Hot answers tagged

25

To say something "calls itself" something is an informal, fairly common subtle way to express scepticism, reservation, doubt or disdain about something; particularly, the validity of its name. It's similar to prefacing "self-styled" or "so-called". If I was to say "In English, Nerima calls itself Nerima City" in conversation, I'd be implying that Nerima ...


24

Slacktivist Wikipedia defines it as: ... a portmanteau of the words slacker and activism. The word is usually considered a pejorative term that describes "feel-good" measures, in support of an issue or social cause, that have little physical or practical effect, other than to make the person doing it feel satisfied that they have contributed. This may ...


22

Catch-22 To use it in a sentence, "It's a catch-22" or "It's a catch-22 situation" From Google's definition of Catch-22: a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions. "a catch-22 situation" (Paraphrased very slightly) from Wikipedia's Catch-22 (logic): A catch-22 is ...


19

It is grammatical, but it is not English as spoken by any kind of native English speaker. It sounds like a poor translation from a language like French, which tends to avoid passives (eg "is called") by either impersonals ("one calls it") or reflexives ("it calls itself").


17

I'm not sure of the etiquette for answering your own question on this site - but I've settled on 'inactivist'. It's not, strictly speaking, proper English, but will do for my purposes. EDIT I have settled on 'inactivist' because it merely categorises based on inaction, but also implies concern/an activist mindset. I'm not able to make assumptions as to the ...


16

Yes, that is proper English. It sound a little strange, since it's not clear whether the antecedent ("a special ward") is a governmental or other organizational unit, or simply the people who live there, when they speak English. You can say "it calls itself" about anything, as long as you're willing to assert that it's capable of naming itself...so yes, ...


13

This sounds like a chicken and egg situation. a situation in which it is impossible to say which of two things existed first and which caused the other It's a chicken and egg situation - I don't know whether I was bad at the sciences because I wasn't interested in them or not interested in them and therefore not good at them. Cambridge Idioms ...


8

You've already made up a word inactivist, apparently. But I have this to suggest: Pseudo activist You already know what an activist is. M-W defines pseudo as: not real or genuine being apparently rather than actually as stated : sham, spurious "distinction between true and pseudo humanism" — K. F. Reinhardt "The Problem With ...


6

In English, it calls itself Nerima City. The sentence, as it was found in the Wikipedia article before it got edited to something more informative and natural, was terrible and unnatural. The sentence is technically grammatical, but it is usually used for things that cannot talk, so the phrase has problems from the beginning (something that cannot ...


6

As you noted, "infinite feedback loop" is not the right term (and not just because your situation has nothing to do with software). That sounds more like a runaway success story, which is quite the opposite of your situation. If you wanted to borrow technical jargon from programming, it would be deadlock: In concurrent programming, a deadlock is a ...


6

Potential According to dictionary.com, noun possibility; potentiality: an investment that has little growth potential. a latent excellence or ability that may or may not be developed. (...) someone or something that is considered a worthwhile possibility: The list of job applications has been narrowed to half a dozen ...


5

(I was gonna comment this, but I feel it answers the question) Personally I would use: "They won by a landslide" or "They won massively" As is alluded to in the comments on my answer, to win by a landslide is usually used in an electorial context. For example: when one politician wins an election with more than 75% of the votes. They won by a landslide.


5

This could be a form of cognitive dissonance... "cognitive dissonance is the mental stress or discomfort experienced by an individual who holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values at the same time, performs an action that is contradictory to one or more beliefs, ideas or values, or is confronted by new information that conflicts with ...


5

Klinger is striving for a Section 8 because being booted out of the Army for any reason is still preferable in his mind to the alternative of getting shot and killed in Korea. "Bucking for" is not solely a negative expression. A young person could be working very hard to get straight A's and could be said to be "bucking for" straight A's on his/her ...


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


4


4

Amiable sex is actually an expression that has been used for a long time, mainly in the past, to refer to women: ... and even adored as well as elsewhere, but when they do not inspire any lively sentiment, the men seldom pay them those attentions which our politeness prodigally and indiscriminately bestows upon every individual of the amiable sex.( ...


4

The let alone construction has been analyzed in great and precise detail in a famous paper by Fillmore, Kay, and O'Connor: "Regularity and Idiomaticity in Grammatical Constructions: The Case of Let Alone", Language, Vol. 64, No. 3 (1988:501-38). EDIT: By request. The two clauses have to be on a certain scale of meaning; one of the clauses must ...


3

It typically means that the person to whom it happened (whatever it is) was best suited for it. The thing happening is typically positive, so it might be rephrased as No person could be more deserving (of it).


3

I agree that "calls itself" is correct English. It does, however, have a somewhat ironic taste to it, as if there was something just slightly comical about this appellation. If irony is not intended I would suggest that it is poor style rather than grammatically incorrect.


3

Double back to go back in the opposite direction (esp in the phrase double back on one's tracks) So you are reluctantly replying to "I love you".


3

You could call them accessories. Accessory noun A thing which can be added to something else in order to make it more useful, versatile, or attractive: optional accessories include a battery charger and shoulder strap - ODO


3

First printed reference that I can find to the phrase in the National Library of Australia TROVE database is a letter to the editor of the Illawarra Mercury in 1857. TROVE The phrase is obviously already a cliche when used by the letter-writer.


3

The word that came to my mind was handily, synonymous with easily, and strongly related to effortlessly. ... even though they won handily. Similarly, with ease.


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


2

Consider, chink [in the armor] : a weak spot that may leave one vulnerable. M-W fly in the ointment A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language wrench in the works a spanner (or North American monkey wrench) in the works A person or thing that prevents the ...


2

Perhaps Achilles' heel (with or without the apostrophe) An Achilles heel is a weakness in spite of overall strength, which can actually or potentially lead to downfall. While the mythological origin refers to a physical vulnerability, idiomatic references to other attributes or qualities that can lead to downfall are common. Wikipedia


2

The expression "first generation" is often used to describe both people born abroad and their descendants, which is terribly confusing. The Oxford dictionary covers both meanings. Assuming you are living in the US and were born abroad, you are a first-generation immigrant. I wouldn’t include citizenship in the mix. You can use “first-generation American” ...


2

The football players were magnanimous enough to compliment their opponents, even though they won hands down. win hands down Slang. To win easily Also, in a breeze; in a walk. Easily, without effort, as in They won in a breeze, 10-0, or The top players get through the first rounds of the tournament in a walk. All of these expressions ...


2

He keeps swiveling in his chair. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/swivel "She swiveled in her seat to check the time. She swiveled the chair around to face us." http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/categories/departments/workspaces/20653/ swivel chairs



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible