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21

That is called: Lip service: support for someone or something that is expressed by someone in words but that is not shown in that person's actions (TFD)


11

Perhaps token support representing no more than a symbolic effort : minimal, perfunctory token resistance; token integration Merriam-Webster


11

Single sitting (in InE) is commonly used in context of -single sitting treatment-situations: Hair replacement procedures Root canal Tx Cataract operation etc. It's probably an adoption from the idiom "at/in one sitting". at/in one sitting: If you do something at one sitting, you do it during one period of time without stopping. ...


9

Slacktivism seems to fit your description pretty perfectly: The word is usually considered a pejorative term that describes "feel-good" measures, in support of an issue or social cause, that have little physical or practical effect, other than to make the person doing it feel satisfied that they have contributed... The acts tend to require minimal ...


6

Outside of India, single sitting is and was certainly used, as attested in the comments, but it will nowadays usually refer to a meal. The (extended) meaning of in the time frame of a single occurrence may be typical Indian usage currently, but I would certainly not qualify such usage as a “blunder”, let alone an “absolute” one. It is no more a blunder ...


6

A few choices- stop by for a few moments. drop round for a few minutes pop in for a minute I like the expression - an abbreviated visit- though I have not heard of this phrase before and could not find much reference. And for the supporting cast- Cameo- the suggestion by Dan Bron definitely appears the most suitable. ...


5

You're describing a flying visit, it might also be pro forma or perfunctory, depending on why it is short.


4

Though it usually refers to being a boastful person, the phrase all talk can be used to refer to someone who puts a lot of words forward for a cause or action, but doesn't take any action towards it themselves. Somewhat prejorative, you would say something like "he may like to tell people how he supports deforestationg groups, but he's all talk". The ...


4

You could say that you support them in word but not in deed.


3

Individual death: Met his Maker. Bought the farm. Kicked the bucket. Bought the big one. Is pushing up daisies. Went on to his reward. Shuffled off this mortal coil. Huge number of deaths: genocide massacre extinction bloodbath internecine life is cheap Armageddon depopulated mass carnage angel of death (biblical reference - see Passover) rained death ...


2

Your support is only skin deep.


2

In my experience Glass Cannon is also a term used in Collectable Card Games (Magic the Gathering) where a combination deck will be totally unable to recover in cases where the combination is countered/disrupted. In this sense where the combination succeeds it results in a game win and when it fails it is a certain loss as there is no way to recover.


2

You are exactly right, FumbleFingers, that "you're not the boss of me" is a childish (or childhood) equivalent of "you're not my boss." In fact, in southeast Texas, where I spent the first 16 years of my life, it was a standard riposte in Childspeak, covering much the same ground as "You're not my mother," but without the demeaning acknowledgment that your ...


2

It's not wrong, but it sounds a little odd. I think it's "my process" - "my path" or "my route" may be better. Then there's the business of mixing metaphors: a cornerstone belongs in a building, not in a path or process. So maybe cornerstone needs to change too: "... an important step on my route to ..."?


2

I dunno... It makes sense to me. Although It seems like you may be confusing "by virtue of," and "in light of" - which can both be used in this sense.


2

Are you all kidding? Kissing the boss' hand was a sycophantic display. "...I chap easily," means: "If you kiss my hand too much, the skin will become chapped from the excess moisture - and it will be irritating to me - which will not be good for you." It's the boss' way of saying: "If you kiss my butt too much, it'll backfire on you." Get it?


1

Another couple options: "swing by" or "swing round" - These give the impression of just stopping in for a short period of time. "look in on" - Gives the impression of just checking up on someone/something and as soon as the curiosity is satisfied, the querier will be on their way. HTH.


1

If it might be 100 of X (sticks) and no y (rocks), or no x (sticks) and 100 y (rocks), or any combination that adds up to 100, I would say this is one of a few occasions where the best conjunction would be "and/or" A combined total of 100 sticks and/or rocks. But of the two examples you gave, I would say that the version with "and" is more ...


1

I don't think these are modifiers. Rather than modification, their semantic function is predication. Digging a hole is predicated of them, and standing over there is predicated of it. "I saw them digging a hole" is a non-obvious but fairly transparent preposition construction of the same sort that historically gave us the progressive aspect: [ I saw them ...


1

The difference between the first two and the last two is that the first two are examples of adjectival phrases. Why are they adjectival? Because they modify a noun, and not a verb. Your suspicion that it has something to do with time I cannot place in a grammatical context. I saw them digging a hole. Digging a hole modifies them: they were digging a ...


1

"Lone wolf" means being solitary and not socializing much. "Skated by" means that the individual "just got by" or was "on autopilot" or otherwise didn't really work at whatever the task was but simply did the minimum. "Doing the bare minimum thing" means the same as "skated by". (And of course "Shut the front door!" is simply an exclamation, similar to ...


1

Amusing it may sound to the natives, single sitting is used to decribe even one night stands. Indians will often ask, "What is your good name?" which is a somewhat literal translation of "Aapka shubh naam kya hai?" Shubh means auspicious or good, and it is basically used as a polite way of asking for someone's full name. Something which ...


1

A taste of your own medicine, meaning: in the end you will get what you deserve!! If you cheat or behave unfairly , people will treat you in the same way! The moral of Æesop's fable is that dishonesty doesn't pay. If you give someone a taste of their own medicine, you do something bad to someone that they have done to you to teach them a lesson. ...



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