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In my view "to insert sth over sth" is a bit curious as the Latin verb in-ser-ere (from series row) means to put sth in a row. But if the usage to insert over has become common in certain areas one can't help it. But I think English has a lot of better alternatives for to insert over.


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Colloquially, at a disco, I would say "Tonight I'm gonna dance my problems off." From Google Books "Why don't you put on some music and dance off your excess energy?"


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Well, I think grammarians are going to have various opinions, but the Oxford English Dictionary thinks these are both nouns. Or, more precisely, they are adjectives used as "absolute" constructions which omit the noun they reference implicitly, somewhat similarly to a process where we use an adjective as a substantive, like referring to the weak when we mean ...


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In short is an idiom, and idioms cannot be broken down to into their constituents. From oxford The same goes for in brief


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Don't throw the cigarette butts away in the trash bin. In your first example, "in the trash bin" is a complement to the verb "throw"; it's not adjectival. If "away" were moved to the end, "Don't throw the cigarette butts in the trash bin away", "in the trash bin" would be interpreted as a modifier of "cigarette butts", but that's not possible in the ...


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"Mr. XYZ's contact" could be taken to mean someone with whom Mr. XYZ is in contact. "contact to" is redundant in any usage, whether verb or noun. "contact on" makes no sense. Perhaps one might use "contact for", as an elision of "the contact information for". (This is assuming the student was sending, to someone else, the contact information for Mr ...


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'Seeking an answer' since 'seeking ' means 'looking for'.



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