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6

Historians compare the rise of gin as England's first drug craze. It was considered a bane on society and started becoming an endemic situation. In an attempt to control this rising problem, the government attempted to remedy the situation. The Gin Act of 1736 whereby the government imposed a high licence fee for gin retailers and a 20 shillings retail tax ...


5

It means to hit on a topic that is of importance to person you are speaking to. You can strike a chord either positively or negatively. Positively if you say something that impresses/flatters/connects (positively) with them. Negatively if you speak ill about something that is of importance to them or something that rubs them in the wrong way. To me its ...


4

I always took it to be one of those phrases that represents a partial utterance, as in "Oh, the horror that this invokes...". You are not addressing "horror" directly or evocatively; it's not a name or a title. I get the same impression from the famous "Oh, the humanity" quote. By comparison, if we say "Oh, Brother" or "Oh, Lord", that would be more in an ...


3

"Order received" might be perceived as ambiguous, because it may not be clear whether it refers to the supplier receiving the order, or the customer receiving what he has ordered "Order is done" is similarly afflicted: does done refer to what the customer does, or the supplier? I would use Order placed. This is unambiguously something that the customer ...


3

Origin Gin made from grain and juniper berries, the fruit being plentiful and picked in London even today. I know of people who gather these wild fruits in order to make their own home-made gin, the recipe is very simple. Why is it called mother's ruin? Well, as mentioned by the OP it was a cheap means for forgetting your worries. And as we all know, ...


3

The semicolon strikes me as grammatically incorrect, but people like to do some strange things with semicolons around here, so who am I to say. However, your question seems moot since the "but not only" part is completely redundant and can be removed. Saying "Every possible accessory... including X" already implies that there are other things you're not ...


2

The first is right, the second sounds awkward. Formal, yes. Stylish, no. Pretty standard really, which is good, because you don't necessarily want to be fancy here. It's what you say next that will count. You could also say In conclusion or To conclude or As we have seen or As I have shown or In discussing these matters what has emerged is...


2

I found this version: Gin was called mother's ruin because in the mid eighteenth century the effects of gin on the family and economy were disastrous. Considered the poor man's drink due to its affordability, gin drinking had started out as medicine but due to its easy availability, men became impotent while women became sterile causing the London birth ...


2

"Back the right horse" might be the expression you're looking for. He backed the right horse with Mr. Koch. Of course, every investor wants to back the right horse -- but which assets to choose? Everyone wanted to back yhe right horse Also, consider "a cinch" and "a shoo-in." cinch: a person or thing certain to fulfill an expectation. ...


2

Gymnasium Wikipedia is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe and the CIS, comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and U.S. preparatory high schools. In its current meaning, it usually refers to secondary schools focused on preparing ...


2

You're not wrong, but "redundant" may be overstating in. Near synonyms perhaps. It is one of those double adjective structures so beloved of marketing people like new and improved. They want the rhythm of the phrase rather than the meaning. Etymologically, both words are French, where they are almost never used together in the way they are here. Fresh ...


2

Actually their use as synonyms appears to be still an issue: Usage Note: The distinction in meaning between healthy ("possessing good health") and healthful ("conducive to good health") was ascribed to the two terms only as late as the 1880s. This distinction, though tenaciously supported by some critics, is belied by citational evidence—healthy has been ...


2

There is no article in "Oh Lord!" "Oh Lord!" is what's called vocative and it should probably be spelled as O not Oh ("O Lord!"). When used in the phrase "oh, the horror!" it's an interjection. Note that there's a comma of difference too: it's not "Oh, Lord!" and not "oh the horror!"


1

The term game in hand is used in sport to indicate when a team has played fewer matches than other teams around them. This term is used to indicate that, whilst a team is in a particular position in a league, because they have played fewer matches than other teams around them they could potentially improve their position depending on the results in the ...


1

I think they are much the same, I prefer 'used with permission' as well but crucially it is a legal term that should be provided by the agency you are seeking permission from. They will have their own standard regarding how you show that you have obtained permission so it would be quite correct to have ABC is a trademark of XYZ corp, used by permission ...


1

"Identity" here does not carry its common conversational English meaning of "selfhood." Instead, it means "sameness"; think of it as the noun form of the adjective "identical," as in "identical twins." This is a less common meaning in everyday speech but is reasonably common in technical or academic writing. In other words: the sentence could be rephrased ...


1

Be to be is a construction with various different meanings. (1) a command: Safety helmets are to be worn at all times. Safety helmets must be worn at all times. (2) 'are [here] [/ provided] for the purpose of': These cakes are [here] to be eaten. The reason these cakes have been put here is so that you can eat them. Please help ...


1

I can't find any authoritative tome to back me on this so what I'm going to say is just based on x decades of use of the language. I haven't heard the expression "to ride on a winning horse" though it could easily be a regional colloquialism somewhere. However I don't believe that it applies here anyway, nor would the similar "backing a winner". The ...


1

This is a metaphor. A more concrete metaphor would be: George is a big teddy bear. George is not literally a big teddy bear; he exhibits the qualities of a big teddy bear. In the same way: Baltimore is love means Baltimore exhibits the qualities of love. (Having lived in Baltimore, I can't say I agree with this metaphor, except in that it ...


1

No, you are not using it correctly. In the example sentence, "at once" and "both" serve the same function; having both of them in the same sentence is redundant and awkward. You can say, The good folk were both delighted and amazed which would be the more idiomatic way to put it in modern English. Or you could say The good folk were at once delighted ...


1

According to Wikipedia, double whammy can be applied to multiple things as well. An English expression meaning multiple (or a combination of) negative circumstances, events, or effects. Sometimes hyphenated. Though triple whammy is used in the sense you want also and Wiktionary has a definition: a threefold blow or setback (popularized in the ...


1

**strike or touch a chord (with somebody) means to say or do something that makes people feel sympathy or enthusiasm. eg. The speaker had obviously struck a chord with his audience.I've heard people saying: "He struck the wrong chord", maybe that's what your friend was referring to, but I don't really know if it's right.


1

This term may have originated from several places. First, the sport of baseball. The usage may have come from: "It's outta here!" that was used during the occurrence of a home-run. From this basis and with the help of the radio, this terminology might have caught on. Anything that seems out of the ordinary was deemed 'out of here' and when a tall tale or ...



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