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Placement of 'please' in both the sentences is idiomatic English. 'Please' is used commonly at the end with a syntax as in the post in English to make a request more polite. The same sintax with 'please' in the mid or front positions brings in a change in semantics meaning the request is serious or important and sometimes, sounds more like an order.Placed ...


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I don't know where its from, but its relevant to self-confidence/confidence: when there's nothing you might be hiding e.g. insecurity, a dark past, an alter ego, a boring/bad life etc etc then you can be fully confident in yourself and your actions i.e. socially.


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The correct sentence would be "I treat My teammates like my brothers."


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'Dropping out' has a new meaning (beyond quitting school).


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You probably want this: His case comes before the court on the 27th of February. You can ”come into” a courtroom, but you “come before” the court, as in you present yourself to the court. The courtroom is the room the court is in, but the court is the judge and other people who officiate in the courtroom. The date grammar is like “the 27th [day] of ...


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Neither version of "See" belongs in that sentence. See means "Look at" or "observe" So your sentences literally mean: "Do you want to watch me remove things?" When you really want to ask: "Do you want me to remove things?" Removing "See" may also help you realize that "to be" is not relevant. A person does not "be something removed", a person "has ...


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"something you would like to see being removed" implies that they might want to watch the process of it being removed (i.e. continuous present) "something you would like to be seen removed" is not grammatical. "be seen" is passive. If someone wants to "be seen" then it means they want someone else to see them doing something or in some condition. ...


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Blazing is a present participle, a verb which can be used to modify a noun. It is effectively an adjective in this form. Blazing modifies the noun phrase warmth and respect. As @Silenus says well in a comment, the term blazing means To shine or be resplendent with: eyes that blazed hatred. American Heritage It means show an intensity of emotion ...


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In the US the term most often refers to a structure that is separate from the regular "primary" ("elementary") or "secondary" ("high school") school building, having been built because there was not enough space in the main building to accommodate all the students. Typically the construction is somewhat less grand than the main building, and, eg, heating ...


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The term "school annex" usually describes something that has been annexed or added to a school district. For example, if a school is overcrowded, the district might move a small building onto the grounds, assign some students to it and call it an annex.


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I'm from Aberdeen and use this all the time, and I'd never come across anyone I'd said it to in Scotland who didn't understand. I moved down south, and someone picked me up on it and I was stumped- I couldn't actually find a different way to get across what I was trying to say! It makes total sense to me colloquially, albeit incorrect English!


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But has commonly been used as an adverb to mean only; e.g. "I am but one man." Sometimes they are still interchangeable: "Sell them, only (or but) save four of the best for us." Sometimes this replacement sounds okay, other times it would sound a little funny or change the meaning, and in quite a few circumstances it would be really awkward. I find it much ...


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It means, "I am just one person out of billions that exist on this earth."


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Do you take on new students? or Are you accepting new students? or I wish to learn. Would you teach me?


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Your first use of contacts is wrong. Contact has many meanings. contact does not have a plural in your context, it would be The more contact the cloth has with the dirty surface, the more spoiled it gets. When speaking of contacts in plural the word refers either to electrical contacts or to people with whom you have a connection. Also, the info cards ...


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Poetic license is yours to use, however, I should think about it a second time before I wrote "enraged expression" Enraged to me suggests the noun is somehow sentient, possibly even intelligent, but that this intelligence has been set aside due to rage. To speak of an expression with intelligence of its own (ie. one that doesn't belong to the owner of the ...


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Please refer to the book The Last Moon "enraged expression" is the phrase used; "an" is not used due to phoenetic sound starts with 'n' Here is the same phrase used in one more book "Scarred Heaven"


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I interpreted it different from the person who said "I could have a cheeseburger," as I don't think the question was about the main verb "have" but "could have" as a conditional perfect form. COULD HAVE: It's possible that something happened; I just don't remember or don't know: I can't remember going to gym class in first grade, but I could have (gone to ...


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Well first, the differences: "could" denotes possibility, or ability for something to be, while "would" denotes willingness or conditional possibility. I could have a cheeseburger. All this is really saying is that I have the option of a cheeseburger should I choose it. It doesn't necessary mean I want one, or that I'm going to have one, just that the ...


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Yes, you are correct. The metaphor is a gold miner who is swinging a pick axe again and again and only hitting dirt, and then clank! he strikes gold and celebrates his good fortune. So in your example sentence, you have someone who has presumably been dating and looking for a girlfriend but finding only “dirt” and then recently he met Janet and “struck ...


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As someone who has read a lot of resumes, works well under pressure works for me. It is succinct and clear. I would not know what you meant by "Pressure performer"; I would find that term in a resume irritating. My immediate picture when I first saw it in your question was of a dancer in a hyperbaric chamber. A multitasker may or may not be able to work ...


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In industrial laundries there are also the processes of drying (or tumble drying) and dry cleaning. They (the laundry machine, detergent manufacturers and the service providers) mostly use the common term "Laundry" for all of the laundry (linen) processing steps but when they have to specify the type of the laundry, they use the specific term. They don't ...


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An idiomatic expression would be to keep a cool head To maintain a calm demeanor and think clearly in a difficult, stressful, or troubling situation [The Free Dictionary] Personal Point of View If you are wondering if using idioms in resumes is informal, I have used idioms and phrases while creating my own resume and being in IT, I do review quite a ...


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collected, level-headed, established, persevering, tenacious, unflinching, unshakable; you could also explore some synonyms of these words. Personally, I think "pressure performer" doesn't sound right, while multi-tasking means something else entirely - the ability to focus on several tasks at once, with no reference to pressure.


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Polishing a Turd (NAVY) Someone trying to make an idiot look like a genus. (Music Industry) The house band attempting to make the opening act singer sound good when they sing terrible. (Government) Promoting a person as having high moral management standards, when in fact they have no morality at all.


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A: Notice Definitions 3,4,5,6 http://www.thefreedictionary.com/heart All pointing to "heart" in a metaphoric sense as the seat of things like emotion, strength, and courage. To "have a lot of heart" means to have a lot of these deep inner resources. (and is not limited to compassion as some might assume) B: This metaphoric use of "heart" has a long ...


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To have a heart: If someone has a heart, they are kind and sympathetic. If you say, 'Have a heart' to someone, you are asking them to be understanding and sympathetic. Source: http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/have+a+heart.html to show kindness and sympathy: I can't teach somebody to have a heart. Source: ...


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To have a lot of heart means to be particularly empathic, compassionate or loving. Although I can't say I've seen a cast-iron origin for this specific idiom, it likely stems from the heart traditionally being used as a symbol of love and caring. See examples such as "[The Grinch's small] heart grew three sizes that day" in The Grinch.


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This is not a question of correctness of syntax applied in the English language, but of logic. Therefore, this question applies to any language in the world. Such a sentence logic is probably more suitable to fantasy stories, especially those with time travel, the physics of multiple time lines, or stochastic events happening over a spectrum of ...


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There are a couple of issues with the proposed alternative. The phrase "If not too long ago, ..." can be initially read as "If [it was] not too long ago, [then] ...". This makes the rest of the sentence sound confusing. The reader who happened to pick that interpretation of the starting phrase then needs to start again. If the reader didn't stumble at the ...


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To understand the idiom "take a poke at" think of the difference between "taking a swing at" someone versus just poking them. A full swing is meant to knock them down, to hurt them. Where a poke (or a jab) is typically just meant to provoke or irritate the target. The usage "Bennett took a poke at the President's refusal to sign the bill" sounds rather ...


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The phrase sounds like it rises from back-country North American colloquialism. As commenter Verace notes, it means to make a disparaging appraisal, quite possibly in a humorous vein. Its probable etymology is pugilistic: an attack on a statement or person (e.g., "Mrs. Clinton struck back at at Mr. Trump today.") Since a "poke" is a small, pointed blow, ...


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Let's consider one of the definitions of Contact (noun) an acquaintance, colleague, or relative through whom a person can gain access to information, favors, influential people, and the like. [Dictionary.com] So if you lose your phone, you eventually lose all your contacts figuratively since you won't be able to communicate with them. This seems to ...


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The adjective fatal refers to (according to Merriam-Wester): 1 (obsolete) fated 2 fateful 3 a: of or relating to fate b: resembling fate in proceeding according to a fixed sequence c: determining one's fate 4 a: causing death b: bringing ruin c : causing failure Although some of the definitions have an aura of "nature" (or ...


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A newer theory: German for emperor is Kaiser /Kaizer/. German for cheese is Kase /Keizer/ ( sorry, no schwar in iphone) British WW1 soldiers may well have got a rise out of pronouncing Kaiser as Kase; hence a more derogatory theory for "Big Cheese" as a reference to "one with power over others".


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If I've read properly between the lines, your Russian phrase translates as Fuck everything and the horse as well. We do have a (rough) equivalent in English: Fuck you and the horse you rode in on. Let's go to the videotape.


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"Set up another session" implies that you would like to add another date in addition to the previously discussed date. E.g. if you originally booked for February 10th, then by saying "set up another session," you are saying you want to book them for February 10th and also another date. "Set up an alternative session" would be better. I'm not sure what ...


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http://www.beliefnet.com/resourcelib/docs/86/Letter_from_George_Washington_to_the_Grand_Master_of_Free_Mas_1.html 'YES' is the answer to the Question: Does the phrase "human Race" Allude to the idea of a relay? The following Letter from George Washington provides credence to this allusion. Letter from George Washington to the Grand Master of Free Masons ...


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I don't see any wrong to this sentence. There are several ways to express it. Here are two of them: 1.The reason is that we have to repeat everything to men. 2. The reason has to be for that you are talking me about because we have to repeat everything to men. for that you are talking me about - this part of speech is meant by. I hope it helps.


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Is "the reason has to be because" a common usage in colloquial conversations? It may be a common usage, but it's ungrammatical. Because is used between two propositions, to justify the first as a result of the truth of the second - I went to London because I wanted to visit X or She is not a good guitarist because she hardly ever practises. The reason has ...


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You don't specify the reason for the building work, but if the intention is to resell, you can use the colloquial term flipping. House flipping has become a hobby or even business in several parts of the U.S. The goal of course is to sell the house for more than the cost of purchase plus cost of repairs, thereby earning yourself a profit.


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Gentrify speaks to revitalizing a building, with improvements that increase the value. the process of renewal and rebuilding accompanying the influx of middle-class or affluent people into deteriorating areas that often displaces poorer residents


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The building is being renovated. Renovation or renovations are the common terms associated with redoing buildings in the construction and architectural industries...


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I restricted my search to 'eat shit', although I included that phrase with the variant spellings 'shite', 'sh*t', 'sh-t', and 's--t', where possible. I also included the various inflections of 'eat'. A troublesome instance in Supplemental Nights, 1888 (R.F. Burton), returned from a search for 'eat shite', footnoted "to eat skite" (as meaning "to talk or act ...


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"No can do" means "I can not do that", and there is an implication "It might be possible, but I'm not willing to try." It does not have a comma. I think the phrasing is meant to imply simplified English, as if speaking to a non-native speaker. I've never heard anyone use "No, can't do".


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No(-) can(+) do implies someone is not able to do something. No(-) can(+)not(-) do implies that whatever he or she is doing is impossible not to do. There is no comma in this phrase.


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In print, people may not have been ordering others to eat shit before the 1940s, but the euphemistic expression eat dung is much older. Ngram plots “eat dung” (red line) starting from 1800s When a few days after the Rais (one of the mullahs who watch over the people, and have power to flog any one who does not observe strictly the Muhammedan religion) ...


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The words "eat shit", used in the sense of "Go to Hell!", first appear in Ngram in the 50s. But, as it's a fairly rude phrase, it's use, prior to the "let it all hang out" 60s, was probably rarely recorded on durable media, even if it was spoken with fair frequency. (Speaking as someone born in 1949, I never got the impression that the expression was ...


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The expression appears to be from the second half of the 19th century. Eat shit: Also, eat crap. Submit to degrading treatment, as in He refused to eat shit from the coach. James T. Farrell had the one term in Grandeur (1930), “They don't eat nobody's crap,” and Mario Puzo the other in Dark Arena (1955), “He'd eaten shit all week.” (second half ...



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