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9

My generation tends to call this type of person an old fogey (instead of old man or old woman), plural old fogeys. I can't do better than Word-Detective.com, so here's a post from that site that explains perfectly: "Fogey," of course, is, as the Oxford English Dictionary puts it so well, "a disrespectful appellation for a man advanced in life, ...


7

They are both correct but have significant differences in meaning. Digging a grave is creating a hole in order to bury someone. Digging up a grave is uncovering a previously-buried body. (As for the ladder question, since climbing normally happens in an upward direction, "climbing a ladder" and "climbing up a ladder" are synonymous; one could argue that ...


7

If you want to characterize their fears as excessively focused on unlikely issues, you could call them a worrywart: : a person who worries too much or who worries about things that are not important m-w.com


7

In print, people may not have been ordering others to eat shit before the 1940s, but the euphemistic expression eat dung is much older. Ngram plots “eat dung” (red line) starting from 1800s When a few days after the Rais (one of the mullahs who watch over the people, and have power to flog any one who does not observe strictly the Muhammedan religion) ...


4

I restricted my search to 'eat shit', although I included that phrase with the variant spellings 'shite', 'sh*t', 'sh-t', and 's--t', where possible. I also included the various inflections of 'eat'. A troublesome instance in Supplemental Nights, 1888 (R.F. Burton), returned from a search for 'eat shite', footnoted "to eat skite" (as meaning "to talk or act ...


4

The idiom "of the same mind" long predates "on the same wavelength." ...complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. [Philippians 2:2, ESV]


3

The context you supply: doesn't do nothing but does x makes it clear that you're using the phrase "doesn't do nothing" in the way you intend. To avoid the problematic construct altogether, you could say something along the lines of: Contrary to my previous report, the button isn't passive but instead does x.


3

"No can do" means "I can not do that", and there is an implication "It might be possible, but I'm not willing to try." It does not have a comma. I think the phrasing is meant to imply simplified English, as if speaking to a non-native speaker. I've never heard anyone use "No, can't do".


3

The building is being renovated. Renovation or renovations are the common terms associated with redoing buildings in the construction and architectural industries...


3

Pain causes anxiety because the patient is anxious for the pain to cease (and anxiety reinforces pain). People cannot relax when they are anxious, even if they are at rest. The suggestion here is to stop fixating on the day when the pain will cease; it will cease when it will. Instead, turn your mind to other things so that you can relax.


3

The expression appears to be from the second half of the 19th century. Eat shit: Also, eat crap. Submit to degrading treatment, as in He refused to eat shit from the coach. James T. Farrell had the one term in Grandeur (1930), “They don't eat nobody's crap,” and Mario Puzo the other in Dark Arena (1955), “He'd eaten shit all week.” (second half ...


2

"Set up another session" implies that you would like to add another date in addition to the previously discussed date. E.g. if you originally booked for February 10th, then by saying "set up another session," you are saying you want to book them for February 10th and also another date. "Set up an alternative session" would be better. I'm not sure what ...


2

Let's consider one of the definitions of Contact (noun) an acquaintance, colleague, or relative through whom a person can gain access to information, favors, influential people, and the like. [Dictionary.com] So if you lose your phone, you eventually lose all your contacts figuratively since you won't be able to communicate with them. This seems to ...


2

To have a lot of heart means to be particularly empathic, compassionate or loving. Although I can't say I've seen a cast-iron origin for this specific idiom, it likely stems from the heart traditionally being used as a symbol of love and caring. See examples such as "[The Grinch's small] heart grew three sizes that day" in The Grinch.


2

As someone who has read a lot of resumes, works well under pressure works for me. It is succinct and clear. I would not know what you meant by "Pressure performer"; I would find that term in a resume irritating. My immediate picture when I first saw it in your question was of a dancer in a hyperbaric chamber. A multitasker may or may not be able to work ...


2

collected, level-headed, established, persevering, tenacious, unflinching, unshakable; you could also explore some synonyms of these words. Personally, I think "pressure performer" doesn't sound right, while multi-tasking means something else entirely - the ability to focus on several tasks at once, with no reference to pressure.


2

In the context of static stretching, the advice I've heard is to hold the stretch for quite a while, ranging from 10 seconds to 1 minute. There is often a point at which the stretched muscle relaxes slightly, allowing a greater range of motion. (Note: don't try this at home before getting appropriate advice.) When a therapist (physiotherapist, occupational ...


2

What's throwing you off is the word "feel" as it's not necessary in this case. You can just say "I've adjusted to life in Vegas", or "I haven't adjusted to the night life if Vegas yet".


2

Writers of mathematics (and academics generally) often use 'we' and 'us' (for example, "Let us turn to..."). I suspect this is because it can draw the narrator and the reader together, making it seem like the reader is part of the 'we' which has uncovered, or is doing, the proof or argument. This is pedagogically helpful, especially in mathematics. If you ...


2

I agree that your final interpretation (which would be correct from the grammar used) doesn't make any sense. In addition to being grammatically poor, I think the original sentence is also ambiguous. My initial interpretation was like this: I do not see the D.P.P. being able to radically overhaul the economy, nor do I see them promoting a radical ...


2

It depends how much you are wanting to point and make fun. Over-anxious perhaps? The over-anxious always click on "buy travel insurance" when booking a ticket.


2

You could refer to these apprehensive persons as nervous Nellies (or the singular nervous Nelly), Merriam-Webster defines the term plural nervous Nellies a timid or worrisome person — many new parents are nervous Nellies when it comes to the health of their babies


2

Al is the definite article in Arabic language, in our Egyptian dialect we tend to pronounce it as El. I do not know about the other dialects. So Al is the standerd Arabic and El is the daily language.


2

You need to place an indirect object after the verb "to save." This expression typically uses a ditransitive conjugation: Save yourself some trouble Save me some trouble Save him some trouble. Whereas you should be able to move the indirect object on the other side of the direct object by saying, "Save some trouble for me," it doesn't work that way in ...


2

Slather us Americans with your British accent and we won't care what you say--we'll bend over backwards trying to help you regardless of how you address us. "Tally ho, good chap! I say, where mightst one get a spot of tea with some buscuits?" The key to getting help from strangers won't be to assimilate but to sound as British as can be. As for ...


1

Here is the entry for "knock on wood" in Robert Hendrickson, The Facts on File Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins, fourth edition (2008): knock on wood. Why do we say knock on wood and tap wood or our heads after declaring that some calamity has never happened to us? The superstition is an old one and has many possible explanations, none sure. It ...


1

In English, a double negative is taken literally, so the two negatives cancel each other out. In some other languages multiple negatives merely add weight to the negation.


1

I’m sure that many of the hits on this ngram are for literal uses of the two phrases searched, but it shows that “on the same wavelength” first appeared around 1920 (not too long after Hertz’s work on wavelengths in the 1880s) and took-off around 1960. Prior to that, “on the same track,” from its first appearance around the time of the first steam engine ...


1

I was thinking about "to be in sync" but was not very sure about its etymology. I explored a bit and found an idiomatic expression - in phase that redirected from "in sync" According to the Free Dictionary Also, in sync. In a correlated or synchronized way; in accord, in harmony. For example, If everyone were in phase we could step up the ...


1

I'm from Aberdeen and use this all the time, and I'd never come across anyone I'd said it to in Scotland who didn't understand. I moved down south, and someone picked me up on it and I was stumped- I couldn't actually find a different way to get across what I was trying to say! It makes total sense to me colloquially, albeit incorrect English!



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