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0

The second one is an adjective clause, not an adjective phrase. The fact that it begins with who is a clear sign. It also contains a verb, which phrases do not.


1

Chasing phantoms would describe chasing something that doesn't exist.


0

It may not be you but some other person or the nature (wind, sun) that dries the thing. You could have it dried by your mother, for example.


0

I think I'll be there in a day or two's time. is defensible, but it would be far more euphonious to say I'll be there in a day's time or two days' time.


0

B) is the correct answer. I'll be there in a day or two's time. https://www.google.gr/#tbm=bks&q=%22in+a+day+or+two%27s+time%22


0

They are adjective phrases. An adjective phrase is a group of words that describe a noun or pronoun in a sentence. The adjective phrase can be placed before, or after, the noun or pronoun in the sentence. http://examples.yourdictionary.com/adjective-phrase-examples.html


0

Chasing Happiness (The Blue Bird)


4

"chasing rainbows" seems like a good choice. trying to achieve something that is not possible or practical TFD e.g. He wanted to go into show business, but friends told him to quit chasing rainbows. I'm always chasing rainbows Watching clouds drifting by My schemes are just like all my dreams Ending in the sky... (lyrics by Joseph McCarthy) or ...


1

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


5

Wild goose chase: (via dictionary.com) Definition: a wild or absurd search for something nonexistent or unobtainable Example: a wild-goose chase looking for a building long demolished


3

will-o-the-wisp, Cambridge English Dictionary something that is impossible to get or achieve: Full employment is the will-o'-the-wisp that politicians have been chasing for decades From Wikipedia A will-o'-the-wisp....is an atmospheric ghost light seen by travellers at night, especially over bogs, swamps or marshes. It resembles a ...


0

The way I would read it is as the following: The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and the fraction he invested in mutual funds was 4/11. If the author prefers to include "that of," perhaps he'd word it like this: The fraction of Vishal's monthly income that he invested in stocks was 2/11, and that of mutual ...


1

Sometimes, English doesn't seem to work logically. An indefinite article is supposed to be placed before a singular noun or noun phrase. A month is a long period. *A two months is a long period. (Ungrammatical) But depending on how you perceive two months, you can treat two months as a singular unit (quantity of time) as in: Two months is a long ...


0

I can't help but notice a similarity between sentences containing the construction you've isolated (indefinite + adjective + unit of measurement) and sentences containing collective or group nouns like 'committee'. They both can appear with indefinite articles in singular and plural contexts, for example: It was an amazing two days. [singular] They were an ...


2

To be "in deep" can be understood as: inextricably involved in or committed to a situation. "He knew that he was in deep when his things began to proliferate in her apartment" Your sentence looks like a variation on it. Sometimes, a "strong" or negative word is omitted in spoken sentences, which in this situation could have been depression, as ...


0

That looks like a typo. It doesn't mean anything. Looks like someone was writing something like I've been in a fairly deep depression


0

(N.B the accepted answer is wrong -- see later in the answer for an updated answer) 'Are' because we discussing 'two numbers'. Same for 'two numbers whose sum is known' 'The sum of two numbers' would use 'is' because we are discussing 'the sum' 'The sum and difference of two numbers' would use 'are' because we are discussing 'the sum and difference' ...


2

Your premise is not correct. According to Oxford Dictionaries Online the phrase in the offing means Likely to happen or appear soon: there are several initiatives in the offing Similarly Collins likely to occur soon


2

The Holy Bible names them Simpleton and Naive. A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences.


-1

This question should be closed for it can be answered straightforwardly by looking up any dictionary and is linguistically unproductive. "Of a certain age" is a subjective expression, subjective being defined as "based on feelings or opinions rather than facts" (Webster Dictionary). Furthermore the Webster Dictionary defines "certain" (among other ...


0

I think what you are looking for is pending, something you consider likely to occur in the near-distant future.


1

In store (for somebody/something) — TFD planned or likely to happen. "We have a big surprise in store for you." "She's got a difficult few months in store, with her husband's illness." In the not too distant future — M-W at a time that is not long from now:  soon "Changes are expected in the not too distant future."


0

If the matrix being generated is a duplicate of another, I would use identical, and restructure the ending slightly. Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and fusion center can let the pseudo-random number generators generate a matrix indentical to that of matrix A. Or maybe: Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and fusion ...


1

The closest I can think of is dismissive. To be dismissive of someone or a group of people is to refuse to give proper consideration to their merits. Having said that, this seems to lack the venom of your example. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dismissive


0

Unsportsmanlike comes to mind here, as it is specific to the context of winning/losing. Merriam-Webster: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/unsportsmanlike


0

Shout down — TFD verb (tr, adverb) to drown, overwhelm, or silence by shouting or talking loudly By "shout down the road to something else", it's possible that it means the road is blocked from being accessed by something else.


2

We want to eat two more apples. We want to eat an additional two apples. (a little formal) We need two extra chairs.


6

The earliest Google Books match I could find for "[women] of a certain age" is from The Spectator, number 53 (May 1, 1711), and it takes the expression in an unexpected direction: Epictetus, that plain honest philosopher, as little as he had of gallantry, appears to have understood them [women], as well as the polite St. Evremont, and has hit this point ...


-1

He brushed off his opponent. The act of wiping something from your shoulder more readily portrays this.


0

I've used the phrase suggested by @TimRomano in a comment (emphasis mine): Sometimes you'll see "Principals only. No recruiters please." – Tim Romano Jul 7 '15 at 14:01


25

"X of a certain age" is an intentional vagueness, specific sounding euphemism that is entirely context dependent, on both general culture and the conversational topic, but is more often lately used to mean barely more specifically, later middle age. As a euphemism, it is directed non-specifically to a target range of age that is undesirable or otherwise not ...


6

In my experience, it's most often used colloquially to simply refer to "at our/their time of life". Looking it up, the consensus is that it means "no longer young", e.g. the freedictionary definition of simply who are not young. The Urban Dictionary definition is a little more direct: Ironically polite term for a woman who does not want her actual age ...


36

Of a certain age: who are not young: Adults of a certain age might want to spend a couple of hundred dollars more for a larger monitor that will be much easier on their eyes. Usage notes: used to avoid saying middle aged or old. Used also in a humorous sense: Somebody of a certain age: used to avoid saying that a ...


0

You can either say The reason why the grass is wet is that it rained last night. or, leaving out 'why', The reason the grass is wet is that it rained last night. or, to make it more complicated, replacing 'why' with 'for a certain reason', The reason for which the grass is wet is that it rained last night.


0

I read in a newspaer article called AJ Boyd if I rememer right that in the old west in cowboy saloons there was always a piano where the piano player whatever he knew. In time some man started writting piano music for those saloons, standarizing popular songs that caught on. His name was ______Tonk. In time people starting requesting from the piano player to ...


0

It's an invalid test. In most cases, even if the button were completely disconnected it would be a positive test or a negative test. In the case where the test is somehow flawed as you describe, then it's an invalid test. Other common terminology may include: incomplete test, insufficient test, incompatible test, or the test is considered null and void.


1

You could say something like, "Please arrive punctually as Anne has another appointment scheduled soon after the meeting and needs to accommodate for travel time."


-5

The title of the article is: Tea Party activist to GOP: 'Take off your lace panties,' cut more from the budget" The gist of the article can be summed up in the final paragraph: "I say to the Republican leadership: take off your lace panties, stop being noodle backs, take a strong, bold, unwavering stand for the American people." The context of ...


16

The terms are often confused, probably for the fact that some people think that tact is a short for tactic (which is similar to tack): Tact is sensitivity in social situations. A tack is a course or an approach (the word has nautical origins). When switching courses or taking a different approach, one changes tack, not tact. Tact often appears in ...


0

The Internal Revenue Service (US) calls this a "controlled group."


2

It's not a fixed phrase but an instance of a standard construction, ever the NOUN. Ever here has the sense always. Phrases of this usually occur in apposition to the subject of a clause and characterize the subject's action as typical of his identity as a NOUN: Ever the academic, John is reluctant to give off-the-cuff opinions: he prefers to research a ...


0

Are you talking about the "steampunk" fashion/style? It is a low-tech homage inspired by the writing of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G.Wells. (Think: 19th century mad-scientist or inventor.)


0

Most of the other answers imply that delay is a good thing. I don't think that is implied by "the opposite of as early as possible". Responding to the question, I would use "not later than", implying that any time before that was equally good, but still imposing the deadline.


0

Like many terms, this could have many opposites, depending on the sense you have in mind. "Eye candy" can simply mean a person or object that is pretty, or it can mean a person or object that serves no purpose other than to be pretty. In the first case, "opposite" could mean someone who is not particularly pretty or attention getting, e.g. "plain". Or it ...


0

It should be Take your time but within the specified time. The above line gives both freedom as well as the restriction of doing the work by defining a boundary value of within specified time.


0

I've used "publicly available" for similar instances. Depending on its copyright status, you could also consider "public domain."


1

gewgaw, as defined by Wiktionary Showy; unreal; pretentious. It has a nice 600 year history, too. 1678, Dryden, John, All for Love, Scene II, The rattle of a globe to play withal, This gewgaw world, and put him cheaply off. Another example: 1855, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Maud; A Monodrama, X, stanza 1, Seeing his gewgaw castle shine, New as ...


0

Kitsch 1: something that appeals to popular or lowbrow taste and is often of poor quality 2: a tacky or lowbrow quality or condition "Kitsch." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 13 May 2016. There is a strong air of, shall we say, unoriginality about kitsch. Of course, if it was done a long time ago, we call it neoclassical.


1

I would have said, "easy on both the lettuce and onions." Or to use your wording, "Can you give me a little of both lettuce and onions." It's the use of the word "both" that denotes you mean to include the two of them together in the same context. Alternatively, you could use the word "little" in front of each: "Can you give me a little lettuce and a ...


0

In an intellectual or academic setting, I would go with "a gentleperson and a scholar."



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