Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

To take the last question first: no, the forms in the examples in the question here are not gerunds. They are verbal nouns. Morphologically speaking, gerunds and verbal nouns are indistinguishable in English: they both end in -ing and are identical both to each other and to the present participle (which is a different kettle of fish that I’ll leave out of ...


3

It's a rare instance in which English applies an article to a proper name. Rephrase to attach your article properly: "The purpose of the business is to own and operate a franchise of The Tutoring Center."


3

Your two should be spelled out. I cannot imagine any style editor anywhere demanding a numeral there. It's not a cardinal number in that context. Use words to express numbers that occur at the beginning of a sentence, title, subtitle, or heading; for common fractions; for accepted usage and numbers used as pronouns;... AMA Manual of Style: A ...


2

I think your hypothesis would not be borne out by the facts. Some native speakers say "him doing" and others say "his doing". You're not likely to find the same native speaker switching between forms, for varied emphasis. Those who say "his doing" were probably taught in school that the possessive pronoun is the correct form, so this form is more ...


2

I think you can use either and it would be acceptable. However, you already anthropomorphized them by using the verb claim, so it would be consistent to use who to refer to them. If you changed that phrase to something less active, such seemingly human users, it would then be more appropriate to use which.


2

No, you shouldn't leave out the pronoun. Indeed, this is a good example of where pronouns are most useful. We could have a similar use of so that didn't have a pronoun: The milk was so hot that the baby was scalded. We don't need a pronoun because we're not talking about the milk in the last clause, and while obviously the milk was the culprit we just ...


1

In both the sentences, 'as' is used as a conjunction. 'As' is generally used as a conjunction, a preposition, an adverb or as a pronoun as in 'such as'. For ex: As you can see from the graph, fuel prices are consistently increasing. (Clause 1: you can see from the graph Clause 2: fuel prices are consistently increasing) As you know, he is an author as ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible