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2

Bryan Garner addresses this, asking "How does one make a possessive of the noun McDonald's? Literally, it would be McDonald's's, as in Try McDonald's's dinner combos! But good phrasing requires the dinner combos at McDonald's. It is also quite defensible to write McDonald's dinner combos, with the name functioning as a possessive." At the magazine where I ...


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The matter of asylum seekers and their treatment is a current and sensitive topic. This answer comments only on the English construction of the phrases suggested, without commenting on the issue itself. Your three terms refer to children, but not in exactly the same way. As @HotLicks mentions, "children of asylum seekers" is the clearest of the terms you ...


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Like all punctuation questions, this one   a. has no clear answer, since "the vast individual differences in punctuation of English suggest       that writers use a multitude of contradictory rules in their punctuation; and that there is no       reason to expect this situation to change soon."     ...


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As your last sentence says, 1), which has door as the only noun to which it can strictly refer, would be mistaken - if English had to be fed through a compiler that checked for syntax errors. In reality, the purpose of language is to communicate ideas, so no native speaker would bat an eyelid.


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"I could see the possessive ’s applying to the whole phrase" You are right. This is normal idiomatic English. Like "the girl I used to go with's father".


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If you are talking about the leg of a specific table or the radio of a specific car then it's "the table's leg" or "the car's radio". If you are talking about a leg or a radio, and you want to qualify its type, you say "the table leg" or "the car radio". In the first case you're talking about something that "belongs" to something else. In the second ...



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