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40

Both are fine. However, the first response is the most common way to answer. Very empathetic people might say my mum. Turn the sentence around; would you say "I'd apologize to your mum if I were you" or "I'd apologize to my mum if I were you"? Probably the former. If I were you, I'd... is a common way to give someone advice; it is not meant to be ...


26

You offended your mom. So if I were you, I would apologize to your mom when she gets home. But: You offended my mom. So if I were you, I would apologize to my mom when she gets home.


17

Over the years I've converted to the belief that what is important in language and grammar is that the communication is not unintentionally ambiguous, not that it satisfies any formal criterion. Whether you say your mum or my mum, no one is going to be confused by what you mean. So use whichever feels right to you. Compare to A: I just spent $5 on the ...


12

Formal correctness is the wrong test in this case. The problem is that the referent is ambiguous -- are we speaking from within the conditional, or from outside it? "My mum" is interpreted differently in the two cases, since the meaning of "my" changes. "Your mum" is clear no matter which case one chooses. Whether I am you or not, your mum remains your ...


6

Your examples use nouns that are used to modify other nouns (attributive nouns). Possessive (also called Saxon Genitive) constructions, on the other hand, show possession. "a hotel's room" - a room belonging to a hotel "a hotel room" - a specific type of room, somehow related to hotels (in this case also usually belonging to the hotel but that is not ...


6

Insisting on a genitive pronoun (my, his) + noun in such constructions would be sheer pedantry, but in practice we do overwhelmingly prefer it to the simple pronoun (me, him) + verb... It's worth homing in on that "flatline" above... What those charts show is that although there's still a marked preference for the genitive, the usage is in fact ...


4

"Johnny's's" is not correct. In fact, I think there probably isn't a correct way to use the Saxon genitive here. There are several ways to express the sentiment though: How is the pasta at Johnny's How is Johnny's restaurant's pasta? How is Johnny's pasta? This last one is interesting. It can be interpreted two different ways. Either you are breaking out ...


3

If you were me, you'd answer your question thusly: "My mom" is grammatically correct -- I ... my. As to which one is clearer to the listener, depends on the context. If there were possible ambiguity as to whether your mom or my mom potentially deserved an apology, "your" removes any such ambiguity. Having had 2 parents with English PhDs, one an English ...


3

"Theirs not to" here seems to mean "their job is not to", or "it does not fall to them to" or "it's not their responsibility to" If we take the original: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die: and rephrase it slightly: Their job is not to make reply, Their job is not to reason why, Their job is ...


2

"my" is correct. "your" conveys the message but could lead to ambiguity in some circumstances. Imagine you have a custom that requires you to touch the tip of your nose while apologizing. Then what would you do? I would touch "my" nose and apologize to "my" mom. Besides, if I were "you", there is no "you" any longer, and no "your" mom either. There is ...


1

It would be "I have included Linda's and my suggestions in the file." The trick is to simplify. Separately you would write: "I have included my suggestions in the file." and "I have included Linda's suggestions in the file." Since the same rules apply in combination, either "my and Linda's", or "Linda's and my" are correct. "Both" is optional before ...


1

They are both correct, but most people would say Google's car in everyday speech. This is usually used with particular things which are possessed by named people/companies/countries etc John's car Anne's job Britain's coast America's mountains Thus: "Let's go in John's car" but never "Let's go in the car of John." However, you could use it for ...


1

First start by referring to the linked question (possible duplicate). The singular use of philosophy suggests that this is a shared (or joint) possession and only the final possessive inflection should be used. If they are actually distinct philosophies, then you should show the possessive inflection for both, but philosophy should be pluralized, also.



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