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1

That is or i.e. is used for clarifying a statement. Think of it as "in essence" or "in other words". Use that is when you want to explain what you just said in a different way.A definition, metaphor, or a clarification can follow. You may want to check examples here (Read the part that explains i.e) I am including a few examples here: 1.The elephant is ...


0

'This has prompted soul-searching over Amazon’s 41 percent share of new book sales in America and its 65 percent share of new books sold online.' Amazon has 41 percent share. That is, as you say, an objective figure. But the soul-searching is over this fact. This implies that knowing that Amazon has 41 percent share (a lot) and having a dispute with a ...


2

The OED definition you wrote for soul-searching is the applicable one: Deep and anxious consideration of one’s emotions and motives or of the correctness of a course of action. In this case, it is referring to the continued support of Amazon by the book-buying public, to the detriment of physical book stores and other online book-sellers. Amazon's ...


0

There are two different bookselling models between "Paris" (physical bookstores) and Amazon (online book sales). When Amazon stopped delivering books, it put the writer in the mood to count bookstores in Paris, and caused the writer to "search her soul" to see if the "Paris" model isn't better.


1

I was in a bookstore-counting mood, see: there were seven bookstores within a 10-minute walk of my apartment. You could use this if you wanted "I was in a xxx-counting mood," but you'd best explain it afterwards, e.g.: I was in a house counting mood, so I counted all the houses on Main Street. The author explains her "counting mood" by mentioning ...


0

A Greek chorus aka known as a "homogeneous non-individualized group of performers" is an "echo" to the main character. An American term might be "cheering section." In the context of a single individual, the term would be "yes man." An "echo," "cheering section," or "yes man" is specifically what a husband is not supposed to be. So Tolstoy is saying that ...


0

Your instinct is basically correct, in that “Go against type” as “go against typical pattern or traditional way of thinking." In the Wall Street context, it does NOT mean "aggressive, abrasive and revolutionary” because those are terms that could define Wall St. firms, i.e. Morgan Stanley's peers. Having "fewer of the grand ambitions or larger-than-life ...


0

Though it doesn’t have the same flavor as the original Hungarian phrase, the term overcorrect is often used in such situations.


0

If the intended meaning is “to divide into two equal portions”, then I would use the verb halve.


0

Please see this : Both forms occur in objective writing, but "when compared to" occurs more often in personal and persuasive writing. "As compared to" is the standard form in the reporting of statistics from research. It's used in scientific, technical, and business writing. It's very impersonal. "When compared to" is a short form of "when one compares ...


0

1982 the who song " athena" is the earliest pop reference i can find that uses the term the bomb as its currently used . "she's a girl, she's a bomb"


0

A gauntlet is not only glove designed for combat, but it is also a word which expresses the idea of being in danger on both your left and your right as you attempt to move forward as quickly as you can. The danger can come not only from gunfire on your right and left, but it can also come from other weapons such as sticks, stones, fists, whips, or ropes, ...


1

You need the other definition of gauntlet: (in phrase run the gauntlet) 1 Go through an intimidating or dangerous crowd or experience in order to reach a goal: she had to run the gauntlet of male autograph seekers 2 historical Undergo the military punishment of receiving blows while running between two rows of men with sticks. From ...


1

You are using an unrelated meaning of gantelet from Old French gantelet (“gauntlet worn by a knight in armor, a token of one's personality or person, and symbolizing a challenge”), diminutive of gant (“glove”). Here it means "a simultaneous attack from two or more sides", originally gantlope, from Swedish gatlopp (“passageway”), from Old Swedish gata ...


0

"For all intensive purposes" is wrong. It was first written by someone who heard the phrase "for all intents and purposes" incorrectly. That is, it's something people who have misheard "for all intents and purposes" but who have never seen it written, have started using. It's meaning - to the extent it has any meaning - would be nearly opposite of the ...


1

I think it's worth noting that when I saw this thread in my weekly email, I (and no doubt many others) knew exactly what it referred to. It's highly likely that in my mind's ear, I heard it with the "correct" pronunciation, despite the absence of any phonetic indicators. That suggests that context matters, and that simply writing 'potato-potato' might not be ...


1

My one and a half cents worth would be- you are combining two (different) ideas in one sentence. One is expressing your desire to connect: "I wanted to..." This is an expression of your feelings, and does not relate directly to the person you are addressing. The second is a request: "please..." This is a way of asking to connect. Assuming you want to ...


0

It seems you are trying to define a distinct set of method, which includes 'Method A' and any others like it. If you can derive them from a common ancestor, that would provide you with the necessary bounds for something as necessarily specific as a legal document. Something along the lines of "Method A, and any other methods : derived from ...


1

These sound like typical non-native emails, I experience and work with them regularly. Would you mind on a permission level sits like this... Would you mind if we continued the meeting this afternoon? And on a favour level like this... Would you mind continuing the meeting this afternoon? The first you'd use in a more formal situation, due to the ...


0

The intention is to express a request in a "polite" way. But besides being unnecessary it makes for an awkward sentence. "Please" followed by the request is sufficient.


2

Would you mind providing some details, please? Is perhaps the more 'correct' and slightly more formal way of rephrasing your question. Or the example given by @unorthodox grammar is just as good, and slightly less formal: If you don't mind, would you please provide some details...? The please is optional in either place, as the 'would you mind?' ...


0

Yes it's correct; you're stating a fact. There is [pointing something out] a good fellow [the thing]. Setting aside the attached meaning of the phrase for a minute, grammatically it's no different than saying "There's a good restaurant", or "That's a nice toy-truck". The phrase "There's a good fellow" goes back to the idea of being a "good man". It's used ...


4

The word nerd has so many cultural connotations, both positive and negative, that you should read the Wikipedia article about it to get a good understanding. Generally, it is used as a label for someone who: is highly intelligent and very knowledgeable about mathematics, science, and computers; is a fan of science fiction and/or similar pursuits (e.g., ...


1

Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1848, s.v. Drag out says ‘A “knock down and drag out” is a fight carried to extremities [my emphasis]. The term drag out seems also to be used, at the South, to denote a bully, a tearer’, and gives an instance: Set to your partner, Dolly,—Cut him out, Jim, —Sald does put her foot down good. The yellow roan’s up! ...


1

It's a fight. It's violent enough that one opponent is knocked out. They easiest way to remove an unconscious person from the pub (arena/venue/other) where the fight took place is to drag him out to the street. There would be no dragging out without the knockdown, so that may be why the shorter phrase came after the longer one was already in use.


0

It comes from boxing; a knock-down, drag-out fight is a lengthy one, where both opponents are closely matched in size, skill, and weight, so they manage to knock each other down (but not out), and extend the fight.


-1

This phrase is generally used when someone helps you out in your work,and you praise him by using this phrase.Its not generally used by modern speakers.


2

Depending on context... For a small music group such as a rock band, for example, I'd mention the missing current members: "The legendary Prog-Rock group YES will be touring the US this summer minus its iconic lead vocalist, Jon Anderson." If it's a large group such as the US Army Band, for example, I might call the smaller group an "ensemble" made up ...


-1

Would Partial Ensemble be appropriate?


4

A punishment may be harsh, but if it's meted out equally to all who merit it, it would be considered fair (impartially administered or unbiased). If you have trouble seeing how this could be, maybe you're not seeing one sense of the word 'fair'.


1

perfunctory - (adjective) (of an action or gesture) carried out with a minimum of effort or reflection. http://en.wiktionary.org/w/index.php?title=perfunctory


0

I think that this Nazi reasoning given to us by Joseph Goebbles, even in translation, has been read in English print long enough for it to qualify as a common English Phrase. https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/goebbelslie.html If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can ...


0

Many people celebrate the first menstruation much like quinceañera. This link explains it all. Honestly, first moon parties done RIGHT, aren't as weird as it sounds. It’s a HUGE life event that marks massive changes for the female’s body, no one is going to celebrate your moody-crampy week again, so why not do it the one time and enjoy the free chocolate.


1

The entry for the Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (this edition 1984) seems to capture one possible path for the evolution of this phrase quite nicely. The first three meanings were all British Army slang, and the progression from idle to AWOL to angry makes perfect sense. Idle, not engaged on any particular job (Army, W.W. I), ...


-3

Cockney rhyming slang: spare tyre = ire.


0

My dad said my grandad was laid off in 1948 and he was termed to be 'going spare'. This teamed with the obvious annoyance it would breed leads me to buy that colloquial language would adopt the phrase as a depiction of anger.


-1

Put you into trouble. push you into trouble. trouble you. Are better usages.


2

I've also seen the one that Cugel mentioned; that's close to what you're describing, though it's more about the risk than the actual outcome. (Which is to say that you may not be hanged at all; you're merely risking that possibility, whereas you're seeking something where the person believes that things cannot get better.) The one I've seen used commonly, ...


2

There is: One might as well be hanged for a sheep as a lamb which is common in the UK. In the bad old days, if you were caught poaching on the master's land, you got the death penalty regardless of what you were poaching. Hence, if you were going to poach at all, you might as well go for the bigger, more valuable "sheep," as opposed to the smaller ...


0

It depends what you are referring to! if you are referring to Dog as an animal you say: I like Dogs (meaning all dogs/dog varieties). If you have been talking about a specific Dog (your dog or neighbour's). You might wanna say: I like that Dog. If you are comparing animal species (talking biology or some zoology stuff). you might wanna say: ...


1

I've always used the phrase "I might as well get my money's worth." There's obviously no financial arrangement but it implies that you might as well get the most value out of the arrangement that is possible.


0

"I like dogs" - I like all dogs. "I like this dog" - I like this specific dog. "I like dog" - I like 'dog' as a particular object. If you were of the inclination to ever eat a dog's meat, you'd say 'I like dog.'


1

"I like X" suggests you like the stuff of X. When it is an animal, the implication is that you like to eat it. Thus, "I like dog" sounds like dog as a food. "I like Xs" suggests you like things of the X type; thus for animate objects it suggests you enjoy spending time with them, so "I like dogs" suggests you like them as pets. "I like this X" is entirely ...


5

Once for all is now old fashioned, once and for all being standard. The Oxford English Dictionary from ca. thirty years ago says "once for all, now usually once and for all".


1

Ngram shows a wider usage of once and for all and very little usage of once for all. Once and for all: Adv. once and for all - in a conclusive way; "we settled the problem conclusively"


1

In other words: hindsight is 20/20. It means that you're often much better at judging a situation after the fact rather than while you're experiencing it. See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hindsight_bias


1

'With the perspective time gives [to me]...' means: I have found this perspective in the time that has passed. The time that has passed has allowed me to see this perspective.


0

I've always heard it came from the TV show Dragnet. "'Marijuana is the flame, heroin is the fuse, LSD is the bomb'", it's from a 1968 episode called "The Big Prophet." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Twre6ItGEI


1

As an informal turn of speech, it can be used to show that two or more parties are talking about basically the same thing but not in same exact terms, or not quite agreeing on the specifics. You could use color-colour or apologise-apologize, or one of many other spelling differences between AmE and BrE, to express the same thing. I don't think there ...


6

You could use a simpler transcription, that, even if people were unfamiliar with the notation, would still convey that a difference exists: "tomāto, tomäto". The macron (overbar) indicating a long vowel was something I was taught in elementary school, and it's widely enough known that it sometimes gets used in brand names (pūr, fōn, etc). The diaeresis ...



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