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21

Jinxed could refer to someone who is suffering a period of bad luck. jinxed jinx (jĭngks) n. 1. A person or thing that is believed to bring bad luck. 2. A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing. However, this usage has connotations of being cursed, or having an extrinsic cause. ...


18

To be dogged by misfortune is an expression used to convey the idea that you are constantly unlucky. To dog: to pursue or follow after like a dog. The Free Dictionary


17

A Man Said to the Universe By Stephen Crane A man said to the universe: “Sir, I exist!” “However,” replied the universe, “The fact has not created in me A sense of obligation.” In another Crane poem ("War is Kind"): Hoarse, booming drums of the regiment, Little souls who thirst for fight, These men were born to drill and die. The ...


12

String/streak of bad luck; an albatross around one's neck; Can't catch a break; Can't win for losing; can't stand up for falling down; born to lose; it never rains but it pours; when troubles come they come not single spies but in battalions (that one is from Shakespeare); born under a bad sign; losing since the day one was born; born to suffer;


10

Probably, the word you're looking for is nostalgia a sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past (Oxford) I have quite a few nostalgic memories of that song.


9

There are at least three literary devices present. Both of the examples in the title, "asparagus to avocados" and "kangaroos to koalas" exhibit two of them. Those two devices are alliteration, and juxtaposition. Alliteration is the device where two or more nearby words begin with the same, or nearly the same sound. In the case of the vegetables, the sound is ...


8

Schlemiel: An awkward and unlucky person for whom things never turn out right. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/schlemiel


7

How about these? Ill-starred: destined to fail or have many difficulties; unlucky. Doomed likely to have an unfortunate and inescapable outcome; ill-fated.(You can say 'doomed for life' is you want to specify that the person being referred to is going to be unlucky for the rest of his life(though I understand that it's a completely hypothetical ...


7

The word rendition comes from American jurisprudence. It has traditionally referred to a person transferred from one jurisdiction to another, such as when the pursuit of justice crosses state boundaries. It was used a lot during slavery, when slaves escaped across country. Returning them involved rendition. In recent times it has come to be applied to ...


6

OK. I think the singular article is used because in each of your examples the plural nouns make up a single unit of time. The same structure would be used with other units of measurement: a weighty three bags of coal a full ten bottles an arduous eighty kilometres In such case, the unit of measurement is the noun phrase which includes the ...


6

Maybe it does not necessarily mean that the universe not 'caring' about your existence. Take parents for example. Regardless of you stating the nature of your existence or not, they have an obligation to you. They feed, clothe, and teach you. The universe implies that it won't help you in your endeavors by just handing things to you. If you're looking for ...


6

I think it means that we shouldn't expect the universe (or the world, or other people, or the government) to provide us with what we need just because we exist. Our existence doesn't magically create some sort of obligation in others to care for us, or support us. I understand this as meaning that you should work for (i.e. earn) things you want, rather ...


5

As comments have already stated, this is quite nonsensical at first blush. Having read the article, however, it becomes clear how it is meant to be understood: A price hike is an increase in prices. In this case, the person raising the ‘prices’ (here: the rent) is the landlord, so this is a landlord price hike, as it were. Jesse’s Deli is now having a ...


4

The correct adjective for someone who is consistently unlucky: hapless.


4

The meaning probably refers to its original one of surrender, yield: Rendition: (Etymonline) c. 1600, "surrender of a place or possession," from obsolete French rendition "a rendering," noun of action from Old French rendre "to deliver, to yield" (see render (v.)). Meaning "translation" first recorded 1650s; that of "an acting, a performing" first ...


4

The spinning wheel, or 'charkha', was used by Mahatma Gandhi to weave his own fabric. Any resemblence of the expression to any idiom in your native language is sheer coincidence. PS - His aim wasn't to promote Hinduism, but to boycott foreign clothes; which was in the interest of the poor people working in the Indian clothing industry. From wikipedia: ...


4

Understand it first as not metaphorical. "Glow" is peripheral to "our prosperity," meaning developed areas. I think you're being confused by "our prosperity," an abstract term, being used to mean "places where humans live in high enough numbers to cause light pollution." The writer is using "our prosperity" to indicate light pollution is a side effect of ...


4

This is a sentence which uses extraposition from noun phrase movement. Often when a noun phrase (NP) has a long relative clause, or other modifier, that modifier gets moved out of the noun phrase and appears at the end of the sentence. This is particularly likely when the verb phrase is very short like this. Here is another example: We fired three people ...


4

I've always been a fan of "Hedge one's bets". to protect yourself against making the wrong choice And does seem to be used when literally betting on things: Basically, hedging is just a way to reduce or eliminate the risk of a bet. You would generally look to hedge a bet when you are no longer comfortable with the bet you have made – i.e. you don’t ...


3

You can say that they husband their recources: "Use (resources) economically" (Oxford). Unfortunately, it's a bit archaic, so you don't get the full range of words to go with it. You can say that they display good husbandry (Oxford), but saying they're a "good husband" doesn't work, for obvious reasons.


3

FTR, Is the expression "All things X" a parody of some other popular phrase, Not really. Traditionally it is an "old-fashioned sounding" phrase. The phrase has, let us say, "dignity" and "charm". As Morton mentions, there is a Church Song "All things bright and beautiful." Traditionally, you would use the phrase it for shop names such as - let's say ...


3

The task of persuading ordinary Muslims to leave Congress was made much easier by the long ostentatious hours he spent in tending his spinning wheel. The implied (negative) meaning is that Gandhi's talk of Hinduism, his cultish practices and his giving a lot of attention to his spinning wheel lead to the departure of Muslims from Congress to join ...


3

It's the universe personified, talking. In the world of humans, narrowed down to relationships, the statement, "I exist" may mean a few things in different scenarios. For the universe, of which I am an insignificant part, my existence means nothing. Why? The universe is unimaginably immense. The statement, "I exist" demands attention in human ...


3

Really, there are very few. The best alternative would probably be: Excuse me, but could I...? Or maybe: ..., if you don't mind me asking? In context: 'Excuse me, but could I please have your date of birth?' 'What kind of car do you drive, if you don't mind me asking?'


3

If you're going for subtlety, try He began to cross the line, committing illegal acts instead of upholding the law... Other phrases you could substitute here for the bold text would be: turn to crime cross over cross into the dark side (pop culture reference) Edit: if the character was also homosexual you could make a double entendre with the ...


3

I think the expression you are looking for is proprietary eponym: An eponym: is someone or something whose name is or is thought to be the source of something's name (such as a city, country, era, or product); alternately it can be used to refer to the name of something that is based on or derived from someone or something else's name. Albert ...


3

I would expect your colleague to understand that the same "parameters" were used to produce the data set each time. Parameter - from MW-O: 2: any of a set of physical properties whose values determine the characteristics or behavior of something In your example, the "set of physical properties" (the parameters) would be the specifics of the query ...


2

The three main versions of this saying that a Google search finds are "There's a pork chop in every beer," "There's a sandwich in every beer," and "There's a steak in every beer." None of them appear to be very old sayings. Here's the rundown on each one. 'a pork chop in every beer' A posting from September 23, 2000, at StraightDope.com titled "The New ...


2

The answers by Josh61 and FumbleFingers provide a solid baseline notion of when “state of the art” arose in three senses: “status of the art” (late nineteenth century, according to WorldWideWords, citing the OED, in Josh61’s answer); “current stage of development of a practical or technological subject” (1910, according to Wikipedia, also citing the OED, in ...


2

Wiktionary Talk has (at the moment, at least): The bee's knees is an English slang phrase. The Oxford English Dictionary records the expression "bee's knee" as meaning something small or insignificant from 1797. The phrase "the bee's knees", meaning "the height of excellence", became popular in the U.S. in the 1920s, along with "the cat's ...



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