other people with you, in addition to Victor; so using the second sentence is better: I went for a run with Victor. Alternatively you can say: Victor and I went for a run. Remember that you shouldn't say "me and Victor ...", but "Victor and I ...".


1

The placeholder (whoever, or whatever,) holds the place for a name/identity. There's no case for the objective case here. Not to be confused with the thought about "to whom it is being addressed," which is not relevant within the salutation here. Say "Dear whoever;" "Dear he." Claudia Coutu Radmore, Arctic Twilight: It gets thrown around, ...



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