Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

There are at least three literary devices present. Both of the examples in the title, "asparagus to avocados" and "kangaroos to koalas" exhibit two of them. Those two devices are alliteration, and juxtaposition. Alliteration is the device where two or more nearby words begin with the same, or nearly the same sound. In the case of the vegetables, the sound is ...


4

I've always been a fan of "Hedge one's bets". to protect yourself against making the wrong choice And does seem to be used when literally betting on things: Basically, hedging is just a way to reduce or eliminate the risk of a bet. You would generally look to hedge a bet when you are no longer comfortable with the bet you have made – i.e. you don’t ...


3

I think the expression you are looking for is proprietary eponym: An eponym: is someone or something whose name is or is thought to be the source of something's name (such as a city, country, era, or product); alternately it can be used to refer to the name of something that is based on or derived from someone or something else's name. Albert ...


3

I would expect your colleague to understand that the same "parameters" were used to produce the data set each time. Parameter - from MW-O: 2: any of a set of physical properties whose values determine the characteristics or behavior of something In your example, the "set of physical properties" (the parameters) would be the specifics of the query ...


2

It seems to me that you want to reassure your reader that the results are exactly comparable to, and just as valid as, the statistics that the reader has received previously. It's probably irrelevant whether you ran the same query, ran the same procedure that extracts lots of data and then processes it to make statistics, or followed the same manual steps to ...


2

OneLook is a website that links to several dictionaries, including specialized dictionaries. I decided to start looking there. OneLook returned 10 hits for computing dictionaries, including this one, from the Free On-Line Dictionary of Computing (FOLDOC): query A user's (or agent's) request for information, generally as a formal request to a database ...


1

'In addition to the above/previously mentioned/aforementioned/forenamed ....' is fine. 'In addition...' is also fine. It's matter of personal preference really. Do note that 'In addition...' can replace 'In addition to the above', but not vice versa; this is because 'In addition...' revolves around a more general case, while 'In addition to the above..' ...


1

I would consider query to be suitable for a non-technical audience, provided you don't get into the details of the query implementation. However, if you're looking for something less technical, I would simply use operation: Attached are the results of the usual operation [on the dataset]. You could also add "with the same/usual parameters". It's not ...


1

If selection criteria is too techy, how about search terms or search criteria? Search might not be quite the right word for a database, but search terms are something that everyone should be familiar with from googling.


1

At times like these I often find it helps to restructure the sentence entirely. You're not happy with using the perfectly accurate 'query', and many of the synonyms are either unsuitable or still too formal. The key information that you're trying to convey is that you have the requisite 'dataset' from the correct 'database', and that it was procured in a ...


1

Dip. We do a database dip to get the corresponding name.


1

This dataset was produced using the same selection criteria we have been using all along.


1

The answers by Josh61 and FumbleFingers provide a solid baseline notion of when “state of the art” arose in three senses: “status of the art” (late nineteenth century, according to WorldWideWords, citing the OED, in Josh61’s answer); “current stage of development of a practical or technological subject” (1910, according to Wikipedia, also citing the OED, in ...


1

"Make it" is synonomous with "succeed" is some contexts.


1

I would call the title misleading. If it is purposely misleading to add impact (e.g. the book is titled as a teen romance, but becomes a murder mystery), I would call it diversionary or a smokescreen. As those commenting have suggested, don't judge a book by it's cover is a popular idiom, though it would serve better as a warning to be wary of this kind of ...


1

Yes, due to subject verb agreement it should be either whose talents reach or whose talent reaches depending on whether it is a single talent or plural talents.


1

Telling someone "Good Luck in all your" sounds like you are telling the person good luck. Telling someone "Good Luck to all your" sounds like you are telling the endeavors' good luck, not the person. To make the latter correct, you could say "Good Luck to you in all your endeavors'".


1

This is probably due to difficulty with prepositions, for which it is harder to learn by rules than by experience! The preposition "by" is used in "X by X" where "X" is a noun to adverbially specify that the main verb is performed to each "X" in the context one at a time. Some examples are: one by one (one at a time) line by line (one line at a ...


1

"Who" refers to people; "that" may refer to either people or things. Use "who" if doing so would help your reader identity the antecedent. That's not a problem with your text. "... the only way to do this was by taking control ...."


1

Merriam-Webster lists eight different definitions for the phrase "put down". When someone says they'll "put you down for a weekend tour", they mean they'll write your name down in the list of weekend tour bookings. Or maybe instead of writing it, they'll type it, or drag it there. They'll put it there somehow.


1

It's fine. Put down meaning kill is only ever used of an animal. It would not be understood in that sense in referring to a human, and if you found a way to force that meaning it would imply that you were regarding the person as an animal. However there is another idiomatic meaning which could occur here, meaning "deprecate", or "diminish in status". I ...


1

There's nothing wrong with "every once in a while." However, you don't say "your thoughtfulness to come and visit," say "your thoughtfulness in coming and visiting." If you want to use "thoughtful" and "to come," you say "It's thoughtful of you to come and visit every once in a while. I appreciate it" (which sounds a little awkward to me, but that's a ...


1

I'd suggest saying this instead: I appreciate the thoughtfulness in your occasional visits. Edit: As GetzelR said, the usage of every once in a while ends up sounding like it may be sarcastic and the replacement of it with occasional helps clarify that the speaker means occasional only in the most literal sense, without a hostile intent behind it. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible