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The estimated results from Google Books are remarkably similar... up the aisle to the altar - about 11,200 results down the aisle to the altar - about 11,800 results ...but I think there's evidence of a slight US/UK split here. Americans invariably use toward where Brits use towards, so I think these results for AmE usage are significant... up ...


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It may be that "down the aisle" has taken the lead because "up" anything can be construed as rude. We live in a time where profanity is much more common and socially acceptable, and therefore, if you say "up" something, people aren't sure if you're attempting a double entendre. (Or, not... but it makes sense to me.) (US)


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There is a marked preference for down the aisle. See this ngram: (bride up the aisle),(bride down the aisle) I get zero hits for 'bride up the aisle' in British English. I'm thinking of the phrases "walked|accompanied|brought|took the bride ___ the aisle". And there's a marked preference for down the aisle generally: * the aisle.


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According to Ngram, "down the aisle" passed "up the aisle" in frequency of usage in the 1890s. Since then, usage of "up the aisle" has actually increased somewhat, but usage of "down the aisle" has increased more than fourfold. Of course, I have no idea what proportion of these mentions had to do with brides, nor to what extent Google Books's corpus might ...


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I would understand the phrases as follows: Second from the left: starting at the left, moving towards the right, the second person in. Second to the left: starting at the right, moving towards the left, the second person in. In other words, second to the left = second from the right.


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Let's keep this simple. When looking at a picture, the idiomatic expression is: second from the left. = Starting from the left count to the right. By itself, second to the left does not establish a definitive location. A particular point of reference must be specifically identified or clearly understood. Example: Second to my left identifies me ...


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If the people in this photo (source: Usual Suspects film) are numbered 1 to 5 from left to right, I would describe number 2 as second on the left or second from the left. That is, he is second from the left hand side of the photo. However, if you asked "Which one is dressed all in black?" you could reply "The man second to the left of number 4." In this ...


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I would say the person standing second from left.


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To my (AmE) ear, identical to sounds better. These stones are optically, chemically and physically identical to natural, mined diamonds, but they suffer from a longstanding image problem. The New York Times Generic drugs are chemically identical to brand name drugs, equally effective and prescribed for the same purposes. The Chicago Tribune This ...


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Both phrases are grammatically correct and interchangeable, to me at least. In general, it's not a good idea to refer to obscure grammar manuals to decide what is grammatical. The important question to ask is "Is the phrase recognized by native speakers of English as being grammatical?" If so, any grammar manual that says otherwise doesn't have a leg to ...



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