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5

Using "of" suggests a stronger association between the shroud and the figure of the lady --- she is the lady best known by (or at least well known by) her association with the shroud. In the same way as e.g. "The Lady of Shalott" rather than "The Lady from Shalott"; "The Lady of the Lake" rather than "The Lady in the Lake". It indicates an identification ...


2

You are right and your teacher is wrong. 'in' always takes an article with a noun here (unless the noun is uncountable) WRONG: My father always goes to university in car. RIGHT: My father always goes to university in a car. RIGHT: My father always goes to university in the car. RIGHT: My father always goes to university by car.


1

Where a gerund-participle clause is complement to a preposition, both genitive and non-genitive subjects are possible: I have no objections to [their/them taking notes]. She insisted on [my/me being present at the interview]. So, both your examples are fine. It's essentially a free choice between genitive "their" and non-genitive "them", though the ...


1

I love @ProfYaffle's answer, but perhaps it's also connected to countability. "Drive" is countable, but "memory" is uncountable; you say "the data is on the/a/twelve drive(s)", but "the data is in memory" without "the/a/twelve". Note, also, that we say the uncountable "the data is in storage".



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