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63

"Who knows?" is the simplest form. I hear it (and use it) regularly.


31

Obviously, you are wrong. First off, I don't need to point out that the majority of everything we say or write is superfluous, redundant, or pointless. Very, very little is really "worth saying". However, it is not a rule of English (or any language) that anything that can be removed must be removed. Pointlessness and redundancy are not wrong, they are ...


29

This one involves swearing, but there is an extremely common way to express that phrase: "Fuck only knows" or just "Fuck knows"


28

"Needless to say" is often used to bring attention to something which should be obvious to everyone, but (in the speaker's mind) isn't necessarily obvious. For example, you might say: We ran over budget again this quarter. Needless to say, if we can't stay under budget, we'll all lose our jobs. The speaker in this case is using "needless to say" to ...


25

How about "It's anyone's guess"?


25

The literal intended meaning of this phrase is "nobody knows". As an atheist, I don't believe there is a God. Therefore, I can still say "God only knows" because the intended meaning of "nobody knows" logically follows from these premises.


21

If you are from 1950s England, you could say goodness only knows.


10

A secular phrase to the idiom "God only knows" It's impossible to say. - "God only knows how he managed to find out where I lived." http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/american-english/god-only-knows Another choice woule be "Nobody knows and neither do I". - "God only knows where I've left my keys".


8

Secular phrase you seek. Quote Yoda you can. Difficult to see. Always in motion is the future..


8

Most people I know are atheists and we happily use "God knows" and "Oh my god", without reverence or irony. Like all language, it's just a term that has universal currency - the archaic reason for why it exists is really just interesting more than important. In the unlikely event that the world reverts back to a place where it's really important that we ...


7

The person can be said to suffer from verbal diarrhea The fact or habit of talking too much: was it necessary to have the narrator exhibit verbal diarrhea throughout the entire picture? [Oxford Dictionaries Online] Similarly logorrhea excessive, uncontrollable, or incoherent talkativeness [Collins] And, by extension, they might be called a ...


7

Adding the phrase needless to say can have at least a few purposes. First, it is one of those emphatic phrases used to give special weight to a particular observation. Your mother stopped by and cleaned the house again. Needless to say, I can't find anything now. This emphasizes the seriousness of the conclusion, even though it may be obvious from ...


6

It declares that something is obvious, because whom it's obvious to will always be limited. To an insider the phrase is useless, but to a third party that is not aware of experiences or information that make something obvious, the phrase needless to say fills them in. In @Canis Lupus's example: Your mother stopped by and cleaned the house again. ...


5

I might call them a "chatterbox". An extremely talkative person. The definition on Urban Dictionary might not be as academic, but it certainly matches your description. Someone who never shuts the hell up. They keep blabbering about random crap that makes no sense


4

This phenomenon is called "The Halo effect". The Halo effect is an effect where the reputation or the trust of someone or something builds up so much that everything done or said by that person/thing starts appearing to be divine, and the best. The phrase of 'Halo effect' can be used in relation to a thing as well as a person. The opposite of 'The Halo ...


4

If the person usually ends up off topic, and you want to express that point, I'd consider using digressive (although it seems to be more commonly used to describe conversations/text rather than people); as Collins has it: digressing or given to digression As Hellion notes below, serial digressor, or perhaps just digressor, would work if you're looking ...


4

Hard to think of a good noun option. Blabbermouth. Motormouth. Windbag. They all sound somewhat dated. Although I do like windbag. Adjectives that might help: "prattling," "filterless," and "windy." Or you could get metaphorical. In college, who we nicknamed a kid who did that "Filibuster" -- it stuck.


4

"Keeping an eye on x" would fit the bill in my locality.


3

A humorous, colloquial version playfully ascribes omniscience to a person: Only Chuck Norris knows. In Stack Overflow culture, this would be: Only Jon Skeet knows.


3

It's an informal neologism, but oversharer is an increasingly commonly used descriptor, as a quick google search will show.


2

There's skirt-chaser, defined at freedictionary.com as a man who is aggressive in making amorous advances to women. Some examples: "Robinson was supposed to have been one of the most incorrigible skirt-chasers of his time." (oxforddictionaries.com) "Troy vows to relinquish the life of a skirt-chaser if only he can get Angel in his arms." ...


2

Consider hound dog (slang) A promiscuous man. [Wiktionary]


2

A pick up artist is someone who is intentionally and systematically approaching women with the intention of seducing them. A term for pursues intimate relationships with a lot of women is a womaniser or a casanova. A man who is good at chatting or flirting with woman, would be a charmer. This term tends to be a compliment, and charmer isn't necesserily ...


2

How about: "only surpassed by/surpassed only by/surpassed by only" ? "Our algorithm showed accuracy that was only surpassed by/surpassed only by/surpassed by only ... ."


1

Good example, incidentally. Whether sth. is traceable and if so, how it happens to be, is obviously unrelated to how it can be traced. As such, there is no overlap of meaning, or any ambiguity. By the way, this difference (a quality vs. a method) is very important in certain contexts. In general, how something is doable (or otherwise) deals with ...


1

"I'm chief cook and bottle washer" meaning: I do everything from A-Z; one man show; especially self employed. Chief cook is the top job in a kitchen; bottle washing is endless, mindless work that anyone can do. If you're doing both, it implies you're also doing everything in between. can also be used sarcastically: "He's chief cook and bottle washer ...


1

It looks like they are trying to say one of two things. ~Either: "Our algorithm showed accuracy that was worse than the best-in-class alternatives." ~Or, you could change the emphasis of the sentence to be less focused on the negative and more focused on the comparision. In side-by-side testing, our competitor's state of the art algorithms accuracy ...


1

'No pun intended' IS a pun! Not so much a contradictory answer, however, I do miss another aspect of the phrase "no pun intended". Thanks to Jeff Richards on episode 135 of the Probably science podcast I can now never hear the phrase without hearing: Nope, unintended! Thought that side of the phrase had to be told here as well. This does underline ...


1

If your algorithm's accuracy is inferior but not by orders of magnitude, just slightly less, you could also say: Our algorithm approaches state-of-the-art for accuracy (but costs much less, perhaps).



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