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24

Consider clichéd, meaning “repeated so often that it has become stale or commonplace; hackneyed” – wiktionary and trite, meaning “Worn out; hackneyed; used so many times that it is no longer interesting or effective (often in reference to a word or phrase)” – wiktionary.


13

You sound like a broken record. to say the same thing over and over again. (Fig. on a scratch in a phonograph record causing the needle [or stylus] to stay in the same groove and play it over and over.) Last edited by Grefsen; 4th August 2013 at 9:59 PM. Re: sounding like a broken (scratched) record.


11

The phrase is tired or well-worn or old hat or...


9

According to Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997), one potentially relevant idiom is "old chestnut": old chestnut A stale joke, story, or saying, as in Dad keeps on telling that old chestnut about hgow many psychiatrists it takes to change a light bulb. This expression comes from William Diamond's play, The Broken Sword ...


7

To put something charitably means to express a negative feature in the most favorable way. However, it's usually used sarcastically, when describing something you think is very wrong. By specifically pointing out that you're being charitable, the reader understands that you're avoiding the obvious negatives. In the example you gave, the writer is implying ...


6

There is nothing new under the sun may convey the idea you want to express: Everything that is happening now has happened before. The newspaper today is shocking. Three prominent politicians have been convicted of fraud. Jane: That's not shocking. It only proves that there's nothing new under the sun. Source:http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com


6

"That old chestnut" refers to a subject, an idea, or a joke which has been discussed or repeated so many times that it is not interesting or funny any more. from "http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/an+old+chestnut"


4

There is an idiomatic phrasal verb that you can use and rephrase your sentence accordingly. It is wheel out. to mention or to use someone or something that has been mentioned or used many times before, often so many times that people are now bored with them They still wheel her out at every party conference. [macmillandictionary] ...


4

To the extent that you wish to convey a boring repetition of well known material, consider yadda yadda yadda (or yada yada yada) Used as a substitute for actual words where they are too lengthy or tedious to recite in full: boy meets girl, boy loses girl, yadda yadda yadda [Oxford Dictionary Online] Similarly blah blah blah [Dictionary.com] You ...


3

An "old saw" is an oft-repeated to the point of being somewhat tiresome idea or maxim. It's well known enough that UPenn doesn't mind using it as the title of a translation of a Kant essay... http://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/997.html


3

In actual answer to your questions, Is it same [as] “to put it mildly" or "to say the least”? Yes, it is absolutely identical. I wonder why the writer preferred to use a phrase not so popular. "to put it charitably" is as perfectly widely known as “to put it mildly" or "to say the least” Note that it has a slightly more sarcastic, aggressive, witty ...


3

Reading your question brings to my mind the expression: If I had a dime for every time I heard that one I'd be rich by now. or some more clever, funny outcome. See http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=If%20I%20had%20a%20dime%20for%20every%20time for more examples.


3

I suppose it depends on what you mean by "creative", or more specifically, what tone or color you want to set. You could use some of the many idioms for this, for example "ink the deal", "get it in writing" or just simply "write it down." You might go for a deliberate misuse of an idiom, such as "carve it in ink", or "not-so-verbal contract". Our you might ...


2

The phrase "in my humble opinion" is too much of a colloquialism nowadays. Taken literally, it might have acted as a softener once, but idiomatically, as others have pointed out, it comes off as rude and sarcastic. Personally, I would use something like "I believe", or just "in my opinion" without the word humble. Simply stating explicitly that your opinion ...


2

The phrase in my humble opinion and its acronym IMHO have become trite and virtually meaningless. In context, they often seem disingenuous. The speaker often seems to be very sure of the rightness of his or her point of view. I urge losing the phrases completely. There are standard alternatives that are not so canned sounding: I think my proposal may ...


2

I spent four undergrad years in Pittsburgh. This was the only place where I had heard the construction such as The car needs washed. An interesting article by the Grammar Girl gives the name of the phenomenon (infinitival copula deletion), the name of an academic researcher (Barbara Johnstone), and whether it passes the cover letter test. Grammar ...


2

If you are willing to consider a noun, try scrivening (obsolete) writing [Collins] as in I filled the paper with my scrivenings. You could also use the verb form scribe (chiefly LITERARY) Write: he scribed a note that he passed to Dan [Oxford Dictionary Online] But note that the verb is now more often used to describe marking with a sharp ...


2

"To put something charitably" means to look at something is the most forgiving manner to the person in question. For example if someone left a store without paying for something and it is not clear they meant to steal it (eg perhaps they were trying on sunglasses and left them on their head as they walked out), then you could charitably say "they forgot to ...


2

Here is a suggestion: lore - knowledge gained through study or experience. The definition is from Merriam Webster's dictionary. There are several other words which you may use depending on context and audience.


1

In some contexts, "been there, done that, wore the shirt" is a common way to express that a suggestion has been tried so often that it's almost a trope by now. been there, done that, bought the T-shirt (idiomatic, humorous) Expresses the speaker's complete familiarity with a situation, with overtones of cynicism or exhaustion. (Used in slightly ...


1

The usual set phrase is ", to put it mildly". It is used to stress the fact that the criticism expressed is not as strong as it should be, that it was an understatement. From this basic, standard cliché, you can make any sort of personal variation. In this case 'charitably' is more strong, sarcastic than the original. It means you have pity of the author, ...


1

I occasionally Jot things down on a napkin, envelope, scrap of paper; whatever's handy.


1

It's a commonly misunderstood phrase. A misapplication of the definition occurs almost always, it seems. In this case, 'humble' is used in the rank/status/quality context. That is having or showing a modest or low estimate of one's own importance/of low social, administrative, or political rank.. That is "With consideration of my limited capability to ...


1

Of all the people who wanted to join the trip, Anna was the the last I expected would come. We barely knew each other at school, and I was pretty sure she wasn't interested in me. If you check after all you'll see that it is not necessary. I suppose you are the author, you can choose if you want to add it. If you do, probably it would be better to ...


1

In the quoted text, the idiomatic phrase "after all" means roughly the same thing that the phrase "for one thing" would. The author includes "after all" as a way of emphasizing the progression of his (or her) thought in explaining why Anna's interest in joining the trip came as a surprise. In other words, "after all" serves a stylistic purpose. You could ...


1

Here are three tangentially related proverbs from Wolfgang Mieder, A Dictionary of American Proverbs (1992): The cat is mighty dignified until the dog comes by. It is easy to be brave from a safe distance. Opportunity makes a thief. Also somewhat related (in different ways) are these from Rosalind Fergusson, The Facts on File Dictionary of ...


1

The word you want isn't official - it's... "Please provide links to authoritative sources supporting your argument" Obviously, authoritative there means considered to be accurate and knowledgeable by people who are themselves experts in the relevant field, not endorsed by some official body or "authority". As has been stated, you can also use credible ...


1

Just say, "My proposal is interesting because . . ." We already know it's your opinion, because you're the one stating it. The rest is filler.


1

The sentence is not incorrect, it is just awkward. Whenever I see there and it used in a sentence, I know I can come up with something better. Many words in English can both enhance and refine a sentence. For example, by using instead of and satisfy in the sentence, we can rearrange it to read: It is better to deny many hungers instead of satisfying ...


1

I’d say the meeting might run long. I am not able to find authoritative backing for this phrasing, but I assure you it is said around me and by me quite frequently. I work in an office in Chicago.



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