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Superfluous adjective unnecessary, not providing additional benefit


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This is a well-known quote from Muriel Spark's novel about a teacher in a private girls school in Scotland, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: For those who like that sort of thing," said Miss Brodie in her best Edinburgh voice, "That is the sort of thing they like. (The character is talking about the Girl Guides, an organization similar to the Girl ...


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I think this is more about the different definitions of sharp. Informally sharp can be used in relation to someone style, clothing, or general appearance and in that context, I would say either could be used acceptably. In this sentence, I think more sharp actually aides the clarification of the adjective used because saying "these earrings are sharper" ...


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Duh It has to be pronounced with a certain intonation (high to low and then a bit up again) and a certain facial expression. Example: Today I figured out my laptop has a touch screen. Duh! I've only had it for three months! (The last part is pronounced with sarcasm.) This would be a way of poking fun at yourself. Duh means it should have been obvious. ...


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"Dog" is a count noun, and you mean you like dogs in general (i.e., more than one dog), so you'd use the plural form. If you were talking about a noncount noun such as coffee or luggage or research, you'd say "I like coffee/luggage/research." Native speakers usually know intuitively which nouns are count nouns. Generally, count nouns are things that are ...


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In British English usage 'more clear' or 'clearer' strictly speaking mean the same. I agree with a previous answer - 'more clear' is used for emphasis, especially when negated. Often one form or the other seems more natural and also may help remove ambiguity ( see previous answers). For example, "the edge of that desk seems more curved than usual" versus ...


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Year of built 1922 No, that is incorrect because you cannot use 'of' before a verb (other than a gerund). Possibilities Year of build, 1922 Year of construction, 1922 Year built, 1922


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It means something like: but of course I would say that. It implies that there's some reason what the speaker is saying is typically or obviously biased from their position. It's a kind of tag question, which gives it kind of an "I know you know what I mean" tone. Here's a quote from an interview with Nick Clegg: Part of the challenge for a third party ...


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'Round about' (the initial a- is usually dropped) in the sense 'approximately' is a strictly colloquial use, and should be avoided in most formal writing. There is also a more conventionally spatial use of this double preposition to describe a path of motion: We wandered round about the zoo til it closed. When this sense is used as an intransitive ...


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What do you mean? is commonly known and usually said when one does not comprehend what the other said. Basically it is asking for a repeat of the sentence in more detail. How do you mean? is a little different. How can be defined as in what way or manner. How does this work? In what way or manner does this work? Both sentences are basically the ...


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Struggle with Agonise over Contend with Deal with Trouble over


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I think Youkay's suggestion "nugatory" is ok but it's a bit obscure - depends on your readership. It's also has a condemnatory tone, to me at least. "Redundant" perhaps?


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It means to become inoperative or ineffective. It is an intransitive verb, and you can see it in the Merriam Webster Dictionary under definition 1 B.


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It's "sharper." If an adjective has one syllable, you make comparative by adding "-er". Using "more + [a one-syllable adjective] is not an accepted alternative.


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When it shows up in a dictionary you respect, it's a real word. Dictionaries add words based on real-world usage. So if enough people use in in print, in multiple placed (e.g. books as well as internet) for a long enough time, it will show up in a dictionary. Of course, each dictionary decides how much "enough" is. For Urban Dictionary, which is ...


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I wonder if it could be a US x UK issue. I have always learnt and used 'any more' (two words) in all contexts, and come from a British family unit, attending a British School. So we would have: John doesn't live here any more (UK) John doesn't live here anymore (US)



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