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Sometimes "just as well" actually means "preferable." For example, "I carried an umbrella in case of rain, but it was a sunny day after all, which is just as well." So one interpretation is that the second person in your example is saying it's preferable for the first person not to be mad. That preference may be in part because then the first person is not ...


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Short answer: no. If you are looking for something which expresses the meaning "equally so", as well as rhyming with the preceding line, you might need to consider changing the ending of the first line or even re-arranging the structure of the sentence completely. These are some (very quick, off the top of my head) options to make it rhyme (if indeed ...


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Consider: "And when you're not, almost as stubborn." or "And when you're not, nearly as stubborn."


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This usage of the word water seems to have gone back and forth a bit between singular and plural. The OED gives this definition for water (sense 17.c): The fluid contained in the amniotic cavity (liquor amnii); now usually pl. The effusion of this fluid from the womb, which precedes the exclusion of the fœtus, is popularly denoted by the expression ‘the ...


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I think both forms are acceptable, Ngram shows a difference in usage between AmE and BrE. Ngram BrE: shows the plural form ( waters) as more used , while Ngram AmE shows the singular water as the preferred form. When your waters break.


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"In the case being" simply does not make sense, here or elsewhere. In the case would be acceptable though imperfect in your example; the verb would have to be were involved rather than were to be. I think the journalist is just too much of a hurry to think of the best construction, "if ISIS were to become involved". And as per is a horrible construction. It ...


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In American English, when referring to a woman reaching a critical stage of the birthing process - "water" is singular since it's a singular object that is being broken. Breaking waters are waves that crash into foam. I don't believe I've heard them intermixed except perhaps as a joke.


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Usually a decimal portion of an hour is followed by "hours". Like 2.5 hours, 1.5 hours, 0.5 hours etc. However normally we say half an hour or thirty minutes not 0.5 hrs.


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Die is a word followed by different prepositions : For accident "in" is a perfect one and for voilence "by" negligence"through" disease"of" wound overeating etc."from"and harness"in" is used with die.


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Are you looking for shotgun approach? Wiktionary defines it as: (idiomatic) An approach in which the subject is indiscriminate and haphazard, using breadth, spread, or quantity in lieu of accuracy, planning, etc While "indiscriminate" and "haphazard" can have negative connotations, this still seems like a perfect fit for your context. "I did it X way ...


1

Perhaps painstaking? As an adjective or noun, or can be used as an adverb. John painstakingly put the model together.


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How about fastidious? http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fastidious adjective 1. excessively particular, critical, or demanding; hard to please: a fastidious eater. 2. requiring or characterized by excessive care or delicacy; painstaking.


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How about assiduously? Showing great care and perseverance Oxford Dictionaries According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word 'acquired a taint of "servility"' in the 18th century. I think it still retains a bit of this today, but perhaps it's been generalized a bit. In any case, maybe this has the color you're looking for.


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Why not scrupulous (Of a person or process) diligent, thorough, and extremely attentive to details: the research has been carried out with scrupulous attention to detail [Oxford Dictionary Online]


2

I would suggest exhaustive. Including or considering all elements or aspects; fully comprehensive: the guide outlines every bus route in exhaustive detail [oxforddictionaries] including all possibilities : very thorough [merriam-webster] Another word that comes to mind is scrutinize which is a verb. to examine ...


-3

Old-school is a term that took time for me to accept, but occasionally I use old-school to mean done properly.


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Also consider anal. From en.wiktionary, it has a sense “(psychology) of a person, obsessed with neatness, accuracy, compulsiveness and stubbornness, supposedly from not having progressed beyond the anal stage. [eg] Please don't touch his furniture, as he can get very anal about things like that”.


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Pedantic might fit. pedantic adj. excessively concerned with minor details or rules; overscrupulous. Sue was pedantic when it came to following the recipes. She made sure her measures were weighed to the gram, and that her cup measures were exactly level.


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Do you want an adjective (phrase), a noun (phrase), a verb (phrase), or an adverb (phrase)? nitpick, nitpicky, nitpicker perfectionist meticulous, meticulously punctilious, punctiliously fastidious, fastidiously exacting, exactingly


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I don't believe it is figurative. See entry 3b from Merriam-Webster " to repulse, remove, or cause to go by force, authority, or influence "


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Consider using satisfy a need rather than develop it. "We can help you satisfy your needs..."


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Also consider old bromides and old platitudes as terms for often-repeated phrases or stories. From wiktionary, bromide means “A platitude [eg] We hoped the speech would include reassurances, but instead it was merely one bromide after another”. Also from wiktionary, platitude means “An often-quoted saying that is supposed to be meaningful but has become ...


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This means that you perform the Accounts Receivable functions for the company. This could mean that either: you are employed by the company as a salaried full-time employee, and are the only one doing this job (otherwise you would likely say "I work in Accounts Receivable for XYZ company" , if there was more than one full-time employee in the ...


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The long and the short of it refers to old weaponry used in wars. The long refers to halberds on very long poles that men would brace into the ground. They would then raise the points as armored men on horseback charged, unseating the enemy from their steeds. Then, men with swords would wade into the fray and kill the downed enemy, "making short work" of ...


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Cliche: a trite, stereotyped expression; a sentence or phrase, usually expressing a popular or common thought or idea, that has lost originality, ingenuity, and impact by long overuse, as sadder but wiser, or strong as an ox. "What a cliche!" -Dictionary.com


1

The word you want isn't official - it's... "Please provide links to authoritative sources supporting your argument" Obviously, authoritative there means considered to be accurate and knowledgeable by people who are themselves experts in the relevant field, not endorsed by some official body or "authority". As has been stated, you can also use credible ...


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I would say you are looking for "credible online references".


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Another possibility beyond the excellent ones already mentioned is to say, "I've heard it ad nauseaum", which idiomatically and literally (well, once you translate the Latin) means "I've heard it enough to cause nausea."


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If you are willing to consider a noun, try scrivening (obsolete) writing [Collins] as in I filled the paper with my scrivenings. You could also use the verb form scribe (chiefly LITERARY) Write: he scribed a note that he passed to Dan [Oxford Dictionary Online] But note that the verb is now more often used to describe marking with a sharp ...


1

I occasionally Jot things down on a napkin, envelope, scrap of paper; whatever's handy.


-1

Say: I need written statement. This is my answer.


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I suppose it depends on what you mean by "creative", or more specifically, what tone or color you want to set. You could use some of the many idioms for this, for example "ink the deal", "get it in writing" or just simply "write it down." You might go for a deliberate misuse of an idiom, such as "carve it in ink", or "not-so-verbal contract". Our you might ...


0

"Oy vey again!", comes to mind too.


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Here is a suggestion: lore - knowledge gained through study or experience. The definition is from Merriam Webster's dictionary. There are several other words which you may use depending on context and audience.


0

If it's essentially the same, with only trivial variations. then you can go with: Same shit different day


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In some contexts, "been there, done that, wore the shirt" is a common way to express that a suggestion has been tried so often that it's almost a trope by now. been there, done that, bought the T-shirt (idiomatic, humorous) Expresses the speaker's complete familiarity with a situation, with overtones of cynicism or exhaustion. (Used in slightly ...


3

An "old saw" is an oft-repeated to the point of being somewhat tiresome idea or maxim. It's well known enough that UPenn doesn't mind using it as the title of a translation of a Kant essay... http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/997.html


3

In actual answer to your questions, Is it same [as] “to put it mildly" or "to say the least”? Yes, it is absolutely identical. I wonder why the writer preferred to use a phrase not so popular. "to put it charitably" is as perfectly widely known as “to put it mildly" or "to say the least” Note that it has a slightly more sarcastic, aggressive, witty ...


3

Reading your question brings to my mind the expression: If I had a dime for every time I heard that one I'd be rich by now. or some more clever, funny outcome. See http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=If%20I%20had%20a%20dime%20for%20every%20time for more examples.


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"That old chestnut" refers to a subject, an idea, or a joke which has been discussed or repeated so many times that it is not interesting or funny any more. from "http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/an+old+chestnut"


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You sound like a broken record. to say the same thing over and over again. (Fig. on a scratch in a phonograph record causing the needle [or stylus] to stay in the same groove and play it over and over.) Last edited by Grefsen; 4th August 2013 at 9:59 PM. Re: sounding like a broken (scratched) record.


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To the extent that you wish to convey a boring repetition of well known material, consider yadda yadda yadda (or yada yada yada) Used as a substitute for actual words where they are too lengthy or tedious to recite in full: boy meets girl, boy loses girl, yadda yadda yadda [Oxford Dictionary Online] Similarly blah blah blah [Dictionary.com] You ...


2

"To put something charitably" means to look at something is the most forgiving manner to the person in question. For example if someone left a store without paying for something and it is not clear they meant to steal it (eg perhaps they were trying on sunglasses and left them on their head as they walked out), then you could charitably say "they forgot to ...


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According to Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997), one potentially relevant idiom is "old chestnut": old chestnut A stale joke, story, or saying, as in Dad keeps on telling that old chestnut about hgow many psychiatrists it takes to change a light bulb. This expression comes from William Diamond's play, The Broken Sword ...


4

There is an idiomatic phrasal verb that you can use and rephrase your sentence accordingly. It is wheel out. to mention or to use someone or something that has been mentioned or used many times before, often so many times that people are now bored with them They still wheel her out at every party conference. [macmillandictionary] ...


0

For a less derisory and more literal term, you could use oft oft adj. archaic or literary form of often. The politician used the oft repeated, but misinformed factoid, that global temperatures haven't increased in 17 years. Consider also: often said, oft cited.


0

... or old news or yesterday's news or ...


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To put something charitably means to express a negative feature in the most favorable way. However, it's usually used sarcastically, when describing something you think is very wrong. By specifically pointing out that you're being charitable, the reader understands that you're avoiding the obvious negatives. In the example you gave, the writer is implying ...



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