New answers tagged

1

Not specifically related to sports, but consider leave no loose ends untied and dot the i's and cross the t's dot the i's and cross the t's (idiomatic) To take care of every detail, even minor ones; To be meticulous or thorough. Before taking the project to the CEO, let's make sure we dot the i's and cross the t's. Wiktionary


0

I don’t know if the origin of the similar expression: “cover all {the} angles” (from ‘WordReference[dot]com) is related to sports, but as used in the following excerpt from page 17 of Teach'n Beginning Defensive Field Hockey Drills, Plays, and Games Free Flow Handbook by Bob Swope (via ‘Google Book’), it does seem to be relevant to at least hockey (and ...


0

Another possibility (not specific to sport) is: ready for every contingency. A "contingency" is a possible but not very likely future event or condition;an eventuality; a future emergency that must be prepared for. Example: The United States is ready to deal with any contingencies in North Korea, a White House spokesman said on Thursday, dismissing ...


1

Leave no stone unturned Fig. to search in all possible places. (As if one might search under every rock.) "Don't worry. We'll find your stolen car. We'll leave no stone unturned." "In searching for a nice place to live, we left no stone unturned." to do everything possible in order to achieve or find something. "Both sides have vowed ...


0

You have missed a subtlety. "Very good,Sir" in fact implies that the servant is a senior servant who has the ability to judge the commands they have received, has done so and found them good. The alternative is "Yes, Sir" and we have all heard this used (if only on TV) by senior servants to imply something quite other. Footmen - for example - do not say ...


0

You might consider, give someone ten fingers, which alludes to the way a person may cup their hands and lock their fingers together to provide a boost. The other person will put a foot in those "ten fingers," and get the boost. Hey, come over here, and give me ten fingers so I can look in the window. Arthur's Soul Adventure “Give me ten ...


0

The term is 'Paronym' but the terms most striking and of greater currency, are Malapropism and Dogberryism It is the act of using an incorrect word in place of one that is similar in pronunciation and the effect is ludicrous. The words owe their origin to the characters of the selfsame names of Mrs. Malaprop (a character in 'The Rivals' by Sheridan) or ...


0

Try giving someone a boost Here, boost means helping someone by pushing or raising them from below. Example sentences - Boost him through the window. He gave me a boost to help me climb the wall.


0

We're on the same wavelength on the same wavelength : in agreement Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms


0

How about cachet ? (M-W) Definition of cachet an indication of approval carrying great prestige a characteristic feature or quality conferring prestige prestige "being rich doesn't have the cachet it used to" — Truman Capote Though I'm not sure if this would work with "effect". I think the effect is implied, so "cachet effect" just sounds redundantly ...


9

An 1844 translation of Wilhelm Meinhold, Mary Schweidler, The Amber Witch (1838) describes the conclusion of a trial for witchcraft that supposedly occurred in 1630 (the book was a piece of fiction but was presented as an old document discovered by the author, in the manner of James Macpherson's discoveries of the works of Ossian). First the judge pronounces ...


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


0

The term actually derives from the tradition of putting two coins over the deceased eyes. Two pennies two his name suggest a person leaves this earth with nothing more. Of course the saying has changed over the years, and it's lost its original intent. The monetary unit has change leading people to think it's an economic context, but it's more spiritual than ...


2

Perhaps Achilles' heel (with or without the apostrophe) An Achilles heel is a weakness in spite of overall strength, which can actually or potentially lead to downfall. While the mythological origin refers to a physical vulnerability, idiomatic references to other attributes or qualities that can lead to downfall are common. Wikipedia


1

Stress is very important in English, and affects meaning. Contrary to what we're usually taught, there are 3 levels of stress in English speech: hi, lo and mid, for convenience. There are about 40 or 50 words that are almost invariably unstressed in English: 'to' is one of them. I'll just rewrite that sentence with that type of unstressed word in italics: ...


2

Consider, chink [in the armor] : a weak spot that may leave one vulnerable. M-W fly in the ointment A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language wrench in the works a spanner (or North American monkey wrench) in the works A person or thing that prevents the ...


0

Two possibilities, hitch or catch. To illustrate the first, recall that the German plan to defeat the French in 1914 required the Germany army to overcome resistance in the Low Countries quickly. Unexpected Belgian resistance on 5 August required the Germans to spend 11 days to capture the defenses at Liège. From Leadership In Conflict by M Hughes and M ...


0

Dead giveaway something that reveals a fact or an intention completely. "The car in the driveway was a dead giveaway that someone was at home."


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


-1

"The military" is synonymous with "any military", or "the armed forces", which when viewed this way, would include all of the world's different armed forces. "Military" can be a plural noun, meaning "all the militaries" ("all the armed forces"), or an adjective, meaning "belonging or relating to an armed force". This isn't an idiom. You would say ...


0

The google reports (1) "great pleasure to us to" 7130K hits (2) "great pleasure to us" 321K hits (3) "great pleasure for us to" 199K hits (4) "great pleasure of ours to" 21.5K It's hard to explain the stats for (1) and (2). The Ngram viewer finds that before about 1945 (1) was more popular than (3), but after 1945 their positions switched. The ...


0

The intentional use of bad or incorrect grammar to make a humorous point is called a "solecism". This was the most unkindest cut of all. --Julius Caesar, Shakespeare


2

circular dependency a relation between two or more modules which either directly or indirectly depend on each other to function properly. Such modules are also known as mutually recursive. http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_dependency


-1

Perhaps you are looking for "mutually inclusive". Mutually inclusive means "neither may exist without the other".


1

The sentence I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful is grammatically correct. But it would be much more natural (and simple) to insert the adjectives before the noun described: I want to be smart and beautiful, like you. The simplest way of writing or speaking English is nearly always the best way.


-2

Deadlock situation? Coming at it from a computer science perspective, here is the definition.


0

I like the picturesque phrase describing your English. And in English, the word yolk means the yellow part of the egg - you don't have to say yolk of an egg because there is no other meaning of the word. I think it would help if you told us your mother tongue, and then we could perhaps work out what spider means to you.


6

As you noted, "infinite feedback loop" is not the right term (and not just because your situation has nothing to do with software). That sounds more like a runaway success story, which is quite the opposite of your situation. If you wanted to borrow technical jargon from programming, it would be deadlock: In concurrent programming, a deadlock is a ...


0

"Anyway" should be "any way". Get the basics right, and then add decorative flourishes if needed. That said, "plenty of" is not usually used in formal contexts: try "much" instead. Then you've made your meaning plain, which is what you set out to do - no elaboration required.


0

My mother used to tell me: "There's a difference between hearing and listening. If you're just using your ears, you're hearing the person, but not what they're saying. If you're listening: then you're hearing them, but also paying attention to what they have to say. So to be a good conversationalist, you should also be a good listener." A really ...


22

Catch-22 To use it in a sentence, "It's a catch-22" or "It's a catch-22 situation" From Google's definition of Catch-22: a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions. "a catch-22 situation" (Paraphrased very slightly) from Wikipedia's Catch-22 (logic): A catch-22 is ...


-1

It's a paradox. An infinite looping event. As bib said, a chicken and egg situation.


13

This sounds like a chicken and egg situation. a situation in which it is impossible to say which of two things existed first and which caused the other It's a chicken and egg situation - I don't know whether I was bad at the sciences because I wasn't interested in them or not interested in them and therefore not good at them. Cambridge Idioms ...


1

I would play with 'substantial improvements could be achieved' and, more importantly, I would add the ways those improvements can be achieved.


1

It's not a big change, but the following sentence will sound more professional: "Even in ..., there is considerable room to improve ...", Altenative: "Even in ..., much improvement remains to be done.",


1

If you say, "I think I spider," any native English speaker will think that you said, "I think I spied her," and will be very confused. Spider can, in fact, be used as a verb, and has several possible meanings: 1 [no object] Move in a scuttling manner suggestive of a spider: ‘a treecreeper spidered head first down the tree trunk’ 1.1Form a ...


1

Spider is a noun and has never been used as a verb. ( That doesn't mean that one day it won't become a verb and it may not express what you are trying to express.) Also, as Kristina said above, this may be too literal of a translation of your language to English. As far as "my English is not the yoke from the egg," it sounds like you are saying that your ...


0

Since you asked for the name of an IDEOLOGY, I might suggest fascism or totalitarianism as an answer to your question. However, the ability to know what people are thinking suggests a high-tech or science fiction aspect as well. Once again, Orwell comes to the rescue - Orwellian. Of course, we wouldn't describe such a system as one Orwell would have ...


2

Other people have mentioned Orwell's 1984, but not the actual term used therein for this offense, thoughtcrime: An instance of unorthodox or controversial thinking, considered as a criminal offense or as socially unacceptable: thoughtcrimes are notoriously difficult to prosecute (Oxford Dictionaries) People also use the spaced-out spelling ...


2

This is the sort of thinking that happens when you've descended into scrupulosity. (The linked article in Catholic Answers Magazine describes scrupulosity as "the occupational hazard of the Catholic moral life"): The scrupulous person may believe that having even a fleeting impure thought (maybe sexual thoughts or thought about revenge) is sinful. He ...


1

Reminds me of the Thought Police and double-think in 1984 by George Orwell. There is also a section of the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5 where Jesus is preaching on Hebrew teachings and taking the ethics impossibly high. There's a repetition of, "You have heard it said that..." (state a Hebrew law here) "but I say that..." (state a higher ethic here). ...


0

It has to do with increasing the likelihood of success or safety. Merriam-Webster gives the following as an example: "We chose to err on the side of caution [=to be very cautious] when planning our investments." I despise this usage because it reduces "err" to "being on the side of", which is redundant. Why not just say, "we chose to be cautious"? That's ...


1

Both varieties have the same syntactic structure. The difference is lexical, semantic, and pragmatic. Mental process verbs like believe and think take complements describing the mentation. They don't say much about the truth of that mentation, as you point out. However, a special type of predicate doesn't simply describe a proposition; it presupposes it. A ...


2

Ceremonious dumping appears to be much less common than unceremonious dumping, if we are to judge from this Ngram chart for "ceremoniously dumped" (blue line) versus "unceremoniously dumped" (red line) for the period 1850–2005: Examples of "unceremoniously dumped" go back to the nineteenth century. From "The Merz System of Garbage Utilization in Four ...


0

It should be written as 'different kinds of people'. People of different kinds sounds off because the head of the phrase has to come after the of. Since you want to talk about people, that would be the head. From the wikipedia article on head (linguistics): [I]n the compound noun birdsong, the stem song is the head, since it determines the basic ...


1

It should be people of different kinds. Both people of different kinds, and people of a different kind are grammatical, but they mean two different things. It depends on whether you are talking about several kinds of people, or one kind of people. For your sample sentence, it should be This brings up the issue of how well our sample represents people ...


0

Yes grammatically it is either, People of different kinds, or people of a different kind. But as the meaning is different , the suitalbe one of the sample sentence is : "people of different kinds"


1

People of a different kind. (Because 'kind' is a singular count noun and needs an article - in this case an indefinite article.) or People of different kinds. (Without articles)


1

As kind is a countable noun (used in this sense), it must have an article when singular. So it is either people of different kinds, or people of a different kind. However whilst the former is used to refer to two or more kinds of people e.g. The anti-EU voters comprise peoples of many different kinds, the latter is used to apply to a single kind of people, ...



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