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4

Employing 'an invalid way of framing the debate [by assuming] the acceptance of some false premises' (specifically to add improper weight to the argument) is known as begging the question. begging the question Definition: A fallacy in which the premise of an argument presupposes the truth of its conclusion; in other words, the argument takes for ...


4

The phrase warts and all springs to mind. This was supposedly used by Cromwell to his portrait-painter to discourage a flattering representation. It has come to be applied to something that should be accepted in its entirety, good points as well as bad.


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They're all perfectly good, and in some contexts, two or even all three of them will fit: it all depends on the spatial (or sometimes notional) arrangement of the situation. Come over means "come from somewhere else to here". Sometimes it is literal: from the other side of the road, or of a fence. But sometimes it is more abstract, meaning something like ...


2

How about to "make a mountain out of a molehill (tfd)". The link to the free dictionary says "cliché: to make a major issue out of a minor one; to exaggerate the importance of something"


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You could describe the person as having "snatched defeat from the jaws of victory", a reversal of "snatch victory from the jaws of defeat". According to Wiktionary, the latter phrase came into being as follows: The first recorded use of the phrase discovered to date is an article criticizing Representative James Seddon of Virginia for claiming that a ...


2

I have been in the Military for 26 years & in civilian Law Enforcement for 15 years so I use this term all the time. Do you "Read" me does not just mean... Do you hear me? It also means... Do you understand me? Because you can "Hear" someone but not be able to "Understand" what they are saying. The reason for not understanding may be because the words ...


2

"Hedge". A hedge is tacked on to qualify a phrase as being perhaps not 100% true or not 100% appropriate. As for example, if I qualified my answer by writing "'hedge', to a certain extent, at any rate".


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The best choice is 3. It means that the fund will carry someone a considerable distance toward achieving a goal. Number 2 is grammatically correct, but the meaning becomes potentially ambiguous because to has many definitions in addition to toward. Some readers or listeners might at least initially interpret to as meaning in order to, suggesting that, in ...


1

When someone attempts to divert the course of a debate into a different argument it is sometimes referred to as a red herring. The figurative use arises from the practice of using a strong odoured cured fish to distract dogs from the scent of something they are pursuing.


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Taking another cue from Nietzsche, "The All Too Humans" or just, "The 2/Too Humans".


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You could say that they "decided to do it the hard way", or that they "made it tough on themselves", or that they "took the long way around".... These all have the sense that the team was in control of what happened and they chose not to do it in the most quick, easy, or efficient manner.


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How about making your own phrase like "engineered a rube goldberg" From wikipedia "A Rube Goldberg machine is a contraption, invention, device or apparatus that is deliberately over-engineered or overdone to perform a very simple task in a very complicated fashion, usually including a chain reaction. The expression is named after American cartoonist and ...


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I have heard the phrase "He made a meal out of that..." used to indicate something was made harder than it should otherwise be. See Cambridge dictionary: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/make-a-meal-out-of-sth


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If you are feeling the anger and the hilarity simultaneously, you actually are feeling ambivalent ADJECTIVE Having mixed feelings or contradictory ideas about something or someone: The strength of your anger, and the strength of your amusement are both at play in your mind: "simultaneous conflicting feelings," 1924 (1912 as ambivalency), ...


1

"Look out for" is usually used in junction with a negative concept, such as "Look out for the incoming missile!". Support is something you don't look out for, it is what you seek, or embrace. "Looks in" does not fit well in your sentence, as it is unclear where the person is looking in, and also because you use the word "inner" (repetition). He seeks ...


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I don't have an earlier date, but a Mr. Hurd, writing in the NYT used it three times in one article, 'LA GUARDIA INSISTS FEDERAL AID GO ON; Halt Next Year 'Unthinkable,' He Says, Calling for New Funds by Next Congress." Here is a partial quotation, courtesy of BYU's COHAE: " With technological displacement, with labor-saving devices in agriculture as ...



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