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55

They are known as "trust-fund babies" or "trust-fund kids": from Dictionary.com: noun: a child of wealthy parents or other relatives who can rely on a trust fund rather than hard work for a living


46

harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


40

They're called wet nurses. Wikipedia A wet nurse is a woman who breast feeds and cares for another's child. Wet nurses are employed when the mother is unable or chooses not to nurse the child herself. Wet-nursed children may be known as "milk-siblings", and in some cultures the families are linked by a special relationship of milk kinship. Mothers ...


32

Traditionally the most common (noun) terms for such a one would probably be a "prodigal" (as in the proverbial, Prodigal Son) or, alternately, a "profligate". prodigal noun: 1. a person who spends money in a recklessly extravagant way. • a person who leaves home and behaves recklessly, but later makes a repentant return. noun: prodigal ...


31

The Free Dictionary says "at a certain time past, not distant, but indefinite; not long ago; recently; rarely, the third day past." Collins simply says "a few days ago." So your girlfriend is closer to right. But to me, a limit of about a week, not a month, sounds right; otherwise, say "last week," "a week or two ago," etc.


24

Indeed there is: "spendthrift" is one, and "wastrel" another. The latter is archaic but I really like it. Derived from "waste", I guess, but pronounced with a short A not a diphthong. You don't have to be stinking rich to be these, though. And there is another archaic word for spending an inheritance etc. quickly and reprehensibly: "to blew". That's not the ...


14

Playboy: noun A wealthy man who spends his time enjoying himself, especially one who behaves irresponsibly or is sexually promiscuous: ODO Apparently the phenomenon is not chauvinistic as playgirl works for her: n. A usually wealthy woman who spends much of her time pursuing leisure and romance. ODO The popularity of Playboy ...


12

There are a few terms which specifically capture the physical state of lying on the ground, face up, but they're fairly clinical and lack the mental overtones you describe (of complete relaxation, etc). Nevertheless: Supine: (of a person) lying face upward.[google definition] Which I like because its spelling reminds me of "supple" (relaxed, like a ...


12

In psychology, these are known as intrusive thoughts(1). The term is chosen because these thoughts seem to enter your mind from outside, without your control. Intrusive thoughts can occur across a wide spectrum of subjects, from uncontrollable fears, to the urges toward mischief or violence which you experience, to the urge to harm oneself without reason, to ...


11

I've always liked the term Trustafarian, a portmanteau (of trust and rastafarian) that can be somewhat limited in distribution to college campuses and the "hip" parts of town (and it is a term which can seen as a form of religious and cultural expropriation from the Rastafaris). /ˌtrʌstəˈfɛərɪən/ noun (sometimes capital) ( Brit, informal) a ...


10

Should I use apple or pear in the sentence I love to drink apple / pear juice? The answer is: it depends entirely on what message you want to convey. By the way and anyway do not mean the same in that sentence: It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And anyway, why is he so sure about it? He's not an astronomer. This version could roughly ...


10

I think the word you are looking for is toponym. I also think that a list of 'trade products' that includes lesbian needs work (unless your supermarkets are markedly different from ours).


9

Although most people agree that whatever happened last week, but not a year ago, can be said to have occurred "the other day", any attempt to specify time limits would be opinion-based. I might use the phrase for any event that occurred during the past four weeks, but some people may not agree.


8

Rake is not as overwhelmed with sexual connotations as playboy but it still: rake 2 n. A usually well-to-do man who is dissolute or promiscuous. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. It is the reduction of rakehell: n. An immoral or dissolute man. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, ...


8

The person is performing the duties but doesn't officially hold the title. Jerry is the CEO in name only. Csarina is effectively the CEO: 1.1 Actually but not officially or explicitly: ODO


8

That would be a nurse or a wet nurse: nurse: 1 (a) a woman who suckles an infant not her own : wet nurse wet nurse: a woman who cares for and suckles children not her own Both definitions from Merriam-Webster Online.


7

The idiom lets you anchor two propositions against one another in order to add emphasis. There was nothing I loved more than English, not even volleyball and that's saying a lot! Think: because you know how much I actually love volleyball, so just imagine how much I loved English. I think I'd even prefer him to the terrorists—and that's saying a ...


7

According to the corpus, from one another seems to be significantly more idiomatic than one from another: One from another seems to be preferred over from one another by people with a fixation on parsing words in sentences, because the preposition from has a clear object: another separated from (or influencing) one. The meaning of the two expressions is ...


7

Your instincts are correct: "next to that" is not something a native speaker would use if they wanted to say "additionally". Given enough context, most native speakers would understand what was meant, mind you, but like Robusto said, it's an odd, foreign-sounding locution. (Also, it might be misinterpreted as an attempt to say "besides".) The phrase can be ...


7

Innocent might work to capture the lack of conceit: adjective Without experience or knowledge of: ODO Alice is that much more charming, because she is so innocent of her beauty.


6

It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And anyway, why is he so sure about it? He's not an astronomer. Is correct. And, by the way, why is he so sure about it? Is incorrect, because "By the way" implies you are introducing an unrelated subject. Cf. the comment above: "By the way, what's his wife's name?" where we have a departure ...


6

I think Scot's answer is perhaps more accurate, but for my exact sentence I ended up using: in all but name It applies to conditions as well and is not limited to describing a person. Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/in+all+but+name


6

This caught my eye, because my wife & I have very-very different perceptions of what "the other day" means. She grew up in SE Asia with a British school education, so she's fluent in English, so it's not a misunderstanding of the idea, I think it's a cultural perception thing. When she says "the other day", it can mean any time in the past few years, ...


6

Oxford Shorter (1933 edition) Wet nurse, wet-nurse sb 1620 A woman who is hired to suckle and nurse another woman's child. Wet-nurse verb transitive, to serve as a wet nurse.


5

slake verb: 3rd person present: slakes; past tense: slaked; past participle: slaked; gerund or present participle: slaking quench or satisfy (one's thirst). "slake your thirst with some lemonade" synonyms: quench, satisfy, sate, satiate, relieve, assuage "we longed for a mountain spring to slake our thirst" see Google slake


5

In a somewhat restricted context, the term remittance man might apply. The term was used in former times (such as the Victorian era) to describe British men who lived abroad and whose income consisted of funds sent by their families. While this does not necessarily imply that the remittance man was simply fooling around rather than trying to work, there is ...


5

He is taking it personally. to think that someone is offending you when they are not: These criticisms should not be taken personally (= they are not meant to criticize any one person in particular). [Cambridge]


5

The original version of the sentence was correct: I have Sodium and Potassium. This type of element (i.e. elements considered to be metals)... Sodium and potassium are a single "type of element" (considered to be metal), despite being more than one element, so "element" should be singular. Even if your list was many longer, it would still be a ...


5

While this is the "English Language & Usage" part of stackexchange your answer mentions "in linguistics". There is also an internationally recognized legal term that protects these names to indicate authenticity, the French "Appellation d'origine contrôlée". Roquefort cheese, Cognac, Porto, Lambic beers, and others benefit from this protection. In many ...


4

A dilettante is a dabbler in different subjects, usually the arts. The usage of dilettante peaked in American literature in the 1920's to the 1940's. This is because in those hard times a dabbler needed to be wealthy in order to have the luxury to avoid an onerous or practical occupation. The word dilettante conjures up a mental picture of an idle, well-off ...



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