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56

Verbatim: (from TFD) using exactly the same words; corresponding word for word: a verbatim report of the conversation. or literally: in a literal manner; word for word: translated the Greek passage literally.


46

As Dan has said in his comment, the comma adds gravitas. However, I believe it also changes the implication of the sentence. Complete the job, as directed could be interpreted as "You have been told to finish this task. Do so.", which says nothing about how you should perform it. In contrast, I feel the clear implication of Complete the job as ...


34

The comma after “job” tells us that the phrase as directed is non-restrictive. The sentence states “you have been directed to do a job”, and implies that how you do it is up to you. But if we take out the comma, Complete the job as directed. Now “as directed” is restrictive, and the sentence is saying something more severe: Do the work, and make ...


30

In math, you provide a proof of something: a series of logical steps that lead to a conclusion. In the rest of life you provide proof of something: a citation or evidence or other support for a fact. In the mathematical sense, the proof is somewhat divorced from the theorem it proves, in the sense that a single theorem could have many different proofs. ...


23

The following, although not slang, may be relevant: • practical joker, “someone who instigates practical jokes” – wiktionary • prankster, “One who performs pranks” – wiktionary • trickster, “One who performs a trick”; also “A mythological figure responsible for teaching others through the use of guile and treason” – wiktionary Wikipedia's ...


14

The expression "cultural amnesia" would likely come from the lips of someone who bemoans the tendency of some people to forget about their roots, particularly the values, customs, mores, taboos, and ideals which may have once been embraced by a people-group as a whole but have now been forgotten and replaced by different customs, mores, taboos, and ideals. ...


10

As Joshn61 said, the most common synonym is simply Verbatim. In many contexts you could also replace it with exactly. For example: The text was copied word for word. The text was copied verbatim. The text was copied exactly. They all mean the same thing.


10

Provide proof of X means provide proof that X exists / obtains: Often, you will be required to provide proof of the document. You must provide proof of: your birth or arrival. How to Provide Proof of Financial Responsibility. [all internet] Since you prove the claims of a theorem rather than its existence, the correct wording here is We ...


8

I believe both versions are correct, but with slight nuance in meaning. When you say you're going to provide proof of something, it seems to focus on the fact of proving rather than the process of proving. For example You think these lines intersect. Well, I will now provide proof that these lines are parallel. When you say you're going to provide a ...


8

The slang term troll seems to be acquiring this meaning. Troll has been used for a number of years to refer to a person who makes inflammatory posts in Internet forums for the purpose of annoying others or stirring up trouble. More recently, it seems to also refer to people who perpetrate real-life pranks for similar purposes. Troll seems to have a ...


7

Despite Ø not being is the only correct form. If you've seen someone use Despite of, it's probably due to influence from the synonymous phrase in spite of, which does need the preposition.


6

You could figuratively call that person an imp. I would quote Wikipedia, which mentions imps' affinity for pranks, but the entry is not sourced well.


5

It means they've already missed the deadline. If they haven't missed the deadline, but their current progress indicates that they will, then they are behind schedule.


5

And I quote Is quite a common way to say it when retelling what someone has said: You said to me last week, and I quote, "I will never drink again"


5

rascal (Merriam-Webster): a person and especially a young person who causes trouble or does things that annoy people


5

"For good" means irrevocably, for ever. In this context, it means Alarick would not be able to resurrect (come back to life) as (I presume) he usually does. forever; permanently. I finally left home for good. They tried to repair it many times before they fixed it for good. (from TFD) (Disclaimer: I haven't watched the series in a long time, ...


4

There was some controversy over this back in 2003 when Los Angeles Country asked manufactures/suppliers to stop using it. This ultimately led different software platforms (like Drupal) to adopt, in 2014, the terms: primary/replica Other possible phrases that I like include: parent/child leader/follower For more information: ...


4

It does prove to be surprisingly hard to Google. In general, my sense is that it primarily means social amnesia, the collective, often deliberate forgetting of something important by a group, with additional connotations of both a culture of amnesia (meaning a culture that represses memories), and the forgetting or abandonment of things of specific cultural ...


3

John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009) includes a brief discussion of "happy as Larry" under a primary entry for "happy as a sandboy": happy as a sandboy extremely happy ; perfectly contented with your situation. An 1823 dictionary describes a sandboy as an urchin who sold sand in the streets, and according to the same ...


3

“They have developed a governing philosophy that is so fanatically anti-investment that they literally have at their doorstop death. There is no exaggeration in this. First of all, I believe doorstop is a typo, it should be spelled doorstep; the step leading to or the threshold of one's home. The above phrase suggests that it is a variation of the ...


3

horizontal - it means level relative to the (infinite) horizon or an imaginary analog.


2

Individual servings of wine are sold by the glass, or as glasses of wine. Conventionally, we say wine is served in glasses, rather than cups, even though technically a wine glass is a type of cup. See What's the difference between “cup” and “glass”? for that topic.


2

It is hard to guess the author's intent without seeing the context, but I would assume it is referring to the failure of a society or group of people to remember important aspects of their history, or a willingness to pretend that their cultural history is other than it is.


2

The way my Dad, a Navy vet, used to say it, it was "Chief, Cook, & Bottlewasher" (3 professions, not 2) and the meaning was that not only were you in charge, but you had to do all the middle management and menial responsibilities too...you did it all. Its not so much a derogatory term but it usually implies that everything is your responsibility, but ...


2

"Subject" here means two different things, and comes into English by two different paths. "Subject to" comes from the general sense of subjection, that is to say the overlordship of one over another. Much as people who were under the rulership of a king were called his subjects. This usage is attested very early in the English language. "Subject" in the ...


2

The other ticket refers to the candidates of the other party who are on the ballot. A party presents a given set of candidates for election to a given set of offices. That set of candidates is the ticket of that party. The other ticket is a ticket for another party. When there are essentially only two (main) parties, it is clear what the other ticket is, ...


2

(feel it) in my bones: to believe something strongly although you cannot explain why: It's going to be a good summer - I can feel it in my bones. - Cambridge Dictionary Online


2

Toggle is a standard term for switching back and forth between opposite conditions, from toggle switch.


2

The strategy described works because the player has set up multiple defenses at the same time. Therefore, I'd fill in your sentences with: Player A's layered defenses won him the game. If it wasn't for the commanding officer's layers of defense, the mission would have gone FUBAR.


2

The phrase defense in depth (1,2) is somewhat related to the concept outlined in the question. As noted in wikipedia, Defense in Depth ... is an information assurance concept in which multiple layers of security controls (defense) are placed throughout an information technology system. Its intent is to provide redundancy in the event a security ...



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