New answers tagged

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couldn't care less seems like the most widely used phrase for this type of context: The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms Be completely indifferent. "The viewers couldn't care less about the disasters on television"


1

How about "vacillate" http://www.dictionary.com/browse/vacillate?s=t verb (used without object), vacillated, vacillating. 1.to waver in mind or opinion; be indecisive or irresolute: His tendency to vacillate makes him a poor leader. 2.to sway unsteadily; waver; totter; stagger. 3.to oscillate or fluctuate.


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You can say "on hold" here, yes. You can also use "at hand" or any other expression that conveys you have offers lying around that are pending. Side note: I'd suggest s/that I have to reply to [...]/and I have to reply to [...]/.


1

The closest figurative expression I can think of is: - None of their business None of their business. Not of their concern. As the explanation you have quoted states: - "[The issue has] ...nothing to do with" the individual or party concerned. While Josh's suggestion: - It's no skin off my nose Conveys a sense that the party in question is ...


1

It's not my dog — TFD It’s not my problem. "So what! It doesn’t matter! Not my dog." "Not My Circus, Not My Monkeys", literal translation of a Polish idiom, would be interesting too.


2

Done for means "done on [someone's] behalf". If someone was trying to commit suicide, but the police did it for him, it isn't clear how grateful his survivors would be. But since the "for" means the subject is doing what the object wants done, yes, most of the time, the object will experience it as a positive. Off topic, but in British English, "done for" ...


1

Positive "do to" You do something to me, something that simply mystifies me. Tell me, why should it be you have the power to hypnotize me? (Cole Porter)


2

Positive do to: "Hot diggity, dog ziggity, boom What you do to me, When you're holding me tight." -Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom) [1956]


4

Probably not a perfect fit, but close in meaning is: It's no skin off my nose. (British, American & Australian informal) also It's no skin off my (back) teeth. (American informal) something that you say which means you do not care about something because it will not affect you. (Cambridge Idioms Dictionary)


2

In Scots English, there is 'to swither' From OED, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/swither (Verb) Be uncertain as to which course of action to choose


5

Some colourful (Australian slang) options: farnarkling [+about/around] (alternative spelling: farnarkeling) the group activity whereby everyone sits around discussing the need to "do something" but nothing actually happens - Urbandictionary.com eg: "You know how my friends are, they always farnarkle about so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At ...


6

One possible answer is waffle. Used as a verb, it may mean: Merriam-Webster: to be unable or unwilling to make a clear decision about what to do "Stop waffling and pick a movie!" "I don't know which side he's on. When I asked him, he waffled." One may "waffle between" several choices. If the problem isn't indecisiveness, but rather wasting time, ...


0

Among the answers you're looking for is "wishy-washy": not having or showing strong ideas or beliefs about something : weak and not able or not willing to act


2

There are probably better options already stated, but to add a little (possibly chiefly British) variety to these: The verb "to potter" and its associated constructions would work well here. Sense 4: To occupy oneself in an ineffectual or trifling way; to work or act in a feeble or desultory manner; to dabble in or with something. or 5: To move ...


6

It means to purposefully play slower. This would be a disadvantage to a team that plays quickly, as it interrupts their natural flow and frustrates them. If a game has a high pace, then it's likely that both teams are looking to attack and/or counter-attack quickly, as opposed to patiently gaining ground and concentrating on keeping the ball.


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I would say of the suggestions people have submitted, the word "deliberated" would fit your initial 3 examples best: "You know how my friends are, they always deliberate so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At the restaurant, when I was asked what I wanted to order, I deliberated before finally ordering the steak." "Stop deliberating, this has ...


0

Speaking as an native Englishman who lives just outside of London, the use of the term "jam it down their throat" is perfectly fine; "ram it down their throat" or "stuff it down their throat" is used interchangeably. "Cram it down their throat" is perhaps regional; I have certainly never used it in my life or heard it in conversation locally. "Cram it into ...


3

You might consider procrastinate or one of its synonyms: delay or postpone action; put off doing something. "it won't be this price for long, so don't procrastinate" synonyms: delay, put off doing something, postpone action, defer action, be dilatory, use delaying tactics, stall, temporize, drag one's feet/heels, take one's time, play for ...


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Other than being present in the process, state B does no mediation. So, e.g., children (a) reach adulthood (c) through youth (b). Insect eggs reach adulthood via larvae.


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I have seen all of these words used : dilly-dally, dither, vacillate, waver Also a nice idiom: beat around the bush dilly-dally: to waste time, especially by indecision don't dillydally on the way to the store dither: to delay taking action because you are not sure about what to do She did not dither about what to do next. ...


11

"Hem and haw" would be appropriate. Wikitionary: To discuss, deliberate, or contemplate rather than taking action or making up one's mind. 'If you hem and haw long enough, someone else will do it first.' Merriam-Webster: To take a long time before making a decision about what to do. 'The city council hemmed and hawed for a year before ...


0

My bad is an informal AmE expression: used for saying that you accept that you are wrong or that something is your fault: "You brought the wrong book." "Okay, my bad. I'll go get it." It is generally used in the first person by the speaker who admits a mistake and apologises for that mistake. Referring to a third person you would, ...


2

The "past week" refers to the most recent week. If this is the fourth week of July, the "past" week would be the third week of July. The "last week" refers to the final week in a series. If the fourth week of July is the last, or final of four weeks of July, the current week would be the last week of July. "Last" week can be used for the "past" week, if ...


1

Patch to mean an area where one operates (especially for police officers, criminals or salesmen) is common in informal BrE. It could sometimes equate to a hometown but not always. 3.1 British informal An area for which someone is responsible or in which they operate : we didn’t want any secret organizations on our patch More example sentences ...


1

The difference is "past week" would be to count back exactly a week from now, while "last week" is the calendar week preceding the present week. "Past week" is usually used when going through something/event. "Last week" is usually used to point to that particular week. Example: For the past week, it was raining heavily. Last week, it was ...


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One meaning of patch is a small plot of land, one often used for gardening. The word is often used with some particular cultivation, notably melons. For a brief discussion of a watermelon patch and its role in your survival after armageddon, go here. Earlier references are more likely about the literal meaning. Thus from Poultry, Garden and Home, Volume 3 (...


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The simplest interpretation is to use the definition (OED) percent, n: one part in every hundred Then, 87 is just a count. At least according to Wiktionary, percent has two plurals: percent and percents. It seems you are using the former. Recall you cannot have a count and an article. I earned 1 percent. I earned 87 percent. Of course, there are ...


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Yes, it is correct. This is assuming you are asking whether be a pioneer is standard usage or whether it would be somehow non-standard or perhaps deprecated to use pioneer as a noun, to use the indefinite article a before it, or to use the infinitive be before a pioneer. The answer is that there are no problems at all with the phrase. As for whether your ...


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The verb "juxtapose" requires contrasting things placed next to one other: https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/juxtapose Oxymoron Definition : Oxymoron is a figure of speech in which two opposite ideas are joined to create an effect. The common oxymoron phrase is a combination of an adjective proceeded by a noun with contrasting meanings, e.g. “cruel ...


4

"I dislike his being blunt" means I dislike it when he speaks in a blunt manner. "I dislike him being blunt" means I dislike this person-- when he is being blunt. Actually, the first is more grammatically correct--and this is probably what the speaker means to say--- but people very often use the second way.


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Technically 1 is correct and 2 is incorrect, but in practice people use both. In the example, "being blunt" is a gerund, and takes the possessive, ie "his". (See http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/do-i-hate-your-singing-or-you-singing). Gerunds are nouns made out of verbs, and that is why they are used with possessive pronouns. If the ...


0

short-lived American Heritage dictionary Living or lasting only a short time; ephemeral. I'll try to find something with more of a connotation of positivity. You could use: "that moment was like an éclair" Wikipedia The word comes from French éclair 'flash of lightning', so named because it is eaten quickly (in a flash).


0

The word you are looking for is Decadent. It's definition is: characterized by or appealing to self-indulgence This word is commonly used on chocolate bar wrappers, like this one: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm271581.htm


0

WordReference.com licenses such constructions: Depending on the weather, I may go camping this weekend. Some may argue that this is a misplaced modifier error, but it is an idiomatic usage (210 000 Google hits for "depending on the weather, we") , and the context in this example precludes the possibility of 'depending on the weather' modifying 'I'. The ...


-2

Look at this please- "cock a snook at" used in mainly journalism-- to deliberately do something that insults someone or that shows a lack of respect for someone or something. vide Free thesaurus definition of to insult or offend someone from the Macmillan English Dictionary - a free English dictionary online with thesaurus and with pronunciation from ...


2

According to ThisDayinQuotes.com in the September 19, 1926 edition of the Chicago Daily Tribune...in [his] column “Notes on Journalism” what Mencken actually said was: No one in this world, so far as I know — and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me — has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the ...


0

This is covered by the subject-verb agreement rules of English grammar. Tl:Dr The words fail us. A word fails us. c.f. The cliche: "Words fail me"


0

Use fails for third person singular conjugation. Use fail otherwise. Since "words" is not singular, use fail.


0

You have clarified in your comments that you want to write to the client informing him/her that the organiser has agreed to cover your client's business-class fare for travel to the event. I would phrase that along the following lines: I am pleased to inform you that the organiser has agreed to cover the costs of your [return ?] flight by business ...


1

Your health condition entitles you to the seat upgrade. M-W: entitled -ˈtīt-liŋ, -əl-iŋ\ transitive verb 1 : to give a title to : designate 2 : to furnish with proper grounds for seeking or claiming something


0

The reason for revealing the plan is the hubris of the villain. Excessive pride or self-confidence. 1.1. (In Greek tragedy) excessive pride towards or defiance of the gods, leading to nemesis. His failure was brought on by his hubris. - MW Obviously the villain would not put hubris forth as reason, but an outside observer very well might.


0

Okay, I think the answer to your question is "the client is eligible for an upgrade" , but let's clarify first, looks like your question is: "How to suggest your client gets a business class seat due to health impairment", is that correct? "The client is eligible for an upgrade to a Business Class seat on the grounds of health impairment" Now, regarding ...


2

In addition to the fact already mentioned that "killed" is less specific than murdered, I'd say that "the killed man" is unidiomatic. "Killed" and "murdered" are both verbs, but here they are used as an adjective, making them attributive verbs. By using these verbs without an object as in your examples, they become deverbal adjectives (verbs behaving ...


0

The term usually used off-late is "the murder victim". Check the google ngrams below, including terms suggested by you. You are still right in absolute terms but the trend is changing. Edit: Arctic Tony is right too. Killed does not always mean murdered. There are other ways to get killed.


0

I think you are looking for something like this: count something on the fingers of one hand: Used to emphasize the small number of a particular thing: you can count the exceptions on the fingers of one hand More example sentences: Throughout the eighteen years of Conservative government, the total number of Cabinet ministers with children ...


1

I would go with parting shot: A final remark, usually cutting or derogatory, made just before departing. The parting shot can (and usually does, at least in movies) include a revelation.


2

I have a couple suggestions for the reason: Vindicate: to show that (someone or something that has been criticized or doubted) is correct, true, or reasonable http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vindicate Justify: to provide or be a good reason for (something) to prove or show (something) to be just, right, or reasonable to provide a good ...


3

[the] reveal the moment in which previously withheld information about characters or plot is unveiled.


0

TVTropes (a website that catalogues pop culture cliches) has it listed as Motive Rant. See: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/MotiveRant. For a more general answer I'd go with Impetus which basically means the driving force behind some action.


0

Without more detail, any one of the other posters could be right, but the general sense of the statement is, "Guys who are better off than me, annoy me." These could be guys who are "in love," or "with it," or "excited about their work," or any other form of "switched on," because your colleague "is not." Someone in his early 40s is more likely to feel any ...



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