New answers tagged

0

I would say this is not quite right, although perhaps grammatically sound. When you say "as X as I am", you are setting up for a situation in which you actually go against X. For example: As perfectionist as I am, I often take shortcuts when cooking. So you're saying that despite being perfectionist, in some situations you go against that tendency. ...


0

After some research, I conclude that it depends on the context. I got here from searching “what does it mean when the brakeman rings his bell?” after listening to these lyrics of Night Flight by Led Zeppelin: Please Mr. Brakeman, won't you ring your bell. And ring loud and clear Please Mr. Fireman, won't you ring your bell Tell the people they got to ...


2

Since the turn "belongs" to the English edition, so to speak, I would indicate the possessive with an apostrophe-s added to "edition." Also, since the second clause of the sentence is independent (it has a subject, it, and a verb, is), you need a comma after "Arabic." So you have: I read this novel four times in Arabic, and now it's the English edition'...


-2

States parties is a term of art in public international law. It refers to the states that have signed a particular treaty. For example: states parties to the Treaty of Versailles. It may not make sense from a purely grammatical perspective, but it is regularly used in international law. The first and second options are not commonly used in international ...


0

The word possessive is typically applied to a person who, from a desire for control, rather than from true affection or love, attempts to assert ownership or dominance over another person. possessive: - wanting all of someone's attention and love - manifesting possession or the desire to own or dominate http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/...


4

There is absolutely positively completely nothing wrong grammatically with ending a sentence with a preposition. This was a bogus rule made up by grammarians to sell grammar books, and ignores the way Germanic languages work. Some people cling to the rule, but it is a question of style, not grammar. Furthermore, used to has become, in practice, a lexical ...


5

There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


11

The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...


1

The opposite of a Pyrrhic victory is an Irenic victory. Pyrrhic is about victory at all or every cost. An Irenic victory is not so much about victory but resolution for both sides. It strives NOT to have winners or losers. Irenic comes from the Greek word for peace.


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It comes from the novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe: man Friday n. pl. men Friday or men Fridays An efficient, faithful male aide or employee. [After Friday, a character in Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe.] From the Free Dictionary online. Also, from Wikipedia: Friday is one of the main characters of Daniel Defoe's 1719 novel ...


0

A scientist, Gives information to the subject "he" So I think it's not an absolute phrase but an appositive phrase since it does not add information to the entire sentence.


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The commas in this situation show a kind of side note to give the reader more information and thus helping the reader understand the entire situation. It's as if to give additional information in the middle of the sentence. This is very normal and a typical use of commas. Here are two examples given side by side. Jon and Kathy had a serious ...


0

In the example sentence structure, the comma in question is not the usual stand-alone comma (pause-indicator punctuation), but part of a pair of commas forming a delimiter for a parenthetical phrase: However, it should be noted that, at extremely high or low levels of anxiety, the data for sick role and for preventive health behaviors are similar; &...


0

If we provide a convenience, like superstores (Walmart etc) or an online bookseller, but that causes the usual channels to fail, we end up with a world where only the one possibility is available, and the others cannot re-arise. It makes for a narrower, less interesting world. Eventually, even places like Paris might wind up with lots of closed storefronts ...


10

No. This would imply that "rescue" is a form of transport - akin to saying "flown to a safe place" or "driven to a safe place". While driving and flying may form part of the rescue, they are not part of the definition of the word rescue, which involves changing someone's situation from "being in danger" to "being safe". The actual act of rescue might ...


4

According to World Wide Words the origin of go west — meaning to die, perish, or disappear is related to the idea of the sunset, as a figurative image of death: Go west seems anciently to be connected with the direction of the setting sun, symbolising the end of the day and so figuratively the end of one’s life. Going west has been linked to dying ...


3

This is often referred to as a permanent loan A form of loan agreement in which an individual, trust, or company loans artwork or other objects to a museum for an extended period of time. The loan agreement may stipulate that the museum must display the loaned artwork in a specific area of the museum, that the artwork is to be displayed as part ...


0

In present-day idiomatic English it is usually: Still/Yet more can be done. Your variant in the title of your question would be easily understood and is grammatically correct, however it has a slight archaic/poetic feel: More can be done yet. [The "yet" adverbially modifies the whole sentence.] Your second variant is grammatically incorrect: (...


1

In addition to the answer above: stretch myself, learn something new, explore different options, expand myself. I don't know which if any of those would be good for your application, though. Thing is, I'm certain the person reading your application won't believe that's why you did it (to stretch outside your comfort zone). You tried a different career ...


2

I felt I needed to broaden my horizons. broaden/widen somebody's horizons to increase the range of things that someone knows about, has experienced, or is able to do This trip to the Far East has certainly broadened our family's horizons. Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed.


0

The verb "to find" can be either simply or complexly transitive.  That is to say, in the active voice, it can take a direct object as its sole argument or it can take a pair of arguments, that pair being an object and its complement.  The original sentence has a simply transitive "found".  The direct object is a content clause.  ...


0

Thanks all! Here is a breakdown of the 13 answers I've recieved from native speakers: 4 for the Supersonic, 5 for The Grand Adventure, 1 for either the Supersonic or Grand Adventure, 2 with no answer, and 1 with the Roadmaster. 3 of the 4 respondents who chose the Supersonic also mitigated their answer with things such as "avoid ambiguity/weird ...


0

There are multiple meanings to this idiom. There is "on a winning streak" which I take to be meant by your quote and also "drunk"/"on a drunken spree", both of which have already been described. However, I have also heard this phrase used to mean something more like "ranting and raving" or "righteously indignant". (I would pronounce "tear" in this usage to ...


1

A recent study found that posting photos of oneself correlates with lower levels of intimacy. This sentence has a declarative content clause as the Complement of the verb find: that posting photos of oneself correlates with lower levels of intimacy. In English we do not like to use declarative content clauses as Subjects. They usually sound awkward and ...


-1

I always believed it was "on a tare" referring to empty trucks (at tare weight) that have delivered their loads and are now barreling down the highway towards home, not struggling with hills and curves, full speed ahead.


0

I'd like to add one suggestion to Colin's answer: preferably you'd use "task list" instead of "tasks list" form. See the following thread for reference: should a list of tokens be called a "token list" or a "tokens list"


1

I reckon it's (3) the Supersonic and here's why. Some people are saying there's ambiguity in "soon" and I agree but I think ambiguity could also lie in "available": Whom exactly are we waiting for it to be available to? The Supersonic will be available to the car salesman immediately, but to the man and woman soon. So the question is: Is the question ...


1

I'm never clear what people mean by "correct", but the word is "birthday" (one word). I have never heard "birth anniversary"; but looking on GloWbE, I see that it does occur 495 times (as aginst 62005 for "birthday"). Looking further at those 495 instances, I see that 202 are from Indian sites, 94 from Bangla Desh, and nearly all the rest are from Sri ...


0

Resorting to criminality. This amounts to another way of saying the same thing.


0

In the south, we say "you catch more flies with honey than vinegar!" While that isn't exactly related - I think it'll help people understand the meaning of the phrase "cut you off with honey", better. The phrase with flies/honey/vinegar is easy to picture, right? Imagine a syrupy plate of honey in summer - it'd be covered with flies! Not so much for a ...


2

Pictograms A pictorial symbol for a word or phrase. Pictographs were used as the earliest known form of writing, examples having been discovered in Egypt and Mesopotamia from before 3000 BC. Note: The answer given by @vickyace is still technically correct as pictograms, or pictographs, are a form of ideographs/ideograms.


2

"Integral to" is what I would say and expect to hear. Ngram says that's about eight times as common as "integral in" in modern English, and it's the form the several online dictionaries use in their preposition-containing examples. For example: necessary to the completeness of the whole: This point is integral to his plan. (Dictionary.com; ...


2

Not exact but close enough,see ideography. thefreedictionary.com The use of ideograms (see definition) or logograms (see definition) to express ideas.


1

A word may be defined in more than one way or may have usage in more than one sense. Explaining a word further with the phrase as in is to provide an example case where the meaning of the word is easily understood and thus acts to guide the reader. In the instant case, … “protect”. As in protecting our religion. … explains ...


1

Sequitur — M-W the conclusion of an inference "a reasonable sequitur from that announcement is that you'll be leaving the company"


0

"As" is a conjunction and "in" is a preposition. "X as in Y" could be short for many different clauses as follows: as (X is meant) in Y as (they mean X) in Y as (X is used to mean X) in Y as (X could be synonymous with Y) in Y, etc. The clauses in the parentheses could be understood contextually and there is no need to write them. "As ...


3

Innate or congenital would fit (somewhat), but I don't like them much here. Intrinsic might work fairly well, but it's not really opposite "acquired". Congenital is; I just don't really like it for this use. I might go with natural, which has the dubious bonus of being a weak musical pun ("see sharp or be flat!"). That said, I'm not sure that Trance is ...


2

It means that instead of being passively affected by an emotion, you have to make it yours. You have to fully integrate it into your being, and not be a slave of it. Introspection is a concept that is quite connected to this one too. This is a rather philosophical matter so we won't discuss about it too much on this section, but an Own your emotions Google ...


1

This might be regional in application, but consider the invitation, "Cuppa tea?". In times of crisis, there is nothing like a nice soothing cup of tea. - dailymail The findings reveal that even a single cup of tea can significantly reduce anxiety levels after suffering a stressful experience – and in some cases, make people calmer than they were before. - ...


5

You could use take a chill pill. See definition at ODO A notional pill taken to make a person calm down or relax. As a verb take a chil pill means calm down. See dictionary.com.


0

Going above and beyond the call of duty is fairly common, as is Doing more than his fair share


2

I read this as, "[if you] don't, somebody is sure[ly] going to to take her away from you." The word "sure" used as an adverb to "going"; the basic meaning is unchanged if you omit it. Therefore, "don't somebody sure" isn't a phrase with a meaning in its own right, as illustrated by Colin Fine's example in the comments, above.


1

If you want to keep it colloquial you could consider thanks for stepping up [...] or thanks for picking up the slack [...]


1

If you are not sure about a phrase, it is better not to use it. I don't think using to "pull a lot of weight" could be misinterpreted in your example. However, to pull one's weight doesn't necessarily mean to help you while you are busy. As the link shows, it means to do one's share in a common task and it is usually used in a negative sentence as the below ...


1

go the extra mile (also walk the extra mile) — TFD Definition: to do more than one is required to do to reach a goal; to make more effort than is expected of you. Example: I like doing business with that company. They always go the extra mile. So you could say: Thanks to X for going the extra mile for me doing Y while I was busy


3

A drinking buddy: some one who is almost always there when you drink. From A West Texas Soapbox: My best drinking buddy, Mike Cronin, laughed and said that Sanderson had the aesthetic of a plumber. The expression has been used from the '50s (Ngram)


2

It is not about what is common per se but what is correct. The difference between I have been wanting to go there and I have wanted to go there is that the continuous form of the present perfect focuses on a process, something that has been happening over a recent period of time, while the simple form focuses on the end result of something that happened. ...


0

Left field in baseball is a very busy place with a lot of hit baseballs going there due to the majority of batters being right handed and tending to pull the ball that direction. So things going into left field are common. A natural contradiction is that things coming out of left field would be very unusual and unexpected. Thus the saying. PB



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