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5

I believe that this can be classified as an attempt at Solecism, or, in a nutshell, intentionally mucking up grammatical conventions to make a point. The view the author holds is that no religion or belief can claim to have influenced the love a mother has for her child... it's simply mother love. The author is using "mother love" as a term to distinguish ...


4

...it is mother love." Is it possible to express "mother love" as it is? Shouldn't the word 'mother' be subjected to Possessive case and make it "mother's" love? Or is it just a proofing error? It is not a mistake, actually it is the correct form: the Saxon genitive, as you say, is used to express the 'possevive case', that means that 'the person ...


3

One of the guys is one guy among a group of the guys. Adding an apostrophe forms the possessive plural guys': One of the guys' swords The word guys' is possessive plural, and the meaning of the sentence is ambiguous, depending on whether one modifies swords or guys: One sword from a group of swords belonging to the guys. Or The swords ...


1

The subject is the noun phrase: You telling me that my question asking abilities are poor Where the crucial noun is the gerund telling. Some grammar sticklers would say that for this to be correct it would have to read Your telling...


1

The treatment of plural possessive Drs. Smith and that of attorneys general ought to be about the same. (Although the hyphenated British version is probably not applicable) The site Above The Law has some useful advice for the latter: In short they say, "Don't do it- rewrite it.": In American English, attorneys general is the correct plural form. The ...


1

I'm going to make an educated guess, which isn't necessarily the best option but: Technically, if you rewrite the phrase, you get: The house belongs to the Drs. Smith. Smith is singular, so the possessive form would be: The Drs. Smith's house. Similarly, if the sentence was: The house belongs to Drs. Joe and Jane Smith. The possessive ...


1

It depends how many loved ones there are. If just one then one's, if more than one then ones' Although the latter does look odd to my eyes too, I often find words, if you stare at them too long, look (and sound), odd! (Their does not influence this part of the sentence)


1

The traditional expression is "a mother's love". The writer probably wrote "mother love" because English wasn't their first language, and they just decided to use "mother" to describe this unique and well-known form of love. Since the meaning's clear, I'd let them off the hook and afford them a bit of creative license. As for "mother" not being an ...


1

While this presentation of a type of love is nowhere near common, and you are correct that it would normally be presented as a possessive ("a mother's love"), it is not wrong. The use of "mother" as a nominal adjective is certainly used regularly in other phrases ("a mother hen", "the mother Earth", "a mother tongue"), so to attempt to use "mother" to ...


1

No, because "The love of a mother is a mother's love" is tautological, i.e. an empty assertion, while "The love of a mother is mother love" is not empty, so "a mother's love" and "mother love" can't mean the same. (I supplied the "a" in "a mother's love, because without the "a", I find the sentence ungrammatical.) Grammatically, "mother love" is noun, ...



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