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0

An excellent orator is a rhetorician. Since you are asking for an uncommon term, you might enjoy referring to them as a grandiloquent rhetorician.


2

You can consider the adjective Demosthenic, derived from the famous historical figure Demosthenes who is considered the greatest orator of antiquity. (and perhaps all time; even Cicero presents Demosthenes as the greatest orator of all time in De Optimo.) Of or relating to Demosthenes or his oratory; typical of or resembling Demosthenes or his speeches, ...


4

If you want something very unusual and yet historically resonant, you might try chrysostomic (that is, "golden-mouthed"). Here's the OED definition of that word: Chrysostomic a. rare. {f. Gr χρυσοστομος golden-mouthed, an epithet applied to favourite orators which became a kind of surname of Dio and John Chrysostom.} Golden-mouthed. [Example:] 1816 ...


4

The one and only correct answer to this question is, quite obviously, slick whistle-stopper. I will now use my prodigious rhetorical skills to prove this point. Firstly, I did a Google search for that term, which produced the following: No results found for "slick whistle-stopper". And here is the Google Ngram: No valid ngrams to plot! Ngrams not ...


0

The baby took a nap because he was sleepy.


0

I think the sentence would flow better if no punctuation was used between "at ease" and "with me." "With me" is a prepositional phrase, and they usually aren't separated by a punctuation mark unless they come at the beginning of a sentence. My main priority as a tutor has always been to help the learner feel at ease with me, with themselves, and with ...


0

Synergy. (Although non-native speakers should be aware that this is a buzzword used primarily between businesspeople, and is a better word to use in a presentation or speech than in actual everyday conversation.)


0

I'd go with an em-dash in this situation: My main priority as a tutor has always been to help the learner feel at ease--with me, with themselves and with their own abilities. (I've used two dashes here, but in MS Word I'd insert one long dash, aka the "em-dash".) Read more about the wonderful em-dash here: ...


1

In an artistic context, the word I hear most often is simply collaboration. Mirriam-Webster: to work with another person or group in order to achieve or do something


0

"oratissimo" (since ScotM likes it)


3

Symbiosis - A relationship between people, companies etc. that is to the advantage of both. Eg. She imagined us living in a perfect father and son symbiosis.


4

Rhetorical magician: rhetorical adjective 1 Relating to or concerned with the art of rhetoric: magician noun 1.0 A person with magical powers. 1.1 A conjuror. 1.2 informal A person with exceptional skill in a particular area. The art of rhetoric tends to be a black box to the masses, who experience the impact of great ...


8

Silver-tongued A tendency to be eloquent and persuasive in speaking. - Google


6

Ciceronian : in the style of Cicero: characterized by melodious language, clarity, and forcefulness of presentation: Ciceronian invective. a Cicero: Roman statesman, orator, and philosopher. A major figure in the last years of the Republic, he is best known for his orations against Catiline and for his mastery of Latin prose. His ...


-1

Both are correct. I'd use drumline in order to avoid confusion with drum, the instrument.


0

There doesn't seem to be a word that ignores how you are going to play the music together, so which word you use depends on how you will play. If you're going to be emphasizing improvisation, you could call it a "jam". If you're going to be reading music together, you could call it a "reading session". If you're going to take turns playing something with ...


-1

No, I've never heard of this or anything remotely close to this in the United States. I also can't conceive of a professional woman (an attorney, physician, business analyst) thinking of calling a carpenter or truck driver a girl. It just wouldn't make any sense.


0

I don't think you'll find a term that is completely devoid of genre context; though I agree jam is the most widely-applicable. One term a bit more in the vein of classical music would be a reading session. It's semi-formal, since it's not a performance and the participants are usually volunteers, but there will still be a conductor and perhaps a librarian ...


-1

Impromptu music/performance is also used to refer to an improvised musical performance: made, done, or formed on or as if on the spur of the moment : improvised. Michael Buble' Treats NYC Commuters to Impromptu Performance


37

It is called a jam session. It is sometimes shortened as jam. (jam is used as a verb as well.) An informal gathering of musicians to play improvised or unrehearsed music. [TFD]


6

In the United States, there is a long association between putting your hand over your heart and affirming something sincerely. Most notably, when people in the United States say the pledge of allegiance or sing the national anthem, they are encouraged to salute the flag either by putting their right hand over their heart or (if they are in military uniform) ...


1

wikipedia just leads to Kylie - Hand on your heart For idioms, Wikipedia isn't necessarily the best place to look in. If you assume you're dealing with an idiomatic expression, go to Google Books and search for this whole search expression: "hand on your heart" idiom This will find many idiom dictionaries describing the idiom that are stored at ...


-1

It's an idiom. put your hand on your heart (TFD) if you can put your hand on your heart and say something, you can say it knowing that it is the truth I couldn't put my hand on my heart and say I'd never looked at another man. And a standard gesture during the Pledge of Allegiance (US) I give my heart and my hand to my country, one country, ...


0

"I'm not an expert when it comes to kinds of feces, but I know pieces of shit when I see em!" Not a direct correlation, but I think it gets the point across.


0

It would appear from this that Americans call fish kettles something else. This page shows what we in the UK mean by a fish kettle. We regularly use ours and call it just that.


0

It's not quite what you asked for, but when describing a situation where you find everything equally bad, that would usually be called a rats nest. Claiming that everyone in that group is "a rat" and showing that the speaker is looking down on them. I can't tell one politician from another, really, and I don't want to get involved in that whole rats ...


2

One possibility albeit without the negative connotation but in terms of expressions that can be used to express the indifference and generalization present in the former idioms would be: two sides of the same coin Or slices of the same cake Googling I also found (the following) - which does have a negative connotation, though more literary than ...


0

The recipe for Coca Cola is a trade secret. There is an old family secret that tells you to use it as a cleaning solution because it contains citric acid.


3

A fine or pretty kettle of fish As Peter Shor's comment beneath Ralph Richardson's answer indicates, "kettle of fish" has been used as a slang term for several centuries. The same definition of the term that he points to appears in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, second edition (1788): KETTLE OF FISH. When a person has ...


0

I have the earliest attestation for the idiom dated to 1742 in Oxford Dictionary of English Proverbs. The work is Henry Fielding's novel The History of the Adventures of Joseph Andrews and of his Friend Mr. Abraham Adams. With such like discourses they consumed near half-an-hour, whilst Betty provided a shirt from the hostler, who was one of her ...


0

I don't think one word can convey all of the meaning you want. - 'Small, but effective' - or something that 'punches above its weight' or 'disproportionately significant' or 'hugely influential' or 'surprisingly important' or 'unexpectedly significant' or 'trend-setting' - hope these expressions may be useful. Another overused expression that might be ...


-1

Seminal: adjective 1.0 (Of a work, event, moment, or figure) strongly influencing later developments: 2.0 Of, relating to, or denoting semen. 2.1 Botany Of, relating to, or derived from the seed of a plant. ODO The meaning of seminal is big influence, the connotation is small. With just ten sentences uttered over a mere ...


1

Small thing: a certain catalyst for social development Catalysis is the increase in the rate of a chemical reaction due to the participation of an additional substance called a catalyst. With a catalyst, reactions occur faster and with less energy. Because catalysts are not consumed, they are recycled. Often only tiny amounts are required. ...


2

Folklore: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 The traditional beliefs, customs, and stories of a community, passed through the generations by word of mouth. ODO Which includes: Folk wisdom, Folk memory, Folk music, Folk remedies, Folk medicine, etc. From etymonline.com Folklore: "traditional beliefs and customs of the common people," 1846, ...


7

David. David was a young shepherd with a sling and 5 smooth stones who pitted himself against a gigantic Philistine who was fully armed for battle. Yet he brought the giant down with one stone (saving the others for the giant's brothers.) But we've known O'Brien is a fighter since back in the day, when he was the David to Jay Leno's Goliath. [Boston ...


5

A different kettle of fish and a whole new kettle of fish is the British English equivalent of the North American idiom a whole new ball game. Both idioms mean "a different thing altogether", and refer to a new topic which only appears to be related to a previously mentioned one. Nowadays the term kettle is usually associated with teakettles, but in the ...


5

The accepted answer lacks the impact and colour of the original: replacing fecal expertise by a reference to the Maker doesn't strike me as the best way to find an equivalence. I would probably go with same shit, different flies This implies that there are differences (the flies), but that those differences are meaningless when it comes down to what ...


0

If I have understood the OP correctly, the Ukrainian saying В сортах гівна не розуміюся expresses a sense of frustration or futility when faced with a range of equally bad options. A phrase which has its origins in ancient Greece and has been used in English since the 14th century is: the lesser of two evils Example: I didn't like either ...


0

Not sure how localised this is, but: You can't polish a turd Seems appropriate, insofar as whichever choice you pick, or whatever you do to it, it's still a turd no matter what.


0

Your exam grades make a big difference to your future career. You're looking for make a difference. The end of the sentence feels awkward, though. I've tried rewording it, but I'm having trouble making it sound natural without changing the wording much. Personally, I might say: Your exam grades have a big impact on your future career opportunities. ...


2

For a fairly colloquial equivalent, "There ain't a dime's worth of difference." Made famous by George Wallace as a comment on the Democratic & Republican parties.


3

Tariq Ali, a left-wing writer, made a famous comment (I believe he was talking about the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War): "Given the choice between syphilis and gonorrhea, I choose neither."


1

The sentences have different meanings. Each is correct but with a different meaning, so usage statistics is quite pointless. Which is more often used: "I love you" or "I hate you"? Pointless question. In the first sentence, the speaker would wish a closer relationship, but as has happened to many other people in history before, the other person just wants ...


7

"Same old story," is the idiom. (US)


5

Assuming that you're masking an expletive with "faeces", then: "It's all the same shit to me" - indicating that every example within a set is just as bad as every other example. A milder version - "it's all the same crap to me", and more family friendly "it all smells the same to me".


5

If your idiom means "I don't make distinctions among things that are all meaningless." then I would suggest: I don't pick fly-shit out of pepper. or You shouldn't try to pick the fly-shit out of the pepper. This is a way to tell someone that they are concerned with trivial differences that do not matter in dealing with the general situation.


11

Not an exact match, but "six of one, half a dozen of the other" could probably be used in many of the same contexts. It doesn't quite capture the negative connotations of the OP's phrase (it could conceivably be used to describe equally-good options as well as equally-bad). But it could certainly be used to describe politicians that are considered to be as ...


12

It's all the same to me: something that you say when it is not important to you what happens Billy Ray Cyrus wrote It's all the Same To Me about a bad experience in love, where all the gory details became irrelevant: Refrain: You can put me on some island In the middle of the sea Or lock me in a prison With no chance of ever being free Or run ...


1

The saying born and bred dates back at least to the 17th century as shown in Ngram. To breed at that time already meant also to grow up ( late 14th c.) so there is not reason to suppose that the expression had originally a meaning different from the contemporary one. Born and bred: used to say that someone was born and grew up in a particular place, ...


26

To minimize the distinction we say, One's as bad as the other: Or, if we leave room for more than two: One's as bad as the next.



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