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2

None of your examples needs a comma before the preposition. All of the following would be nonsense: I looked, on the other side of me and seen a bird. I looked on the other side, of me and seen a bird. I looked, on the other side, of me and seen a bird. All, of my friends came with me except Ron. All of my friends came, with me except Ron. ...


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The simple answer is that talk collocates naturally with both to and with and that both talk to and talk with are grammatical. Your recent edit of your question actually provides the semantic difference: talk to indicates the activity of talking, followed by the listener as object talk with implies conversation, discussion, and discursiveness Some ...


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Americans, who use prepositions completely differently to us, talk with people all the time. In Britain we generally talk to our interlocutors, and they talk to us. 'Talking with someone' always sounds to me as though you are both speaking at the same time, a bit like singing a duet.


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It's the same kind of "for" as you find in: "It's warm for December" - the temperature is not high in an absolute sense, but is high within the range of temperature that one might expect to find in December. "That's a good effort for a beginner" - the result is not particularly good in an absolute sense, but is good within the range of results that one ...


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She is tall for her age This means that she is noticeably taller than the average height of girls her age.


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When you say "sentences "a" and "b"" I gather you mean sentences "a" and "c". "...because in a moment, we need to get back to my point with Eliot." "...similar to what we have seen with other crises like the Hawaiian earthquake." Yes, it means "in relation to", "concerning", "regarding". "He has become very popular with the people." here it ...


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I've been considering this for a while, now. Here's what my thoughts are: Near Near is a good option when you're considering geographical proximity of two stated locations. If you're literally saying "A is ___ B", it feels most natural to use "near" rather than "near to", "nearby to", or "nearby". I feel "nearby" is often interchangeable with "near" in ...


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I'd say they're mostly interchangeable, however there are occasions when I would use one over the other: "I kept my sword close at hand" "I remain on hand to help you "I keep a good deal of cash in hand" I would use either "on hand" or "in hand" - "The stock I keep on hand is shown on the accounts as "Stock in hand"".


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At difficult times refers to difficult moments - points in time. In difficult times generally refers to difficult time periods. (But it can also refer to moments.) So if you want to emphasize moments then use at; if you want to emphasize periods then use in. And of course the notion/perception of what constitutes a moment in time versus a period of time ...


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I believe on hand is probably the best phrase to use synonymical to in stock. Edit: In response to a question about my reason, it simply seems to sound most fluent in the context, although the other ways of phrasing would also be grammatically valid.



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