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0

I'd change "by fortune" to "by chance" and "like those who reach these positions by legacy" to "like those who inherit these positions"


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The more informal way of saying "Come in" is "Come on in". In my experience, there is a clear distinction in when to use these terms. "Come on it" implies that you know the person who is wanting to come in and that there is some familiarity with them, or you are trying to create an air of familiarity. In a similar way, on the game show "The Price is ...


0

This must be a very regional occurrence to call it a "tea towel" here in the United States. I have lived in California, Arizona, and Connecticut and have NEVER heard it referred to as a tea towel. Washcloth, dishcloth, dish towel, hand towel, kitchen towel, and dishrag are the only ones I have used or heard to it referred to as. If any of the previous ...


0

Hawkeye, The problem with America is it is so wide spread that we don't always call items by the same name. We have pop, soda, and coke for referring to a carbonated soda depending on where you are from. I have heard of tea towels all my life but I have heard then called wash clothes, cheese cloths (even if that isn't technically correct), hand towels, ...


1

Given you've come back and edited your question, it seems you are still interested in an answer, so I'll elaborate on the one I provided in the comments. The modern rendering of "out upon" would be "out with" or "away with", so, Solanio's barb to Shylock: Out upon it old carrion, ... would be rendered in current English as "Out with you, ...", or ...


4

Mirroring John Deters' answer, here is an inventory for the British kitchen (well, Home Counties English - I'm sure there are further local variants): Tea-towel, or drying-up cloth - [=JD's Dish towel] clean, thin, absorbant, passed from generation to generation until disintegrating. Commemorative pictures, flowery patterns, rude phrases. Hand towel - ...


-2

In every era and among every people since the race began we find men who leave the impress of their ^character on all associated with them. Men born to rule their fellows, and to mould the thoughts and opinions of state and nation. Such a man was Elder Leland ; not only in the sparsely settled districts of old Virginia where his influence was sought when ...


-1

http://www.monticello.org/site/research-and-collections/mammoth-cheese Consider how this could have been portrayed by Jefferson's political opposition with some derision as they are wont to do...even to this day.


15

As an American, I can tell you that we have many different absorbent materials in our kitchens. Here's an inventory of ours, along with the typical uses. Dish towel - always kept clean of food or hand contamination, used only to dry clean dishes after washing them. Sometimes known as flour-sack towels, they are flat, 100% cotton. They are often printed ...


-1

This expression may well have its origins in radio of the 1940s. Contestants rang a bell when they recognized a melody and could name the song. [?]


1

I could imagine someone saying "barge on in" in the situation you describe. It's not a common idiom, but it would be understood. For some reason, "barge in" by itself doesn't sound as apt. EDIT: I'm taking it as a given that a playfully rude phrase is desired. You wouldn't use this unless you actually wanted to be (humorously) rude.


14

The OED says it's "after German schwanen(ge)sang, schwanenlied". Being the OED, they're probably right. They give the meaning as: a song like that fabled to be sung by a dying swan; the last work of a poet or musician, composed shortly before his death; hence, any final performance, action, or effort. "swan, n." OED Online. Oxford University Press, ...


0

"To see" is what is considered a punctual achievement verb; a verb that happens instantaneously. Other examples of achievement verbs are: catch, faint, hit, kick, recognize etc. Many of these verbs cannot take the progressive form to describe an action that is happening at the moment of speaking. For example, we can't say, "He is seeing the movie." or, ...


29

I guess they are called: Dish towels: a rectangular piece of absorbent cloth (or paper) for drying or wiping A tea towel or drying-up cloth (English), or dish towel (American) is a cloth which is used to dry dishes, cutlery, etc., after they have been washed. In 18th century England, a tea towel was a special linen drying cloth used ...


30

I am American and familiar with "tea towel", but I think more commonly you'll see them called "kitchen towels". I would be surprised to find them in a gift store - they don't strike me as very collectible items. That may be the larger cultural disconnect.


2

It's a metaphor. Water is life giving, cooling, satisfying, relieves and assuages thirst. Maynard needed assuaging, comforting, support and encouragement in her struggle to end her life with dignity. So she compared those who supported her to water, which is necessary to life and health; in this case they were assuaging her spirit.


0

When a noun is preceded by an adjective or by the, it’s leaner and cleaner to drop the of in all of: all my books all the lessons of history. When a pronoun is involved, the of is essential, as in phrases like: all of it all of us When a possessive noun is preceded by a or an,the 'of' is required: all of a book’s wisdom all of history’s ...


0

Without comma, you were told (or directed) a specific way how to complete the job. Now you are asked to complete the job in precisely this way (that is you should not complete the task by any other method). With comma, you were directed to complete the task previously. And now you are once more asked to complete the job (and reminded of the previous ...


1

With a comma: focus is on job completion and as previously suggested says nothing about how it is to be completed. The alternative without a comma has the sense of an imperative command that says do the job as directed in the way directed, but the punctuation is incomplete. With out a "!" ending the sentence the meaning and expression is weak and somewhat ...


1

They are "question tags" (BrE) or "tail questions" or "tag questions" (AmE) Question tags are the short questions that we put on the end of sentences – particularly in spoken English. If you are interested in the rules (they are very easy to learn) just follow the above link. And yes, they do exist in several european languages. (French, Spanish, ...


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The comma after “job” tells us that the phrase as directed is non-restrictive. The sentence states “you have been directed to do a job”, and implies that how you do it is up to you. But if we take out the comma, Complete the job as directed. Now “as directed” is restrictive, and the sentence is saying something more severe: Do the work, and make ...


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As Dan has said in his comment, the comma adds gravitas. However, I believe it also changes the implication of the sentence. Complete the job, as directed could be interpreted as "You have been told to finish this task. Do so.", which says nothing about how you should perform it. In contrast, I feel the clear implication of Complete the job as ...


0

My father used this phrase many a mickle makes a muckle" he all ways told people when asked what the meaning was, would say many a small part makes a greater whole part. Also my father used this saying as well think small build big.


2

Money burns a hole in my pocket. The Phrase Finder shows very old usages of the idiom, which clearly suggest a sense of urgency to get rid of something because it is supposedly too hot: "It was only a bit of change, but it was plainly burning a hole in his pocket." As though it were something hot, he wanted to pull the money out--and get rid of it ...


0

The punctuation is correct in the main. However, the semicolon after 'life' should be a colon since you go on to expand on or explain his 'tragic life' (see http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/colon). Opinions regarding the use of a serial or 'Oxford' comma before 'and' vary (see http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/comma). The two commas (after ...


1

"Level" would be acceptable, as in the term "level playing field" (i.e. not sloping towards either goal).


3

horizontal - it means level relative to the (infinite) horizon or an imaginary analog.


1

I ran a quick search of the Google Books archive to see if I could find a plausible candidate. There were some hits for the phrases: To be young and in love and To be young and to be in love in the nineteenth century, but none seemed particularly likely to be influential. There was a review of a Henry Wadsworth Longfellow novel, and a novel call ...


0

Without more context, the sentence does not appear to be a well-formed idiomatic sentence in either British or American English. It might, however, be a valid English sentence written with non-standard orthography. I deal with a lot of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century documents, in which spelling is more or less phonetic and individual word spellings are ...


0

The first sentence is rather unclear... Is this an email with an attachment? Is the "above reference" the attachment? And, assuming it is, does this attachment contain "(y)our representation"? If your answer to all of the above is "Yes", I would suggest you reword it thus: "Attached please find our representation." Actually, what is "(y)our ...


3

John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009) includes a brief discussion of "happy as Larry" under a primary entry for "happy as a sandboy": happy as a sandboy extremely happy ; perfectly contented with your situation. An 1823 dictionary describes a sandboy as an urchin who sold sand in the streets, and according to the same ...


0

Another reference to Larry Foley claims that he won about $150,000 and got an article in a New Zealand newspaper titled "Happy as Larry" and that stayed.


0

If you have to clarify what the example is alluding to, then 'for' or 'of' (my preference) is appropriate, but if the subject is obvious (usually immediately precedent), you don't need either 'for' or 'if'. An example is ...


1

The correct preposition is "of". "Example for" is occasionally used in literature, but that is likely because of a typo or other mistake. For proof, refer to the Ngram results:


2

There are 319 British National Corpus citations for an example of this and only one for an example for this. We don't say for in British English.


2

The title of the article the quote is from is "Who'll save the justice system? and in it the probity of judges is questioned, including that of high court or superior court judges. The "good men in robes" therefore can be taken to men that "honest and upright judges" as judges usually wear robes.


2

If I understand your question correctly, there are countless ways to say that. I would come up with: "There I was..." "It was right then that..." "At that very moment I..." "There I was, in a foreign country and having just been robbed of all my money and credit cards." "It was right then that this stranger stopped and asked me ...


0

One way to strengthen a sentence is to remove unnecessary words. The message comes through more clearly if the sentence is short and to the point. Another way is to make the subject more active. Thus, you could write, "I am interested in applying machine learning to real world problems."


0

Any of these would be perfectly understandable and acceptable. In the LitCrit racket, however, the preferred term would be convention of the genre. Such conventions do not operate like “rules” or “laws”, in that violating them does not disqualify the work from being read as an instance of the genre. On the contrary: the conventions exist in order to be ...


0

These look like playing with set phrases or clichés: "law of the genre" is like "law of the jungle" "rules of the genre" is like "rules of the game" "genre principles" is like "general principles" Doing this can surprise and amuse the reader, and done well can be a feature of good writing.


-1

No info regarding the first use, but maybe something about why it is no longer as common as it was. I recall talking about how nobody would use "bomb" in this way when I was working in a law office in New York City shortly after September 11. I was sorry to see "the bomb" go. Does anybody else recall "it's the bomb-digity?" The "bomb-digity" (sp?) was even ...


0

You could phrase it in a way such as this: I am interested in the way in which machine learning can be applied to real world problems.


2

One thing that interests me is exploring how machine learning can be applied to real world problems.


0

Deuteronomy chapter 21 may hold the answer. It was written approximately 1,500 years before the book of Matthew. This chapter describes the procedure for when someone is found dead in a field and nobody knows how he died. They were to kill a young cow as compensation to God, afterwards they would be free of guilt. Verses 6 through 9 mention the hand washing ...


0

Jerry rigged in a more modern sense came from World War Two American soldiers who came upon captured and abandoned German equipment. Towards the end of the war the Germans were in short supply of equipment and parts due to American bombing of their factories and supply lines. So the Germans had to "Rig" their equipment any way they could to get by. The ...


0

I can find no reputable sources substantiating the phrase "the blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb" as the root of "blood is thicker than water". Jbeldock mentioned an article that references the Troy Book (c. 1420), but the reproduction I found here doesn't seem to mention anything remotely like "blood is thicker than water". In ...


0

'Kidder" comes to mind now which can indicate childish behavior including practical jokes by anyone regardless of age. Its ok to have some humor but some go to the excess at the discomfort of others.


1

Fish are gutted then spit into two parts lengthways, before smoking. The two parts are packaged together for sale. In Britain, between the wars, seamstresses were in demand and frequently moved to new employers. It was unusual for them to move without their friend, so seamstresses usually came in pairs and were referred to as kippers. Seamstresses stitch. ...


5

"For good" means irrevocably, for ever. In this context, it means Alarick would not be able to resurrect (come back to life) as (I presume) he usually does. forever; permanently. I finally left home for good. They tried to repair it many times before they fixed it for good. (from TFD) (Disclaimer: I haven't watched the series in a long time, ...


2

The way my Dad, a Navy vet, used to say it, it was "Chief, Cook, & Bottlewasher" (3 professions, not 2) and the meaning was that not only were you in charge, but you had to do all the middle management and menial responsibilities too...you did it all. Its not so much a derogatory term but it usually implies that everything is your responsibility, but ...



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