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0

I would say he is preoccupied (by thoughts of her). He has a preoccupation (with her). Or, she is his preoccupation. http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupied http://i.word.com/idictionary/preoccupation "Obsessed/obsession" are used similarly, but they sound a bit stronger than what you described.


1

Yes, due to subject verb agreement it should be either whose talents reach or whose talent reaches depending on whether it is a single talent or plural talents.


1

"Make it" is synonomous with "succeed" is some contexts.


3

I think the expression you are looking for is proprietary eponym: An eponym: is someone or something whose name is or is thought to be the source of something's name (such as a city, country, era, or product); alternately it can be used to refer to the name of something that is based on or derived from someone or something else's name. Albert ...


0

Geographical Indication: is a sign used on products that have a specific geographical origin and possess qualities or a reputation that are due to that origin. The sign must identify the product as originating in a given place. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographical_indication http://www.wipo.int/geo_indications/en/


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vicariously means experiencing through others. vicarious: felt or enjoyed through imagined participation in the experience of others: a vicarious thrill.


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It's called a litany. "she was reciting the litany" a tedious recital or repetitive series. "a litany of complaints" synonyms: recital, recitation, enumeration


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The sentiments are so similar that it's really just a matter of style. Since you care about the subtleties, I think the gist of the matter is this: In usually designates encasement by the limits by or actual presence. It means you hope or believe the endeavors somehow possesses the quality of luck that will make them successful. To usually designates a ...


0

Wishing luck to your endeavors... ? I'd rather wish you luck in all your endeavors. Here's why: The endeavors are yours, directly dependent upon yourself, your state of being, circumstances, etc. If I wished you luck (better circumstances in your favour), you could win or become more successful. Note: A google hit may bring up all that in current usage ...


1

The answers by Josh61 and FumbleFingers provide a solid baseline notion of when “state of the art” arose in three senses: “status of the art” (late nineteenth century, according to WorldWideWords, citing the OED, in Josh61’s answer); “current stage of development of a practical or technological subject” (1910, according to Wikipedia, also citing the OED, in ...


1

Telling someone "Good Luck in all your" sounds like you are telling the person good luck. Telling someone "Good Luck to all your" sounds like you are telling the endeavors' good luck, not the person. To make the latter correct, you could say "Good Luck to you in all your endeavors'".


1

This is probably due to difficulty with prepositions, for which it is harder to learn by rules than by experience! The preposition "by" is used in "X by X" where "X" is a noun to adverbially specify that the main verb is performed to each "X" in the context one at a time. Some examples are: one by one (one at a time) line by line (one line at a ...


1

"Who" refers to people; "that" may refer to either people or things. Use "who" if doing so would help your reader identity the antecedent. That's not a problem with your text. "... the only way to do this was by taking control ...."


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Merriam-Webster lists eight different definitions for the phrase "put down". When someone says they'll "put you down for a weekend tour", they mean they'll write your name down in the list of weekend tour bookings. Or maybe instead of writing it, they'll type it, or drag it there. They'll put it there somehow.


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It's fine. Put down meaning kill is only ever used of an animal. It would not be understood in that sense in referring to a human, and if you found a way to force that meaning it would imply that you were regarding the person as an animal. However there is another idiomatic meaning which could occur here, meaning "deprecate", or "diminish in status". I ...


1

There's nothing wrong with "every once in a while." However, you don't say "your thoughtfulness to come and visit," say "your thoughtfulness in coming and visiting." If you want to use "thoughtful" and "to come," you say "It's thoughtful of you to come and visit every once in a while. I appreciate it" (which sounds a little awkward to me, but that's a ...


0

I tend to agree with Blubberguy22, with the small change "I appreciate the thoughtfulness of your occasional visits". I think this eliminates the problem of the "during each visit" issue raised by phoog!


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I'd suggest saying this instead: I appreciate the thoughtfulness in your occasional visits. Edit: As GetzelR said, the usage of every once in a while ends up sounding like it may be sarcastic and the replacement of it with occasional helps clarify that the speaker means occasional only in the most literal sense, without a hostile intent behind it. ...


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There are at least three literary devices present. Both of the examples in the title, "asparagus to avocados" and "kangaroos to koalas" exhibit two of them. Those two devices are alliteration, and juxtaposition. Alliteration is the device where two or more nearby words begin with the same, or nearly the same sound. In the case of the vegetables, the sound is ...


1

Become crooked adjective 4. not straightforward; dishonest. (dictionary.reference.com) Almost always meant in a criminal way. (i.e. a crook.)


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If you're going for subtlety, try He began to cross the line, committing illegal acts instead of upholding the law... Other phrases you could substitute here for the bold text would be: turn to crime cross over cross into the dark side (pop culture reference) Edit: if the character was also homosexual you could make a double entendre with the ...


1

Stiffed as a transitive verb is to cheat someone out of money owed or not to pay someone an amount due or expected. “He stiffed me on the tip.” Encarta Dictionary North American


2

I'm not really familiar with this exercise, but if you need it to contain all the source words, you could say: I must know all the facts, otherwise I cannot help you.


-1

You can also say, " You may want to go through it. Please let me know what are your thoughts about it. "


3

Really, there are very few. The best alternative would probably be: Excuse me, but could I...? Or maybe: ..., if you don't mind me asking? In context: 'Excuse me, but could I please have your date of birth?' 'What kind of car do you drive, if you don't mind me asking?'


1

You have a compound infinitive describing your job: "to extract and to calculate." You also have a predicate complement "lethal" in the relative clause "that could be lethal." You have to decide whether leaving out the comma will momentarily mislead your reader into thinking that the complement might turn out to be compound, as in "that could be lethal ...


1

A till is a noun and it means a cash register. noun: till; plural noun: tills (from here) a drawer, box, or the like, as in a shop or bank, in which money is kept. a drawer, tray, or the like, as in a cabinet or chest, for keeping valuables. an arrangement of drawers or pigeonholes, as on a desk top.


0

British Transport Police: Fatality Guidance Manual, 2012 You will note from the above guidance that the British Transport Police refer to the 'scene' whilst assessing and investigating deaths on transport networks. A crime scene examiner is deployed to all suspicious/unexplained fatalities. Page 14 contains a flowchart showing that a 'crime scene' is ...


2

I've heard it just referred to as the scene. (Isn't it a crime in some places?)


2

The Group in the sentence refers to IS (Islamic State). To contain means to have or hold (someone or something) within. It is often used in strategic language in that way. Containing the enemy is stopping them from growing; militarily, geographically, economically or in any other way. Therefore, the airstrikes and limited ground operations by local forces ...


0

A long time ago I was serving a custodial sentence. Anyhow, while the prisoners were locked in their cell they used to talk out of their windows while sticking their neck out. "wind your neck in" was often a phrase of banter. Therefor, I think it is very much possible that the police officers have actually got the saying from the potential prisoners


-1

Lagniappe, this is a term used in Louisiana that means getting more than you thought. A bonus or a gift.


1

I would interpret that to mean the author finds the way Apple's DTrace port controls processes is ugly (hackish, kludgy, slap-dash, slipshod, careless, etc) absurdly in the sense of comical or laughable gross meaning disgusting or horrible I would also note that DTrace originated on Solaris so it isn't very surprising that porintg it to Mac OS X wasn't ...


0

You're right. There are many definitions of rather. used to indicate one's preference in a particular matter. "I'd rather not say"(I'd prefer not to say) to a certain or significant extent or degree. "she's been behaving rather strangely" used to suggest that the opposite of a previous statement is the case; on the contrary. "There is no shortage of ...


0

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder": play a blinder perform very well informal Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or ...


0

The English expression head over heels is parallel to German Hals über Kopf (neck over head), the only difference being that in German the expression is a logical image for someone falling down head first. If OED has no explanation why in English things are the other way round one can only guess. Perhaps it is not mere chance that German Hals (neck) and ...


1

In every example it has the meaning of something been done/happening/occurring not for the first time. Maybe even as the summary of a longer statement, as mentioned in a comment above. 1., 2. and 3. Here something happened that did occur once or more often before. It is just a repeated behavior or thought or practice or event. Like it happened ...


0

From a "Mental Health" p.o.v. I believe it stems from stability. If a person does not feel a good "sense of well being", they're blind to feel something is not right which may affect other aspects of their liveslives. Otherwise having a good sense of well being by adapting to their surroundings in a much easier way.


2

Wiktionary Talk has (at the moment, at least): The bee's knees is an English slang phrase. The Oxford English Dictionary records the expression "bee's knee" as meaning something small or insignificant from 1797. The phrase "the bee's knees", meaning "the height of excellence", became popular in the U.S. in the 1920s, along with "the cat's ...


0

This answer focuses exclusively on the widespread attribution of the "'Sir,' I said to the universe, 'I exist'" quotation to Douglas Adams. I recognize that this issue is tangential to the OP's question, but if it is indeed a false attribution, I think, it ought to be exploded if possible. As IQAndreas and Henry note in comments beneath the poster's ...


0

That statement does not tell us whether or not the universe cares. Rather, it implies that someone's existence --even if cared about-- need not, cannot or must not be taken as a reason to help, intervene, or otherwise get involved in any way. Imagine watching your favorite football team playing a match on TV. No matter how much you care about them winning ...


1

For fuller context, here is Stephen Crane, "A Man Said to the Universe" published in 1899 as part of Crane's War Is Kind and Other Lines: A man said to the universe: “Sir, I exist!” “However,” replied the universe, “The fact has not created in me A sense of obligation." I have always imagined this poem to be a response to the ...


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A Man Said to the Universe By Stephen Crane A man said to the universe: “Sir, I exist!” “However,” replied the universe, “The fact has not created in me A sense of obligation.” In another Crane poem ("War is Kind"): Hoarse, booming drums of the regiment, Little souls who thirst for fight, These men were born to drill and die. The ...


2

I think it denies other quotes such as the following from The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho: “And, when you want something, all the universe conspires in helping you to achieve it.” Humans tend to think they are the most important thing that ever happened to the universe. The thing is, it existed long before we did, and it will live long after we perish.


2

A day is unit of time: noun 1 A period of twenty-four hours as a unit of time, reckoned from one midnight to the next, corresponding to a rotation of the earth on its axis. ODO We often speak of time metaphorically in terms of spacial movement as in: the time has come take each day as it comes the day is coming The expression the day ...


1

The universe has no obligation to any existence. In this context, the meaning of obligation if taken as "a grateful feeling that you have toward someone who has done something for you"(Ref), then it implies that this person's existence doesn't make the Universe feel any gratitude. If we take the other definition as "something that you must do for legal or ...


3

It's the universe personified, talking. In the world of humans, narrowed down to relationships, the statement, "I exist" may mean a few things in different scenarios. For the universe, of which I am an insignificant part, my existence means nothing. Why? The universe is unimaginably immense. The statement, "I exist" demands attention in human ...


2

For some reason, the Disney classic short of the grasshopper and the ants jumped right to my mind with that quote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3V9uL_ruafU I exist. I shout out to the universe announcing my existence. the universe acknowledges this as fact, but expresses the opinion that this is entirely incidental to its own existence. My existence, and ...


4

This is a sentence which uses extraposition from noun phrase movement. Often when a noun phrase (NP) has a long relative clause, or other modifier, that modifier gets moved out of the noun phrase and appears at the end of the sentence. This is particularly likely when the verb phrase is very short like this. Here is another example: We fired three people ...


6

I think it means that we shouldn't expect the universe (or the world, or other people, or the government) to provide us with what we need just because we exist. Our existence doesn't magically create some sort of obligation in others to care for us, or support us. I understand this as meaning that you should work for (i.e. earn) things you want, rather ...



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