Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

"Inserted over" shows up in many editions of this old grammar book: An Abridgement of Murray's English Grammar and Exercises: With Improvements ...enter link description here, By Lindley Murray, Joab Goldsmith Cooper. A caret, marked thus a is placed where some word or words are omitted, and which are inserted over the line, as as well as ...


1

The phrase "sorry for your loss" is only used in relation to a death. (If you used it regarding a lost camera, it would sound sarcastic, or just silly.) Regarding the situation when someone dies. 'sorry for your loss' and 'sorry about your loss' are the same, there's no difference. The first one is more formal. Regarding a lost camera you'd say "I'm ...


2

The comments to this question are excellent and, collectively, supply a strong answer to the OP's question. In trying to summarize them, let me first deal with the specific case of the friend's lost camera at the Taj Mahal. Neither I am sorry for your loss. nor I am sorry about your loss. works well in U.S. (and perhaps also in British) English ...


0

It's the following meaning of for: for preposition 6 a — used with a noun or pronoun followed by an infinitive to form an equivalent to such noun clauses as that he should, that he might for him to confess would be painful shouted the news for all to hear for you to have to pay for this is not fair here are some books for ...


0

For with verb-phrase (e.g. required for, needed for, take for, must happen for) = necessary and sufficient to produce an effect. What would it take for the pipe to be so badly corroded. Could water have done that? What would it take for you to sell me your Van Gogh? $10 million? $20 million? What things are needed for combustion to take ...


1

Neither. You are calling about or in reference to the new job. I'm calling in reference to the new job posting. Your second question is more appropriate over at Workplace.SE.


0

To call in a new job is to let someone know that there is a job for them to do (a new landscaping contract, for example). If you are talking to the potential employer, I'd recommend "I'm Frank Garrett and I'm calling to apply for position X which you posted on Thursday." If you are at your old job, someone calls about a new job, and a coworker asks who ...


1

You are calling an employer. You would say: I am calling an employer about a new job. When you are called and asked your example question, you would say: Your peer: Who is it? You: It's an employer who has a new job posting for which I applied. ..or any number of other responses to "Who is it?": It's Jane from accounting. It's someone ...


0

While studying Financial accounting, I remember always using these terms: Stock-in-hand for Stock balance. Cash-in-hand for Cash balance. Cash-at-Bank for Bank balance.



Top 50 recent answers are included