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4

Neither. You arrive at your work. arrive (v) - Reach a place at the end of a journey or a stage in a journey: we arrived at his house and knocked at the door


3

Traditionally, words modifying just about anything other than a noun phrase were lumped into the default category: adverbs. Here, a more analytical approach is to label about as a quantifier modifier, which is obviously its function (if one is in the 'numbers are quantifiers' camp. Those who define numbers as being different from quantifiers on the grounds ...


3

In short, yes, about is an adverb here. It means approximately, and is used correctly in both your examples. EDIT: When I say adverb, I mean it modifies the adjective five, not the verb weigh. In English, adverbs can modify not only verbs, but also adjectives and other adverbs. This Oxford entry confirms that it is an adverb indeed.


2

Closer in this sentence is the comparative of the adverb close. close (adv.) at or to a short distance or time away [M-W]


1

Apparently, it looks like an incident of poor translation. "Quando penso a Modena..." = When I think of (or about) Modena I'm a fluent French speaker and I find the above Spanish phrase very close to the French equivalent: "Quand je pense à Modena", which can only translated as: When I think of Modena


1

The difference isn't so much in meaning as in nuance and it is very slight. In the first sentence there is a sense of time elapsing. If it had been written as On the journey home and back at his house in Scy Chazelles Schuman gave the plan his undivided attention. there is still the meaning that while on the journey Schuman was giving the plan ...


1

The second one, "I will send it to you right now", is grammatically correct. The first one, "I will send you right now", would be correct if you had something (a noun) to send: "I will send you the recording right now."


1

Sometimes we use "at" and sometimes we use "to". If what follows the preposition is action-like or an ongoing event, then we can use "to" or "at". He arrived at 8AM. They police arrived at the just right moment to thwart the bank robbery. The police arrived at the scene of the crime. He arrived to work drunk, and got fired. They arrived late to the ...


1

You may also say "arrive for work", meaning "arrive ready for work" with Ready understood.


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Strangely enough,"to arrive" is not considered a verb expressing movement. So you shouldn't use any prepositions of movement ( to,into ), but only the static ones ( in,at ).


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Periphrastic adj periphrasis n. : use of a longer phrasing in place of a possible shorter form of expression. MW


1

I don't have a name for it, but I know the phenomenon all too well from decades of translating. In that particular culture, they would take it further, and rather than the equivalent of "The East is red" they would write "The East is a colour that is red", or even, "With respect to its colour, the East is a colour that is red". As a critic of wordiness, ...


1

'I moved closer.' Here closer is a comparative adjective functioning as a complement of the verb move. It does not describe the process of moving, it describes the subject, I, at the end of the moving process. As such we could regard it as a type of locative complement. These types of complement are nearly always preposition phrases or adjectives. ...



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