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15

It comes from the novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe: man Friday n. pl. men Friday or men Fridays An efficient, faithful male aide or employee. [After Friday, a character in Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe.] From the Free Dictionary online. Also, from Wikipedia: Friday is one of the main characters of Daniel Defoe's 1719 novel ...


11

The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...


10

No. This would imply that "rescue" is a form of transport - akin to saying "flown to a safe place" or "driven to a safe place". While driving and flying may form part of the rescue, they are not part of the definition of the word rescue, which involves changing someone's situation from "being in danger" to "being safe". The actual act of rescue might ...


5

There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


4

There is absolutely positively completely nothing wrong grammatically with ending a sentence with a preposition. This was a bogus rule made up by grammarians to sell grammar books, and ignores the way Germanic languages work. Some people cling to the rule, but it is a question of style, not grammar. Furthermore, used to has become, in practice, a lexical ...


4

According to World Wide Words the origin of go west — meaning to die, perish, or disappear is related to the idea of the sunset, as a figurative image of death: Go west seems anciently to be connected with the direction of the setting sun, symbolising the end of the day and so figuratively the end of one’s life. Going west has been linked to dying ...


3

This is often referred to as a permanent loan A form of loan agreement in which an individual, trust, or company loans artwork or other objects to a museum for an extended period of time. The loan agreement may stipulate that the museum must display the loaned artwork in a specific area of the museum, that the artwork is to be displayed as part ...


2

Since the turn "belongs" to the English edition, so to speak, I would indicate the possessive with an apostrophe-s added to "edition." Also, since the second clause of the sentence is independent (it has a subject, it, and a verb, is), you need a comma after "Arabic." So you have: I read this novel four times in Arabic, and now it's the English edition'...


1

The opposite of a Pyrrhic victory is an Irenic victory. Pyrrhic is about victory at all or every cost. An Irenic victory is not so much about victory but resolution for both sides. It strives NOT to have winners or losers. Irenic comes from the Greek word for peace.


1

After some research, I conclude that it depends on the context. I got here from searching “what does it mean when the brakeman rings his bell?” after listening to these lyrics of Night Flight by Led Zeppelin: Please Mr. Brakeman, won't you ring your bell. And ring loud and clear Please Mr. Fireman, won't you ring your bell Tell the people they got to ...



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