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4

It depends whether you're asking about English, or about the artificial language made up by grammarians a couple of hundred years ago on the basis of "If only this were Latin", and inflicted on schoolchildren ever since. In the real English that most people speak, My dog can run much faster than me. is normal and grammatical, and the "than I" ...


2

Lynne Murphy has written about this in her blog "Separated by a common language". Her answer is, It's complicated. British usage is different from American, and the patterns vary depending on the instrument. On 'guitar', she says: Ziggy played guitar. Maybe the Spiders from Mars made him do it without the the, but in 1990s UK, the British were ...


2

Choosing between "them" and "those" would depend on the context. If we were discussing a number of different books I would use "those" because as a deictic pronoun it refers to particular items, separating them from any others under discussion that I might have read. On the other hand, if the comment about Harry Potter books was not in the context of other ...


1

Yes, it is short for "My dog can run much faster than I (can run)." That's why. EDIT: Despite the downvote, I persist in my answer. Bye.


1

None but the brave deserve accolades. None is a fused determiner that can take singular non-count nouns (None of the meat was fresh) and plural nouns (None of the boys went). The brave here is understood as brave people where the head is the plural noun people; so plural deserve is fine. No one deserves accolades but the brave. No one is a compound ...


1

When writing original work, one solution is to use constructions like "my love", "my friend", or dropping the possessive with "the" or "that" (as in "before I called the name"). The problem with this is of course that as you are doing a translation you may not feel you have the latitude to introduce additional meaning. I would probably use "they / them / ...


1

Well, your second question is easy. "Between John and I" is one of the most common errors in English. It's funny: you wouldn't say "The tension is heavy between we," which is equivalent to number 3. I believe the confusion arises because of a similar-sounding problem, with a different answer. A lot of people tend to say: John and me were having a ...



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