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A word can be considered a real word even if it's not in an established dictionary. Many words that have yet to appear in dictionaries are widely understood, and could be added over time - if their usage continues. Others fall away over time, but during their peak, they would have been just as real as standard dictionary words. Merriam-Webster's Help ...


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This article from 'The Garden of Phrases at Grammar.ccc.com gives a good overview: ABSOLUTE PHRASE Usually (but not always, as we shall see), an absolute phrase (also called a nominative absolute) is a group of words consisting of a noun or pronoun and a participle as well as any related modifiers. Absolute phrases do not directly connect to ...


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If you reject privacy, Private life is a possibility. Coupled with preservation, it may bring the expected positiveness.


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Bernie is referencing the music industry execs. The entire album is a concept album regarding the struggles he and Elton endured during their early years.


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Both are fine. Could you please do X is a construction I use often. It trips off the tongue easily, which makes it sound casual, hence good for a classroom setting.


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you may say that their love was indescribable or beyond description Indescribable means impossible to ​describe, because too intense, extreme, etc, for words. you may also speak of an overwhelming love. Overwhelming means very great in number, effect, or force, i.e. extreme. it is used to describe something that is so confusing, difficult, etc., that ...


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Words were ________ (meaning not necessary). (idea: for them to display their affection towards one another) Words were superfluous. meaning "unnecessary or needless" -- Random House.


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This showed an uncooperative attitude on the part of A. A showed an uncooperative attitude. A was uncooperative. This showed a lack of cooperation on A's part.


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I may not be correctly parsing your example, but it it would appear that party A is violating at least the social norm of courtesy if not some level of legal agreement. If your inactions cause inconvenience to fall on others, you are inconsiderate or discourteous. Acting in 'Bad Faith'(mentioned above) is actually a legal term when someone is 'following the ...


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Self-sacrificing if the person doesn't overdo it. Otherwise, kitchen martyr or doormat.


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He was late, as a result, he didn't catch the bus. My suggestions He was late. As a result he didn't catch the bus. He was late; he didn't catch the bus. He was late: as a result he didn't catch the bus. He was late and didn't catch the bus. You might like to consult the article Using the semi-colon and colon from the Universtiy of Leicester.


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You need to use "and" if you're yoking two clauses each of which can stand independently. He was late. That is a short but perfectly complete sentence. As a result, he didn't catch the bus. Although it refers back to a prior statement, that is also an independent sentence. Your choices when writing are to use "and" between them, or to use a ...


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They shared a tacit understanding. Words were gratuitous. tacit : expressed or understood without being directly stated Synonyms     implied, implicit, unexpressed, unspoken, unvoiced, wordless Antonyms     explicit, express, expressed, spoken, stated, voiced ... gratuitous : not necessary or appropriate Antonyms ...


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May be not the exact answer, however I think it could convey the message in the best way. Words are unable to express their love.


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Essentially it means that whatever it is that you are working on or experiencing "takes a momentum of its own" at some point, such that you no longer need to be expending effort to continue working on it or experiencing it. On a related note, given that your context is art, the notion of "aesthetic experience" is meant to create such a condition wherein the ...


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It means go to bed. Linen was once the common bedding material for sheets. Believe linen sacks/storage bags (like burlap bags/hessian bags today) were once more commonly used for things like grain (linseed in the old process of extracting linseed oil) etc. Linen (flax), also the same material/fabric as was used for bed linen/sheets, pillow slips and ...


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omission o·mis·sion /əˈmiSH(ə)n,ōˈmiSH(ə)n/ noun –Google a failure to do something, especially something that one has a moral or legal obligation to do. Omission (criminal law) –Wiki Duty to act when contracted to do so [...] the court ruled that "a man might incur criminal liability from a duty arising out of contract." Sin of omission ...


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I would say that person A is exploiting or taking advantage of a problem with the rules. The fact that the rule does not require presentation of the bill before work starts makes it very difficult and costly to enforce. Basically, you'd have to undo the work you already did to enforce it. Knowing that this is a weakness in the rule, person A simply exploits ...


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You could use negligence: : failure to take the care that a responsible person usually takes : lack of normal care or attention Merriam-Webster Your sentence would read: This was an act of negligence on the part of A.


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In the declarative sentence I wonder why the Joneses don't have a Lexus and you do. the word "why" serves as a subordinating conjunction to introduce the clause Joneses (subject) -- don't have (verb) -- a Lexus (direct object) The structure is the same as the related sentence I wonder that the Joneses don't have a Lexus and you do. with ...


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It's context sensitive. If you are genuinely asking "I wonder why the other bakery doesn't have dinner rolls, but you do?", then it's just a question. If you are not asking in order to get a response, but are instead commenting on the sad state of the other bakery (perhaps you are making a point to this baker that he needs to be well-stocked in dinner ...


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You could also say that this was an act of "deceit" on the part of A.


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Building on Paul Rowe's excellent answer, I would say: This was an act of selfish manipulation on the part of A. A is indeed manipulating the process with selfishness as motivation. He only cares that his needs are met and does not care that the business transaction requires a reciprocity.


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Perhaps "It was a couldn't-give-a-damm attitude of A" devil-may-care also refers to a lack of concern.


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An appropriate term for this might be manipulation. You can, of course, expand that to indicate the nature of manipulation. This was an act of manipulation through intentional negligence on the part of A. A is manipulating the process. If this happens enough times, B's company will eventually require technicians to have the bill in their hands before ...


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As mentioned in one of the comments, "altruistic" seems to be the word you're looking for. altruism (noun) "feelings and behavior that show a desire to help other people and a lack of selfishness" e.g. "I ​doubt whether her ​motives for ​donating the ​money are altruistic - she's ​probably ​looking for ​publicity." MW Depending on ...


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I think you could use complaisant, charitable, altruistic, humane, accommodating, and maybe liberal or compassionate. Those would be pretty good.


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"Withstand" or just "stand" : "She withstood the loss..."


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The Ngram viewer is ignorant of "often a times," but it finds "often at times," currently out-written 100 to 1 by "oftentimes." From Young Children at School in in the Inner City by Barbara Tizard: It seems likely, too, that disruptive behaviour occurred more often at times not observed,.... But the google finds the phrase about 175K times in ...


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In formal writing, use the reflexive pronoun when the pronoun refers to the subject of the sentence: And they considered that such poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves.


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I think it means that the person read somewhere about the room, like when someone says 'Do you know MJ' and someone else says 'I've heard of him'. I hope I helped. :)


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What is the meaning of "So far, so obvious"? Does it mean "Although out of expectation, it is actually true"? No. This phrase is a variant of "So far so good," which means, Okay, I'm following what you've said so far, i.e. I understand what you've said up to this point; let's continue. Sherlock Holmes is too smart for the rest of us. Things which take ...


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How about overcome challenges?


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I have a feeling that this rejoinder comes from He would say that, wouldn't he?" which had its first entry in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations in 1979. (When I Google for "I would say that..." it's this version above which comes up at the top of the list, along with MRDA) This famous phrase is a misquotation of an answer given by Mandy Rice-Davies ...


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I particularly like deal with, proposed by @MDMcDMD. Here's a way to use it: My mother-in-law has her arthritis to deal with. Alternatively: We all have our troubles is a nice way of complaining. Here's a nice made-up noun my German spouse invented once: ... the tougheties of life


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EDIT - I misunderstood your question. It looks like you don't mean daily care but the responsibility until a minor becomes of age. In this case I would say "guardianhip or custody of minors" If you mean a professional looking after a child and being paid for that, just as we say "elderly care" or "aged care", you can say "child care". "child care" (or ...


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A Google search indicates this phrase has most recently shown up in the TV series Sherlock: LESTRADE: So she’s German? SHERLOCK (still looking at his phone): Of course she’s not. She’s from out of town, though. Intended to stay in London for one night ... (he smiles smugly when he apparently finds the information he needed) ... before returning home ...


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'Around' and 'about' are synonyms. Not only is using both redundant, but it's silly: you you would would not not double double words words in other sentences, right? :) Fun fact: a 'roundabout' is a traffic circle.


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We need to create a bit of context: Joan and Lisa are friends. Joan has a tendency to talk before she thinks, and can be somewhat of a pessimist at times. Lisa has a crush on Paul. Lisa asks: "Do you think he thinks of me?" Joan answers: "Nah, he's probably hanging with that girl from the bar" Joan sees Lisa is sad by what she suggests, and so adds: "But I ...


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It means something like: but of course I would say that. It implies that there's some reason what the speaker is saying is typically or obviously biased from their position. It's a kind of tag question, which gives it kind of an "I know you know what I mean" tone. Here's a quote from an interview with Nick Clegg: Part of the challenge for a third party ...


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'Round about' (the initial a- is usually dropped) in the sense 'approximately' is a strictly colloquial use, and should be avoided in most formal writing. There is also a more conventionally spatial use of this double preposition to describe a path of motion: We wandered round about the zoo til it closed. When this sense is used as an intransitive ...


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Year of built 1922 No, that is incorrect because you cannot use 'of' before a verb (other than a gerund). Possibilities Year of build, 1922 Year of construction, 1922 Year built, 1922


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Martyr means witness in Greek, so martyr to should reasonably mean one who suffers for a cause — for example, a martyr to non-violence.


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What do you mean? is commonly known and usually said when one does not comprehend what the other said. Basically it is asking for a repeat of the sentence in more detail. How do you mean? is a little different. How can be defined as in what way or manner. How does this work? In what way or manner does this work? Both sentences are basically the ...


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A dog replicates a person waiting for something. The bone replicates good information that the Person can use. A dogs behaviour after receiving a bone is the behaviour of the person after receiving the information, the dog not unlike the person; may run around with it showing it off or dig a hole to bury it; so he doesn't have to share it with another.


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This is a well-known quote from Muriel Spark's novel about a teacher in a private girls school in Scotland, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: "For those who like that sort of thing," said Miss Brodie in her best Edinburgh voice, "That is the sort of thing they like." (The character is talking about the Girl Guides, an organization similar to the Girl ...


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Struggle with Agonise over Contend with Deal with Trouble over


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More of the same thing that is addition already there In addition to In this context 'adding to' implies that there is already,in this case, a carpet of flowers. 'Adding to' implies that the Norwegians will be putting more flowers with the ones already there. It is time to eat! Mother is setting the food on the table, adding to the feast. More info ...



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