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5

Actually, it has shed some casual terms and kept the formal ones. Thou, Thee, Thy, Thine were once the colloquial norm. "You" was more formal. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou However, it seems that many people get this backwards, and regard these archaic forms as more respectful, perhaps because they are used in the King James Bible, even when ...


3

Whoever wrote your exam is pretending they is an invalid pronoun to use when the referent is one. They expect you to write the same word each time: If one has a special medical condition such as diabetes, epilepsy, or allergy, it is advisable that one carry some kind of identification in order to avoid being given improper medication in an emergency. I ...


2

The use of "it" versus "them" as pronouns has nothing to do with living or non-living subjects. Use "them" for plural subjects and "it" for singular subjects. Example There is a 16-digit code on your card. Please enter it into the box. There is only one 16-digit code, which makes the subject singular, so you say "it," referring to the entire code. ...


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Indeed your use of "it" is fine. Also assuming I under stand your sentence, you've got the order wrong on the cumulative adjectives. It should be the "brutal killer animal", not the "killer brutal animal". If you still feel you don't like the 'it's, you could rephrase: I assumed the humans were the ones that had wounded him before." I realized that ...


1

Starting the sentence with "As much as" is fully acceptable. I have come across many such sentences during my quests through the realms of fiction. Although, I would replace "it doesn't" with "they don't" since the last subject i.e "mere changes" is in plural form & hence would require the use of a subject pronoun appropriate for plural subjects i.e. ...


1

The easiest way to answer this question is to start by replacing the pronoun him or her with the referent that the pronoun points to. Thus, in the case of If my daughter [had been] born a boy, I would have named her Harry. swap out her in favor of my daughter: If my daughter [had been] born a boy, I would have named my daughter Harry. and in the ...


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The narrator is musing on something that "bothered him," but he can't decide what the bothersome thing is. All he knows is that the bother is a minor thing -- a detail, a little detail, which might be important or might not. He considers whether the bother is something about the case, and he rejects the possibility; he considers whether the bother was ...



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