Hot answers tagged

31

Aside from No More Secrets' excellent suggestion, "cut someone some slack," there is "let it slide," which means not to oppose something that may be objectionable but that (apparently) is not intolerable. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997) discusses "let slide" in an entry for "let ride": let ride Also let slide. Allow ...


25

"Cut someone some slack" informal Allow someone some leeway in their conduct -- Oxford Dictionaries "Ease up on someone" to treat (someone) in a less harsh or demanding way -- Merriam-Webster


20

I see an important distinction between those two sentences. To me the use of "with" implies a more personal struggle. If you say In the past I have struggled with entitlement and greed. You're saying that you personally have been entitled and greedy, and you are trying to not be. Whereas, if you say In the past I have struggled against entitlement ...


18

If you never put your foot down, you could be acting as a doormat (figurative meaning) and letting someone walk all over you. Probably not what you wanted but I couldn't resist the foot-related opposite :). EDIT: all those comments and no-one thought of it :).


15

I have seen all of these words used : dilly-dally, dither, vacillate, waver Also a nice idiom: beat around the bush dilly-dally: to waste time, especially by indecision don't dillydally on the way to the store dither: to delay taking action because you are not sure about what to do She did not dither about what to do next. ...


11

To put your foot down is to insist on having your way in a situation where you wouldn't otherwise. It illustrates the act of taking a stance to resist some force being exerted on your body by planting your feet firmly. You could say the opposite action would be relenting and letting whatever may happen, happen. I wanted to put my foot down, but her ...


11

The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...


11

"Hem and haw" would be appropriate. Wikitionary: To discuss, deliberate, or contemplate rather than taking action or making up one's mind. 'If you hem and haw long enough, someone else will do it first.' Merriam-Webster: To take a long time before making a decision about what to do. 'The city council hemmed and hawed for a year before ...


7

I saw this was already mentioned as a comment, but I believe it is the best answer. As was also mentioned already, to "put your foot down" is to assert your authority on a matter to have your way after another's insistence. The complete opposite is to "Throw your hands up" which means to "give up and yield to the insistence of another, allowing them to ...


7

While the answers are good suggestions, I would like to propose roll over as the ideal idiom to use as it implies that the person is totally complicit in the request as opposed to putting their foot down, or protesting after letting something go and/or not noticing the thing that was happening. Roll Over To consent or comply passively or without ...


7

I would say of the suggestions people have submitted, the word "deliberated" would fit your initial 3 examples best: "You know how my friends are, they always deliberate so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At the restaurant, when I was asked what I wanted to order, I deliberated before finally ordering the steak." "Stop deliberating, this has ...


6

Your sentence makes me think of back down. withdraw a claim or assertion in the face of opposition — New Oxford American Dictionary Backing down is very nearly the opposite of putting one's foot down; it means letting the other person win the argument as opposed to insisting on your own way. Even the metaphors are opposite: putting your foot down ...


6

To me the obvious opposite is letting up. To let up is to relax or remove a condition or constraint. "Hey! Let up on the gas a bit, would you please?" Verb: let up Become less in amount or intensity "The rain let up after a few hours"; abate, slack off, slack, die away Reduce pressure or intensity "he let up the gas pedal and the ...


6

It means to purposefully play slower. This would be a disadvantage to a team that plays quickly, as it interrupts their natural flow and frustrates them. If a game has a high pace, then it's likely that both teams are looking to attack and/or counter-attack quickly, as opposed to patiently gaining ground and concentrating on keeping the ball.


5

Origin of the proverb 'There is honour among thieves' According to G.L. Apperson, The Wordworth Dictionary of Proverbs (1993), the notion that thieves share a bond of honorable conduct goes back at least as far as Cicero: There is honour among thieves. {Cum igitur tanta vis iustitiae sit, ut ea etiam latronum opes firmet atque augeat.—Ciciero, Off[ices],...


5

There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


5

"Turn a blind eye" is a good opposite. Turning a blind eye is an idiom describing the ignoring of undesirable information. -Wikipedia If "putting your foot down" is a response to reprehensible behavior of some sort, "turning a blind eye" would be quite the opposite. "Rather than putting my foot down and demanding change to the company's ...


5

One possible answer is waffle. Used as a verb, it may mean: Merriam-Webster: to be unable or unwilling to make a clear decision about what to do "Stop waffling and pick a movie!" "I don't know which side he's on. When I asked him, he waffled." One may "waffle between" several choices. If the problem isn't indecisiveness, but rather wasting time, ...


4

Also consider 'struggle between', 'struggle versus', and 'struggle through' which I go into further detail below. They're synonyms, although 'struggle against' has more of a connotation of a bigger battle against the idea that one struggles with. One can 'struggle with' an addiction but a 'struggle against' addiction suggests that the struggle is much ...


4

There is absolutely positively completely nothing wrong grammatically with ending a sentence with a preposition. This was a bogus rule made up by grammarians to sell grammar books, and ignores the way Germanic languages work. Some people cling to the rule, but it is a question of style, not grammar. Furthermore, used to has become, in practice, a lexical ...


4

who knows what and who knows what else are English idiomatic expressions. (I know them from British English, but the citations below suggest they are also common in American English.) who knows what One or more things described with no detail. Our junk drawer has old remotes, instruction manuals, and who knows what else in it. You're supposed to be ...


4

To me, the direction implied by the prepositions against and with does have a grain of literal meaning. I would tend to use the "with" case to describe the effort of building or formulating something or furthering progress towards a goal that is being thwarted by unforeseen difficulties: Einstein struggled with the "hole argument" for nearly three years ...


4

Starting during Victorian times in Britain it became very popular for people to go to the seaside for holidays. Many seaside resorts built piers on which tourists could walk to take the sea air, which was said to be good for the health. Certainly better than the smoky city air of the time. Small theatres were typically built at the ends of piers to ...


4

"I dislike his being blunt" means I dislike it when he speaks in a blunt manner. "I dislike him being blunt" means I dislike this person-- when he is being blunt. Actually, the first is more grammatically correct--and this is probably what the speaker means to say--- but people very often use the second way.


4

Some colourful (Australian slang) options: farnarkling [+about/around] (alternative spelling: farnarkeling) the group activity whereby everyone sits around discussing the need to "do something" but nothing actually happens - Urbandictionary.com eg: "You know how my friends are, they always farnarkle about so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At ...


3

Perhaps revamp is an appropriate term here. Although not associated with recycling per se it really captures the improvement bit. Give new and improved form, structure, or appearance to: an attempt to revamp the museum’s image (as adjective revamped) a revamped magazine Reference: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/revamp


3

Repurposing would certainly apply to the context of recycling.


3

The OED has one meaning of Judas being A small aperture or lattice in a door, orig. the door of a prison cell, through which a person can look without being noticed from the other side; a spyhole, a peephole. with the earliest quotation being from 1837: "Following the slow march of that whitish square that the Judas at my door cuts out upon the dark ...


3

I think crystal is the term more commonly used in "professional" contexts: the glass or plastic cover over the face of a watch. From www.europastar.com/watch-knowledge A watch crystal is a transparent cover that protects the watch face. Note that, coincidently, the word "crystal" is also used to denote the tiny piece of quartz that serves ...


3

[the] reveal the moment in which previously withheld information about characters or plot is unveiled.



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