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Consider “nirvana plan”. From en.wiktionary, nirvana means (Buddhism) complete cessation of suffering; a blissful state attained through realization of sunyata; enlightened experience. (non-Buddhist colloquial usage) state of paradise; heightened or great pleasure.


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You have nothing to fear if you have nothing to hide. The phrase - widely used in discussions of Internet security and uttered by Pius Thicknesse in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - is most commonly attributed to Joseph Goebbels in 1933. However, there is an earlier precedent. Upton Sinclair used an inverted version in 1918 in The Profits of ...


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I had always assumed that the water referred to was the water of baptism -- the tie which binds Christians to one another in the Christian community -- and the blood is the 'blood tie' -- the relationship we have by virtue of (what we now know as) our genetic heritage. It's saying that, when it comes to the crunch, our family responsibilities and ...


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Perhaps the phrase started before the great dispute between the two City Livery Companies the MERCHANT TAYLORS and the SKINNERS'COMPANy, but this history is probably the most reliable It was a royal requirement that the Mayor of the City should process from the City of London to the City of Westminster(seat of the monarchy) each year to present himself to ...


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I think both of them are awkward, if not wrong. A better, IMHO, phrasing can be: I am one of your millions of great fans. or I am a great fan of yours, amongst millions of others. or I am a bigger fan of yours than the million others you have.


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Definition 2.1 at ODO is: Perceive (the difference between one person or thing and another): I can’t tell the difference between margarine and butter This is the sense that's used in tell them apart.


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So that and such that are synonymous in this context. However, such is more formal, and commonly appears in mathematics (e.g. "The set of all prime numbers p such that p+2 is also prime"), while so is less formal and more likely to appear in (say) a DIY instruction manual. Avoid "in a way that"; it's wordy and feels clumsy to me.


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Here's a sentence from Wikipedia describing Kafka's novels: Dark and at times surreal, the novel is focused on alienation, bureaucracy, the seemingly endless frustrations of man's attempts to stand against the system, and the futile and hopeless pursuit of an unobtainable goal. Also Kafkaesque has become an adjective Kafka's writing has inspired ...


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I think you are referring to the strategy a business has regarding the: customer retention rate: is the key factor to determining how good your customer service is and how quickly you can grow your business. If you can get the formula right, you can start retaining more customers, which will lead to strong business growth. The kind of business ...


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An idiom is nothing more than a very common phrase or speech pattern. The phrase you mention is not an idiom. Merry xmas!


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"Don't rock the boat" is a well-known (in the US, at least) phrase meaning "Don't ask too many questions or be too assertive," lest you cause your current endeavor to fail. Adding "there will be waves", while not a common expression, is readily understood to mean that "rocking the boat" could not only damage the current endeavor but could cause consequences ...


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The phrase straight from Kafka may not be an established idiom per se, but in an X straight from Y could be considered idiomatic. The phrase essentially means reminiscent of or according to the school of. Check out this excerpt from a ballet review: The Age of Anxiety is based upon the 1946 poem by W H Auden, depicting the lives of four New Yorkers who ...


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"Straight from Kafka" is a metaphor. metaphor - "a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them (as in drowning in money)" Merriam-Webster Edit - No, "straight from Kafka" isn't an idiom. It's a figure of speech meaning that a certain ...


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I'd like to add an answer to the several good ones here to point out a slight distinction between the title and body of your question. It's fairly common parlance to refer to stereotypes as myths, but there are certainly many myths which are certainly not stereotypes. Consider the myth, or old wives' tale that: Toast always lands buttered side down! ...


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"in scenarios that come straight from Kafka" is not an idiom, and I will leave the matter of Kafka and cultural reference to others, but I think your question is a reasonable one and I'd like to point out that the phrase in question actually contains something that can be used idiomatically, in a sense, and that is the following phrasal template: "come ...


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It's not an idiom, it's a literary reference. Saying something comes "straight from Kafka" implies it is dark and disturbing to the point of being surreal. Franz Kafka was a Bohemian (Czech) writer who wrote strange stories of the grotesque and terrifying. In his most famous, Metamorphosis, the protagonist is inexplicably transformed into a gigantic bug ...


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It means that actions have consequences.


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Probably the reason in that the expression became popular in the US in the mid sixties where 'a skeleton in the closet' is the more common expression between the two as shown in: Ngram AmE: a skeleton in the closet vs a skeleton in the cupboard. From The Phrase Finder: The phrase 'a skeleton in the closet' was coined in England in the 19th century. ...


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Disabuse - to show or convince someone that a belief is incorrect http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disabuse http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/disabuse


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This is almost definitely a regional phrase. I live in Lawrence, Kansas, where John Brown was active and is a local cult hero. His face appears in pictures in bars, paintings in most prominent buildings, and plastered on t-shirts and bumper stickers. I have never heard this phrase in my life.


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Is there an actual calendar of virtues somewhere with specific virtues listed? Yes. 'Calendar' is an archaic word for a list of any kind (see FumbleFingers's comment). Greek and early Christian moral philosophy was based on the notion that there were certain virtues a person should aspire too. Modern academics typically call them "catalogs". Plato, ...


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The buzz is the sound of many people talking about something, it's a playful slang idiom that generally means something is the subject of positive rumors. "Living up to the buzz" is indeed fulfilling expectations --the expectations created by those rumors. In this case, the phrase is used especially because bees also make a buzzing sound.


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According to the Dick Gregory short story "Shame," in the 1930's the Negro payday was on Thursday, so the eagle (dollar coins) flew on Friday - they had money to buy food, a little booze, gamble a bit. Eva Cassidy also uses the phrase in "Stormy Monday" on her album Live at Blues Alley.


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Sadly these phrases mean nothing on their own and are always contextual. "It's all downhill from here." can be used in the sense that a journey will become easier (as travelling down a hill is easier), however, it can also be used in a negative context to alluding to moving to a lower position. Similarly, "uphill" can be used to mean that difficultly and ...


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I'm assuming you're referring to the Madonna song "Let It Will Be". First off, songs are not a reliable source for grammatically accurate English. You won't find a native speaker that thinks "let it will be" is good grammar. Most likely, Madonna is using "let it will be" as a corruption of "let it be." The refrain: That it will be Just let it be Oh ...


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If you face an uphill battle, you are marching against gravity. This would be more difficult. Hence, When I was your age, I walked fifteen miles to school, through the snow, uphill, both ways! (Warning: hyperlink goes to TV Tropes, where you will lose track of time.)


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Based on Digital Chris's Norma comment and my guess that the positive version is he most commonly used, it seems probable that: "It's all downhill from here!" means things will only get better. "It's all uphill from here!" means things will only get worst.


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Well, I think uphill is representitive of getting a better vantage point perhaps. And I think downhil could signify things getting worse, darker, less clear.


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I believe the term linguaphile is possibly the closest single-word description. It embraces the extreme care, attention and dedication that are described - http://www.thefreedictionary.com/linguaphile.


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The other answers have provided nouns referring to "a love of language" and verbs denoting "pampering," so I'd like to provide some adjectives that I believe convey the "extreme care and attention" (and thus, one might say, the "devotion") to which you refer in your question: fastidious: very attentive to and concerned about accuracy and detail. "He ...


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Per Hatchet Jobs and Hardball: The Oxford Dictionary of American Political Slang edited by Grant Barrett (Oxford University Press, 2004), it refers to a hanged abolitionist and is an alternative for 'damned'.


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About treatment of words or a language .... Glossophilia is a love of language, be it foreign or native. The term refers to people with a love for language and the structure of language.


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Nurture could take the place of pamper without its rather negative connotations. VERB [WITH OBJECT] 1 Care for and protect (someone or something) while it is growing: 1.1 Help or encourage the development of: 1.2 Cherish (a hope, belief, or ambition): NOUN 1 The process of caring for and encouraging the growth or ...


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Logophilia: The love of words. Logophile: (from TFD) One who appreciates and enjoys words. Someone who loves words is called a logophile. Despite there being quite a few of us word-lovers, logophile is not common enough to find its way into most dictionaries. Logophile comes from two Greek roots--logos, meaning "speech, ...


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to refute a myth to refute: Prove (a statement or theory) to be wrong or false; disprove. OxfordDictionaries.com A simple google search shows that to refute a myth is indeed actually used widely enough. It is also used in books, as seen in this Google Ngram Viewer (which also shows how the phrase compares with the more popular to debunk a myth). ...


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In the context of explaining what has been taught in greater detail, consider expound: 2 : to explain by setting forth in careful and often elaborate detail <expound a law> (Source: Merriam-Webster) It could be used in your context in this way: In this class, I shall expound the knowledge you have learned from your prerequisite courses.


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Mythbusting Only nerds will understand this reference to the TV show Mythbusters, but this could be suitable depending on your audience. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters


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The verb sour can describe the deterioration of a relationship. Example from a Cambridge dictionary: This affair has soured relations between the two countries.


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Deterioration is widely used to describe relationships that fall apart as time wears on. (Disintegration is also used, but not as widely.) [Ngram] Deterioration, noun: the act or process of deteriorating. the state or condition of having deteriorated. a gradual decline, as in quality, serviceability, or vigor. Examples: This Brutal Anecdote Reveals ...


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The relationship became humdrum Oxford Dictionaries define it as Lacking excitement or variety; boringly monotonous: You hear your friends tell stories about how humdrum their marriage is so you think that maybe that's just how marriage is after all.


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If you're looking for a colorful colloquialism, and the earlier topics which form the foundation of your later discussions are related to eminent historical personages (e.g. Newton's Laws, the Code of Hammurabi, etc), you could say you will be "standing on the shoulders of giants", a phrase which in the context of education is attributed to Isaac Newton: ...


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If you wanted to include a connotation of inevitability, you could say the relationship had run its course (though that also implies it is over, or nearly so).


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A more colorful phrase to describe your situation is that someone is putting the lie to a myth or cliche. This is usually used to describe something which belies some usually-overreaching claim or statement, and has a somewhat triumphant air of "Ah-hah! I have found a clear counterexample to this absurd statement!" As an example, from last month's ...


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You might use the brief phrase friends through thick and thin to describe "best/old friends", while it would never be used for new friends. The phrase not only implies the length of a friendship but also the strength of it. Unfortunately, it is used to actually describe long-term friends, not to differentiate between them and newer friends, so it may not be ...


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Debunk is spot on but, if you don't mind being a little less accurate, dispel also works and I've seen it in this context quite frequently. I am posting this in order to dispel the myths and rumours that answers posted three hours after the question never get upvotes.


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hound (noun) is "a dog", or hound (verb in the infinitive) is "to pursue relentlessly". Neither makes sense here. As IconDaemon has mentioned in a comment, it can only be a misprint, where an "h" was typed instead of a "b". bound to - very likely, sure. (Merriam-Webster), predetermined; certain (TFD) "He believed that whatever he planned to do was ...


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You can puncture a myth or stereotype: VERB 2 Cause a sudden collapse of (mood or feeling): EXAMPLE SENTENCES the earlier mood of optimism was punctured The company has punctured this fragile mood of optimism with a miscalculation of astonishing proportions. Worse still is the title track - eight-and-a-half minutes of tedium and ...


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I think it's OK with break the stereotype. I suggest also demolish, get rid of, eliminate the stereotype, and explode, shatter, ruin the myth.


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Disprove means "to show that (something) is false or wrong." So you could say, for example, "A recent study disproves the myth that girls are bad at sports."


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This poem/proverb is saying that the old friends are gold (more valuable than silver): “Make new friends but keep the old; one is silver and the other is gold”



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