New answers tagged

0

It's the old argument between how people actually talk or read text, and how it SHOULD be done. I agree the commas are necessary in academic writing, but leave it out in informal for better readability.


0

It is an ambiguity only of the written representation of the language. In speech, the two meanings would receive different intonation and syntactic micro-pauses. I can't represent the intonational differences, but the phrasal units would be like this: Nellie washed ...... the dishes in the sink. [which dishes] Nellie washed the dishes.....in the sink. ...


1

I would use the phrase "study of" as in: In a study of malaria patients... "Study in" implies either the location or the broad topic (as in "The study in the building was..." or "I study in the field of..."), not the specific topic as mentioned. Regarding "In a study of adult men in participants with whooping cough...", I would delete the word "in" ...


1

I think that "study of malaria patients" is correct and that "study in malaria patients" is incorrect. You could also say "in a study about" such as "in a study about malaria patients or "in a study about elephants ..." or "in a study about the causes of violent street crimes"


1

"on" vs "in" tends to be the result of metaphor - how we understand things in terms of other things. "in" makes sense if you think of a group of people, and the team member is in the middle of that group. However, imagine writing the team names out on paper, compiling the team list. The player's name would be on the page, and if the page defines the team ...


0

Some comments to this effect have already been made, but I'd like to build on them. Both forms are grammatically correct. In formal written English, the "rather" form looks more elegant. I would suggest that the elegance argument is less important than the flow of the sentence. Your sentence is already a short one, and without the flow of text before and ...


1

Number three is the only one that is acceptable when putting something in writing. Number one is not only okay when speaking, but is probably better, as it sounds more casual and less stuffy.


2

"from" is not used with 'ask a question'. The normal usage is "ask a question", but you can also say "ask a question of". So: What questions do they ask a communication trainer? What questions do they ask of a communication trainer? are both OK. Some variants allowed are: What questions do they pose to a communication trainer? What ...


1

You can always arrange the phrase so that the preposition is not at the end of the sentence, although you have to be the judge of whether the result sounds fine or overly complicated. In fact, many would consider sentence 3 the only "correct" option, because it does not end with the preposition. In reality, the usage in #1 is completely fine, just not very ...


1

It actually depends on the context of the sentence. In everyday spoken English example 1 is fine. In professional/academic written English example 3 is, in my opinion, the best choice. I agree that example 2 is incomplete.


1

Grammatically, it is wrong to assume that a preposition should always be followed by nouns (or noun phrases), clauses or gerunds. It could be followed by a prepositional phrase. For example: From behind the cloud appeared the sun. In the above sentence, both "from" and "behind" are prepositions and "behind the cloud" is a prepositional phrase ...


0

How about generally suggests a proposed answer to a question. To answer the question, when would you like to go to the museum, one could say either Sunday or on Sunday. Therefore, one might also say how about Sunday? or how about on Sunday?


5

As you've discovered, the ordinary order of English declarative sentences is subject first, verb following, but there are a number of rhetorical or informatic reasons to invert that order. One is that speakers tend to put old information before new information, and another is that speakers prefer to place weightier (i.e., more grammatically-complicated) ...



Top 50 recent answers are included