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5

There are so many options for this: Clerk: Can I help you find anything? You: No thanks, I'm doing fine. I'm good. This is very informal but very natural for a native speaker. Depending on how you say it, it can also come off a bit tersely. I'm just looking/browsing, thanks. "Browsing" is a great word for when you're not ...


3

Yep! That's perfect! Thank you, but I've just had a cup. Is just right. You could also say: Thanks but I've just had some. You would not want to say (from the point of view of an AmE speaker): Thank you but I just had one. The other person asked you if you wanted some tea, so it would be slightly odd (though not horribly so) to say "one". ...


2

Bucket and chuck it: Supposedly from 'beakhead' part of the forecastle used by sailors as a toilet. (A B Sea: A Loose-footed Lexicon Di Jack Lagan) The routine was to 'bucket and chuck it'. You crawled to the bow end of the boat with baby wipes and the blue bucket. It was important not to confuse this with the yellow bucket – which ...


2

The answers can change according to context as well as how the clerk approaches you, but these work in most cases: I am fine. & I am good. or I got it/(I think) I will be ok. Just browsing. Keep in mind that your body gesture is important too. (crossed arms/open palms to resist the approach is a clear sign that you don't want to be bothered) Edit: I ...


2

Actually, the word single have two meanings in baseball, but neither of your meanings is perfectly correct. Single can be a noun, in which it simply means a one-base hit. As a verb, it means to get a one-base hit. It has nothing to do with what happens to the men on base, except that if you reach first base and someone else is out on the play, it's not ...


2

Actually B is correct. What the sentence is saying is that Kang Jung-Jo hit a single which allowed a previous batter's run to complete (ie a previous batter made it all the way around the bases), thus scoring a point. Kang 'singled in' a previous player's run. 'Off' is used in reference to the pitcher. You might hit a home run off your brother's pitch, for ...


2

I would assume that it originates from the 1970s description (which may predate that, of course) of e.g. nightclubs as "cattle markets" where the women danced and the man stood around the perimeter deciding which they would choose. The phrase also crops up in "The Thoughts of Jefferson Galt" at www.jeffersongalt.com where he says "I'd rather view a woman ...


1

'Direct', 'redirect', 'forward', 'route' can all be made to work in place of send. Specifically in the context of an introduction 'connect' may also be considered If the purpose of the introduction is to suggest or recommend one party to the other, 'refer' probably best conveys that.


1

No Jess, that's not correct. A prepositional phrase is a phrase with a preposition as its head. 'in the vase' is a prepositional phrase, with the preposition 'in' at its head. In your sentence, 'arranging' is the main verb and 'flowers' is the direct object.


1

so what I would say this is the canonical phrase. Also: And...? (the ellipses indicating a pause before the question mark)


1

"there's something to it/them/NP" means that there is some substance in 'it', whatever 'it' refers to. It is usually in reference to something someone says and implies that you shouldn't dismiss them so easily. The phrase looks very vague and empty and is not precise speech because of its dependence on the nuances of the preposition 'to'. In speech the ...


1

OP has misparsed the usages. You can have something on someone (you know something "secret" about them, giving you power to "blackmail" them). But you can't have something to [a person]. The cited usages are versions of the idiomatic there's something to it, meaning it's not a completely daft idea - there's at least a grain of truth in it. Or perhaps there ...


1

Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


1

I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning



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