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28

I'm pretty sure it means that he looks good in a hat. Not sure if UrbanDictionary is a good reference, but this is the definition I mean: Rockin' Wearing something proudly and/or looking good wearing something. He's really rockin' that new hat of his! He's really rockin' that new haircut. Taken from UrbanDictionary: Rockin'


15

My eldest son can rock a hat. I am the opposite: even great hats look terrible on me. To rock a hat is to look great in a hat. On an errand this weekend, I saw these chic summer hats on display.... They’re designed by Eugenia Kim, a New York based milliner. I was tempted to buy one but I’m not sure I can rock a hat. and It's not top brands or ...


6

To rock a hat is a slang term meaning to wear a hat. How one looks in the hat is not always relevant, although it can refer to looks depending on how the phrase is used. In this example the only implication is to wear a hat: I think I will rock a hat for the party tomorrow night. Whereas in this one it is strongly suggested that Eric looks good in the ...


5

"X, here we come" or "X, here I come" is a phrase meaning "We are/I am going to X". It pretends to be addressed to the place itself: Hey, Bora Bora, I'm coming to you! The important meaning here is that X is usually a luxurious place such as you'd visit for holidays or hope to live in after retirement. What the phrase is getting at is that the speaker is ...


4

I always took it to be one of those phrases that represents a partial utterance, as in "Oh, the horror that this invokes...". You are not addressing "horror" directly or evocatively; it's not a name or a title. I get the same impression from the famous "Oh, the humanity" quote. By comparison, if we say "Oh, Brother" or "Oh, Lord", that would be more in an ...


4

It means to hit on a topic that is of importance to person you are speaking to. You can strike a chord either positively or negatively. Positively if you say something that impresses/flatters/connects (positively) with them. Negatively if you speak ill about something that is of importance to them or something that rubs them in the wrong way. To me its ...


3

The semicolon strikes me as grammatically incorrect, but people like to do some strange things with semicolons around here, so who am I to say. However, your question seems moot since the "but not only" part is completely redundant and can be removed. Saying "Every possible accessory... including X" already implies that there are other things you're not ...


3

"Back the right horse" might be the expression you're looking for. He backed the right horse with Mr. Koch. Of course, every investor wants to back the right horse -- but which assets to choose? Everyone wanted to back yhe right horse Also, consider "a cinch" and "a shoo-in." cinch: a person or thing certain to fulfill an expectation. ...


3

Vis-à-vis is a possibility. Literally, it means face to face, but it can also be used as an expression of comparison. "Vis-à-vis our previous study, our results could not show the difference between A and B. The score for A was low, compared to their [its?] score." (Is the referent of "their" "our previous study"? I'm not sure.) Other possibilities ...


2

It's a reference to the prophecy that King Arthur will return. The idea is that he was once king, and will be again. As far as I know, T.H. White did in fact coin the phrase for his Arthurian book The Once and Future King, but you'll occasionally hear it adapted for other uses ("ladies and gentleman, the once and future champion!"), presumably as an ...


2

I'm taking a guess here, but in T.H. White's book of that title about Arthur (if I remember correctly), Merlin, who plays a very prominent role in the book (perhaps more so than even Arthur, at least in the Sword and the Stone book), is traveling through time backwards, so to Merlin, Arthur already was king (Merlin complains about life in the 20th c). Merlin ...


2

From Wikipedia: Stereotypes of Jews are caricatured and generalized representations of Jews, often of a racist nature. Jews are commonly caricatured as having large noses or hook noses. I don't think the meaning of the phrase goes anything beyond physical appearance. Such stereotypes would be considered rude and insensitive and would be best avoided. ...


2

Conk is a colloquial expression for nose, quite frequently implying a large size. See also definitions 3 and 4 here. It would refer, in your example, to the stereotypical size and shape of a Jewish nose, which according to the Jewish Encyclopedia is perhaps not as widespread (no pun intended) as caricaturists would lead us to believe. I would suggest that ...


2

The first is right, the second sounds awkward. Formal, yes. Stylish, no. Pretty standard really, which is good, because you don't necessarily want to be fancy here. It's what you say next that will count. You could also say In conclusion or To conclude or As we have seen or As I have shown or In discussing these matters what has emerged is...


2

There is no article in "Oh Lord!" "Oh Lord!" is what's called vocative and it should probably be spelled as O not Oh ("O Lord!"). When used in the phrase "oh, the horror!" it's an interjection. Note that there's a comma of difference too: it's not "Oh, Lord!" and not "oh the horror!"


1

Actually their use as synonyms appears to be still an issue: Usage Note: The distinction in meaning between healthy ("possessing good health") and healthful ("conducive to good health") was ascribed to the two terms only as late as the 1880s. This distinction, though tenaciously supported by some critics, is belied by citational evidence—healthy has been ...


1

I think they are much the same, I prefer 'used with permission' as well but crucially it is a legal term that should be provided by the agency you are seeking permission from. They will have their own standard regarding how you show that you have obtained permission so it would be quite correct to have ABC is a trademark of XYZ corp, used by permission ...


1

This is a metaphor. A more concrete metaphor would be: George is a big teddy bear. George is not literally a big teddy bear; he exhibits the qualities of a big teddy bear. In the same way: Baltimore is love means Baltimore exhibits the qualities of love. (Having lived in Baltimore, I can't say I agree with this metaphor, except in that it ...


1

I found this version: Gin was called mother's ruin because in the mid eighteenth century the effects of gin on the family and economy were disastrous. Considered the poor man's drink due to its affordability, gin drinking had started out as medicine but due to its easy availability, men became impotent while women became sterile causing the London birth ...


1

No, you are not using it correctly. In the example sentence, "at once" and "both" serve the same function; having both of them in the same sentence is redundant and awkward. You can say, The good folk were both delighted and amazed which would be the more idiomatic way to put it in modern English. Or you could say The good folk were at once delighted ...


1

According to Wikipedia, double whammy can be applied to multiple things as well. An English expression meaning multiple (or a combination of) negative circumstances, events, or effects. Sometimes hyphenated. Though triple whammy is used in the sense you want also and Wiktionary has a definition: a threefold blow or setback (popularized in the ...


1

**strike or touch a chord (with somebody) means to say or do something that makes people feel sympathy or enthusiasm. eg. The speaker had obviously struck a chord with his audience.I've heard people saying: "He struck the wrong chord", maybe that's what your friend was referring to, but I don't really know if it's right.


1

It was common in the 18th and 19th centuries to hold impromptu shooting matches where the target was simply a rag hung on a bush in the distance. A good shot would hit the rag, making it visibly jump. A great shot would literally “take the rag off the bush,” putting an end to at least that round of the contest with an overwhelming success. Making this ...


1

This is not a common phrase; I think it's Indian English. I understand it as meaning “the letter is in the process of being issued”, i.e. the decision has been taken to write that letter (a reply to the application, presumably?), and either the content is being written, or it's waiting for someone's signature, or it's in the mail. Google Books turns up very ...


1

It means that until now, front ends were not very stable, which caused a lot of chaos for developers. But now, front-ends are stabilizing, so the chaos that used to be caused by the unstable front-ends is no longer a big problem for the developers. But, instead of appreciating this moment of calm where they no longer have to worry about unstable front-ends, ...


1

You can also use: reach out (to someone) and get hold/ahold (of someone) E.g. Please feel free to reach out to us if you have any questions. Reach out to us at[E-mail address, phone number, etc.]. You can get ahold of us at [E-mail, phone number, website, etc.]. Get ahold of us at[E-mail, phone number, website, etc.].


1

The earlier phrase "to a tittle", of which "to a T" is apparently a shortened form, would seem to be derived from King James bible (originally translated in 1611, and by the end of that century the most widely used English language bible). Matthew 5:17-18 17 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but ...



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