Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

This, that, etc. are demonstrative pronouns and thus don't have genitive forms. The genitive case would be attached to the noun that you are demonstrating, e.g. "This thing's colour." That isn't to say it wouldn't make sense to have genitive forms of demonstrative pronouns - their usage would be fairly niche - just they're not currently a feature of the ...


4

If Alex and Jen are marrying each other, then it is "Alex and Jen's wedding". If somehow they are marrying two other people, then it is "Alex's and Jen's wedding". This distinction becomes more significant when the possession is also plural. Alex and Jen's cats are the cats owned jointly by Alex and Jen. Alex's and Jen's cats are the cat or cats owned by ...


3

The MLA Handbook doesn't specify behavior here, and this article seems to suggest other style guides don't either. In general, you should try to reword the sentence to not require such an awkward structure.


2

No. In The Syntactic Phenomena of English, McCawley uses this fact to construct examples illustrating his proposal that the purpose of syntactic transformations is to fit logical forms into the surface requirements of English, one of which is that all the words must be permitted by the English morphological system. If you find yourself wanting to say ...


1

I would use the simpler "plugin options". Computer jargon very rarely uses possessives; it prefers to stack noun after noun, using almost any noun as an adjective.


1

There are no problems with the sentence "Due to his poor memory, Richard forgot about the appointment". The other sentence, "Due to Richard's poor memory, he forgot about the appointment" contains a possessive antecedent (Richard's poor memory), which has offended some prescriptivists. Wikipedia has a short entry on the possessive antecedent and why some ...


1

Disclaimer: English is not my native language, although I live in the U.S. Personally, I would write it as the decimal expansion of the first generalized Euler constant But I believe this is not the only acceptable way. I see no problems while reading the decimal expansion of the first generalized Euler's constant But dropping "the" before ...


1

There doesn't appear to be a universal consensus on this point. I would suggest that the OP chooses the form he or she prefers and remain faithful to that. CDO life's work noun [U] (US lifework) Your life's work is the work that is most important to you and to which you give a lot of time and effort: Her garden was her life's work Without ...


1

I can see that what you are trying to do is use the plural and yet also apply the possessive. When a word ending with "s" is possessive, just add an apostrophe to the end of the word. Here is a quote from http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/apostrophes/apostrophes-with-words-ending-in-s/ Rule 2: To show plural possession of a word ending in an s or s ...


1

I checked the BNC (British National Corpus), and found the example: ...but he had been a frequent visitor at the Stevenses' home... I think you can use both variants. In one way, you can leave Rogers or modify to Rogerses because Rogers is already carries in a way the plural meaning as it is the family, which consists of several persons, name. Rogers ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible