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0

You're probably looking for the word 'aphorism'. There are entire books of aphorisms, online and off, and so no need to think of examples. As an example of such a book, consider Aphorisms, by Hippocrates. Often, aphorisms become cliches, and in the process lose their meaning. Exploiting this circumstance can deliver rhetorical and humorous profits: "You ...


0

I would just refer to it as juxtaposition, I think? I don't know that there's a particularly easy way to refer to the contrasting of opposite words like these ones.


0

Some additional phases that I have heard in the past include: Dancing on shifting sands Running on water Snatching at fog Trying to nail down a shadow


0

Pence in the pound I’ve just watched the news tonight, and apparently today the Bank of England dropped the base interest rate to “one and half pence in the pound.” I’m totally shocked ... If was measuring anything else but money, of course, it would be 1.5%. Matt Godbolt's blog It is a measure of how many pennies per pound are ...


1

This is an unusual usage -- normally pence in the pound refers to tax rates when it's equivalent to percent. Here it's more like an anglicised "pennies on the dollar" (related question) meaning a small fraction of the nominal value.


0

You might consider evolving, mutating or mutable.


2

The phrase I would use in this case is "... right out from under me," with the leading part variable depending on the context. In your particular example, I would say something like: Well, nuts, looks like this document got revised right out from under me.


1

'The ground is shifting under my feet' is an expression that I think most closely reflects the situation described of a document being edited while you are editing it. 'Shifting goalposts' is not quite analogous. More suitable for the 'boss' changing what they want the document to say when you present it for review.


0

How about transitory, fleeting, or fugacious?


2

I invented the term. Kenneth Duda and Thomas Lumley have it right (though phenry and GenericJam gave good guesses). It's a play on words. The "people from the concrete steppes" think of the economy (and the effects of monetary policy in particular) like a mechanism, where the central bank moves one lever, which causes another lever to move, and so on. They ...


1

I have yet to see someone mention the most common phrase I would use to describe this: a ninja edit; that is, a change to something that happens while you are commenting on it. I find it to be a very common saying on forums and message boards. Urban dictionary confirms this, if you consider that valid: A ninja edit is an change made to a published post ...


2

How about inscribe? to mark (a surface) with words, characters, etc., especially in a durable or conspicuous way. (m-w.com)


1

Well there is a word but it might be a little over the top! emblazon /ɪmˈbleɪz(ə)n,ɛm-/ verb conspicuously inscribe or display a design on. "T-shirts emblazoned with the names of baseball teams"


1

Clauses contain nouns and verbs; phrases are missing one or the other; constructions describe any word group, independent or subordinate. There are participle uses for clauses and phrases, but I think the term "participle construction" describes both types of word groups. Participle clauses contain nouns and verbs, but they're not independent: they never ...


2

The answer is certainly yes, such cases do exist. But before I show you a few, please try to keep in mind the advice from Oxford University Press cited at the end of The Economist’s Style Guide’s section on hyphens: If you take hyphens seriously, you will surely go mad. Yes, they buried their own lede. I didn’t. So now let’s look at some places ...


2

Text is a presentation of language, with some advantages that speech lacks, the main one being portability across space and time, but also with some disadvantages, for example: --fluency alone is not enough--you have to learn to read; --until the advent of text-to-speech you couldn't really chop onions while engaging with the language; --the structure of ...


-2

I'd say : Feels like working on a chameleon.


8

In the UK we often accuse someone of "moving the goal posts" if they change requirements or conditions in a way that makes our efforts or arguments redundant. The same phrase can also be used in a less accusatory manner if events overtake us, but this is slightly less common, IME.


1

The reason to use hyphens in cases such as this is to make it clear that the hyphenated string is used as a single adjectival unit. You pretty much have to hyphenate when you use any string of words as an adjective in the attributive position, i.e., preceding and modifying a noun. Such strings also appear hyphenated in the dictionary when they've been ...


1

"hyphens ...(are) ...not needed in speech, so they must be extraneous" means you don't say, for example, "two hyphen year hyphen old." You don't say the word "hyphen" out loud. Here's an example of a word where I like to insert a hyphen for clarity: re-sent To: school administrator (complaining about school unresponsiveness) I am having trouble ...


0

You could thank him for allowing autonomy or self-direction autonomy / self-direction - personal independence


2

I'm not sure if this is a purely Australian expression, but here we often say that the "goalposts are shifting" in a situation where you can't achieve anything due to constantly changing requirements.


0

Being from the United States (the Midwest), I've never heard the phrase. I doubt that I would've been able to discern its meaning out of context. That said, we use quite a few idioms that begin with those words: "sweet as pie," "...honey," "...sugar," etc. Basically, it would only be used when followed by a sweet object in order to call something else ...


2

“We Are Building a Plane in Mid-Air”


0

nurturing may be the word you're looking for. to support and encourage, as during the period of training or development; foster:


0

There were Bible translations before the KJV, and this synonym for death appears in numerous places in Tyndale (1534). For example, Acts 5:5 reads: "When Ananias herde these wordes, he fell doune and gave vp the goost." Cf. Matthew 27:50: "Iesus cryed agayne with a lowde voyce and yelded vp the goost."


0

clusterflux also like nailing jelly to a tree


1

Posts submitted to StackExchange are subject to change and are continually evolving due to the editorial efforts of the community. That is the nature of the beast here at SE.


4

We always called it a living document. Changes are ever happening and the status quo is always in flux.


0

Of course! Many kinds of phrases, appositives, verbal phrases, absolute phrases, can be included with an independent clause. Combining these different grammatical structures will give your sentences more depth and richness.


1

Yes, it's fine. In your example, "specifically in San Francisco" is an appositive to "in California". An appositive adds information without affecting truth. Here, giving more information about where you live is not relevant to the truth of "I live in California".


1

Fluid (reference.com) changing readily; shifting; not fixed, stable, or rigid: Fluid (free dictionary) fluid - subject to change; variable; "a fluid situation fraught with uncertainty"; "everything was unstable following the coup" Unstable: liable to change or fluctuate quickly: an unstable weather pattern. (an unstable work/code/dev ...


2

"Let alone," as I think you know, is a way of emphasizing a thing that's really not going to happen. Regarding the question of which sentence is correct, the first one works better because you have the emphatic phrase next to the thing it's emphasizing -- video game.


0

It is not easy to make the subtle differerence clear between to try to do and to try doing ( to do/doing stands for any infinitive or gerund). "to try to do" is the normal construction meaning to attempt to do. to try doing: Longman DCE has the heading "test/use". Longman tries to explain by saying: to do or use something for a short while to discover if ...


3

I've heard this situation called shifting requirements. "It's hard to predict what the final product will look like, thanks to all these shifting requirements!"


0

A few phrases that capture the time / out-of-step component of your question: "a day late and a dollar short" or "always behind the eight-ball" or "I zig when everyone else zags.


0

Try quicksilver. It has the element of mercurial (being a colloquialism for the element mercury) but also contains the uncertainty principle idea as it "runs away" when you try to touch it. So, you could say "editing quicksilver" or "a quicksilver task" or "the quicksilver meaning" or "a page of quicksilver paragraphs". It also has a kind of infinite ...


11

If you're looking for one with a negative connotation - you can say you are "building on quicksand".


0

An open question is a question without an agreed answer. An open-ended question is a question that defies a simple answer.


0

They actually refer to two different contexts and they don't have the same meaning: Open question: (Collins) matter which is undecided a question that cannot be answered with a yes or no but requires a developed answer Whether or not juvenile crime can be reduced remains an open question Open-ended question: Unstructured ...


0

An "open question" is one for which the definitive answer is not known: "what became of the Neanderthals?" An open-ended question is one for which even the meaning of the question is open to interpretation: "how should we worship God?"


62

I would suggest moving target. Longman online (3) says: a moving target something that is changing continuously, so that it is very difficult to criticize it or compete against it


0

I always took it to mean that he "practiced what he preached."


3

Evolving could be a suitable option.


4

The 1st word that comes to mind is "mercurial"- defined as changeable; volatile; fickle; flighty; erratic: Other fine words I would use would also be things like protean or mutable If we are talking about something changing because you are working on it there are some good science terms namely the "Uncertainty principle", that observation alters the ...


14

'Capricious' sounds like more close since its more close to being 'arbitrary'. 'Volatile' is also nice to use here but if it is regarding your example of a document it must be 'Dynamic'


-1

You can probably say, by the minute, transient, on the turn. Since you asked for a phrase the first and last should do.


5

I would use "dynamic" which google defines as (of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress If you wish to use it as a phrase then try "dynamic system", "dynamic process", "the dynamic nature of..." or "dynamic in nature"


6

"in flux" or "ephemeral" both seem useful here.


3

As is always the case, context makes a difference in English. However here is an explanation that I hope will be useful.. 1. "I tried closing my eyes" ---> This usually signals an action that was actually carried out, e.g. I was at the dentist's; her lamp was very bright in my face. I tried closing my eyes but it was still uncomfortable. I asked her ...



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