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harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


6

I'm not sure if this what you mean by "little bit less strict context" but a more casual, sarcastic way to say the same thing would be "It wouldn't kill you to say thank you."


6

How about "No harm in?" No harm in being a bit more serious. No harm in saying "Thank you." No harm in keeping an eye out for the perfect job.


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The idiom lets you anchor two propositions against one another in order to add emphasis. There was nothing I loved more than English, not even volleyball and that's saying a lot! Think: because you know how much I actually love volleyball, so just imagine how much I loved English. I think I'd even prefer him to the terrorists—and that's saying a ...


3

The "Oxford comma is irrelevant to this question. Saying "my family and crew" implies that the crew is part of the family, not necessarily your crew. Saying "my family and my crew" implies that both the family and crew "belong" to you, which is probably what you are looking for. In addition, unless you are a ship's captain, you may want to use an ...


3

"It would be a good idea to"... Perhaps? It would be a good idea to say "Thank you". It would be a good idea to keep an eye out for a new job. etc. This way, it seems constructive instead of bringing in the negative connotations of "hurt" or "harm".


3

"Getting reamed", is slang for being fucked hard, in one hole or another. It is just a grosser, more exaggerated form of the slang "getting screwed", meaning to be taken advantage of, mistreated or abused.


3

I would not consider it redundant to have if...then... Leaving aside the point of using then to clearly mark where the consequent clause begins, the use of both if and then can serve to emphasize the causal nature of the antecedent, or to make it seem like an if and only if rather than just an if-then. For example: If it rains, we will stay inside. ...


3

Just use the word behoove It behooves you to say Thank You. It behooves you to keep an eye for that perfect job. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/behoove


2

Perhaps you can say that he is in awe of, intimidated by, cowed by or daunted by his superior.


2

Follow from is the standard way to use follow in this sense. From oxford: (sense 2.2) [NO OBJECT] Be a logical consequence of something it thus follows from this equation that the value must be negative If you want to say that X results from lemma (1), you could say: X follows from lemma(1) or From lemma(1), X follows. You shouldn't ...


2

A reamer is a device or object that enlarges a hole, as this definition from Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2013) indicates: reamer n (1825) : one that reams, as a : a rotating finishing tool with cutting edges used to enlarge or shape a hole b : a fruit juice extractor with a ridged and pointed center rising from a shallow dish. ...


1

It is an idiomatic expression, say a lot about something: to show or express something. In general, I think the way someone dresses says a lot about their attitude. (Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms) In you first example, the fact that you love English more than anything else, shows clearly how much it ( English) is important or means ...


1

Alternatives: "The timing of answering a question is important" "The time of answering a question is important" Different. timing = selection for maximum effect of the precise moment for beginning or doing something Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary


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In the UK, it is often referred to as a "Paddington stare". This refers to the character Paddington Bear who found fame in the books of Michael Bond, which have been adapted for TV and movie. “Paddington had a very persistent stare when he cared to use it. It was a very powerful stare. One which his Aunt Lucy had taught him and which he kept for ...


1

An old saying for a demanding look is, to look at someone with "daggers in your eyes." If you are being patronizing, you would give someone a "withering look". (To cause them to "shrivel up")(US)


1

Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Grumble: definitely not. That consists of complaining words, it is not a sound. Grunt: close, but that isn't it. Grunt doesn't include throat-clearing, and it is an inhalation. Is there a more appropriate ...


1

Just say: By/From lemma X, ... Or if it is a complicated one and you want to make clear what you are using the lemma on: By applying lemma X to object Y, we get/obtain ...


1

Absolutely any compound noun at all is grammatically correct. "Horizon road", "jalousie proof", "temperature depth", "dog cat", whatever. So the only question is whether it has a commonly agreed upon meaning. "Horizon road" is not an established term and would be taken to mean different things by different people, or would not be understood at all. Since ...


1

According to the following sources it is e.g. in BrE and e.g., in AmE abbreviation for exempli gratia: a Latin phrase that means "for example". It can be pronounced as "e.g." or "for example": You should eat more food that contains a lot of fibre, e.g. fruit, vegetables, and bread. (Cambridge Dictionary) According to the Chicago Manual of ...


1

From wiktionary : e.g. Alternative forms eg., eg (informal) Usage notes In American English a comma should follow e.g. For example: Female marsupials (e.g., kangaroos, opossums) have a pouch. In British English no comma should follow e.g. For example: Female marsupials (e.g. kangaroos, opossums) have a ...


1

How about "nothing to lose" Why not say Thank you. You've got nothing to lose


1

Your take/consider constructions seem like independent clauses (of the imperative variety). As such, common usage would suggest using the colon, dash, or period to mark the boundary between clauses. Using a comma creates a comma splice.


1

The pipe in this context is the kind one smokes tobacco in. This just means to empty the bowl of the pipe by knocking it against your shoe or boot (which would normally be leather or some material which protects you from the heat of the pipe if it was recently lit) to loosen the contents and shake them out. This could also be metaphorical but we would need ...



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