Hot answers tagged

15

It comes from the novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe: man Friday n. pl. men Friday or men Fridays An efficient, faithful male aide or employee. [After Friday, a character in Robinson Crusoe, a novel by Daniel Defoe.] From the Free Dictionary online. Also, from Wikipedia: Friday is one of the main characters of Daniel Defoe's 1719 novel ...


11

The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...


10

No. This would imply that "rescue" is a form of transport - akin to saying "flown to a safe place" or "driven to a safe place". While driving and flying may form part of the rescue, they are not part of the definition of the word rescue, which involves changing someone's situation from "being in danger" to "being safe". The actual act of rescue might ...


7

The Phrase Finder confirms the origin, but Etymonline probably explains the rationale behind the saying in a clearer way: Say boo to a goose: It's just a country proverb, perfectly clear to anyone who is familiar with geese, as in earlier centuries virtually all rural European people would have been. Anybody who shouts loudly and firmly at geese ...


5

You could use take a chill pill. See definition at ODO A notional pill taken to make a person calm down or relax. As a verb take a chil pill means calm down. See dictionary.com.


5

There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


4

According to World Wide Words the origin of go west — meaning to die, perish, or disappear is related to the idea of the sunset, as a figurative image of death: Go west seems anciently to be connected with the direction of the setting sun, symbolising the end of the day and so figuratively the end of one’s life. Going west has been linked to dying ...


4

There is absolutely positively completely nothing wrong grammatically with ending a sentence with a preposition. This was a bogus rule made up by grammarians to sell grammar books, and ignores the way Germanic languages work. Some people cling to the rule, but it is a question of style, not grammar. Furthermore, used to has become, in practice, a lexical ...


3

It's not a phrase and any instance you find is likely an error. The ngram viewer finds no instances, for example.


3

Innate or congenital would fit (somewhat), but I don't like them much here. Intrinsic might work fairly well, but it's not really opposite "acquired". Congenital is; I just don't really like it for this use. I might go with natural, which has the dubious bonus of being a weak musical pun ("see sharp or be flat!"). That said, I'm not sure that Trance is ...


3

A drinking buddy: some one who is almost always there when you drink. From A West Texas Soapbox: My best drinking buddy, Mike Cronin, laughed and said that Sanderson had the aesthetic of a plumber. The expression has been used from the '50s (Ngram)


3

au courant In your example: Jane is au courant on where to go and what to do in Boston. Definition from Vocabulary.com To be au courant is to be well-informed about something. If you're au courant with local politics, you follow your city's elections and political controversies closely. This word means being up to date on a certain subject....


3

The two examples are not a sentence and it is not meaningful to classify "shot to death" as "adjectival phrase". In newspaper headlines, it is common to omit the verb to "be" and an article because it doesn't cause confusion and the headlines need to be as concise as possible. It should be A UCLA engineering professor was shot to death in apparent ...


3

This is often referred to as a permanent loan A form of loan agreement in which an individual, trust, or company loans artwork or other objects to a museum for an extended period of time. The loan agreement may stipulate that the museum must display the loaned artwork in a specific area of the museum, that the artwork is to be displayed as part ...


2

If you are looking for an overstatement, you might say "old as the hills" or "older than Mathuselah" Mathuselah" - is the man reported to have lived the longest at the age of 969 in the Hebrew Bible. This refers more to age than appearance, though. If you are more concerned with appearance, "worn-out" may fit.


2

It (just) wasn't meant to be derives from the idiom meant to be, which means "destined to exist" (here). People say that something (for example, an event) was "meant to be" when they want to attribute that thing to fate or destiny. It is a fatalistic expression. To say that something (for example, an event) "wasn't meant to be" means that the thing was not ...


2

I read this as, "[if you] don't, somebody is sure[ly] going to to take her away from you." The word "sure" used as an adverb to "going"; the basic meaning is unchanged if you omit it. Therefore, "don't somebody sure" isn't a phrase with a meaning in its own right, as illustrated by Colin Fine's example in the comments, above.


2

It is not about what is common per se but what is correct. The difference between I have been wanting to go there and I have wanted to go there is that the continuous form of the present perfect focuses on a process, something that has been happening over a recent period of time, while the simple form focuses on the end result of something that happened. ...


2

It means that instead of being passively affected by an emotion, you have to make it yours. You have to fully integrate it into your being, and not be a slave of it. Introspection is a concept that is quite connected to this one too. This is a rather philosophical matter so we won't discuss about it too much on this section, but an Own your emotions Google ...


2

"Integral to" is what I would say and expect to hear. Ngram says that's about eight times as common as "integral in" in modern English, and it's the form the several online dictionaries use in their preposition-containing examples. For example: necessary to the completeness of the whole: This point is integral to his plan. (Dictionary.com; ...


2

Not exact but close enough,see ideography. thefreedictionary.com The use of ideograms (see definition) or logograms (see definition) to express ideas.


2

Pictograms A pictorial symbol for a word or phrase. Pictographs were used as the earliest known form of writing, examples having been discovered in Egypt and Mesopotamia from before 3000 BC. Note: The answer given by @vickyace is still technically correct as pictograms, or pictographs, are a form of ideographs/ideograms.


2

I felt I needed to broaden my horizons. broaden/widen somebody's horizons to increase the range of things that someone knows about, has experienced, or is able to do This trip to the Far East has certainly broadened our family's horizons. Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed.


2

Since the turn "belongs" to the English edition, so to speak, I would indicate the possessive with an apostrophe-s added to "edition." Also, since the second clause of the sentence is independent (it has a subject, it, and a verb, is), you need a comma after "Arabic." So you have: I read this novel four times in Arabic, and now it's the English edition'...


1

A word may be defined in more than one way or may have usage in more than one sense. Explaining a word further with the phrase as in is to provide an example case where the meaning of the word is easily understood and thus acts to guide the reader. In the instant case, … “protect”. As in protecting our religion. … explains ...


1

This might be regional in application, but consider the invitation, "Cuppa tea?". In times of crisis, there is nothing like a nice soothing cup of tea. - dailymail The findings reveal that even a single cup of tea can significantly reduce anxiety levels after suffering a stressful experience – and in some cases, make people calmer than they were before. - ...


1

If you want to keep it colloquial you could consider thanks for stepping up [...] or thanks for picking up the slack [...]


1

If you are not sure about a phrase, it is better not to use it. I don't think using to "pull a lot of weight" could be misinterpreted in your example. However, to pull one's weight doesn't necessarily mean to help you while you are busy. As the link shows, it means to do one's share in a common task and it is usually used in a negative sentence as the below ...


1

go the extra mile (also walk the extra mile) — TFD Definition: to do more than one is required to do to reach a goal; to make more effort than is expected of you. Example: I like doing business with that company. They always go the extra mile. So you could say: Thanks to X for going the extra mile for me doing Y while I was busy



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible