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4

Mawkish, adj.: 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot". Sense of "sickly sentimental" is first recorded 1702. Soppy: showing or feeling too much of emotions such as love or sympathy, rather than being reasonable or practical. (cambridge.org/etymonline.com)


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A hard copy (of a magazine, for instance) is a paper version, versus a digital version.


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I believe the linguistic term the OP is looking for is asymmetries (with minor corrections) Language and Sex Differences Serap Yelkenaç ... Moreover, another lexical fields that are taken into account as errors resulting in discrimination in language are marital status, asymmetries ( in other words, marked and unmarked forms), jobs and ...


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You are correct. "Conceal carry" is simple verbal laziness, along the lines of dropping the "g" in the "ing" suffix. It is also (for now) a purely verbal phenomenon ...


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Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


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I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning


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"To put into relation to each other" could just mean to set up a correlation between two sets of objects: "Apple, Orange, Banana" can be put into relation to "Car, Bus, Bike" as "Apple and Car, Orange and Bus, Banana and Bike". It'd be a strange to find outside of anything but a mathematics context.


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To continue the analogy, I'd call them parrots. One of its meanings is: [dictionary.com] a person who sedulously echoes another's words Which seems to fit. You could also consider ravens, which serve as message carriers in many fantasy works.


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The usual word is just reporters. They serve the same role in your application that news reporters do in the real world. This is often called a secondhand report, so if you want a flowery term analogous to horse's mouth, you could call the reporters the Second Handers.


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"Among the questions" is not the subject. The subject is "who fired the fatal shots that killed nine". The example sentence is an inversion of "Who fired the fatal shots that killed nine is among the questions".


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I would go for one of (definitions from dictionary.com): mushy Informal. overly emotional or sentimental: mushy love letters. soppy British Slang. excessively sentimental; mawkish. saccharine cloyingly agreeable or ingratiating: a saccharine personality. exaggeratedly sweet or sentimental: a saccharine smile; a saccharine song of ...


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"slushy" comes to mind. slushy - (adj) "affectedly or extravagantly emotional" TFD


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It's indeed You play, you pay. It's a shortened version of If you play (and you lose), you (have to) pay your debts. or simply, you cannot play (get something) without paying; a sentiment that is also expressed as TINSTAAFL: There is no such thing as a free lunch.



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