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28

I'm pretty sure it means that he looks good in a hat. Not sure if UrbanDictionary is a good reference, but this is the definition I mean: Rockin' Wearing something proudly and/or looking good wearing something. He's really rockin' that new hat of his! He's really rockin' that new haircut. Taken from UrbanDictionary: Rockin'


15

My eldest son can rock a hat. I am the opposite: even great hats look terrible on me. To rock a hat is to look great in a hat. On an errand this weekend, I saw these chic summer hats on display.... They’re designed by Eugenia Kim, a New York based milliner. I was tempted to buy one but I’m not sure I can rock a hat. and It's not top brands or ...


14

I can't comment on the specific case of the 'Angeles National Forest' map you mention, but in my experience, 'not drawn to scale' indicates your meaning '1', not meaning '2'. One reason the phrase may be added to a map that appears to be scaled correctly might be as a disclaimer, to protect against litigation if someone gets lost, for instance. The phrase ...


10

The message means #1: all parts of the map are not necessarily scaled identically (or accurately). "There don't seem to be any features on the map that are drawn out of proportion to other features." There might not seem to be any, yet there might be some. That's what the message is supposed to draw your attention to. If it were obvious that things ...


6

The mentioning while professing not to mention is a figure of speech known as apophasis. (rhetoric) the device of mentioning a subject by stating that it will not be mentioned: I shall not discuss his cowardice or his treachery An alternative to not to mention is let alone.


6

I'd consider not to mention as a type of scalar focus marker. It cannot be replaced by any of the suggested wordings in the other answers without stripping it of its special focus-marking properties. Basically, X not to mention Y can be paraphrased as: "X should be considered noteworthy; and if you don't think so, there is the related fact Y which is ...


6

To rock a hat is a slang term meaning to wear a hat. How one looks in the hat is not always relevant, although it can refer to looks depending on how the phrase is used. In this example the only implication is to wear a hat: I think I will rock a hat for the party tomorrow night. Whereas in this one it is strongly suggested that Eric looks good in the ...


5

Here is my interpretation: The pronoun this in the sentence actually refers to another shooting took place in 2009 at the same facility that resulted in 13 deaths by Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, a military psychiatrist and a Muslim. It was an act of terrorism. One of his motivations was to kill as many soldiers as he could to wage jihad on American military ...


5

In engineering drawings, a numeric dimension can be labelled Not to Scale to indicate an inaccurate proportion, as in your case 1. My instructor likes to use the example of drawing a broom; the most informative drawing would use cut lines to shorten the handle to allow the grip and the head of the broom to be drawn larger. The dimension for the overall ...


5

I found this: Ears are burning, one's - one is being talked about A tingling or burning sensation in the ears supposedly means that a person is being discussed by others. The origin of this belief goes back to Roman times when augurs (see Under the auspices of) paid particular attention to such signs. Pliny wrote: 'It is acknowledged that the absent feel a ...


5

"X, here we come" or "X, here I come" is a phrase meaning "We are/I am going to X". It pretends to be addressed to the place itself: Hey, Bora Bora, I'm coming to you! The important meaning here is that X is usually a luxurious place such as you'd visit for holidays or hope to live in after retirement. What the phrase is getting at is that the speaker is ...


4

Google ngram result for 'submarine cruise' can be found here. And for 'submarine sail' here. 'sail' is used as a verb in relation to submarine in this specialist publication about a submarine called the Dreadnought. 'cruise' seems more often to be used as an adjective or a noun, rather than a verb. The etymology of 'cruise' links to 'crossing' and ...


4

It's not an exact fit, but Alice is acting as an agent provocateur. An agent provocateur is someone (often a spy) who baits you into performing an illegal act for someone else's gain. She is provoking Bob into making a false accusation for the purpose of making him look foolish. You might also say she's baiting him into bearing false witness. Both of ...


4

"It's all on you" could mean: It's all because of you (you're at fault, you're the reason everything failed) It all depends on you (you're the only person responsible for this task) In both cases, it's a question of responsibility - either for something that has been already done (but often poorly) or that may go wrong in the future, or for something ...


4

It means to hit on a topic that is of importance to person you are speaking to. You can strike a chord either positively or negatively. Positively if you say something that impresses/flatters/connects (positively) with them. Negatively if you speak ill about something that is of importance to them or something that rubs them in the wrong way. To me its ...


4

I always took it to be one of those phrases that represents a partial utterance, as in "Oh, the horror that this invokes...". You are not addressing "horror" directly or evocatively; it's not a name or a title. I get the same impression from the famous "Oh, the humanity" quote. By comparison, if we say "Oh, Brother" or "Oh, Lord", that would be more in an ...


3

It generally means "it is your responsibility." By responsibility it means that the blame or the victory would belong to you - sometimes it is said when someone is taking a risk or doing something that could go badly. The person saying it means "it is your choice, but don't blame me if it fails." Particularly in superhero movies where people are doing ...


3

I trust him as far as I can throw him. This does indeed mean I do not trust him very much (unless I am really big and strong, and he is quite small, and I could actually throw him quite far). I've got Stark. Means indeed "I'll take him on". "I've got it" or "I've got him" can indeed mean "I'll take care of it/him". Q: I can solve the first ...


3

Vis-à-vis is a possibility. Literally, it means face to face, but it can also be used as an expression of comparison. "Vis-à-vis our previous study, our results could not show the difference between A and B. The score for A was low, compared to their [its?] score." (Is the referent of "their" "our previous study"? I'm not sure.) Other possibilities ...


3

The semicolon strikes me as grammatically incorrect, but people like to do some strange things with semicolons around here, so who am I to say. However, your question seems moot since the "but not only" part is completely redundant and can be removed. Saying "Every possible accessory... including X" already implies that there are other things you're not ...


3

"Back the right horse" might be the expression you're looking for. He backed the right horse with Mr. Koch. Of course, every investor wants to back the right horse -- but which assets to choose? Everyone wanted to back yhe right horse Also, consider "a cinch" and "a shoo-in." cinch: a person or thing certain to fulfill an expectation. ...


3

"Order received" might be perceived as ambiguous, because it may not be clear whether it refers to the supplier receiving the order, or the customer receiving what he has ordered "Order is done" is similarly afflicted: does done refer to what the customer does, or the supplier? I would use Order placed. This is unambiguously something that the customer ...


2

In the past, even perhaps, today, goat herds and sheep herders knew well the ideal green pastures on top of hills and in the valleys around villages, they used to call the flock of sheep or goat to gather. By way of echoes the valley transmitted the sound of the herder, and his flock would hear it and come to him. Hence, old men of the villages in N Lebanon ...


2

The name by which they are mostly known in Britain is 'interest groups', i.e.groups pursuing a common interest. Sometimes these are charities e.g Alzheimers Trust, Cancer Research UK, NSPCC (National Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Children), Save the Children, Oxfam etc. But included in 'interest groups' are people who campaign on behalf of people ...


2

Getting into is a much broader phrase. It doesn't imply that you are interested in something or even like it. The knowledge of person asking the question can play a significant role in the difference as well. For example, you may work as a travelling salesman, dislike your job, and be discussing it with someone who knows you are not exactly interested in ...


2

The main difference is that the first sentence, at least at first reading, does not make any sense. 2.Despite being a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called "new age" treatment. This sentence makes sense: Even though it is a very old therapy, it is called "new age". The first version: 1.Despite a very old medical therapy, ...


2

This reminds me of the Hitchcock thriller, Gas light, where a husband twists and manipulates events in order to convince everyone, and his own wife, of her mental instability. Gregory plants false memories, tricks her into hearing noises which no one else in the household hears, so that he can commit his wife, Paula, to a mental institution whereupon he will ...


2

These are called phatic expressions, and their purpose is to perform a social function rather than to convey information. It's sometimes called small talk. You might refer to these as good wishes, which is synonymous with greetings, regards, or (arcane) compliments. This wouldn't suggest that good wishes only covers the examples given in the question, but ...


2

Getting into something can have several connotations: Being interested: I got really into cats after seeing how kittens were born. Being involved in (especially employment): I got into the plastics field right after college. Being accepted (university, program): He got into Harvard because his GPA was a solid 4.0. Opening or entering: I got into the ...


2

On plans, maps, and engineering drawings it means that you should not measure a length on the document and then expect to be able to calculate the “real life” distance from it. (Sometime there is a warning saying “Do not scale”, meaning do try to calculate the real life measure from what you have measured on the document.) On a real estate listing, the ...



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