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In contexts like these, use "a". Even if the hearer is familiar with the particular app, they don't know that that is the subject of the conversation until you introduce it. The only time you might use "the" here is if a collection of which the app is a part has already been introduced in the conversation; eg My boss let me choose which parts of our ...


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I think in light of isn't as far off as you fear. But i agree that from the perspective of or informed by or through the lens of all work.


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Is there an idiomatic prepositional phrase meaning 'with the help of something' in this particular context? Help lends an advantage, yes? ... from the vantage of ... Noun 1. vantage - place or situation affording some advantage (especially a comprehensive view or commanding perspective) Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-...


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through the lens of This phrase doesn't exactly mean "with the help of", but it suits the particular purpose you're looking for. It's a metaphoric use of lens, and conveys a more active process, as if the novel were being seen and interpreted from within Girard's theory, rather than his theory simply "shedding light on" or "illuminating" the novel. ...


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That some sentences are syntactically ambiguous is not a fundamental problem of English syntax. Context and intonation are usually enough to guide hearers in constructing the intended phrase structure (that is, non-ambiguous syntactic structure) of the spoken or written utterance. Such a process is called disambiguation, and we do it all the time. ...


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No you do not. "I'm from Greenwich, London," is the standard way to say it if you want to include the district and the city. Only reason why another word would need to be in between the two is if your audience does not know Greenwich is in London, though it is implied. In that case you would say, "I'm from Greenwich, the one in London." or "I'm from ...



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