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94

You could consider "debunk" To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief). Individual cases where a stereotypical assumption is confounded might be described as someone "breaking the mold" Women Artists Who Broke the Mold


21

Debunk is spot on but, if you don't mind being a little less accurate, dispel also works and I've seen it in this context quite frequently. I am posting this in order to dispel the myths and rumours that answers posted three hours after the question never get upvotes.


17

Disprove means "to show that (something) is false or wrong." So you could say, for example, "A recent study disproves the myth that girls are bad at sports."


13

"in scenarios that come straight from Kafka" is not an idiom, and I will leave the matter of Kafka and cultural reference to others, but I think your question is a reasonable one and I'd like to point out that the phrase in question actually contains something that can be used idiomatically, in a sense, and that is the following phrasal template: "come ...


11

It's not an idiom, it's a literary reference. Saying something comes "straight from Kafka" implies it is dark and disturbing to the point of being surreal. Franz Kafka was a Bohemian (Czech) writer who wrote strange stories of the grotesque and terrifying. In his most famous, Metamorphosis, the protagonist is inexplicably transformed into a gigantic bug ...


8

This gesture is known as wagging (or shaking) one's finger at someone. Someone using the most aggressive form of the gesture could be said to be wagging their finger in the other person's face. See here for the results of a Google Images search for "wagging his finger".


8

This poem/proverb is saying that the old friends are gold (more valuable than silver): “Make new friends but keep the old; one is silver and the other is gold”


6

Definition 2.1 at ODO is: Perceive (the difference between one person or thing and another): I can’t tell the difference between margarine and butter This is the sense that's used in tell them apart.


5

According to The Phrase Finder, the origin is simpler and more intuitive than the legends about it might suggest: 'A frog in the throat': is an American phrase that entered the language towards the end of the 19th century. The expression doesn't have a fanciful derivation (see more on that below) but comes directly from the fact that a hoarse ...


5

I think it's OK with break the stereotype. I suggest also demolish, get rid of, eliminate the stereotype, and explode, shatter, ruin the myth.


4

Mythbusting Only nerds will understand this reference to the TV show Mythbusters, but this could be suitable depending on your audience. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters


4

It means that actions have consequences.


3

to refute a myth to refute: Prove (a statement or theory) to be wrong or false; disprove. OxfordDictionaries.com A simple google search shows that to refute a myth is indeed actually used widely enough. It is also used in books, as seen in this Google Ngram Viewer (which also shows how the phrase compares with the more popular to debunk a myth). ...


3

A more colorful phrase to describe your situation is that someone is putting the lie to a myth or cliche. This is usually used to describe something which belies some usually-overreaching claim or statement, and has a somewhat triumphant air of "Ah-hah! I have found a clear counterexample to this absurd statement!" As an example, from last month's ...


3

Logophilia: The love of words. Logophile: (from TFD) One who appreciates and enjoys words. Someone who loves words is called a logophile. Despite there being quite a few of us word-lovers, logophile is not common enough to find its way into most dictionaries. Logophile comes from two Greek roots--logos, meaning "speech, ...


3

One vivid way to describe the act of moving one's forefinger toward the other person's face is "jabbing [one's] finger." A Google search turns up multiple examples of this usage. From Laura Simon, Dreams of Paradise (1991): "It's a legitimate business from which I fully expect to realize a profit. I wouldn't have started it otherwise. I would have sent ...


3

A common expression is to lose the spark in a relashionship: ( from TFD) vivacity, enthusiasm, or humour 5 Reasons Your Relationship Has Lost Its Spark. Why the Spark Fades in a Relationship. Countless couples complain of losing the “spark” in their relationship. Some chalk it up to evolved differences, a slow growing apart, or sheer ...


2

"Lost its lustre" is a nice way of putting it. Lustre - 1A gentle sheen or soft glow. 1.2 Glory or distinction. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/lustre "We grew apart" is a more relationship-specific phrase.


2

You could say that the relationship has grown stale. Dictionary.com: 4. having lost freshness, vigor, quick intelligence, initiative, or the like, as from overstrain, boredom, or surfeit: He had grown stale on the job and needed a long vacation.


2

If you wanted to include a connotation of inevitability, you could say the relationship had run its course (though that also implies it is over, or nearly so).


2

About treatment of words or a language .... Glossophilia is a love of language, be it foreign or native. The term refers to people with a love for language and the structure of language.


2

I'm assuming you're referring to the Madonna song "Let It Will Be". First off, songs are not a reliable source for grammatically accurate English. You won't find a native speaker that thinks "let it will be" is good grammar. Most likely, Madonna is using "let it will be" as a corruption of "let it be." The refrain: That it will be Just let it be Oh ...


2

The phrase straight from Kafka may not be an established idiom per se, but in an X straight from Y could be considered idiomatic. The phrase essentially means reminiscent of or according to the school of. Check out this excerpt from a ballet review: The Age of Anxiety is based upon the 1946 poem by W H Auden, depicting the lives of four New Yorkers who ...


1

If you face an uphill battle, you are marching against gravity. This would be more difficult. Hence, When I was your age, I walked fifteen miles to school, through the snow, uphill, both ways! (Warning: hyperlink goes to TV Tropes, where you will lose track of time.)


1

I'd like to add an answer to the several good ones here to point out a slight distinction between the title and body of your question. It's fairly common parlance to refer to stereotypes as myths, but there are certainly many myths which are certainly not stereotypes. Consider the myth, or old wives' tale that: Toast always lands buttered side down! ...


1

Disabuse - to show or convince someone that a belief is incorrect http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disabuse http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/disabuse


1

This is almost definitely a regional phrase. I live in Lawrence, Kansas, where John Brown was active and is a local cult hero. His face appears in pictures in bars, paintings in most prominent buildings, and plastered on t-shirts and bumper stickers. I have never heard this phrase in my life.


1

Per Hatchet Jobs and Hardball: The Oxford Dictionary of American Political Slang edited by Grant Barrett (Oxford University Press, 2004), it refers to a hanged abolitionist and is an alternative for 'damned'.


1

hound (noun) is "a dog", or hound (verb in the infinitive) is "to pursue relentlessly". Neither makes sense here. As IconDaemon has mentioned in a comment, it can only be a misprint, where an "h" was typed instead of a "b". bound to - very likely, sure. (Merriam-Webster), predetermined; certain (TFD) "He believed that whatever he planned to do was ...


1

You can puncture a myth or stereotype: VERB 2 Cause a sudden collapse of (mood or feeling): EXAMPLE SENTENCES the earlier mood of optimism was punctured The company has punctured this fragile mood of optimism with a miscalculation of astonishing proportions. Worse still is the title track - eight-and-a-half minutes of tedium and ...



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