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4

Setting the title in italics, which is not unusual, would solve the problem: Press Heavenwards!’s exclamation mark gives away a Godspeed influence. If setting in italics is not an option, perhaps because of your house style, then the quotation marks collide with the necessary apostrophe, as you've noted. It’s also likely that that sentence would be ...


3

Most commonly, the apostrophe AND the letter "s" are omitted, as seen in the following organisations, among others: National Parkinson Foundation American Parkinson Disease Association Huntington Society of Canada In some other cases, the apostrophe is used, as in "Northwest Parkinson's Foundation". Generally, "Parkinsons Foundation" is not used.


2

Today the store's full and proper name is Tiffany & Company; however, its original name in 1837 was Tiffany, Young and Ellis which was shortened to Tiffany & Company in 1853. Colloquially, the store is often referred to as Tiffany's, in speech (TIF-uh-nees; or /ˈtɪfəniz/ ) and in writing. The use of the apostrophe was often a trait or a type of ...


1

An apostrophe after a closed parenthesis is definitely wrong if you are asking about English, although I can't say anything about legal conventions, which are often weird, so I'm answering about English. You make the sentence correct without the parenthetical phrase: "Plantiffs' Interrogatories". Then you add the parenthetical phrase. Since you're saying ...


1

I think this sentence construct is acceptable whenever it is obvious what the noun being referred to is and the ownership is clear. The party was at my Mom's, We celebrated my birthday at my Mum's. Here, it is obvious that the party was at your mother's place of residence, e.g., we know it is some kind of residence and we know your mother lives there. ...


1

Names ending in s get their apostrophe welded on at the end. The correct answer is Jenkins'. Noting occasional stray errors in a Wikipedia page that otherwise gets it correct, or how people say it aloud, is interesting but beside the point. The rule is simple and has nothing to do with how people say things out loud (written English is not subjugate to ...


1

Your first usage is incorrect. The journal's needs is a plural noun. It seems as if you're looking to use need as a verb. Furthermore, your parallel sentence structure sounds awkward with both a noun and an infinitive. Choose one and then have them both conform: The journal needs "impact" and hot topics. Or The journal needs to be impactful and to ...


1

The (US) National Down Syndrome Society has a 'Preferred Language Guide' on their web site that says in part: Down vs. Down's - NDSS uses the preferred spelling, Down syndrome, rather than Down's syndrome ... This is because an "apostrophe s" connotes ownership or possession. Down syndrome is named for the English physician John Langdon Down, who ...



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