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2

I think employment with is more idiomatic and is backed up by a google Ngram search.


2

If it's for a cover letter, and you're seeking a particular position, state the position and how much you, with your experience, skills, etc., would contribute to the position and the company: "...before seeking the position of [insert name of position] with [insert name of company.]" If you do a simple search online there are lots of great, free examples ...


2

Facetime may be the name of the service, but it has also become the verb to describe using the service. That being the case I would recommend "he facetimed me". This was my experience of the usage, but I checked online and found "facetimed me" gets 26,000 google hits versus 1,00 for "called me over FaceTime".


2

Stop smoking before it's too late. correct He won't stop smoking until he's been diagnosed with lung cancer and it's too late.


1

Probably easiest to explain through examples. Each phrase simply means "the thing that we've already mentioned", e.g. The box in which the books are kept The town of which we were speaking The time at which we will arrive The destination to which we were heading I'm sure there's a grammatically-correct term, but they're really just the correct forms of ...


1

Rather than "with", as suggested in the answer from @k1eran, I would prefer "in the company" because you are looking for a position in the company.



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