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77

There are various terms for this. Once upon a time, “screen name” would likely have been the most common. However, it seems to me that this convention has been driven by the most pervasive websites. So, with Facebook et al's move toward encouraging the use of real names, “screen name” seems much less common (phrases such as “nickname” appear to be used now ...


28

I guess screen-name is appropriate: Noun, Digital Technology: a unique sequence of characters that a person chooses to use for identification purposes when interacting with others online, as in computer games, instant messaging, or forums. Source:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/screen+name


16

A more common idiom is being knee deep or up to your knees in something, meaning that something reaches one's knees. When you are up to your knees in water, you have gone in to a point that you are definitely wet, and more importantly, there is so much water around, that walking gets more difficult (you move from walking to wading). It is applied to other ...


14

I suggest 'Internet handle' (but having said that, Fathima's screen name is a well-established term, as a Google search will quickly show).


13

A young person who demonstrates wisdom and maturity beyond their years is often called an old soul. It comes from the belief that some reincarnated souls retain a measure of the wisdom and character developed in previous incarnations. These days, even those who don't share in the actual belief find use for the phrase in normal conversation. I'd be perfectly ...


13

He sounds like a fuddy-duddy one that is old-fashioned, unimaginative, or conservative [Merriam-Webster] The term is not limited to children, but is often applied to someone who seems old beyond their years. You also might consider fogey an extremely fussy, old-fashioned, or conservative person (esp in the phrase old fogey) [Collins] In this ...


13

Nickname is the appropriate word because it is a common synonym of screenname in computing. It is used outside the internet but it became a common word in this context. Nick (short of nickname), on the other hand, is mostly used in technical contexts.


12

I have often seen "alias" used in this way in describing what someone is called on an Internet community.


12

The lad you speak of has an anachronistic perspective. Anachronistic may seem to be a stretch here, but when you think about it, an anachronistic perspective (attitude, outlook, way of looking at things) is a perspective that is somehow out of order chronologically. Very often we think of anachronistic thinking as backward-looking, from the perspective of ...


11

Pseudonym has meanings beyond the web, but is just as applicable to usage online as off. It's also generally more appropriate to both formal writing, and writing for non-technical audiences. It's a bit more widely understood than the alternatives, being several hundred years older and more established in the language. (Screen Name and Handle are, as already ...


11

Sclerotic--an inability to adapt. 'That boy Tim is a sclerotic kid--age 13 going on 65.


10

As I native North American English speaker, I would colloquially refer to the person you described as old-school. Meriam-Webster defines that term as: old-school typical of an earlier style or form based on a way of doing things that was common in the past using or supporting traditional practices So for example: Joey is ...


9

A moniker or handle would be an appropriate word for internet name.


8

"Born middle-aged" is a phrase I have heard applied to such people (including myself, actually). There are plenty of matches on Google for that phrase. The OED says that "middle-aged" can be used for "resembling a person in middle age", so you can interpret the phrase in that sense.


7

My son was like this when younger, and his Scoutmaster remarked once that he appeared to be working on his Running-for-the-Senate merit badge.


6

"Born too late" is a moderately common phrase, as popularized by Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem "Miniver Cheevy": ... Miniver loved the days of old     When swords were bright and steeds were prancing; The vision of a warrior bold     Would set him dancing. [...] Miniver Cheevy, born too late, ...


6

According to the the canonical reference for all things hackish, it's handle, nick, or screen name. http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/H/handle.html


5

I'm going to suggest nostalgist. It seems like there is no word that covers both being young and nostalgic, but nostalgist conveys the idea in the context. You can use nostalgic as an adjective also, as in a nostalgic person. Nostalgist is the noun version of nostalgic but urbandictionary mentions that it is used among young people and includes regional ...


4

I personally use "Alias" to reference an online user's name. It's similar to nickname, but the context is clearer that it's a false name.


4

A jinx suggests the idea of very bad luck: A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing. Ex: Jinx strikes again as Fuller is ruled out! Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com/jinx


3

I'd use something like Refactor to non-deprecated methods. Refactor implies a change that doesn't affect behavior (as should be the case here). The rest is a concise description of the types of changes.


3

According to Dictionary.com, Slander is a good word for what you describe. slander, noun: *a malicious, false, and defamatory statement or report: a slander against his good name.* slander, verb: *1 with object :to utter slander against; defame.* 2. without object: to utter or circulate slander.


3

I suppose it's about context. 'Engineering' as a word is neither positive nor negative. In the same way, the word "crunchy' is positive when it refers to cornflakes, but negative when it refers to someone's leg! So too, 'engineering' can be positive or negative only in context of what is being engineered. Engineering is about one person or a group of ...


3

It is a metaphor that means there is less and less room for her to move, as if the ground she is standing on is shrinking. The police/FBI or whoever is investigating her are closing in on her. Eventually she will fall (she will be caught by the authorities).


3

In this context "naturally enough" means "as you would expect"... In other words, it seems obvious and natural that the command to Import a Module is "import" because the command word is synonymous with its function.


3

Another discussion is here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2216027 'username' seems to be acknowledged as indicative without accompanying baggage. https://www.google.com/search?q=define+username


3

Even if the technical meaning of the phrase refers to the posterior side of something, this could be a euphemism. Ultimately the context will give you a better answer than a study of the phrase itself. Without knowing the context, the idea of someone turning their back on me is much less uproarious than someone aiming their butt at me.


3

Depending on the tone of your piece, you could say something like "seemingly cursed", but a more general term would be "misfortunate": Misfortunate Adjective: deserving or inciting pity; "a hapless victim"; "miserable victims of war"... Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/misfortunate


2

Can I suggest "united", so the whole phrase would be "eternally united"?


2

Ngram shows that the expression is used in the UK too also in the version 'kiss my arse' since the 40s. Kiss my arse! (British & Australian taboo!) also Kiss my ass! (American & Australian Taboo) something that you say in order to tell someone that you will not do what they want you to. He asked for money, and I told him he could ...



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