Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

26

To minimize the distinction we say, One's as bad as the other: Or, if we leave room for more than two: One's as bad as the next.


20

It is called a jam session. It is sometimes shortened as jam. (jam is used as a verb as well.) An informal gathering of musicians to play improvised or unrehearsed music. [TFD]


19

An exact match: I don't know shit about shit! From The Slangman Guide to Dirty English: Dangerous Expressions Americans Use., by David Burke: "I don't know shit about shit, but I know right from wrong!" From An Uprising of Angels, by Marc D. Baldwin: “I don't know shit about shit. Okay? From Four-letter Films: Taboo Language in Movies, by ...


12

It's all the same to me: something that you say when it is not important to you what happens Billy Ray Cyrus wrote It's all the Same To Me about a bad experience in love, where all the gory details became irrelevant: Refrain: You can put me on some island In the middle of the sea Or lock me in a prison With no chance of ever being free Or run ...


12

LET GOD SORT THEM OUT The OP has stated that the phrase in question, "means that one considers all the instances of some group as equally bad ... " The meaning of the OP's phrase is about not caring, as opposed to, not knowing. Additionally of great significance, the phrase is an expression of vituperation and disdain, conveying a fundamental lack of ...


11

Not an exact match, but "six of one, half a dozen of the other" could probably be used in many of the same contexts. It doesn't quite capture the negative connotations of the OP's phrase (it could conceivably be used to describe equally-good options as well as equally-bad). But it could certainly be used to describe politicians that are considered to be as ...


7

"Same old story," is the idiom. (US)


7

David. David was a young shepherd with a sling and 5 smooth stones who pitted himself against a gigantic Philistine who was fully armed for battle. Yet he brought the giant down with one stone (saving the others for the giant's brothers.) But we've known O'Brien is a fighter since back in the day, when he was the David to Jay Leno's Goliath. [Boston ...


6

In the United States, there is a long association between putting your hand over your heart and affirming something sincerely. Most notably, when people in the United States say the pledge of allegiance or sing the national anthem, they are encouraged to salute the flag either by putting their right hand over their heart or (if they are in military uniform) ...


5

Assuming that you're masking an expletive with "faeces", then: "It's all the same shit to me" - indicating that every example within a set is just as bad as every other example. A milder version - "it's all the same crap to me", and more family friendly "it all smells the same to me".


5

If your idiom means "I don't make distinctions among things that are all meaningless." then I would suggest: I don't pick fly-shit out of pepper. or You shouldn't try to pick the fly-shit out of the pepper. This is a way to tell someone that they are concerned with trivial differences that do not matter in dealing with the general situation.


5

A different kettle of fish and a whole new kettle of fish is the British English equivalent of the North American idiom a whole new ball game. Both idioms mean "a different thing altogether", and refer to a new topic which only appears to be related to a previously mentioned one. Nowadays the term kettle is usually associated with teakettles, but in the ...


5

The accepted answer lacks the impact and colour of the original: replacing fecal expertise by a reference to the Maker doesn't strike me as the best way to find an equivalence. I would probably go with same shit, different flies This implies that there are differences (the flies), but that those differences are meaningless when it comes down to what ...


3

Tariq Ali, a left-wing writer, made a famous comment (I believe he was talking about the Soviet Union and the United States during the Cold War): "Given the choice between syphilis and gonorrhea, I choose neither."


3

I'm an expert at using A. I'm an expert in terms of using A. seem polite enough.


3

adept — very skilled or proficient at something This is a very good word.


3

A fine or pretty kettle of fish As Peter Shor's comment beneath Ralph Richardson's answer indicates, "kettle of fish" has been used as a slang term for several centuries. The same definition of the term that he points to appears in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, second edition (1788): KETTLE OF FISH. When a person has ...


2

What does “in the name of…” actually mean? Putting all religious contentions aside for the sake of our language, the etymology of name offers a good place to start understanding: Old English nama, noma "name, reputation," from Proto-Germanic *namon (cognates: Old Saxon namo, Old Frisian nama, Old High German namo, German Name, Middle ...


2

A Google Books search finds two examples of the phrase from the 1890s and two more from the very early 1900s. From "Johnnie You've Lost," reprinted from the San Francisco Examiner as part of "The Sketch Book—Character in Outline," in Current Literature (February 1890): Both [bare-knuckles fighters] were winded and blood was flowing in streams. As soon as ...


2

For a fairly colloquial equivalent, "There ain't a dime's worth of difference." Made famous by George Wallace as a comment on the Democratic & Republican parties.


2

Folklore: noun [MASS NOUN] 1 The traditional beliefs, customs, and stories of a community, passed through the generations by word of mouth. ODO Which includes: Folk wisdom, Folk memory, Folk music, Folk remedies, Folk medicine, etc. From etymonline.com Folklore: "traditional beliefs and customs of the common people," 1846, ...


2

One possibility albeit without the negative connotation but in terms of expressions that can be used to express the indifference and generalization present in the former idioms would be: two sides of the same coin Or slices of the same cake Googling I also found (the following) - which does have a negative connotation, though more literary than ...


1

wikipedia just leads to Kylie - Hand on your heart For idioms, Wikipedia isn't necessarily the best place to look in. If you assume you're dealing with an idiomatic expression, go to Google Books and search for this whole search expression: "hand on your heart" idiom This will find many idiom dictionaries describing the idiom that are stored at ...


1

Small thing: a certain catalyst for social development Catalysis is the increase in the rate of a chemical reaction due to the participation of an additional substance called a catalyst. With a catalyst, reactions occur faster and with less energy. Because catalysts are not consumed, they are recycled. Often only tiny amounts are required. ...


1

The sentences have different meanings. Each is correct but with a different meaning, so usage statistics is quite pointless. Which is more often used: "I love you" or "I hate you"? Pointless question. In the first sentence, the speaker would wish a closer relationship, but as has happened to many other people in history before, the other person just wants ...


1

The saying born and bred dates back at least to the 17th century as shown in Ngram. To breed at that time already meant also to grow up ( late 14th c.) so there is not reason to suppose that the expression had originally a meaning different from the contemporary one. Born and bred: used to say that someone was born and grew up in a particular place, ...


1

The usual expression is "You don't know shit about that." I don't often hear "I don't know shit about that", but it comes up once in awhile. Related expressions: He don't know jack shit. He don't know jack. Possibly from "You don't know shit from Shinola", where Shinola is a type of shoe polish. (from Wikipedia) An statement of opposite meaning ...


1

If the hostess actually said "The company magazine is available with me on demand." Then that is indeed a non-standard use of with; normal use would call for either from or through. (The use of "with" implies that the magazine and the hostess are a combined unit; if you request the magazine, you also get the hostess. And that is probably not the ...


1

Available to me, seems like the most common expression in the written corpus, if she is referring to herself, but she is probably intending to say: I have the company magazine available for you on demand. Her grammar is awkward but intelligible as the implied phrase is intuitive: The company magazine is available (to you) with me on demand. She ...


1

An "Americanism" from the Washington Times: Employee' needs more training Oct 5, 2006 - He's a scanner-gun-toting cowboy who works the register like Bill Clinton works a crowd. Like Bill Clinton And here are a few nouns that should be serviceable, prodigy noun: plural noun: prodigies • a person, especially a young one, endowed with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible