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25

"X of a certain age" is an intentional vagueness, specific sounding euphemism that is entirely context dependent, on both general culture and the conversational topic, but is more often lately used to mean barely more specifically, later middle age. As a euphemism, it is directed non-specifically to a target range of age that is undesirable or otherwise not ...


8

Wild goose chase: (via dictionary.com) Definition: a wild or absurd search for something nonexistent or unobtainable Example: a wild-goose chase looking for a building long demolished


7

"chasing rainbows" seems like a good choice. trying to achieve something that is not possible or practical TFD e.g. He wanted to go into show business, but friends told him to quit chasing rainbows. I'm always chasing rainbows Watching clouds drifting by My schemes are just like all my dreams Ending in the sky... (lyrics by Joseph McCarthy) or ...


6

The earliest Google Books match I could find for "[women] of a certain age" is from The Spectator, number 53 (May 1, 1711), and it takes the expression in an unexpected direction: Epictetus, that plain honest philosopher, as little as he had of gallantry, appears to have understood them [women], as well as the polite St. Evremont, and has hit this point ...


4

will-o-the-wisp, Cambridge English Dictionary something that is impossible to get or achieve: Full employment is the will-o'-the-wisp that politicians have been chasing for decades From Wikipedia A will-o'-the-wisp....is an atmospheric ghost light seen by travellers at night, especially over bogs, swamps or marshes. It resembles a ...


2

I owe you (one) is a colloquial expression: (informal) said to thank someone for helping you and as a way of saying that you will do something for them in the future: Thanks for the help, Bill - I owe you one. (Cambridge Dictionary)


2

Your premise is not correct. According to Oxford Dictionaries Online the phrase in the offing means Likely to happen or appear soon: there are several initiatives in the offing Similarly Collins likely to occur soon


2

The Holy Bible names them Simpleton and Naive. A prudent person foresees danger and takes precautions. The simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences.


2

To be "in deep" can be understood as: inextricably involved in or committed to a situation. "He knew that he was in deep when his things began to proliferate in her apartment" Your sentence looks like a variation on it. Sometimes, a "strong" or negative word is omitted in spoken sentences, which in this situation could have been depression, as ...


2

We want to eat two more apples. We want to eat an additional two apples. (a little formal) We need two extra chairs.


2

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


2

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


1

Sometimes, English doesn't seem to work logically. An indefinite article is supposed to be placed before a singular noun or noun phrase. A month is a long period. *A two months is a long period. (Ungrammatical) But depending on how you perceive two months, you can treat two months as a singular unit (quantity of time) as in: Two months is a long ...


1

The closest I can think of is dismissive. To be dismissive of someone or a group of people is to refuse to give proper consideration to their merits. Having said that, this seems to lack the venom of your example. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dismissive


1

In store (for somebody/something) — TFD planned or likely to happen. "We have a big surprise in store for you." "She's got a difficult few months in store, with her husband's illness." In the not too distant future — M-W at a time that is not long from now:  soon "Changes are expected in the not too distant future."


1

Chasing phantoms would describe chasing something that doesn't exist.


1

"Just a fool chasing dreams", seems very appropriate here (but leaves some ambiguity as to the attainability of the dream).


1

How about chasing shadows? It could also mean things that once were or that one is always trailing behind. But it is always something that you will not catch. Or chasing/following/looking for a red herring. A fish that does not exist. You could also consider using this in a more poetic way if you for instance have established some other creature with a ...


1

Chambers gives a definition of nice as done with great care and exactness and I think the element of 'care' is relevant here. The person will be taking care to ensure that whatever it is is dried and ready for use. Nicely ( or the variant of nice and...) personalises what would otherwise be a bald statement of efficiency.



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