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My confusion is that since the verb that follows the relative pronoun must agree in number with the word that comes immediately before the relative pronoun, if "blocks" are plural, then it must use "weigh" which contradicts with "each". In your sentence, "each" is not used as a pronoun, but rather as and adverb meaning the same thing as "apiece". ...


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The simplest way of dealing with this (I find) is to remove the second object (in this case Mary) and then rework the sentence atound a single object (in this a disputed first person singular pronoun) and check which works and substitue that into your original sentence. If that method doesn't work, perhaps becuase it sounds clumsy, then just reword then the ...


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Shamelessly taken from Grammar Girl after a very short Google search: Between is a preposition, just as on, above, over, and of are prepositions. Because prepositions usually either describe a relationship, or show possession, they don’t act alone; they often answer questions like Where? and When? For example, if I said, “Keep that secret between you and ...


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"Marcos was deceptive and it led to his demise." is grammatical, though "this" in place of "it" sounds a little better. The antecedent of "it" or "this" is the preceding sentence "Marcos was deceptive". This sort of anaphoric construction is unusual, since the antecedent and pronoun have different grammatical categories ("parts of speech"). The antecedent ...


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However, the question is not about formal correctness. The question is whether it's appropriate for me to justify my, ehm, linguistic relationships with "I" with my cultural identity? If you want to use lower-case "i" for cultural reasons, you should come up with a better anecdote than that bit about everyone being a special snowflake. I don't know ...


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'I' is always capitalized in standard English. In Internet chat, it isn't always capitalized.


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A paradigm would help here: I, me, my (mine) we, us, our(s) thou, thee, thy (thine) you, you, your(s) he/she, him/her, his/her(s) they, them, their(s) A table would be better still but I don't know how to do that here. Now all you've got to remember is that the left side of the second row is obsolete, so that both sides of ...



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