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0

How about using the word lag? This seems like the most natural way to phrase the sentence while keeping the structure intact. "Country X lags behind in animal rights compared to other countries." Straggle is another option. Pick whichever sounds best to you. "Country X is a straggler in animal rights compared to other countries." "Country X straggles ...


4

"Lost the battle but won the war" is the closest phrase I can think of that matches what you describe.


2

"Be my guest" is an idiom that's usually used to (politely) give permission for someone to do something. If you want to edit my manuscript, be my guest. Can I try out your new TARDIS? Be my guest. It indicates the other person should feel free to act as he/she pleases. In your question it appears the idiom is being used both figuratively and ...


0

It appears in Euripides' The Medea, from 431 BCE, hence the origin predates the bible by nearly five centuries, at minimum.


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I think what you have in mind is not the "Pyrrhic Defeat". Pyrrhus scored a victory against the other side by sacrificing too much, almost losing. What the losing side is experiencing is the feeling "we lost but we almost took them down with us". The example you give with the separatist party seems more like an unwitting victory to me (obviously referring to ...


2

You might say it was a suicide mission, or that that group made a sacrifice for a more critically important success; they were sacrificial lambs. In the muzzle-loading rifle days you might call your doomed first wave assaulters the forlorn hope. A more aggressive suicide mission might be described as a kamikaze attack.


3

History records a number of heroic defenses that resulted in short-term defeat or even disaster, but that either wore down or delayed the enemy—and inspired allies fighting in the same cause—and thus contributed to subsequent victory in the larger war. Of these some have become bywords for what might be called "Pyrrhic defeats": "a Thermopylae," "an Alamo," ...


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Pyrrhic Defeat Theory suggest increasing power by increasing the cost of a battle: the idea that those with the power to change a system, benefit from the way it currently works. Origin In criminology, pyrrhic defeat theory is a way of looking at criminal justice policy. It suggests that the criminal justice system’s intentions are the ...


14

If the victory was so costly it led to defeat, then its opposite would be a loss that was so advantageous it led to victory: Gambit 2(In chess) an opening move in which a player makes a sacrifice, typically of a pawn, for the sake of a compensating advantage:


0

I am currently translating this book to Croatian and have understood this phrase as crammed notes in the margins as I also haven't found any other references that fit the context...


2

My suggestion is by no means canonical. If you want a compound that seems analogous to hands-on---something that sounds kind of informal, maybe conversational, even hyphenated, why not try run-through, as in: The first part will be a run-through of the fundamentals, while the second will be hands-on, where you can actually play around with the devices ...


1

As opposed to "could have" (which is appropriate for other contexts - they are not equivalent), "could," while correct, has a much more limited use in past time contexts. Many times you'll find replaced, when the past time is involved, as in: I could do the job [then]. by I was able to do the job [then]. This is what makes it quite rare, and makes ...


2

An equivalent phrase that is more idiomatic (Google says about 14,000,000 results) is "won't know until then", for example: So Help Me God By Larry D. Thompson She hasn't regained consciousness. I think we have the right antibiotics for now. We won't have the blood culture results back until at least tomorrow morning. It may be that there is another ...


1

Lecture, talk, lesson, or presentation. The event involves a 1-hour lecture followed by a 2-hour hands-on practicum. Formal or professional term: didactic. The event will involve both a didactic and an experiential component.


1

Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1994), has this entry for the expression: foot the bill Pay the bill, settle the accounts [example omitted]. This expression uses foot in the sense of "add up and put the total at the foot, or bottom, of an account." {Colloq; early 1800s} A Google Books search for the phrase finds an earliest ...


10

From Etymology Online, footing (n.) as solid base for something evolved from the late 13c.: "a base, foundation;" late 14c., "position of the feet on the ground, stance," a gerundive formation from foot (n.). Figurative meaning "firm or secure position" is from 1580s; that of "condition on which anything is established" is from 1650s. From ...


0

"...maintains a more conservative approach toward enacting animal rights than/compared to..." This would be less likely to offend "A".


-3

i think time is up refer to the term "up" which means thoroughly.i.e the period of time is well expired .E.g i have to put an end to a class at five sharp so, i say to the students "time is up". whereas, the term over is refer to something more .so , time is over implies that a\some minutes are just added.


3

Look "with new eyes" - could be replaced with (rephrased to): change of opinion reconsider/rethink, reevaluate give new consideration to revise or renew one's assessment etc.


1

It looks like it evolved from the Middle English hende, which carried both the meaning of "readily accessible" and "useful" as well as a host of other definitions, which itself rose out of the Old English/High German gehende, which, interestingly enough has more or less the same definition as "handy" does today. I just wrote a paper on it, but I wasn't able ...


0

Think of "chance" as a stand in for probability. And then add "low" if you like to make the meaning abundantly clear. "The low probability of winning the lottery makes it unlikely to happen, but I would be one happy camper if I did win it." Maybe it all started with the following exchange. "Want to go in on a lottery ticket together? What do you recon ...


2

You could also try "a facsimile of the original".


28

As I understand it in normal card game it would mean someone manually prepared the cards so they know what is coming (have advantage) In the context of the speech I think it means that average Americans are at disadvantage. Similar to system is rigged in your post. stack the deck (against someone or something) and stack the cards (against someone or ...


2

Replica. From wikipedia: "A replica is an exact reproduction, such as of a painting, as it was executed by the original artist or a copy or reproduction..."


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Other words and phrases (from the top of my head) Carbon copy Duplicate Clone (for persons) Doppelgänger (also for persons) Edit: sorry, most of these don't match your question. Perhaps only 'duplicate', but for other uses I will still keep them here. Edit2: Duplicate Identically copied from an original. So the sentence would be The ...


2

It is more common to say the painting was a forgery. Art forgery is the creating and selling of works of art which are falsely credited to other, usually more famous, artists. Art forgery can be extremely lucrative, but modern dating and analysis techniques have made the identification of forged artwork much simpler. Wikipedia and from the BBC, ...


0

The right side of history is the present. To be on the wrong side of history is to be dead or worse, irrelevant.


1

There is a high likelihood that it refers to nine yards of fabric. Nine yards of fabric was a common standard length for retail sale at least in the mid-to-late 1800s and into the early 1900s. http://esnpc.blogspot.com/2015/02/nine-yards-to-dollar-history-and.html


0

It seems to me that after multiple, long and careful reading and longer deliberation on the section it seems that this quotation is coming from a more simplistic, face-value and almost primitive perspective. Our modern industrialized minds are having a hard time with this one. Perhaps the meaning of the phrase is found in the phrases surrounding it and they ...


0

Isolated He was becoming isolated and in desperate need of friendship.


1

If there is one respondent: The respondent of the questions was deemed to be unsuitable. As a side note, to help understand the use of "of" in this sentence, you can think of it like this: The question's respondent. If there is more than one respondent: The respondents of the questions were deemed to be unsuitable.


-2

yearning for friendship craving for friendship longing for friendship


2

Daybreak (n.) is quite an old expression: 1520s, from day + break (n.). Break: Meaning "to disclose" is from early 13c. (Etymonline) Ngram shows that both expressions, daybreak and break of day, have been used from the 16th century. At the crack of dawn is a similar expression: Fig. at the earliest light of the day. ...


0

In this case it is not a baseball reference, but an abbreviated form of "strike a blow for": http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/strike+a+blow+for "Strike one for me!", in this sense, means that whatever has just happened supports the argument or the goal of the speaker. So in fact, it is quite the opposite of "strike one" in the baseball sense. You could ...


0

I'm guessing you're looking for a phrase which has "I", the subject of the sentence, talking about their impression of "Z", the object. If that's the case, then the previous answer has it covered. But here are some expressions where "Z" itself is the subject: crooked as a dog’s hind leg -> Probably the most direct Economical with the truth -> ...


4

"I wouldn't trust User43228 as far as I could throw him/her." Source: Cambridge Idioms Dictionary as cited on The Free Dictionary.


0

First of all: In virtue of: through the force of; by authority of. It doesn't rhyme/fit with "for the sake of my passion" for someone's sake in someone's interests, to someone's advantage, on someone's account, for the benefit of, for the good of, for the welfare of, out of respect for, out of consideration for, out of regard for I trust you to do a good ...


0

It's old-fashioned if not outright archaic usage, and would be unfamiliar to most native speakers: virtue: Phrases by (or in) virtue of Because or as a result of: virtue, Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 12 April 2015. The full quote is: At three o’clock, implore My mercy, especially for sinners; and, if only for ...


1

The statistics at COCA are very close: around 15 for each. However, "not a one" is seen mostly (80%) in fiction. My guess this is caused by authors wishing to be "natural" by clipping/eliding :-) "Not a single one" is seen 40-50% in speech. Perhaps because of the stress that can be put on "single."


1

I am generously remunerated. I am generously compensated for my time. Northern Ireland in the Second World War - Page 27 Brian Barton - 1995 - ‎Preview These included dispensing grants and subsidies, and setting up parliamentary committees of enquiry (these could quite effectively silence opponents, as members were generously remunerated).


1

In the Original Poster's examples we see the following types of phrase carrying out different types of function: A woman fell 50 feet down a cliff. (preposition phrase; Complement of the verb) The project was finished 10 days ahead of the schedule. (preposition phrase; Adjunct) Emma is 10 years older than Sophie. (adjective phrase; Predicative Complement) ...


0

The term is: Essential English Grammar - Page 86 Philip Gucker - 2012 Adverbial Objective (or Adverbial Noun) A noun used as an adverb, to modify a verb, an adjective, or an adverb. Thus "down a cliff" (an adverbial) is modified by "50 feet" (a noun phrase) etc., in your case. Just a bit more general.


0

"The doorbell rang twice, followed by the sound of the lock disengaging in the front of the house." The bolded is parenthetical, thus requires a comma in front. And no, the fronted variant also sounds natural to me: Followed by the sound of the lock disengaging in the front of the house," the doorbell rang twice.


1

You are probably thinking of half-truth - "a statement that is only partly true, especially one intended to deceive, evade blame, or the like."


6

Ambiguity: the characteristic of having more than one possible interpretation or meaning (AHD) Amphibology: a sentence or phrase (as “nothing is good enough for you”) that can be interpreted in more than one way. (M-W) the use of ambiguous phrases or such as can be construed in two senses. A good example is Shakespeare's 'The duke yet ...


4

Ambiguous means that a phrase can have more than one meaning http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ambiguous Does this help.


4

Double entendre: a word, phrase, etc, that can be interpreted in two ways, esp one having one meaning that is indelicate Pun: a play on words, sometimes on different senses of the same word and sometimes on the similar sense or sound of different words. Play of words: a pun or the act of punning


1

patronize To go to as a customer, especially on a regular basis: We patronize the local diner. The "regular" implication is obviously irrelevant in OP's exact context, because of today. Note that the shopkeeper could have said "Thank you for your patronage"


0

With proper context: being kryptonite to negative comments SPIN - Sep 2006 - Page 96 Vol. 22, No. 9 - ‎Magazine Still, he finds it amusing that, when seated at the table he is kryptonite, but when he has walked the floor, he has been stopped by numerous men wanting information on how to break into the business. _ An unpublished 1940 story ...


4

A common expression for letting other people's negative comments and behavior towards you "bounce off", is being "thick-skinned".



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