Hot answers tagged

10

Try jack of all trades. It means you're good at many things and have a variety of skills. A word would be versatile. Addition - If the above two options don't work for you, try a fancy word that would make you sound smart and good at english, just the way you want them to think of you, good at many things, a protean.


9

Quite avoiding terms like Renaissance Man I'd suggest versatile. 2: embracing a variety of subjects, fields, or skills; also : turning with ease from one thing to another Reference: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/versatile


9

An 1844 translation of Wilhelm Meinhold, Mary Schweidler, The Amber Witch (1838) describes the conclusion of a trial for witchcraft that supposedly occurred in 1630 (the book was a piece of fiction but was presented as an old document discovered by the author, in the manner of James Macpherson's discoveries of the works of Ossian). First the judge pronounces ...


7

Keeping it simple: "I have a wide range of interests, including...". But be forewarned, each of your example subjects can be broken up into smaller subjects, some of which you may actually dislike! The more you learn, the more you discover how little you really know!


6

Most of the replies here imply a level of skill. Being interested at something doesn't necessarily mean being good at it. If you're simply looking tor something that means interest in subjects, here are some suggestions: eclectic tastes varied interests diverse hobbies engrossed in many subjects a kaleidoscope of topics (feel free to pick & mix)


4

Polymath could work: I'm a bit of a polymath: I like maths but also love history and am pretty good at sports. This fits the "not arrogant" part as long as you say it in a self-deprecating way, perhaps with a smile and a slightly sardonic tone. From Wikipedia: A polymath is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject ...


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


3

"I don't know" is a sentence, not an interjection and not an adjective. I suppose you could make it one, rather artificially. Every contestant has a green "yes" light, a red "no" light, and an amber "I don't know" light.


2

Just to confirm Dan Bron's response for future readers, the term 'leg up' is used in horse riding, where the fingers are laced together and the rider places their knee (or foot if they're really short/the horse is really tall) in the helper's interlocked hands. The helper then boosts the rider up as they swing their leg over the horse's back.


2

See also: "The Hedgehog and the Fox". There is some literature that highlights to role of folks who are "interdisciplinary" as key to major innovations. If you want to know more about that looks for scholarly papers and chase the citations. This is sometimes call boundry crossing. This habit, that of being a generalist, is at great enabling the ...


1

This is completely anecdotal, but I find that when people use this type of phrasing it generally means that they'll revisit a decision at a later date, but it's not imperative that the matter be decided upon right now. By phrasing I mean anything along the lines of: I'll know if I'm going in a few hours. I don't plan on moving until my kids are out ...


1

See heuristic. It means involving or serving as an aid to learning, discovery, or problem-solving. Another similar word is didactic, which means that something designed or intended to teach people something. Also, for catchy phrase try "propitious projects." Propitious means likely to result in success, or showing signs of success. It also means ...


1

It means "there are many things you could do that would be less useful than to review some of Lenny Bruce's material". You'd need the context to know exactly what's intended, but it generally is more of the latter (compliment) than the former (suggestion): you don't literally need to review the material, but there are worse things that you could do (i.e. ...


1

'At' wouldn't be correct in this context; you'll want to use 'to.' 'Sticked', unless I am mistaken, isn't an actual word - the correct past participle would be 'stuck.' Both 'stuck' and 'glued' would work in your case.


1

Italian superstition states that placing a hat on a bed is a sign of a death to come. This is derived from when a priest comes to perform the sacrament of extrimunction (giving last rights to the dying or anointing of the sick). As a form of respect, the priest would take off his hat and lie it on the bed before he began his prayers.


1

Try giving someone a boost Here, boost means helping someone by pushing or raising them from below. Example sentences - Boost him through the window. He gave me a boost to help me climb the wall.



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