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54

I would suggest moving target. Longman online (3) says: a moving target something that is changing continuously, so that it is very difficult to criticize it or compete against it


11

'Capricious' sounds like more close since its more close to being 'arbitrary'. 'Volatile' is also nice to use here but if it is regarding your example of a document it must be 'Dynamic'


8

If you're looking for one with a negative connotation - you can say you are "building on quicksand".


7

No. Coffee is made or brewed (in terms of the drink). It's also planted and picked (in terms of the plant). Building coffee does not make sense. Looking at COCA, the only times coffee collocates with build is in the contexts of coffee table and coffee break.


6

"in flux" or "ephemeral" both seem useful here.


4

I would use "dynamic" which google defines as (of a process or system) characterized by constant change, activity, or progress If you wish to use it as a phrase then try "dynamic system", "dynamic process", "the dynamic nature of..." or "dynamic in nature"


4

The 1st word that comes to mind is "mercurial"- defined as changeable; volatile; fickle; flighty; erratic: Other fine words I would use would also be things like protean or mutable If we are talking about something changing because you are working on it there are some good science terms namely the "Uncertainty principle", that observation alters the ...


3

Evolving could be a suitable option.


3

pinnacle (noun): the most successful point; the culmination 'He had reached the pinnacle of his career.' Source: ODO


3

As is always the case, context makes a difference in English. However here is an explanation that I hope will be useful.. 1. "I tried closing my eyes" ---> This usually signals an action that was actually carried out, e.g. I was at the dentist's; her lamp was very bright in my face. I tried closing my eyes but it was still uncomfortable. I asked her ...


2

Are you looking for Communication accomodation theory? Specifically: convergence - Convergence refers to the process through which an individual shifts his or her speech patterns in interaction so that they more closely resemble the speech patterns of speech partners. ... People use convergence based on their perceptions of others, as well as ...


2

I invented the term. Kenneth Duda and Thomas Lumley have it right (though phenry and GenericJam gave good guesses). It's a play on words. The "people from the concrete steppes" think of the economy (and the effects of monetary policy in particular) like a mechanism, where the central bank moves one lever, which causes another lever to move, and so on. They ...


2

1. The song We say, "At first I didn't think much of it but as I continued to listen the song grew on me." grow on someone. — phrasal verb with grow us /ɡroʊ/ verb (past tense grew /ɡru/ , past participle grown /ɡroʊn/ ) › to become increasingly liked or enjoyed by someone: Living in a small town was tough at first, but the place grows on you. ...


2

the week/month/year before last: during the week/month/year before the previous one


2

Praise Merriam-Webster: say or write good things about (someone or something): A good teacher praises students when they do well. Macmillan: express strong approval or admiration for someone or something, especially in public: Mayor Dixon praised the efforts of those involved in the rescue.


2

At the zenith? At the apogee? On top of the world?


2

In the USA they call such a person a "Rube Goldberg" after the cartoonist who depicted highly complicated devices for doing simple tasks. "You are turning that task into a real Rube Goldberg machine." Oxford Dictionaries Online defines Rube Goldberg [machine] as Ingeniously or unnecessarily complicated in design or construction In the UK we had Heath ...


2

"Empirical" means amenable to testing or understanding through physical experience. It comes from the Greek Εμπειρίκος, meaning "experienced" or "practiced." You could also say, "in practice; not theory." If the entire stage is a projection screen for making Bunin's words visible and the a cappella choir makes them audible, then the audience can directly ...


2

We always called it a living document. Changes are ever happening and the status quo is always in flux.


2

In the UK we often accuse someone of "moving the goal posts" if they change requirements or conditions in a way that makes our efforts or arguments redundant. The same phrase can also be used in a less accusatory manner if events overtake us, but this is slightly less common, IME.


2

"Let alone," as I think you know, is a way of emphasizing a thing that's really not going to happen. Regarding the question of which sentence is correct, the first one works better because you have the emphatic phrase next to the thing it's emphasizing -- video game.


2

Text is a presentation of language, with some advantages that speech lacks, the main one being portability across space and time, but also with some disadvantages, for example: --fluency alone is not enough--you have to learn to read; --until the advent of text-to-speech you couldn't really chop onions while engaging with the language; --the structure of ...


2

The answer is certainly yes, such cases do exist. But before I show you a few, please try to keep in mind the advice from Oxford University Press cited at the end of The Economist’s Style Guide’s section on hyphens: If you take hyphens seriously, you will surely go mad. Yes, they buried their own lede. I didn’t. So now let’s look at some places ...


2

How about inscribe? to mark (a surface) with words, characters, etc., especially in a durable or conspicuous way. (m-w.com)


1

'The ground is shifting under my feet' is an expression that I think most closely reflects the situation described of a document being edited while you are editing it. 'Shifting goalposts' is not quite analogous. More suitable for the 'boss' changing what they want the document to say when you present it for review.


1

I have yet to see someone mention the most common phrase I would use to describe this: a ninja edit; that is, a change to something that happens while you are commenting on it. I find it to be a very common saying on forums and message boards. Urban dictionary confirms this, if you consider that valid: A ninja edit is an change made to a published post ...


1

I'm not sure if this is a purely Australian expression, but here we often say that the "goalposts are shifting" in a situation where you can't achieve anything due to constantly changing requirements.


1

clusterflux also like nailing jelly to a tree


1

For a nice parallel, I would suggest "sky-high".


1

Your link says it all (cf also Apposition/ Wikipedia); You are right in your first example and wrong in your second. If the person mentioned is primarily a friend, you are correct in saying I have a banker friend, and she says that interest rates are going up. If the person is primarily a banker, say I have a friendly banker, and she says that ...



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