Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

To answer the question (as opposed to telling you about the noun, which you didn't ask about), yes the verb "judge" can be construed with of, but the OED describes it as "now somewhat rare". It gives examples from 1534 to 1999, of which the most recent is At the time of writing (1999) it is too early to judge of its [sc. the development's] ultimate ...


2

Well, I really find this interesting. in is used to describe a general location which is large in context, whether indoor or outdoor. at describes a specific location. For instance, I could say: I live at № 29 D’alberto Road in Lagos. D’alberto Road is just a small area in Lagos.


1

As tchrist suggests in a comment, "blind [one] from seeing" is more common than "blind [one] to seeing." Here is an Ngram chart of "blind me from seeing" vs. "blind me to seeing" vs. "blind us from seeing" vs. "blind us to seeing" vs. "blind them from seeing" vs. "blind them to seeing": In situations where the thing that one is being blinded to or from ...


1

I did not find any examples with for, but I did find of and about The campaign aims to raise awareness of the dangers of passive smoking. There was a general lack of awareness about safety issues.


1

The opposite ends of a scale could be described as the 'nadir' and the 'apex', but it sounds more like you're describing the opposite ends of a spectrum.


1

First, “grammatically correct” is not something that applies here. Of course it is grammatically correct. That doesn’t mean it’s sensible — nor that it isn’t. This is not a matter of grammar, but of semantics. So now for semantics, which is all that ever matters. You misunderstand the semantics of between. Your error is thinking that between A and B only ...


1

Grammatically and semantically, both options seem correct. Statistically, you're better off going with "of A and B". A quick search on Google Scholar shows there are 141,000 occurrences of "equivalence of * and" and 59,600 occurrences of "equivalence between * and." "Of" is roughly* 2.38 times more likely to be used in academic writing. [* There is a fair ...


1

"From A to B and back" works if one's intention is to state that it's not a one-way trip.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible