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66

I would suggest moving target. Longman online (3) says: a moving target something that is changing continuously, so that it is very difficult to criticize it or compete against it


17

It depends on what meaning you intend to convey. Instruction noun 1. the act or practice of instructing or teaching; education. 2. knowledge or information imparted. In your example, "further instruction" would denote the first meaning, somebody teaching you, while "further instructions" would denote the second, more information.


16

'Capricious' sounds like more close since its more close to being 'arbitrary'. 'Volatile' is also nice to use here but if it is regarding your example of a document it must be 'Dynamic'


12

If you're looking for one with a negative connotation - you can say you are "building on quicksand".


9

In the UK we often accuse someone of "moving the goal posts" if they change requirements or conditions in a way that makes our efforts or arguments redundant. The same phrase can also be used in a less accusatory manner if events overtake us, but this is slightly less common, IME.


8

My answer is No. If you did, no-one would understand what you meant unless you explained it. The only instance of 'eavesread' I could find was Urban Dictionary, a notoriously unreliable source. It is possible that this particular word may gain acceptance with the online community but it will only happen through widespread acceptance. There is no formula ...


7

It is the smoke that came from the now invisible revolver. The revolver vanished, flashed again into sight, vanished again H.G. Wells' The Invisible Man


7

No. Coffee is made or brewed (in terms of the drink). It's also planted and picked (in terms of the plant). Building coffee does not make sense. Looking at COCA, the only times coffee collocates with build is in the contexts of coffee table and coffee break.


6

"in flux" or "ephemeral" both seem useful here.


6

I would use "dynamic" which google defines as (of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress If you wish to use it as a phrase then try "dynamic system", "dynamic process", "the dynamic nature of..." or "dynamic in nature"


5

"Wear the shoes" would be used when the subject already has the shoes on. "Put on the shoes" would be used when the subject is going from not having shoes on to having shoes on.


5

I believe that "do no worse" is a error in this case. I accept your logic. If I say "... do no worse than B" I mean there is nothing worse than B to be found anywhere.


5

You could define them both simultaneously in the sentence as opposed to doing one at a time: Let X and Y be normally distributed random variables with means mu_x and mu_y and standard deviations sigma_x and sigma_y respectively.


5

You might be looking for the word understatement. According to Merriam-Webster: Understate(v): to state or present with restraint especially for effect The "effect" in this case is often humorous.


4

Eric Partridge, Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, fifth edition (1961) has this relevant entry for puff: puff. ... 4. Life ; existence : tailors' [slang] (low ) gen[eral use] : from ca. 1880. As in never in one's puff, never, and as in 'Pomes' Marshall, 'He's the winner right enough! It's the one sole snip of a lifetime—simply the cop of ...


4

Nominalisation is a noun phrase generated from another word class, usually a verb. Here's the Cambridge Dictionaries Online definition, which also specifically mentions that the process can be used to form noun phrases (as opposed to the simplest case, which simply involves using a verb as a noun - for example a big spend). OP's examples also ...


4

The 1st word that comes to mind is "mercurial"- defined as changeable; volatile; fickle; flighty; erratic: Other fine words I would use would also be things like protean or mutable If we are talking about something changing because you are working on it there are some good science terms namely the "Uncertainty principle", that observation alters the ...


4

I've heard this situation called shifting requirements. "It's hard to predict what the final product will look like, thanks to all these shifting requirements!"


4

We always called it a living document. Changes are ever happening and the status quo is always in flux.


3

sacrifice for is more idiomatic. sacrifice someone or something for someone or something. (TFD) It had also fostered a sense of unity among the Greek people, which would make them more willing to make sacrifices for the common good. (New York Times Jul 13, 2015) sacrifice A for B.


3

If you mean "I expect you to do better", then "better of you" is correct. Usually, "better off" describes the outcome of a situation. For example: "you would be better off if you stopped working now and get some sleep" or "we are better off not knowing how the sausage gets made."


3

pinnacle (noun): the most successful point; the culmination 'He had reached the pinnacle of his career.' Source: ODO


3

As is always the case, context makes a difference in English. However here is an explanation that I hope will be useful.. 1. "I tried closing my eyes" ---> This usually signals an action that was actually carried out, e.g. I was at the dentist's; her lamp was very bright in my face. I tried closing my eyes but it was still uncomfortable. I asked her ...


3

Evolving could be a suitable option.


3

It can be very dangerous to cycle in the night. This indicates that there are certain circumstances that make it dangerous, e.g. It can be very dangerous to cycle in the night, for example: if you are cycling without any lights, if you are cycling through a rough area, if you are cycling after a night at the pub. It may be very dangerous to cycle ...


2

I invented the term. Kenneth Duda and Thomas Lumley have it right (though phenry and GenericJam gave good guesses). It's a play on words. The "people from the concrete steppes" think of the economy (and the effects of monetary policy in particular) like a mechanism, where the central bank moves one lever, which causes another lever to move, and so on. They ...


2

The three main versions of this saying that a Google search finds are "There's a pork chop in every beer," "There's a sandwich in every beer," and "There's a steak in every beer." None of them appear to be very old sayings. Here's the rundown on each one. 'a pork chop in every beer' A posting from September 23, 2000, at StraightDope.com titled "The New ...


2

Synonyms Phrases: (when) pigs fly (when) hell freezes over


2

Oxford Dictionaries (online) gives this definition. Propagate 2. Spread and promote (an idea, theory, etc.) widely. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/ The important word here is 'widely'. The sentence "Propagate this message." makes perfect sense, especially if the message is or contains an idea rather than simple facts. However the phrase "to your ...


2

Get him on board with the project is the popular phrase for introducing someone to a project. on board if someone is on board, they are working with an organization or group of people A new financial director has been brought on board to help us assess the cost of the project. We hope to have a new doctor on board by the end of the month. ...



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