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13

I think it would be fun, if slightly histrionic, to say that the statues "languished in obscurity".


11

Single sitting (in InE) is commonly used in context of -single sitting treatment-situations: Hair replacement procedures Root canal Tx Cataract operation etc. It's probably an adoption from the idiom "at/in one sitting". at/in one sitting: If you do something at one sitting, you do it during one period of time without stopping. ...


7

A more fundamental question is, "What did smooch mean at the time of this writing?" The Yellow Wallpaper, which is indeed a complex and brilliant piece by any measure, was published in 1892. The word smooch, which now means "to kiss and cuddle" had a different meaning in the 19th century. According to The Century dictionary and cyclopedia (1897), it's the ...


7

These are properly referred to as lacunae (singular lacuna): : a gap or blank space in something : a missing part <She found a lacuna in the historical record.> (Merriam-Webster Online)


7

Alleged (adjective) : said or thought by some people to be the stated bad or illegal thing, although you have no proof. (Cambridge dictionary). The sentence essentially says the accused man committed the crime. In my opinion, the writer has used "alleged" as a synonym for "accused", though in its objectionable sense. Another fairer phrasing could ...


7

That is called: Lip service: support for someone or something that is expressed by someone in words but that is not shown in that person's actions


6

Either heretofore unknown or heretofore undiscovered would work if no knowledge of the works existed prior to the discovery. The works, heretofore unknown, were discovered in the ruins of a monastery in Pisa. If knowledge of the works did exist, then you could use thought lost or long thought lost, as in The works, long thought lost, were ...


6

Joseph Lancaster's Improvements has this to say on the matter http://www.constitution.org/lanc/practical.htm On a repeated or frequent offence, after admonition has failed, the lad to whom he presents the card has liberty to put a wooden log round his neck, which serves him as a pillory, and with this he is sent to his seat. This machine may weigh from ...


6

I'd render this with something like: I vouch for it with my reputation or I stand behind my {product / service} or I put my name to my {product / service} with pride or I {stake my reputation / pride myself} on the quality of my {product / service}.


6

Outside of India, single sitting is and was certainly used, as attested in the comments, but it will nowadays usually refer to a meal. The (extended) meaning of in the time frame of a single occurrence may be typical Indian usage currently, but I would certainly not qualify such usage as a “blunder”, let alone an “absolute” one. It is no more a blunder ...


6

A few choices- stop by for a few moments. drop round for a few minutes pop in for a minute I like the expression - an abbreviated visit- though I have not heard of this phrase before and could not find much reference. And for the supporting cast- Cameo- the suggestion by Dan Bron definitely appears the most suitable. ...


5

You're describing a flying visit, it might also be pro forma or perfunctory, depending on why it is short.


4

It's not small and rundown- it's a compact charmer. It's not in a bad neighborhood- it's in interesting surroundings. It's not old and out of style- it's a vintage structure with period appeal. It doesn't have inadequate electrical power and bad pipes- it has preserved traditional features. It doesn't have inadequate security- it has an inviting ...


4

Alleged is an adjective: ADJECTIVE [ATTRIBUTIVE] Said, without proof, to have taken place or to have a specified illegal or undesirable quality: In that sentence, it correctly modifies attacker as an adjectival use of the past participle form: mid-15c., "quoted," past participle adjective from allege. Attested from 1610s in sense ...


4

John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary; Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "Fast Expressions of High and Low Society (1864) has a couple of interesting entries for job: JOB, a short piece of work, a prospect of employment. [Samuel] Johnson describes JOB as a low word, without etymology. It is, and was, however, a Cant word, and a JOB, two ...


4

Perhaps token support representing no more than a symbolic effort : minimal, perfunctory token resistance; token integration Merriam-Webster


3

I am assuming that by "question paper" you mean test. In that case a tough test might be described: The test was a [real] bear From Merriam-Webster: bear : 4. something difficult to do or deal with- < the oven is a bear to clean >


3

Using italics just to hammer something across is like a joke that comes with its own laugh track: a sign of weakness. A writer skilled in the craft expresses emphasis through variation in vocabulary, phrasing, structure, and length. This is the best way. Those of lesser skill ROUTINELY TURN TO ALL CAPITALS WHEN THEY WANT TO YELL AT YOU, BUT THIS IS ...


3

Since the knowledge of the work did not exist during the period. What about- "period of anonymity". The noun anonymity comes from a Greek word meaning "without a name." If you have anonymity, you have namelessness, and people will not know who you are. an·o·nym·i·ty - (TFD)* The quality or state of being unknown or unacknowledged. One ...


3

First, terminology needs to be defined. Here, 'word' (orthographic word) and 'phrase' (meaningfully constructed string not containing finite verb and consisting of two or more words) are used: Giegerich argues extensively that steel bridge and watch-maker are unequivocally phrasal and lexical respectively. [ie a phrase and a (compound) word ...


3

You are looking for utopia. Google defines it as: an imagined place or state of things in which everything is perfect. The word was first used in the book Utopia (1516) by Sir Thomas More. Merriam-Webster says it is often capitalized as Utopia and defines it as: an imaginary place in which the government, laws, and social conditions are perfect ...


3

How about: " she danced her life away"? OR "danced lifelong"; she is a lifelong dancer.


3

It is a metaphor that is used to render an effective image of an act that might give rise to a dangerous escalation of further violence. To answer your question, you can define it as a one-off figurative expression. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does ...


3

"Throw guns into a hot stove" isn't a common phrase, idiomatically or metaphorically, in U.S. English. However, I did find one real-life report involving a gun thrust into a hot stove. From the [Salt Lake City, Utah] Deseret News (May 6, 1876): ——When will people learn to handle fire-arms with care? James Cunningham, 15 years old, of Pennsgrove, Salem ...


3

Individual death: Met his Maker. Bought the farm. Kicked the bucket. Bought the big one. Is pushing up daisies. Went on to his reward. Shuffled off this mortal coil. Huge number of deaths: genocide massacre extinction bloodbath internecine life is cheap Armageddon depopulated mass carnage angel of death (biblical reference - see Passover) rained death ...


2

In my experience Glass Cannon is also a term used in Collectable Card Games (Magic the Gathering) where a combination deck will be totally unable to recover in cases where the combination is countered/disrupted. In this sense where the combination succeeds it results in a game win and when it fails it is a certain loss as there is no way to recover.


2

You are exactly right, FumbleFingers, that "you're not the boss of me" is a childish (or childhood) equivalent of "you're not my boss." In fact, in southeast Texas, where I spent the first 16 years of my life, it was a standard riposte in Childspeak, covering much the same ground as "You're not my mother," but without the demeaning acknowledgment that your ...


2

I would suggest "ups the ante". That is, it will cost hackers more (effort) to get into the game.


2

Assuming that it was known that these pieces existed, but we thought they had been lost, a common way of expressing that is long-lost: ctvnews: Long-lost original score of Mozart masterpiece found in Budapest bfi: BFI screens long-lost Laurel and Hardy print Of course, it is possible that nobody (in the recent era) ever knew that they existed at ...


2

You might call such a business one that has a "churn and burn" business plan, though the connotation of such a name is usually quite negative. The company's sole goal is new customer acquisition and it has no interest in (or ability to achieve) customer retention.



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