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9

It may not sound as "natural" but indeed the correct* version is: the moon is as beautiful as she. She is a predicate nominative which is indeed in the subjective case. If you expand the sentence, it becomes clear: the moon is as beautiful as she [is]. Alternately if you said she is as beautiful as the moon. It is clear. Note that ...


8

You are right in saying that hern can refer to a bird—a heron in modern spelling, but spelled without the o archaically and (according to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary) in at least one dialect of English today. One famous example of this usage appears in Alfred Tennyson's poem "The Brook" (1864): I come from the haunts of coot and ...


5

Both are correct, as while the "as her" version is considered not strictly grammatical, English is not a strict language. In English, grammar is descriptive not prescriptive, so whatever is accepted as correct, is correct. In common speech, it is much more usual to say "as her" or "as me" rather than "as she" or "as I". Good grammar, but unusual in ...


5

Don’t worry, Luis. It’s not just you. This sounds strange to everbody’s ears. :) It is possible to use the same as a substantive instead of as an adjective. However, it is in my opinion not necesssarily advisable outside of specialized fields like law and linguistics. Here are the two main substantive possibilities: Used absolutely (that is, without ...


4

This is an interesting question. In the Original Poster's sentence she is indeed the nominative case pronoun. It is also true that we associate this case marking with the subjects of finite verbs - such as the verb is in the original example. However, occasionally we find nominative case pronouns in non-subject positions. Here she is in fact not the subject ...


2

Despite as used in these sentences is a preposition Without being affected by; in spite of [Oxford Dictionaries Online] The words that follow despite are objects of the preposition We had a good time despite him being ill. [him pronoun object, being ill participle modifier of him] We had a good time despite his being ill. [being ill gerund ...


1

Your first sentence has the impression that there were other people with you, in addition to Victor; so using the second sentence is better: I went for a run with Victor. Alternatively you can say: Victor and I went for a run. Remember that you shouldn't say "me and Victor ...", but "Victor and I ...".



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