Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

This is a well-known quote from Muriel Spark's novel about a teacher in a private girls school in Scotland, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie: "For those who like that sort of thing," said Miss Brodie in her best Edinburgh voice, "That is the sort of thing they like." (The character is talking about the Girl Guides, an organization similar to the Girl ...


3

I would say that person A is exploiting or taking advantage of a problem with the rules. The fact that the rule does not require presentation of the bill before work starts makes it very difficult and costly to enforce. Basically, you'd have to undo the work you already did to enforce it. Knowing that this is a weakness in the rule, person A simply exploits ...


3

Struggle with Agonise over Contend with Deal with Trouble over


3

May be not the exact answer, however I think it could convey the message in the best way. Words are unable to express their love.


3

I think it means that the person read somewhere about the room, like when someone says 'Do you know MJ' and someone else says 'I've heard of him'. I hope I helped. :)


3

It means something like: but of course I would say that. It implies that there's some reason what the speaker is saying is typically or obviously biased from their position. It's a kind of tag question, which gives it kind of an "I know you know what I mean" tone. Here's a quote from an interview with Nick Clegg: Part of the challenge for a third party ...


2

Year of built 1922 No, that is incorrect because you cannot use 'of' before a verb (other than a gerund). Possibilities Year of build, 1922 Year of construction, 1922 Year built, 1922


2

Perhaps "It was a couldn't-give-a-damm attitude of A" devil-may-care also refers to a lack of concern.


1

They shared a tacit understanding. Words were gratuitous. tacit : expressed or understood without being directly stated Synonyms     implied, implicit, unexpressed, unspoken, unvoiced, wordless Antonyms     explicit, express, expressed, spoken, stated, voiced ... gratuitous : not necessary or appropriate Antonyms ...


1

You could use negligence: : failure to take the care that a responsible person usually takes : lack of normal care or attention Merriam-Webster Your sentence would read: This was an act of negligence on the part of A.


1

Building on Paul Rowe's excellent answer, I would say: This was an act of selfish manipulation on the part of A. A is indeed manipulating the process with selfishness as motivation. He only cares that his needs are met and does not care that the business transaction requires a reciprocity.


1

Essentially it means that whatever it is that you are working on or experiencing "takes a momentum of its own" at some point, such that you no longer need to be expending effort to continue working on it or experiencing it. On a related note, given that your context is art, the notion of "aesthetic experience" is meant to create such a condition wherein the ...


1

It's context sensitive. If you are genuinely asking "I wonder why the other bakery doesn't have dinner rolls, but you do?", then it's just a question. If you are not asking in order to get a response, but are instead commenting on the sad state of the other bakery (perhaps you are making a point to this baker that he needs to be well-stocked in dinner ...


1

I may not be correctly parsing your example, but it it would appear that party A is violating at least the social norm of courtesy if not some level of legal agreement. If your inactions cause inconvenience to fall on others, you are inconsiderate or discourteous. Acting in 'Bad Faith'(mentioned above) is actually a legal term when someone is 'following the ...


1

omission o·mis·sion /əˈmiSH(ə)n,ōˈmiSH(ə)n/ noun –Google a failure to do something, especially something that one has a moral or legal obligation to do. Omission (criminal law) –Wiki Duty to act when contracted to do so [...] the court ruled that "a man might incur criminal liability from a duty arising out of contract." Sin of omission ...


1

An appropriate term for this might be manipulation. You can, of course, expand that to indicate the nature of manipulation. This was an act of manipulation through intentional negligence on the part of A. A is manipulating the process. If this happens enough times, B's company will eventually require technicians to have the bill in their hands before ...


1

As mentioned in one of the comments, "altruistic" seems to be the word you're looking for. altruism (noun) "feelings and behavior that show a desire to help other people and a lack of selfishness" e.g. "I ​doubt whether her ​motives for ​donating the ​money are altruistic - she's ​probably ​looking for ​publicity." MW Depending on ...


1

A Google search indicates this phrase has most recently shown up in the TV series Sherlock: LESTRADE: So she’s German? SHERLOCK (still looking at his phone): Of course she’s not. She’s from out of town, though. Intended to stay in London for one night ... (he smiles smugly when he apparently finds the information he needed) ... before returning home ...


1

'Round about' (the initial a- is usually dropped) in the sense 'approximately' is a strictly colloquial use, and should be avoided in most formal writing. There is also a more conventionally spatial use of this double preposition to describe a path of motion: We wandered round about the zoo til it closed. When this sense is used as an intransitive ...


1

What do you mean? is commonly known and usually said when one does not comprehend what the other said. Basically it is asking for a repeat of the sentence in more detail. How do you mean? is a little different. How can be defined as in what way or manner. How does this work? In what way or manner does this work? Both sentences are basically the ...


1

The meaning might be clearer as: As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to add to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral, paying their tribute to the dead. Does that help?


1

"Withstand" or just "stand" : "She withstood the loss..."


1

How about overcome challenges?


1

I particularly like deal with, proposed by @MDMcDMD. Here's a way to use it: My mother-in-law has her arthritis to deal with. Alternatively: We all have our troubles is a nice way of complaining. Here's a nice made-up noun my German spouse invented once: ... the tougheties of life



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible