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Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


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You might say not given due consideration. Longman's dictionary suggests the following sample usage: After due consideration, I have decided to tender my resignation. In many contexts "due consideration" would be a formal version of "take seriously"


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Following Catija's advice, I nominate "not being addressed". It is the perfect register for this kind of writing, i.e., social-workeres, aka hot air.


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I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning


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The more common usage is "across the state." Referring to "state" without using "the" will typically mean a state level competition: Our debate team is going to state. "Town" is different and does not require "the": I am going to town. I am driving across town. I am driving through town. I left town. "Country", as you noted, ...


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It's indeed You play, you pay. It's a shortened version of If you play (and you lose), you (have to) pay your debts. or simply, you cannot play (get something) without paying; a sentiment that is also expressed as TINSTAAFL: There is no such thing as a free lunch.


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I think the text you presented would be better rendered as: In general, the purpose of this process is not to rate the absolute quality of a result, but to juxtapose the qualities of several results.


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of all the silly answers. when the head of the house died in the south in the old days the woman would lay his burial clothes out on the bed along with his hat. Over the years it has become superstition that the man of the house will die if you lay his hat on his bed.


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comparative analysis Is the general term for this kind of thing in English. Researching that term might yield more useful information.


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"To put into relation to each other" could just mean to set up a correlation between two sets of objects: "Apple, Orange, Banana" can be put into relation to "Car, Bus, Bike" as "Apple and Car, Orange and Bus, Banana and Bike". It'd be a strange to find outside of anything but a mathematics context.


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To continue the analogy, I'd call them parrots. One of its meanings is: [dictionary.com] a person who sedulously echoes another's words Which seems to fit. You could also consider ravens, which serve as message carriers in many fantasy works.


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The usual word is just reporters. They serve the same role in your application that news reporters do in the real world. This is often called a secondhand report, so if you want a flowery term analogous to horse's mouth, you could call the reporters the Second Handers.


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I believe the linguistic term the OP is looking for is asymmetries (with minor corrections) Language and Sex Differences Serap Yelkenaç ... Moreover, another lexical fields that are taken into account as errors resulting in discrimination in language are marital status, asymmetries ( in other words, marked and unmarked forms), jobs and ...


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"Among the questions" is not the subject. The subject is "who fired the fatal shots that killed nine". The example sentence is an inversion of "Who fired the fatal shots that killed nine is among the questions".


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It isn't difficult to invent a sentence that combines "no end" and "to no end" in their traditional idiomatic senses. Perhaps looking at such a sentence would help clarify why treating the two as equivalent in meaning isn't particularly desirable as a way to achieve immediate coherence. Here's an example: The government spent no end of money on ...


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Pain location frequency per Google's textbase, ass overtaking neck around 1980. .


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You are correct. "Conceal carry" is simple verbal laziness, along the lines of dropping the "g" in the "ing" suffix. It is also (for now) a purely verbal phenomenon ...


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The idiomatic expression is A pain in the neck, ass or butt. Using boobs is non-idiomatic and so is omitting the articles. A pain in the ass seems to be the more used version according to NGRAM and is often shortened to PITA


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Well, apparently I'm the oldest person in the vicinity because I can tell you for certain that "red" in this context does not refer to blood, Valentine's Day, or anger. Nor is it a vague reference to something psychedelic. Reds were (are?)* downers, typically Seconal, which some folks consider(ed)* a good-time drug. In addition to the reference in ...


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scant little Is just an expression. English is full of expressions. Don't try and over-analyse or break expressions down, as you will inevitably find they make less sense than when you understand them intact. To me, "scant little" conveys similar meaning to this expression: just a little


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Mawkish, adj.: 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot". Sense of "sickly sentimental" is first recorded 1702. Soppy: showing or feeling too much of emotions such as love or sympathy, rather than being reasonable or practical. (cambridge.org/etymonline.com)


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I would go for one of (definitions from dictionary.com): mushy Informal. overly emotional or sentimental: mushy love letters. soppy British Slang. excessively sentimental; mawkish. saccharine cloyingly agreeable or ingratiating: a saccharine personality. exaggeratedly sweet or sentimental: a saccharine smile; a saccharine song of ...


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"slushy" comes to mind. slushy - (adj) "affectedly or extravagantly emotional" TFD


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A hard copy (of a magazine, for instance) is a paper version, versus a digital version.


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I can think of one example that may be used in a letter: Dear So-and-so, My apologies that I did not write back to you earlier - I got sidetracked on the ELU forums. -rest of letter- "My apologies" is effectively a more formal/posh way of saying "sorry".


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While this is the "English Language & Usage" part of stackexchange your answer mentions "in linguistics". There is also an internationally recognized legal term that protects these names to indicate authenticity, the French "Appellation d'origine contrôlée". Roquefort cheese, Cognac, Porto, Lambic beers, and others benefit from this protection. In many ...


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The first one is actually short for "solutions that have been offered". So it's correct. In the second sentence you use offered as adjective, but it's a verb, a participle to be precise. Participles often can be used as adjectives. Lost, excited or advanced are perfect examples. Others have to be used with care: the shoe left vs. the left shoe the man ...


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I think the word you are looking for is toponym. I also think that a list of 'trade products' that includes lesbian needs work (unless your supermarkets are markedly different from ours).


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The idium is referring to things happening more quickly or directly - no middle man or travelling required so it is simple and easy. While i can see this is the meaning you are trying to use, for your example "Watch movies right in your tablet" i don't think it works as you are not watching movies IN your tablet - technically the movie may be "inside" the ...


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Milk delivered...on your doorstep: also at your doorstep very near to you Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003. Movies delivered on your IPad is slightly more popular than movies delivered to your IPad. It seems an IPad is sometimes viewed like a television or radio with the preposition on, ...


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This is a very tenuous but possible connection. "Dextral" is also the name of a cough suppressant drug containing the dissociative hallucinogen dxm, which in my experience, allows something like a vision of the infinite, and well, DFW knew his drugs.


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I have read that book too, and its successor. You're right, it's a part of his style, r the translator's, but I am hard put to analyse the connotation. Cautiously, I would suggest that it is intended, in its matter-of-factness, to augment the realism of the preceding absurdities. For it's arguably magic realism, even if no one has labelled it as such. ...


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Not a standard phrase, but I've sometimes referred to this as "borrowing offense" by analogy with "taking offense".


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Colloquially, at a disco, I would say "Tonight I'm gonna dance my problems off." From Google Books "Why don't you put on some music and dance off your excess energy?"


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"The band has made two equally great records. Those who prefer X!X lean towards.... while those who prefer y/y go for a more ...." However, since a suggestion improving clarity of writing or thought does not answer the question: The band made two almost equally good records. The preferable record is their first. The less preferable record was their second. ...


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I guess, one cannot depend upon 'Google' to find all answers as it's primarily a Search Engine. Tense doesn't matter, as it varies depending upon the context. Both are correct.


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I would say an equivalent expression in the opposite, depending on the usage, could be two birds with one stone. Double whammy = double trouble. Two bird with one stone = double progress.


2

I think the only language that calls the people inhabiting Great-Britain "Great-British" is the Breton language. In Breton, Brittany is "Breizh" (Britain) and Bretons are "Breizhiz" (British). Great Britain is "Breizh-Veur" (Great-Britain) and The people are "Breizhveuriz" (Great-British)


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In my bilingual school for my european baccalaureate, and from experience being english and french, I believe that it's a "simple question" "question on the curriculum (content)" "part of the course" "fact of the matter question"... fact of the matter is fairly suitable because, it describes simplicity and is "un faite relatif au sujet" which is a logical ...


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No, it is not used correctly. There are two sentences that I can assume you're trying to say: I have experience in apparel. "Apparel" here means clothing and various goods. I have appealing experience in equipment. However that sentence does not make sense; one cannot have "appealing experience". You should instead go for: I have ...


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In psychology, these are known as intrusive thoughts(1). The term is chosen because these thoughts seem to enter your mind from outside, without your control. Intrusive thoughts can occur across a wide spectrum of subjects, from uncontrollable fears, to the urges toward mischief or violence which you experience, to the urge to harm oneself without reason, to ...


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Oxford Shorter (1933 edition) Wet nurse, wet-nurse sb 1620 A woman who is hired to suckle and nurse another woman's child. Wet-nurse verb transitive, to serve as a wet nurse.


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That would be a nurse or a wet nurse: nurse: 1 (a) a woman who suckles an infant not her own : wet nurse wet nurse: a woman who cares for and suckles children not her own Both definitions from Merriam-Webster Online.


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They're called wet nurses. Wikipedia A wet nurse is a woman who breast feeds and cares for another's child. Wet nurses are employed when the mother is unable or chooses not to nurse the child herself. Wet-nursed children may be known as "milk-siblings", and in some cultures the families are linked by a special relationship of milk kinship. Mothers ...


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Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate (2003) dictionary offers this as one of its definitions of umbrage: a feeling of pique or resentment at some often fancied slight or insult and this as one of its definitions of empathy: the action of understanding, being aware of, being sensitive to, and vicariously experiencing the feelings, thoughts, and ...


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So if you define a situation as "person B got hit by the rocks person A threw in no particular direction (but intended to hit people anyway)". In this case use friendly fire. Also the related term is blue-on-blue.


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I, for one, means that I am speaking only for myself and sharing my view of something even if that is contrasting from other's idea. "I for one" is used to stress an individual's specified view about himself. Eg: I for one, don't think it is a good idea. This is reworded as "I don't think it's a good idea, but other may think it is." A comment ...


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http://biblehub.com/matthew/27-50.htm is a link that says when Jesus cried out in a loud voice he yeild the ghost


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The original version of the sentence was correct: I have Sodium and Potassium. This type of element (i.e. elements considered to be metals)... Sodium and potassium are a single "type of element" (considered to be metal), despite being more than one element, so "element" should be singular. Even if your list was many longer, it would still be a ...


-1

I would use 'some time ago', which to me means from a couple of weeks to a year ago. I am a native English speaker.... Edit - so I'd stop using 'the other day' when the event is more than a week or two old.



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