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22

Catch-22 To use it in a sentence, "It's a catch-22" or "It's a catch-22 situation" From Google's definition of Catch-22: a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions. "a catch-22 situation" (Paraphrased very slightly) from Wikipedia's Catch-22 (logic): A catch-22 is ...


13

This sounds like a chicken and egg situation. a situation in which it is impossible to say which of two things existed first and which caused the other It's a chicken and egg situation - I don't know whether I was bad at the sciences because I wasn't interested in them or not interested in them and therefore not good at them. Cambridge Idioms ...


6

As you noted, "infinite feedback loop" is not the right term (and not just because your situation has nothing to do with software). That sounds more like a runaway success story, which is quite the opposite of your situation. If you wanted to borrow technical jargon from programming, it would be deadlock: In concurrent programming, a deadlock is a ...


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


2

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


2

Consider, chink [in the armor] : a weak spot that may leave one vulnerable. M-W fly in the ointment A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language wrench in the works a spanner (or North American monkey wrench) in the works A person or thing that prevents the ...


2

Perhaps Achilles' heel (with or without the apostrophe) An Achilles heel is a weakness in spite of overall strength, which can actually or potentially lead to downfall. While the mythological origin refers to a physical vulnerability, idiomatic references to other attributes or qualities that can lead to downfall are common. Wikipedia


2

Ceremonious dumping appears to be much less common than unceremonious dumping, if we are to judge from this Ngram chart for "ceremoniously dumped" (blue line) versus "unceremoniously dumped" (red line) for the period 1850–2005: Examples of "unceremoniously dumped" go back to the nineteenth century. From "The Merz System of Garbage Utilization in Four ...


2

circular dependency a relation between two or more modules which either directly or indirectly depend on each other to function properly. Such modules are also known as mutually recursive. http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_dependency


2

This is the sort of thinking that happens when you've descended into scrupulosity. (The linked article in Catholic Answers Magazine describes scrupulosity as "the occupational hazard of the Catholic moral life"): The scrupulous person may believe that having even a fleeting impure thought (maybe sexual thoughts or thought about revenge) is sinful. He ...


2

Other people have mentioned Orwell's 1984, but not the actual term used therein for this offense, thoughtcrime: An instance of unorthodox or controversial thinking, considered as a criminal offense or as socially unacceptable: thoughtcrimes are notoriously difficult to prosecute (Oxford Dictionaries) People also use the spaced-out spelling ...


1

Spider is a noun and has never been used as a verb. ( That doesn't mean that one day it won't become a verb and it may not express what you are trying to express.) Also, as Kristina said above, this may be too literal of a translation of your language to English. As far as "my English is not the yoke from the egg," it sounds like you are saying that your ...


1

If you say, "I think I spider," any native English speaker will think that you said, "I think I spied her," and will be very confused. Spider can, in fact, be used as a verb, and has several possible meanings: 1 [no object] Move in a scuttling manner suggestive of a spider: ‘a treecreeper spidered head first down the tree trunk’ 1.1Form a ...


1

It's not a big change, but the following sentence will sound more professional: "Even in ..., there is considerable room to improve ...", Altenative: "Even in ..., much improvement remains to be done.",


1

I would play with 'substantial improvements could be achieved' and, more importantly, I would add the ways those improvements can be achieved.


1

The sentence I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful is grammatically correct. But it would be much more natural (and simple) to insert the adjectives before the noun described: I want to be smart and beautiful, like you. The simplest way of writing or speaking English is nearly always the best way.


1

Both varieties have the same syntactic structure. The difference is lexical, semantic, and pragmatic. Mental process verbs like believe and think take complements describing the mentation. They don't say much about the truth of that mentation, as you point out. However, a special type of predicate doesn't simply describe a proposition; it presupposes it. A ...


1

Reminds me of the Thought Police and double-think in 1984 by George Orwell. There is also a section of the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5 where Jesus is preaching on Hebrew teachings and taking the ethics impossibly high. There's a repetition of, "You have heard it said that..." (state a Hebrew law here) "but I say that..." (state a higher ethic here). ...


1

Stress is very important in English, and affects meaning. Contrary to what we're usually taught, there are 3 levels of stress in English speech: hi, lo and mid, for convenience. There are about 40 or 50 words that are almost invariably unstressed in English: 'to' is one of them. I'll just rewrite that sentence with that type of unstressed word in italics: ...



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