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1

"I then wondered, why a pig's ear? Does anyone know why pig's ear is used to mean something messy and useless?" Very simply it refers to another old saying. You can't make a silk purse of a pig's ear. If you COULD that would be a wondrous accomplishment, indeed. The reverse would be making a pig's ear out of a silk purse... which would be taking something ...


0

If you are selecting a specific area, from a choice of areas, the phrase would be one of the areas


0

Make up the cash here means "handling of accounts to register correct entries" as I understand the phrase.


2

In such a case In such case The former is the most common of the two expressions and is widely used. In such case, however, is mostly retsricted to formal writing. It is very common in law, medicine and the sciences. It wouldn't be a good idea to use this in other registers, for example in fiction or letters to friends. The meaning of the two terms is ...


5

Making up the cash is an accounting term for reconciling the receipts for money spent from a float such as petty cash with the amount remaining, when using the imprest system of accounting. That might typically be done monthly. In this case B didn't bother to do the reconciliation, and presumably the float was maintained by issuing company cheques, so that ...


1

This dual-use is not only specific to English. In Germany, some Jewish bank owner is quoted to have used this in word play after Machtergreifung 1933: Endlich sind wir über den Berg, Von jetzt an geht's abwärts. which can be translated to: Finally we are out of the wood / Finally we are over the hump, now it's all downhill from here. Now, ...


6

Metaphor is definitely involved, and there's only one meaning. This is a Journey metaphor theme, where Ego is moving through a 2½-Dimensional landscape. There are a number of ways to implement this, and downhill is coherent with all of them. One way -- a source of positive evaluation -- is the Work is a Journey theme. In this trope, people's effort is ...


10

The expression downhill all the way (also, all downhill from here), can indicate both a positive or a negative trend as it can metaphorically suggest both an easy descent down a hill and a downward move to a lower ( possibly negative) level. To avoid misunderstanding you need to be clear about what is meant. Downhill all the way: Easy from ...


1

With regard to the origin of gander in the sense of "take a long look at," it's interesting to compare the definitions of gonder in Thomas Darlington, Folk-Speech of South Cheshire (1887) with the corresponding definitions in Robert Holland, A Glossary of Words Used in the County of Cheshire (1886)—just one year earlier. From Darlington, Folk-Speech (1887): ...


3

The way geese move their neck to look around seems to be at the origin of this saying: gander: from Etymonline.com "take a long look," slang, 1886, from gander (n.) on the notion of craning one's neck like a goose; earlier it meant "to wander foolishly" (1680s). Related: Gandered; gandering. Gander from (www.worldwidewords.org) A quick, ...


1

I expect it just alludes to geese having long necks, making it really obvious when a gander cranes1 its neck reach forward with head and neck, in order to see better 1 I didn't know until I just looked it up, but the etymology for the above verb and the noun crane = machine for raising and lowering heavy weights both derive from crane = ...


-2

Using of driver/ driver's or driving license depends very much on what we are trying to say: For example I would say: a. I lost my driving license. b. It was about a driver license. c. I renewed my driver's license. (Provided that it is clear that I am talking about my driver's driving license.) But again, in daily conversations, they are used almost ...


0

English also uses "in the sand" or "on the sand" to imply transience or fragility. Yoichi must be referring to a Japanese cover of the old (1930s?) song, "Love Letters in the Sand". In 1957, the American singer Pat Boone made an international hit record of the song. In those years, Boone was very popular among Japanese teenage girls. There is also an ...


0

How about simply pending? For a negative twist, try impending or looming.


0

I remember encountering this usage in Southern Indiana hill country, where there is a considerable influence of Kentuckian words and phrases. When you say it's a "southern" usage, where specifically have you heard it? Another phrase I remember from there is "Gimme some o' them cheese, Hoss", which meant "I'd like some cheese, Horace", said to a storekeeper. ...


7

No there isn't. Yoroshiku onegaishimasu is a phatic expression — i.e. an expression that is used only to perform a social function. If you consider all the social functions that yoroshiku onegaishimasu performs, and the English phatic phrases used in the same way, you'll find that there's nothing that comes even close to matching all the uses of ...


3

Japanese politeness and honorific speech is very different and detailed than Western politeness. "Yoroshiku onegaishimasu" is very unique to Japanese culture and is totally untranslatable into a single English phrase and there is no equivalent in English. There are literal translations but they wouldn't make much sense in English and they wouldn't cover all ...


0

I'm not sure, but the phrase "hell of a time" might have originated shortly before WWI with a Brit named Flynn Mitchell I suspect was a music hall entertainer. I'm basing this on a hint on page 176 of the book "On the Front Line: True World War One Stories," edited by C.B. Purdom.


1

Sometimes grammar seems odd but is correct. My opinion is that you're using the rule properly. In your phrase 'than' is used following a comparative adjective. In this case, you're comparing plastic containers to glass containers. I don't see an issue with how you have used 'than' here.


0

I believe Sven Yargis inadvertently supplied the answer: emergent strongly suggests both present and future; e.g. "Execron, Boffex and Crudco are emergent players in the growing codswallop market." =]


0

In Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003), the closest definition of definitive to the one you seem to have in mind is this one: 2 : authoritative and apparently exhaustive (a definitive edition} But there is something less than definitive about this definition, starting with the weasel word "apparently" in the main definition, and ...


0

Dictionary Notice of 'Nuts' The Random House Dictionary of American Slang (1997) distinguishes between nuts in the sense of infatuated, fascinated, or obsessed (which it dates to 1785) and nuts in the sense of insane (which it dates to 1908). As RHDAS notes, nuts appears in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, though the precise ...


1

In a medical register, the difference would be between "curative" (problem oriented) work and "palliative" (symptom oriented) work. E.g.: "The social reforms leading to the state administration of old-age pensions were a palliative effort to prevent the rise of socialism." and "The reorganization of the company was meant as curative; Apple would be in the ...


0

As your comments will indicate, this is an instance of referential humor dealing with various instances of young adult fiction dealing with teenage girls. The joke is that the character uttering them wants to differentiate herself from the themes contained therein, specifically an idealized portrayal of romance.


1

Yes, the phrase I'm all ears, which you have listed, is common in English and means what you're asking. I'm all ears: You have my attention, so you should talk. Source: thefreedictionary.com


1

Which form is more polite and more acceptable for correspondence? Both of them are fine in any conversation of an official nature, but are not exclusively limited to just the two. For instance you may use: May I inquire about something? Could you educate me upon something? Is it possible to know (more) about something? In a conversation ...


0

Both are polite colloquial usage. In English, the respondent would immediately understand that you need more than a simple "yes" or "no" answer.


3

Both are fine options, but if we're being pedantic, they mean slightly different things. Asking somebody to explain something implies that you don't know anything about the topic and want the person to teach you. Asking somebody to clarify something implies that you understand the broad strokes but want more detail about a particular topic. Of course, ...


1

I am from Glasgow and this phrase makes perfect sense to me. I currently live in Cambridge and was recently questioned over the use of this phrase. The closest English equivalent is "a telling off", it is dialectal and not grammatically incorrect where I come from. As for The Wickerman, that's just an insulting insinuation.


-1

My mother told me this goes back to when afternoon tea was spent outdoors, such as in a pavilion or a gazebo type structure. The porch to the grounds had steps and there were steps going up into the structure where tea was served. When the server would fall off the steps, the body falls forward (dropping the tea kettle to the ground); the ass would naturally ...


2

If you are a camper, erecting your tent, the moment when you insert the center pole is critical to the stability of the entire tent. It is the same as a "sink or swim" moment.


0

I'm almost sure that this is not the sense that the OP is asking about, but: "holding your hair" is a somewhat common phrase in popular culture (certainly American, and some British - think of Bridget Jones' Diary, for example). When a group of friends or coworkers go out to a bar, it is unfortunately rather common for one or more of them to drink until ...


0

I think it may come from 'Tug of war' as The Phrase Finder suggest: Pulling for you: I am guessing that it comes "rope pull," a group activity at picnics, etc. This looks like what we call "Tug o' War" in Britain. Is that the case? Yes, that's what we in the U.S. call it too. But I just couldn't think of the term. pulling for someone or ...


3

"Hold on to your hat" and "keep your hair on" are common English phrases that mean "ready yourself for a rough / exciting experience" and "don't get too excited" respectively. The first is obvious enough, the second is a reference to wigs (more fashionable in previous times, and could come off when the wearer was agitated). Never heard of "hold on to your ...


1

It's neither common nor a well-established usage, so arguably the exact sense is somewhat subjective. @mplungjan's link gives us... 1: Don't get upset when you've no real reason to be upset ...whereas Urban dictionary has... 2: Given as advice to someone you you'd like to sit down and shut up ...and (thanks to @Josh61's comment below)... 3: ...


0

Tug of war?? Pulling a vehicle, farm animal, etc., out of the ditch or the mud? Pulling a ballot box lever? Or could it have to do with ringing the bell at a church in recognition of a funeral or wedding, where you are pulling the rope for the bell? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_bell Hemingway quotes part of John Donne's "Devotions upon Emergent ...


1

Could it be 'the truth will never be known'?


-1

You can use the saying: Truth will out: The truth will always become evident in the end. Source: www.idioms.thefreedictionary.com


0

You may have specified a special case in you two example sentences, but if the plastic limit of both A and B is 2, and the liquid limit of both A and B is 3, and if the plastic index of both A and B are 4, then you might write: The plastic limit, liquid limit, and plastic index of both soil A and soil B are 2, 3, and 4 respectively. If, on the other ...


1

While aligned may be acceptable, I think a more common word would be consistent. People also refer to being in sync or on the same page.


1

It's surprising nobody bothered to type an answer in here. It's just an attempt at play on "kiss my ass," or, some similar phrase. I would guess it is the case that the writers/production team were so silly, they were perhaps making a confused play on "kick the bucket" "kick ass" "kiss my ass" and/or any combination there of. Note that there is something ...


-2

It's a short version of the phrase: Tough titty said the kitty when the milk went dry.


0

I think that "last but foremost" is actually somewhat less intuitively logical than its true converse, "First and least," a phrase that makes perfect sense in situations where the speaker or writer is presenting information in ascending order from least to greatest importance. Understanding "last and foremost" to mean "most important even though last" ...


1

"Think differently" would mean: Please think in a way that is different from the way that other people are thinking. "Think different" means: Think about things that are different, or how to do things that are different. The slogan doesn't tell you how to think, but what to think.


-1

While I would interpret (1) and (3) as restrictive relative clauses, I would interpret them as meaning ... found favor with all of the social democrats while they were under the leadership of Schmidt, and not ... found favor with those social democrats who were under the leadership of Schmidt. So the relative clause restricts to a time period ...


2

Jinx TFD n. 1. A person or thing that is believed to bring bad luck. 2. A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing. tr.v. jinxed, jinx·ing, jinx·es To bring bad luck to. If a person is jinxed (adjective), it means that he or she always has bad luck. If you are experiencing a series of ...


1

I'd call that person bad luck "You're bad luck, you are." You're my Henry Allbones - G. B. Hope "Maybe you're bad luck." Hero - E. V. Crowe "You're bad luck. I bet you're bad luck to yourself." "He is, kid," Blocker said. Yesterday Will Make You Cry - Chester B. Himes



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