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6

When "today's" is taken to be a possessive rather than a contraction of "today is", the construction "My today's breakfast" is not grammatical. It is possible to interpret it as meaning the same as "The breakfast I eat today", but this interpretation is only possible after a pragmatic re-interpretation. "today's" is not occurring in this construction as ...


4

Followee A person who is being tracked on a social media website or application. (Oxford Dictionary) One who is followed (has his/her posts monitored by another user). (Wiktionary)


4

Depends on whom you ask! Some grammarians say, "If the extra apostrophe s ('s) makes the word difficult to say, then drop it and stick with just an apostrophe ('). That makes sense to me, especially with words such as Moses's roles as leader, prophet, lawgiver . . .. Jesus's words of wisdom . . .. These two leases's conditions state ...


3

It's a shortened version of "A friend of Steven's friends". That is, one of the set of people who are friends of Steven.


3

The NP answer is correct. Your objections to it are no good. The Pandora's box argument doesn't make sense -- just because an adverb immediately precedes a noun and there is nothing else in the NP, this doesn't mean the adverb modifies the noun. That is what your argument assumes, and it is just not so. In such cases, the adverb modifies only the NP and ...


3

According to Jack Lynch, whose book The English Language: A User's Guide is well worth the modest investment for those without the patience to deal with the OED or Fowler, Many people get spooked by the plurals of proper names, but the rules aren't that different...The only difference between proper and common nouns is that the proper names ending in -y ...


3

There is a degree of ambivalence between Huygens' and Huygens's. The Chicago Manual of Style says that either may be used, whereas Professor Strunk (The Elements of Style) insists it is Huygens's. I personally prefer Huygens's, as it seems to more explicitly indicate the possessive. Your mileage may differ. See Wikipedia on English possessive.


1

The work is mostly Kim's. The work is mostly mine. The victory was almost Kim's. The victory was almost hers. Not every adverb that appears before a noun phrase is modifying that noun phrase There are two issues here. The first is that because an adverb happens to occur before a particular word, it doesn't mean it is modifying it. If an ...


1

The answer depends upon what you wish to convey. They do mean different things. 'Directory path' is a compound noun. 'Path' is the main word and 'directory' is a modifier. If you are talking about the full path of a file for example, you could say, "Be sure to specify the full directory path when saving." If you are describing the path as a ...


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The question in your title is already addressed elsewhere, e.g. the site Rathony mentioned in comments (here and there). This answer addresses the ambiguity between the two sets of Jesses. Words that look the same on the printed page but differ in meaning are called homographs. The inherent ambiguity is part of its nature - they won't be homographs ...



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