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The prayer is addressed to the the Lord, so the second person "Thy" refers to the Lord. (That is most likely why the pronoun is capitalized.) The prayer expresses the idea that the Lord is responsible for all joy and pain, and that the prayer is offered in the shadow of the Lord's love. Thanks to Jasper Locke for pointing out that "thine" is a form of ...


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From what I've read online regarding this, the easiest thing for me to determine when to use "that" is to use it if everything after "that" can be used as a complete sentence. Please check that the light is off. "The light is off." is a complete sentence. "that" is needed. Please check the light. "The light" is not a sentence. Don't use "that". ...


3

There's a difference between a dead body (a biological object) and a dead person (the character). "Her" and "him" (as well as the gender-neutral singular "they") are usually reserved for people. So, the dead body isn't a person; that's why it is referred to as "it". So, if you use "it" to refer to a thing then you imply it is not a person. That's factual ...


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Thy is an archaic word for Your (see http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thy for example), and it is traditional in written English to capitalise pronouns when they refer to (the Christian) God. In both instances the prayer is referring to God's works. [Sorry, this would have been a comment to the above, better, answer but I haven't yet the reputation to ...


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The placeholder (whoever, or whatever,) holds the place for a name/identity. There's no case for the objective case here. Not to be confused with the thought about "to whom it is being addressed," which is not relevant within the salutation here. Say "Dear whoever;" "Dear he." Claudia Coutu Radmore, Arctic Twilight: It gets thrown around, ...


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Grammatically, yes. Semantically, no. The first sentence has program as the subject of input, with token being the object. Since the following sentence uses the same word in an obviously parallel manner, we unambiguously deduce that the subject is the same, especially because tokens do not usually input anything in programs. As Edwin shows in his comment, ...


1

Use it for humanity: “Humanity lived thousands of years in an environment without any source of electric power, but in an environment with radiation it will be dead in a few days. However, to my ears, “Humanity” sounds more like “the state of being human” . She showed her humanity when she cared for the wounded. For the sentence in the question, I ...


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Compare: Is/isn't that the woman who married Tony? (Ans: Yes, it is.) with Is/isn't she the one who married Tony? (Ans: Yes, she is.) In the first sentence, that is genderless, so the response is it. Similarly, That's the one... is referred to with an it. That can refer to gendered or plural things, but when you refer back to that, you will use ...


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Here are the three cases you have presented: (1) I gave Susie a picture of herself. (2) I went there by myself. (3) Do it yourself. I have come up with a new rule under which your three cases as well as the traditional rule are subsumed: A personal pronoun must be in the form of a reflexive pronoun in order to refer back to another word ...


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Okay, so to be free of that 400 character restriction. A reflexive pronoun is defined as: Reflexive pronouns are pronouns that refer back to the subject of the sentence or clause. They either end in –self, as in the singular form, or –selves as in the plural form. But they don't always have to be the subject and I have searched for a few minutes to ...


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You are correct in the desire to use that in your sentence. A great way to tell if your sentence is correct is to dissect it and see how it sounds. This is a huge help in forming sentences that may sound strange, but are correct. For example, if we take your sentence and split it into two, we can better see how it is structured. "Please check the ...


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It's a commonly misunderstood phrase. A misapplication of the definition occurs almost always, it seems. In this case, 'humble' is used in the rank/status/quality context. That is having or showing a modest or low estimate of one's own importance/of low social, administrative, or political rank.. That is "With consideration of my limited capability to ...



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