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72

Eyesore? Affront to all that is holy? Mirror-cracker?


21

The term that describes this phenomenon is snowclone, which Collins defines as a verbal formula that is adapted for reuse by changing only a few words so that the allusion to the original phrase remains clear Note, however, that this definition says nothing about the extent to which the new word(s) may or may not rhyme with what they replace. ...


14

Premature implies a thing that is before its time. The green banana is premature until it ripens. The coupon is premature until the start date. The spare part is premature for an engine that has not been introduced on the market. Alternately as suggested by ScotM Post-dated The new part for an old engine is post-dated.


13

It worked for me in high school, and it's been a reflex ever since. It refers to being an asshole. It worked for me in high school means that the speaker profited from acting in that way. Presumably, being rude and behaving badly can under certain circumstances have positive effects: you create “street cred”, people think you are tough, cool, or ...


13

If we see two things, we might refer to what we are looking on as a single scene (of two things) or as two things. "The thing I am seeing has to be the two bears I raised." → "It has to be them." "The two bears I am seeing have to be the two bears I raised." → "They have to be them." Both are therefore fine. There is also a very common placeholder use of ...


11

"Eye Candy" is most often applied to people. In that case, the opposite is "Double Bagger". Paraphrasing the Urban Dictionary entry (vulgar) -- which the term predates by up to 60 years: Double Bagger: A (person) so ugly that (making love to) (him or her) is only possibly(sic) with the use of two bags: One over (his/her) head, and a second bag over ...


11

The term "eyesore" is well established. It is usually applied to buildings, but it could be used do describe pretty much anything that is unpleasant to look at. That old office block is a real eyesore.


10

There are a number of words that have a more personal attachment to them, such as keepsake: anything kept, or given to be kept, as a token of friendship or affection; remembrance. memento: an object or item that serves to remind one of a person, past event, etc.; keepsake; souvenir. remembrance: something that serves to bring to mind or keep in mind some ...


9

As for the banana example, the descriptor would be: "An unripe banana is green" To describe the car part that's "too new" for the old engine, one of the most common descriptors is modern, as in: "We just can't fix this engine with modern parts" Alternatively, the most accurate descriptor is either postcontemporary or ultracontemporary. ...


8

One way is to use Not yet in date. That can be used with things like coupons which have a validity period which hasn't yet been reached. In date is a direct opposite of out of date (that is, it says that something is valid); but where out of date implies expiry has already happened, using not yet implies something is still to happen. While this does work ...


8

It depends a bit on what you're describing exactly – things can be "up and coming", "avant garde" or "cutting edge" (or "bleeding edge", in particular in IT, if you're not sure it will last or is useful). If you disapprove of the new thing, it can be "newfangled".


8

The Jargon File describes this as "soundalike slang". Hackers will often make rhymes or puns in order to convert an ordinary word or phrase into something more interesting... Terms of this kind that have been in fairly wide use include names for newspapers:... Wall Street Journal → Wall Street Urinal Arguably, soundalike slang refers to accepted slang ...


6

Memorabilia can be used to refer to personal items, though its usual meaning relates more to events, teams etc. From Merriam Webster: objects or materials that are collected because they are related to a particular event, person, etc.


5

From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/pun we have: the humorous use of a word or phrase so as to emphasize or suggest its different meanings or applications, or the use of words that are alike or nearly alike in sound but different in meaning; a play on words. This is in accord with what I've always called what you describe: a pun. Substituting ...


5

"It has to be them" is current usage. "They have to be them", on the other hand, sounds awkward.


5

As you say, the context alone is what enables you to understand exactly what the sentence means. When I read the title of the question (before reading the context), I naturally read the sentence with the most immediate meaning, which can be paraphrased as: “I need to launch my audit application” or “My audit application must be launched”. This reading has ...


5

Employing 'an invalid way of framing the debate [by assuming] the acceptance of some false premises' (specifically to add improper weight to the argument) is known as begging the question. begging the question Definition: A fallacy in which the premise of an argument presupposes the truth of its conclusion; in other words, the argument takes for ...


4

The phrase warts and all springs to mind. This was supposedly used by Cromwell to his portrait-painter to discourage a flattering representation. It has come to be applied to something that should be accepted in its entirety, good points as well as bad.


4

An often used expression is cut from the same cloth From The Free Dictionary: Fig. sharing a lot of similarities; seeming to have been created, reared, or fashioned in the same way. She and her brother are cut from the same cloth. They both tell lies all the time. Father and son are made from the same mold and even sound alike on the telephone.


4

It is quite common to use "as for me" in English. However, using it at the beginning of a sentence would only make sense if it is a follow-up, alternative, or response to something someone else has said (usually, to mark contrast with another person's opinion). "He prefers hiking and surfing. As for me, I would rather just stay at home and relax"


4

Out of reach would fill the blank well. Lit. not near enough to be reached or touched. Place the cookies out of reach, or the children will eat them all. Fig. unattainable. I wanted to be president, but I'm afraid that such a goal is out of reach.


4

In the case of the car part, you could say that it is not backwards-compatible. From that term, it is understood that the part has been updated (otherwise we'd simply say it was not compatible or was incompatible) and that the updated part does not work acceptably with older versions of the mating equipment.


4

To go to has a non-obvious secondary meaning of 'to perform', 'to undertake' or 'to try very hard' in a few common expressions that have a similar meaning to 'to go to great lengths', such as 'to go to a lot of effort' or 'to go to some trouble'.


4

State of the art: (from TFD) The highest level of development, as of a device, technique, or scientific field, achieved at a particular time. According to the following source the expression has been in use since the 18th century and has gradually changed its meaning. The most recent shift in meaning to the present one was in the '60. State of ...


4

Because of English's lack of a gender neutral third person singular possessive pronoun. Originally English had him in this role. In the 1300s they started to also be used for this. While some grammarians have criticised it since the 1790s, others have defended it since the 1890s not least on the ground that they'd had a century and didn't succeed in ...


4

Keep it up Keep up the good work. Keep the good work up. This type of verb plus preposition combination is often called a separable phrasal verb in traditional grammar. It is called this because we can put the complement noun in between the verb and the preposition - or we can put it after preposition. Of course, however, when the complement ...


3

Actually, "keep the good work up" is flat wrong. Keep up is a prepositional phrasal verb meaning to continue at the same level or pace (definition from thefreedictionary.com). Unlike particle phrasal verbs, prepositional phrasal verbs cannot be split apart. Consider the following sentence: Keep up with me. You cannot move up away from keep without ...


3

“Keep the good work up” is not exactly wrong, but neither is it idiomatic English. I think most native speakers would stick with “Keep up the good work”.


3

I think it's based on definition 5: [NO OBJECT] Undergo a change or enter a new state When a fever breaks it changes from existing to not existing, or from severe to mild. Based on just the definition, I suppose it would also be possible to refer to the opposite change as breaking as well. But it's just not how the word is ever used. Several of the ...


3

The opposite of "out-of-date" is futuristic. But in the sense that you mean, "too new", that would be covered by incompatible or no longer compatible.



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