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28

As I understand it in normal card game it would mean someone manually prepared the cards so they know what is coming (have advantage) In the context of the speech I think it means that average Americans are at disadvantage. Similar to system is rigged in your post. stack the deck (against someone or something) and stack the cards (against someone or ...


17

If the victory was so costly it led to defeat, then its opposite would be a loss that was so advantageous it led to victory: Gambit 2(In chess) an opening move in which a player makes a sacrifice, typically of a pawn, for the sake of a compensating advantage:


11

From Etymology Online, footing (n.) as solid base for something evolved from the late 13c.: "a base, foundation;" late 14c., "position of the feet on the ground, stance," a gerundive formation from foot (n.). Figurative meaning "firm or secure position" is from 1580s; that of "condition on which anything is established" is from 1650s. From ...


9

Pyrrhic Defeat Theory suggest increasing power by increasing the cost of a battle: the idea that those with the power to change a system, benefit from the way it currently works. Origin In criminology, pyrrhic defeat theory is a way of looking at criminal justice policy. It suggests that the criminal justice system’s intentions are the ...


5

"Lost the battle but won the war" is the closest phrase I can think of that matches what you describe.


3

The "Oxford comma is irrelevant to this question. Saying "my family and crew" implies that the crew is part of the family, not necessarily your crew. Saying "my family and my crew" implies that both the family and crew "belong" to you, which is probably what you are looking for. In addition, unless you are a ship's captain, you may want to use an ...


3

History records a number of heroic defenses that resulted in short-term defeat or even disaster, but that either wore down or delayed the enemy—and inspired allies fighting in the same cause—and thus contributed to subsequent victory in the larger war. Of these some have become bywords for what might be called "Pyrrhic defeats": "a Thermopylae," "an Alamo," ...


3

Other words and phrases (from the top of my head) Carbon copy Duplicate Clone (for persons) Doppelgänger (also for persons) Edit: sorry, most of these don't match your question. Perhaps only 'duplicate', but for other uses I will still keep them here. Edit2: Duplicate Identically copied from an original. So the sentence would be The ...


3

Look "with new eyes" - could be replaced with (rephrased to): change of opinion reconsider/rethink, reevaluate give new consideration to revise or renew one's assessment etc.


2

You could also try "a facsimile of the original".


2

Replica. From wikipedia: "A replica is an exact reproduction, such as of a painting, as it was executed by the original artist or a copy or reproduction..."


2

It is more common to say the painting was a forgery. Art forgery is the creating and selling of works of art which are falsely credited to other, usually more famous, artists. Art forgery can be extremely lucrative, but modern dating and analysis techniques have made the identification of forged artwork much simpler. Wikipedia and from the BBC, ...


2

My suggestion is by no means canonical. If you want a compound that seems analogous to hands-on---something that sounds kind of informal, maybe conversational, even hyphenated, why not try run-through, as in: The first part will be a run-through of the fundamentals, while the second will be hands-on, where you can actually play around with the devices ...


2

An equivalent phrase that is more idiomatic (Google says about 14,000,000 results) is "won't know until then", for example: So Help Me God By Larry D. Thompson She hasn't regained consciousness. I think we have the right antibiotics for now. We won't have the blood culture results back until at least tomorrow morning. It may be that there is another ...


2

"Be my guest" is an idiom that's usually used to (politely) give permission for someone to do something. If you want to edit my manuscript, be my guest. Can I try out your new TARDIS? Be my guest. It indicates the other person should feel free to act as he/she pleases. In your question it appears the idiom is being used both figuratively and ...


2

You might say it was a suicide mission, or that that group made a sacrifice for a more critically important success; they were sacrificial lambs. In the muzzle-loading rifle days you might call your doomed first wave assaulters the forlorn hope. A more aggressive suicide mission might be described as a kamikaze attack.


1

Your take/consider constructions seem like independent clauses (of the imperative variety). As such, common usage would suggest using the colon, dash, or period to mark the boundary between clauses. Using a comma creates a comma splice.


1

The pipe in this context is the kind one smokes tobacco in. This just means to empty the bowl of the pipe by knocking it against your shoe or boot (which would normally be leather or some material which protects you from the heat of the pipe if it was recently lit) to loosen the contents and shake them out. This could also be metaphorical but we would need ...


1

I think what you have in mind is not the "Pyrrhic Defeat". Pyrrhus scored a victory against the other side by sacrificing too much, almost losing. What the losing side is experiencing is the feeling "we lost but we almost took them down with us". The example you give with the separatist party seems more like an unwitting victory to me (obviously referring to ...


1

As opposed to "could have" (which is appropriate for other contexts - they are not equivalent), "could," while correct, has a much more limited use in past time contexts. Many times you'll find replaced, when the past time is involved, as in: I could do the job [then]. by I was able to do the job [then]. This is what makes it quite rare, and makes ...


1

Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1994), has this entry for the expression: foot the bill Pay the bill, settle the accounts [example omitted]. This expression uses foot in the sense of "add up and put the total at the foot, or bottom, of an account." {Colloq; early 1800s} A Google Books search for the phrase finds an earliest ...


1

Lecture, talk, lesson, or presentation. The event involves a 1-hour lecture followed by a 2-hour hands-on practicum. Formal or professional term: didactic. The event will involve both a didactic and an experiential component.


1

It looks like it evolved from the Middle English hende, which carried both the meaning of "readily accessible" and "useful" as well as a host of other definitions, which itself rose out of the Old English/High German gehende, which, interestingly enough has more or less the same definition as "handy" does today. I just wrote a paper on it, but I wasn't able ...


1

There is a high likelihood that it refers to nine yards of fabric. Nine yards of fabric was a common standard length for retail sale at least in the mid-to-late 1800s and into the early 1900s. http://esnpc.blogspot.com/2015/02/nine-yards-to-dollar-history-and.html



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