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2

Are you all kidding? Kissing the boss' hand was a sycophantic display. "...I chap easily," means: "If you kiss my hand too much, the skin will become chapped from the excess moisture - and it will be irritating to me - which will not be good for you." It's the boss' way of saying: "If you kiss my butt too much, it'll backfire on you." Get it?


1

"Lone wolf" means being solitary and not socializing much. "Skated by" means that the individual "just got by" or was "on autopilot" or otherwise didn't really work at whatever the task was but simply did the minimum. "Doing the bare minimum thing" means the same as "skated by". (And of course "Shut the front door!" is simply an exclamation, similar to ...


2

You are exactly right, FumbleFingers, that "you're not the boss of me" is a childish (or childhood) equivalent of "you're not my boss." In fact, in southeast Texas, where I spent the first 16 years of my life, it was a standard riposte in Childspeak, covering much the same ground as "You're not my mother," but without the demeaning acknowledgment that your ...


-2

Several phrases in the English language are grammatically correct yet sound odd. I do not know if 'You are not the boss of me' is one of them; I do know that I, for one, would never dream of saying or writing it. Rather than obscure theme music, however, I attribute the encroaching ubiquity of this garish construction to its popularity in lowbrow social ...


0

I believe when he said "be careful I Chap easily" he meant, as @Kris said above, I can be rough easily (without much provocation). verb: (of the skin) become cracked, rough, or sore, typically through exposure to cold weather. synonyms: become raw, become sore, become inflamed, chafe, crack "my skin chapped in the wind"; (of the wind or cold) cause ...


0

Another couple options: "swing by" or "swing round" - These give the impression of just stopping in for a short period of time. "look in on" - Gives the impression of just checking up on someone/something and as soon as the curiosity is satisfied, the querier will be on their way. HTH.


0

Compounds are words; although a phrase may sometimes be made up of a single word, phrases are not words. Phrases are made up of one or more words and phrases; compounds are made up of exactly two words (though either of those words may itself be a compound word). (So far as I know, a phrase is never made up from more than one word, but I'm not sure about ...


5

A few choices- stop by for a few moments. drop round for a few minutes pop in for a minute I like the expression - an abbreviated visit- though I have not heard of this phrase before and could not find much reference. And for the supporting cast- Cameo- the suggestion by Dan Bron definitely appears the most suitable. ...


4

You're describing a flying visit, it might also be pro forma or perfunctory, depending on why it is short.


-1

minute. e.g. "His time spent here was relatively minute."


-1

Another phrasing could be: - I will apprise you as soon as I receive it".


0

Yes. Suppose that "it" is an email from a client and "you" is your boss. Saying, "I will inform you as soon as I get it" means that when this email arrives in your inbox, you will immediately tell your boss that you received it.


0

'Hearing' implies that the sound reaches my ears and my brain at some level acknowledges it. (I was in a bar and I heard two people talking). 'Listening' implies focusing on the sound, or the words. (I listened to two people talking about the game). So being listened to means that someone has paid attention to what you've said. Having said all that, when ...


3

Individual death: Met his Maker. Bought the farm. Kicked the bucket. Bought the big one. Is pushing up daisies. Went on to his reward. Shuffled off this mortal coil. Huge number of deaths: genocide massacre extinction bloodbath internecine life is cheap Armageddon depopulated mass carnage angel of death (biblical reference - see Passover) rained death ...


0

You might have better luck if you start with some of the specifics details. If there was a lot of blood for example you could go with: The "x" ran red with blood. *substitute x with your choice of rivers, streets, halls etc. The wet smell of iron hung in the air. Or if there were fires burning, then the black ash could darken the sky. Or if there were ...


0

The Golden This, That, and the Other Thing Family Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006), has this entry for golden parachute: golden parachute An employment agreement that gives generous benefits to its high-ranking executives if they are dismissed owing to a company merger or takeover. This term, dating from ...


0

The Etymology dictionary also lists job (v) from 1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker." http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=job&searchmode=none


2

It's not wrong, but it sounds a little odd. I think it's "my process" - "my path" or "my route" may be better. Then there's the business of mixing metaphors: a cornerstone belongs in a building, not in a path or process. So maybe cornerstone needs to change too: "... an important step on my route to ..."?


1

Amusing it may sound to the natives, single sitting is used to decribe even one night stands. Indians will often ask, "What is your good name?" which is a somewhat literal translation of "Aapka shubh naam kya hai?" Shubh means auspicious or good, and it is basically used as a polite way of asking for someone's full name. Something which ...


0

Try "indirect terms". Or, as ScotM suggested, "unreferenced" "This" and "they" are pronouns, but "here" isn't.


0

Due to urgent personal errands, I may not report to the office today. This is a lame excuse, and it might have gotten a person fired ten years ago, but it seems there is no problem with the grammar. Due to is used prepositionally, validated by OED under due: The use of due to as a prepositional phrase meaning ‘because of’ (as in he had to retire ...


0

Neither one is correct. Think about each sentence: "This is so going down." What is going down? The image? Something in the image? Nothing in this sentence means that you are being affected, and it doesn't really make sense in this context. "I am so going down on this." Unless you're trying to start another fight, you almost certainly mean for instead of ...


0

The word "so" in both phrases means "definitely" in this context. "This is so going down" means "this is definitely going to happen". I've never heard or read the specific phrase "I am so going down on this", but "going down on" something where that something is a person typically has an adult-relations connotation to it.


11

Single sitting (in InE) is commonly used in context of -single sitting treatment-situations: Hair replacement procedures Root canal Tx Cataract operation etc. It's probably an adoption from the idiom "at/in one sitting". at/in one sitting: If you do something at one sitting, you do it during one period of time without stopping. ...


6

Outside of India, single sitting is and was certainly used, as attested in the comments, but it will nowadays usually refer to a meal. The (extended) meaning of in the time frame of a single occurrence may be typical Indian usage currently, but I would certainly not qualify such usage as a “blunder”, let alone an “absolute” one. It is no more a blunder ...


1

A taste of your own medicine, meaning: in the end you will get what you deserve!! If you cheat or behave unfairly , people will treat you in the same way! The moral of Æesop's fable is that dishonesty doesn't pay. If you give someone a taste of their own medicine, you do something bad to someone that they have done to you to teach them a lesson. ...


4

John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary; Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "Fast Expressions of High and Low Society (1864) has a couple of interesting entries for job: JOB, a short piece of work, a prospect of employment. [Samuel] Johnson describes JOB as a low word, without etymology. It is, and was, however, a Cant word, and a JOB, two ...


0

Another guess. http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/job #5 says, "Informal: A thing of somekind." I bought one of those little quilted jobs [=items, numbers] at the craft fair. This would make sense as the "lot" is a group of "jobs" that are things of some kind.


0

The Ngram chart in the OP's question suggests that "dog eat dog world" first appeared in print in 1954, and that "doggy dog world" first appeared in 1984. A Google Books search, however, finds earlier instances of both phrases. 1. In the jungle out there, do dogs normally eat dogs? In fact, the phrase appears to have arisen first in the context of an ...


1

I'd emphasize that "alleged" refers to a charge or claim, usually by authorities. And "alleged" is not a dodge to avoid libel charges, because, for one thing, it is not a defense for libel. If a statement is defamatory and untrue, that's libel per se. Publishing that a person "was an alleged embezzler" is actionable libel if it's not true. "Alleged ...


1

To be clear, as well as not judging who's guilty or lying, they should have said She reported that she pleaded with her attacker (allegedly Mushataq) to take her to the hospital. Or, if she knew Mushataq: She reported that she pleaded with Mushataq (allegedly her attacker) to take her to the hospital. But as noted, it's easier (and typical) for ...


0

Both denote the same thing in the sense that the ultimate thing asked for is the clarification for what is that day's date.


0

You can also look at it this way. The attacker might have not attacked her. She could be bleeding because of her medical condition. The victim accuses the attacker but he might be proven innocent. Hence at the time he is alleged attacker.


2

You might call such a business one that has a "churn and burn" business plan, though the connotation of such a name is usually quite negative. The company's sole goal is new customer acquisition and it has no interest in (or ability to achieve) customer retention.


2

I would suggest "ups the ante". That is, it will cost hackers more (effort) to get into the game.


2

In decades past, Monday newspapers tended to be thin on coverage of political and business developments from the previous day because government offices, stock exchanges, etc., had shut down for the weekend. As a result Monday editions tended to have more than the usual proportion of op/ed think pieces, stories revisiting "evergreen" topics, or articles with ...


1

Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006) has this entry for the phrase "not until the cows come home": not until the cows come home Not for a long time. Presumably the time referred to is when cows return to the barn for milking. Th term has been around since the late sixteenth century. Beaumont and Fletcher's play ...


0

end-all and be-all, or alternatively, be-all and end-all 1: (idiomatic) something considered to be of the utmost importance; something essential or ultimate. • “He thought that cars were the be-all and end-all of life.” • “Profit is the be-all and end-all of business.” or perhaps, raison d'être (plural raisons d'être or raison d'être ...


0

I'd say something like; His performance is a random variable with a high standard deviation. We may, similarly, express how frequently something varies by comparing it against phases of moon, tides, hill and valleys, mottled, or colorful etc.


1

How about erratic Depending on whether you like the sports person in question, the Merriam-Webster dictionary also notes that erratic is a geological term for a boulder, indeed: a boulder or block of rock transported from its original resting place especially by a glacier


0

Should I say I run every morning The toothache hurts My dog eats cheese or should I say I like running every morning Toothaches can be hurting My dog may be eating cheese ?


0

They don't mean the same thing, because in the second one you have introduced can be, which allows for doubt. But the truth is deceptive, would be the same as saying the truth is deceiving.


1

Clauses & Phrases (Straight Forward Advanced English). The People Who Let Go of Their Rocks: Story of a War Dance, Clauses, Phrases, Verbals, and Verbs.


3

How about: " she danced her life away"? OR "danced lifelong"; she is a lifelong dancer.


3

"Throw guns into a hot stove" isn't a common phrase, idiomatically or metaphorically, in U.S. English. However, I did find one real-life report involving a gun thrust into a hot stove. From the [Salt Lake City, Utah] Deseret News (May 6, 1876): ——When will people learn to handle fire-arms with care? James Cunningham, 15 years old, of Pennsgrove, Salem ...


0

"day in, day out", or just "never stop dancing"


3

It is a metaphor that is used to render an effective image of an act that might give rise to a dangerous escalation of further violence. To answer your question, you can define it as a one-off figurative expression. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does ...


-1

Twenty-four, seven Meaning 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.


0

The comparative form of the adjective sound is sounder. All (or almost all) one-syllable adjectives use -er in this way. Perhaps I have just wished someone will be "safe and sound", but then I wish a second person will be "safer and sounder". I could go on and wish a third person will be "safest and soundest".



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