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4

"I dislike his being blunt" means I dislike it when he speaks in a blunt manner. "I dislike him being blunt" means I dislike this person-- when he is being blunt. Actually, the first is more grammatically correct--and this is probably what the speaker means to say--- but people very often use the second way.


3

[the] reveal the moment in which previously withheld information about characters or plot is unveiled.


2

According to ThisDayinQuotes.com in the September 19, 1926 edition of the Chicago Daily Tribune...in [his] column “Notes on Journalism” what Mencken actually said was: No one in this world, so far as I know — and I have searched the records for years, and employed agents to help me — has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the ...


2

In addition to the fact already mentioned that "killed" is less specific than murdered, I'd say that "the killed man" is unidiomatic. "Killed" and "murdered" are both verbs, but here they are used as an adjective, making them attributive verbs. By using these verbs without an object as in your examples, they become deverbal adjectives (verbs behaving ...


2

I have a couple suggestions for the reason: Vindicate: to show that (someone or something that has been criticized or doubted) is correct, true, or reasonable http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vindicate Justify: to provide or be a good reason for (something) to prove or show (something) to be just, right, or reasonable to provide a good ...


1

Patch to mean an area where one operates (especially for police officers, criminals or salesmen) is common in informal BrE. It could sometimes equate to a hometown but not always. 3.1 British informal An area for which someone is responsible or in which they operate : we didn’t want any secret organizations on our patch More example sentences ...


1

Perhaps: "Advise employees on insufficient customer request requirements; outlining deficiencies in details as needed." modified from the following, based on clarifications: "Evaluate submitted (or escalated) customer requests for clarity and detail; solicit additional detail as needed from submitting department/employee."


1

'Hands down' is an adverbial phrase, so it can be used anywhere that an adverb can. You should probably note that of your example phrases only the third and fifth are strictly correct grammatical sentences, even if you substituted 'hands down' with another adverb. Numbers 1, 4 and 5 are contractions, with an implicit 'it is' or 'it is the' at the start. ...


1

Your health condition entitles you to the seat upgrade. M-W: entitled -ˈtīt-liŋ, -əl-iŋ\ transitive verb 1 : to give a title to : designate 2 : to furnish with proper grounds for seeking or claiming something


1

I would go with parting shot: A final remark, usually cutting or derogatory, made just before departing. The parting shot can (and usually does, at least in movies) include a revelation.



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