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4

She is tall for her age This means that she is noticeably taller than the average height of girls her age.


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There is an advantage in abbreviating some things Valid There is an advantage to abbreviating some things Valid There is an advantage of abbreviating some things Bad, ugly English. But... The advantage of abbreviation is that... or The advantages of abbreviation are... Perfectly acceptable.


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The simple answer is that talk collocates naturally with both to and with and that both talk to and talk with are grammatical. Your recent edit of your question actually provides the semantic difference: talk to indicates the activity of talking, followed by the listener as object talk with implies conversation, discussion, and discursiveness Some ...


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It's the same kind of "for" as you find in: "It's warm for December" - the temperature is not high in an absolute sense, but is high within the range of temperature that one might expect to find in December. "That's a good effort for a beginner" - the result is not particularly good in an absolute sense, but is good within the range of results that one ...


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Is the empty line following the text in the box or can it be interstitial? If it is after the existing text, then: "[To add text] Click (or position the cursor in case a keyboard is being used) on a blank/empty (no material difference) line following the text." [interstitial] "[To insert text] Click [position the cursor] on any blank/empty line. ...


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When you say "sentences "a" and "b"" I gather you mean sentences "a" and "c". "...because in a moment, we need to get back to my point with Eliot." "...similar to what we have seen with other crises like the Hawaiian earthquake." Yes, it means "in relation to", "concerning", "regarding". "He has become very popular with the people." here it ...


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The more I consider this, the more I feel that a preposition at the end of a sentence is OK as long as there isn't a better way to write the sentence. (Isn't that usually the case?) For example, "Where is your bathroom at" is incorrect because of the use of an excess word (it would be just as clear to say, "Where is your bathroom?") as much as it's incorrect ...


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I do share your feelings towards ending a sentence with a preposition. However, those feelings aside, all my teachers (both English and my native language) have always emphasised that it actually isn't wrong. Though I should point out that they have all been advocates of writing (almost) spoken language.


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There is nothing wrong with ending with a preposition.


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"Count your blessings" covers the sentiment in that by "counting" (see definition below) or taking into consideration your blessings which are things in your life for which to be thankful, you're saying the same thing without the pesky preposition at the end. Per Google Dictionary's 2nd meaning for the verb, "count": take into account; include. ...



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