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84

There are various terms for this. Once upon a time, “screen name” would likely have been the most common. However, it seems to me that this convention has been driven by the most pervasive websites. So, with Facebook et al's move toward encouraging the use of real names, “screen name” seems much less common (phrases such as “nickname” appear to be used now ...


31

I guess screen-name is appropriate: Noun, Digital Technology: a unique sequence of characters that a person chooses to use for identification purposes when interacting with others online, as in computer games, instant messaging, or forums. Source:http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/screen+name


16

A more common idiom is being knee deep or up to your knees in something, meaning that something reaches one's knees. When you are up to your knees in water, you have gone in to a point that you are definitely wet, and more importantly, there is so much water around, that walking gets more difficult (you move from walking to wading). It is applied to other ...


15

A young person who demonstrates wisdom and maturity beyond their years is often called an old soul. It comes from the belief that some reincarnated souls retain a measure of the wisdom and character developed in previous incarnations. These days, even those who don't share in the actual belief find use for the phrase in normal conversation. I'd be perfectly ...


14

I suggest 'Internet handle' (but having said that, Fathima's screen name is a well-established term, as a Google search will quickly show).


14

Nickname is the appropriate word because it is a common synonym of screenname in computing. It is used outside the internet but it became a common word in this context. Nick (short of nickname), on the other hand, is mostly used in technical contexts.


13

Pseudonym has meanings beyond the web, but is just as applicable to usage online as off. It's also generally more appropriate to both formal writing, and writing for non-technical audiences. It's a bit more widely understood than the alternatives, being several hundred years older and more established in the language. (Screen Name and Handle are, as already ...


13

He sounds like a fuddy-duddy one that is old-fashioned, unimaginative, or conservative [Merriam-Webster] The term is not limited to children, but is often applied to someone who seems old beyond their years. You also might consider fogey an extremely fussy, old-fashioned, or conservative person (esp in the phrase old fogey) [Collins] In this ...


12

The lad you speak of has an anachronistic perspective. Anachronistic may seem to be a stretch here, but when you think about it, an anachronistic perspective (attitude, outlook, way of looking at things) is a perspective that is somehow out of order chronologically. Very often we think of anachronistic thinking as backward-looking, from the perspective of ...


12

I have often seen "alias" used in this way in describing what someone is called on an Internet community.


12

Sclerotic--an inability to adapt. 'That boy Tim is a sclerotic kid--age 13 going on 65.


10

In the www.phrases.org.uk Bulletin Board forum, this phrase has been explained as a formation by analogy with cutting pieces out of cloth: ”Cutting it close” often occurs in the context of working against a deadline. ... To cut it close means to not leave enough margin. My guess is it’s by analogy with cutting pieces out of cloth in garment making. [R. ...


10

As I native North American English speaker, I would colloquially refer to the person you described as old-school. Meriam-Webster defines that term as: old-school typical of an earlier style or form based on a way of doing things that was common in the past using or supporting traditional practices So for example: Joey is ...


9

A moniker or handle would be an appropriate word for internet name.


9

"Born middle-aged" is a phrase I have heard applied to such people (including myself, actually). There are plenty of matches on Google for that phrase. The OED says that "middle-aged" can be used for "resembling a person in middle age", so you can interpret the phrase in that sense.


8

According to the the canonical reference for all things hackish, it's handle, nick, or screen name. http://www.catb.org/jargon/html/H/handle.html


7

My son was like this when younger, and his Scoutmaster remarked once that he appeared to be working on his Running-for-the-Senate merit badge.


7

"Born too late" is a moderately common phrase, as popularized by Edwin Arlington Robinson's poem "Miniver Cheevy": ... Miniver loved the days of old     When swords were bright and steeds were prancing; The vision of a warrior bold     Would set him dancing. [...] Miniver Cheevy, born too late, ...


6

You could use a simpler transcription, that, even if people were unfamiliar with the notation, would still convey that a difference exists: "tomāto, tomäto". The macron (overbar) indicating a long vowel was something I was taught in elementary school, and it's widely enough known that it sometimes gets used in brand names (pūr, fōn, etc). The diaeresis ...


5

I'm going to suggest nostalgist. It seems like there is no word that covers both being young and nostalgic, but nostalgist conveys the idea in the context. You can use nostalgic as an adjective also, as in a nostalgic person. Nostalgist is the noun version of nostalgic but urbandictionary mentions that it is used among young people and includes regional ...


5

A jinx suggests the idea of very bad luck: A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing. Ex: Jinx strikes again as Fuller is ruled out! Source:http://www.thefreedictionary.com/jinx


5

Once for all is now old fashioned, once and for all being standard. The Oxford English Dictionary from ca. thirty years ago says "once for all, now usually once and for all".


4

Postponed Tasks Postpone: 1. to put off to a later time; defer: 2. to place after in order of importance or estimation; subordinate (dictionary.com)


4

Another discussion is here http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=2216027 'username' seems to be acknowledged as indicative without accompanying baggage. https://www.google.com/search?q=define+username


4

I personally use "Alias" to reference an online user's name. It's similar to nickname, but the context is clearer that it's a false name.


4

A punishment may be harsh, but if it's meted out equally to all who merit it, it would be considered fair (impartially administered or unbiased). If you have trouble seeing how this could be, maybe you're not seeing one sense of the word 'fair'.


4

The word nerd has so many cultural connotations, both positive and negative, that you should read the Wikipedia article about it to get a good understanding. Generally, it is used as a label for someone who: is highly intelligent and very knowledgeable about mathematics, science, and computers; is a fan of science fiction and/or similar pursuits (e.g., ...


3

This is the same ellipsis as in, say, as good as gold: It is as good as gold (is good). Everything except the contrasting material is deleted: This is true as often as (it is) not (true). If something is true as often as not it is true at least half the time, and generally more often.


3

You are confusing two different constructions. For the meaning you are after, you would have to use an actual quantifier: "as often as ten times a week", "as often as twice a year", "as often as every Tuesday", "as often as never". This follows the pattern of phrases like "as recently as last Tuesday", or "as soon as tomorrow". Basically with phrases of ...


3

When saying "A is about as much B as C is D", one is saying that A = B only to the extent that C = D. Or, more accurately, one is saying that A is unlike B as much as C is unlike D. In other words, one is contrasting A and B by using a second negative comparison for emphasis. For instance, let's say someone walks inside a store from the parking lot and ...



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