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The person can be called a Cassandra (as noun a Cassandra) A prophet of disaster, especially one who is disregarded. This is based on the character Cassandra from Greek mythology A daughter of the Trojan king Priam, who was given the gift of prophecy by Apollo. When she cheated him, however, he turned this into a curse by causing her prophecies, ...


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I think you're looking for "granularity". Wiktionary's entry for granularity reads: Noun granularity (countable and uncountable, plural granularities) (uncountable) The condition of being granular (countable) The extent to which something is granular And Wikipedia elaborates in its article on granularity: Granularity is the extent ...


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"Hold on to your hat" and "keep your hair on" are common English phrases that mean "ready yourself for a rough / exciting experience" and "don't get too excited" respectively. The first is obvious enough, the second is a reference to wigs (more fashionable in previous times, and could come off when the wearer was agitated). Never heard of "hold on to your ...


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Spelling of English words was consistent with Mark Twain's assertion that anyone who could only spell a given word one way was lacking in intelligence and creativity. It was the publication of Noah Webster's dictionary that led to standardized spelling in America. ROST is given as a variant spelling for both ROAST and ROOST. And while the human hen rules ...


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None of the sentences clearly states what you want to say. They all convey the sense that the social democrats found the activities desirable AND Schmidt leads the social democrats Try something like Such activities found favor with the Schmidt wing of the social democrats.


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Jinx TFD n. 1. A person or thing that is believed to bring bad luck. 2. A condition or period of bad luck that appears to have been caused by a specific person or thing. tr.v. jinxed, jinx·ing, jinx·es To bring bad luck to. If a person is jinxed (adjective), it means that he or she always has bad luck. If you are experiencing a series of ...


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"Think differently" would mean: Please think in a way that is different from the way that other people are thinking. "Think different" means: Think about things that are different, or how to do things that are different. The slogan doesn't tell you how to think, but what to think.


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I'd call that person bad luck "You're bad luck, you are." You're my Henry Allbones - G. B. Hope "Maybe you're bad luck." Hero - E. V. Crowe "You're bad luck. I bet you're bad luck to yourself." "He is, kid," Blocker said. Yesterday Will Make You Cry - Chester B. Himes


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It looks perfectly correct to me. First; because when an active sentence with an indirect object is recast in the passive, the indirect object can take on the role of subject in the passive sentence. Active Professor Villa gave Jorge an A. Passive An A was given to Jorge by Professor Villa. Passive Jorge was given an A. ...


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About 500 years ago, Shakespeare wrote in Hamlet (3:1): “For in that sleep of death what dreams may come ... Must give us pause.” And although it seems like there must be more to it, it just means that surprise or doubt caused a hesitation before one reacts. Most commonly, it is used in a self-referential manner. After all, you know when something takes ...


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I agree with Drew that it is "none of the above". I would surmise that your friend is probably well-read, and perhaps even a bit animated, in general. Readers are exposed to a much wider variety of vocabulary, and it's always good to get more words out there in circulation. Glad to hear they were flabbergasted. As an aside: My wife is a librarian...She's ...


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It's neither common nor a well-established usage, so arguably the exact sense is somewhat subjective. @mplungjan's link gives us... 1: Don't get upset when you've no real reason to be upset ...whereas Urban dictionary has... 2: Given as advice to someone you you'd like to sit down and shut up ...and (thanks to @Josh61's comment below)... 3: ...


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I suggest: The truth is patently obvious


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It's surprising nobody bothered to type an answer in here. It's just an attempt at play on "kiss my ass," or, some similar phrase. I would guess it is the case that the writers/production team were so silly, they were perhaps making a confused play on "kick the bucket" "kick ass" "kiss my ass" and/or any combination there of. Note that there is something ...



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