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The word order in the English language is: Subject-Verb-Objects-Manner-Place-Time + first most detailed, then more general information. Therefore, this is how I would phrase it: I have an interview with Joe Smith for an Editor II position at ACME Inc on Friday.


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For the original question's statement: My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow. Why not an article? My aunt is coming to the dinner tomorrow. Which dinner? Oh, you mean that big well-known thing. My aunt is coming to a dinner tomorrow. Oh? Is this something you're hosting? My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow. What time will she be at ...


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We often use singular nouns to represent the entire class of object they describe, rather than an individual instance of the noun. When we do so, the noun often does not take an article I love cilantro. She travels by car. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. What time do you go to work? I use soap to wash my hair. This is not ...


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I'm not a native English speaker, so I don't really know about the grammar rule behind this. However, by saying "to the dinner", it feels like the aunt will go to a specific, previously mentioned dinner. It also focuses the attention on the "setting", rather than on the action of dining. Take "My aunt went to dinner with Mary" vs "My aunt went to the dinner ...


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The confusion can arise because dinner can mean either the actual meal that is to be eaten or the event at which the food is eaten. See Cambridge Online So with a slight rewording: My aunt is coming to my dinner meal tomorrow. or My aunt is coming to attend my dinner meal tomorrow. or My aunt is coming to eat my dinner meal with me tomorrow. Based ...


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Maybe you can simply change the construction: Books are what I've most read, or, I've read more books than anything else, or, I've read mostly books. In your example, books ARE what you have read most, so I would agree that in diagrammatic reasoning most of what you've read ARE books. Of all of the various materials I've read, most ARE books. Therefore, ...


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I pointed out in a comment to the OP that they really did not want to do this, and was asked why. My answer did not fit within the designated comment-length restrictions, so I provide it here. TL;DR: Even if you do find a suitable value for XXX, no one will ever thank you for writing that “school is XXX-istically taxing on/of an individual’s time” when ...


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I'd say 'school is chronically taxing'. Chronically--Lasting for a long period of time; of long duration.


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I'm pretty sure you could get away with "durationally", but I don't think you'll get anything as specific from another word. Your best bet might be "temporally". Of course, if the alliteration of "temporally taxing" sounds too whimsical for the context, you have a whole new problem. "temporally inefficient", perhaps?


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I don't like prepositions either. Or pronouns -- especially not mixed up with auxiliary verbs. As @Edwin points out, a fronted on phrase implies a temporal frame for description of events. On/Upon asserting that the red pill would reveal how deep the rabbit hole was, Morpheus was arrested, cautioned, and bound over to the authorities. (Upon makes the ...


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'On asserting ...' here requires a main clause which does not describe a consequence or restatement, but merely an event happening (almost) simultaneously. AHDEL sense 3 for on: b. Used to indicate the particular occasion or circumstance: On entering the room, she saw him. By introduces a consequence, and in an explanation, an apposition. Here, by ...


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As others have specified, the word by is generally synonymous with no later than when referring to a date or time. However, it is important to note (and this is why I am adding another answer) that if all you know is "The work must be completed by MM-DD-YYYY", then the exact due date is still ambiguous. Without additional information, 'due by MM-DD-YYYY' ...


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Well when you say: "a map measuring 400 by 600 mm" You mean it is 400x600mm, i.e. it includes it. And for a deadline, it is the same indicating a deadline or the end of a particular time period. "I've got to do this report by Monday" synonyms: no later than, in good time for, at, before "please be there by midday" In your case, it ...



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