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79

A common expression for this is to fall flat (from the "idioms" section of thefreedictionary.com): fall flat if an entertainment or a joke falls flat, people do not enjoy it and do not think it is funny Several attempts at humour during his speech fell flat. if an attempt to influence people's behaviour or opinions falls flat, it fails The ...


49

In American English, we would usually say "his joke flopped," or that "his joke was a flop." The noun "flop" is sometimes used informally to mean "a complete failure." A phrase similar to your Japanese idiom about the air freezing would be "(his joke was so bad), you could hear the crickets chirping." This is referring to the silence that follows a bad joke,...


42

"Beast" is a bit biblical, perhaps, but it is commonly understood to mean non-human animals. From Merriam-Webster: Beast: 1 a : a four-footed mammal as distinguished from a human being, a lower vertebrate, and an invertebrate b : a lower animal as distinguished from a human being More clarification from the Oxford English Dictionary follows. ...


38

So funny I forgot to laugh Definition: A phrase used to mock someone when they say a joke or something they think is absolutely hilarious Source: Urban Dictionary


38

Creature - an animal, as distinct from a human being. Creature - 1. an animal, especially a nonhuman:


32

"Wildlife" could be used to differentiate between humans and non-human animals, but will not account for any non-human domesticated animals like dogs, cats, birds, etc. From Merriam-Webster: living things and especially mammals, birds, and fishes that are neither human nor domesticated Another option could be "Fauna" which describes the animals common ...


23

The phrase lame joke is broadly used to describe (idiomatic) An attempt at humor which is perceived to have been used previously to the point of being cliche, or was never funny to begin with. You could use "His joke was lame", "His joke was not even funny" or "His joke was corny." [Wiktionary, Merriam-Webster Learner's Dicitionary]


20

In this instance you could say that the joke "went down like a lead balloon" or "missed the mark" (although the latter could imply that it was in poor taste as well as not being funny). It's worth noting that neither idiom is specific to jokes.


18

The following biblical passage uses language very similar to your own: the earth opened its mouth and swallowed them and their households, and all those associated with Korah, together with their possessions (Numbers 16:32) This passage should convince you that there is nothing wrong with plainly saying "the earth swallowed the people." You could also ...


18

Engulf is a good word for this. American Heritage: To swallow up or overwhelm by or as if by overflowing and enclosing: The spring tide engulfed the beach houses. More generally, a scene like that might be described as a cataclysm. something that causes great destruction, violence, etc. (from Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary)


13

The type of charity described in the original question occurs on a country-wide scale sometimes. Recently, an EU member donated a large shipment of medicines to our local General Hospital; however, when it came time to distribute them, it was realized they were already expired. There is a word to describe this type of donation of unwanted materials: they ...


11

A commonly used term is a groaner, from the reaction of people to the joke. groaner: a stale or corny joke, observation, or story. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/groaner


7

Informal forms of address: colloquial vocatives, faux intimates, hailnames What you’re talking about are informal forms of address, colloquial vocatives, faux intimates, or my favorite from William Safire, hailnames. They’re forms of direct address (hence vocatives) used in casual situations as a substitute for you or for the formal sir or ma’am (depending ...


6

salvage describes both the OP and the comment scenario. You rescued the sugar from waste, and extracted some residual utility if not your full value. Same with the evening duration with girlfriend or brother: you rescued it from waste, and extracted some residual utility if not your full value. Miriam-Webster salvage the act of saving something (such as ...


6

The only idiom that I can think of is One man's trash is another man's treasure which means: Prov. Something that one person considers worthless may be considered valuable by someone else. [McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs]


6

You can say it was a corny joke. Corny usually means "showing no new ideas or too often repeated", but I heard this phrase also referring to a joke simply not funny.


6

I've heard unfunny jokes referred to as: About as funny as cancer Obviously offensive, but it makes a joke out of the bad situation. I personally would be careful using this phrase around people that I'm not very friendly with.


5

The joke backfired. (i.e. to have an opposite and undesirable effect to what was intended).


4

The Latin 'fauna' is one option. 'Animals' does not include humans; 'animalistic' refers to behaviour that is sub-human in its character. 'Creatures' does however include humans as part of God's living Creation.


4

You could refer to a bad joke as a tumbleweed. This works better visually, where the joke would be told and then there would be a period of silence with a tumbleweed blowing past in the background.


3

Tumbleweed Usually signified by one of the silent audience making a hand-over-hand rolling motion, suggestive of the way tumbleweed rolls across a movie shot, with only the murmur of the wind on the soundtrack. See wikipedia


3

Voter's remorse would seem to be a straightforward parallel, and has a fair amount of usage. The political equivalent of buyer's remorse is voter's remorse. --The Atlantic 2007-04 http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/04/voters-remorse/305859/ Voters’ Remorse: Brits Regret Vote To Leave EU, Claim They Didn’t Know Their Votes Would Count; ...


3

As discussed and requested in the comments, you could say the joke "bombed" or "fell flat" (which has already been added as an answer). However, this is more in relation to how the joke is received, since the joke could indeed be funny on its own, but it "bombed" with the crowd it was delivered to. Or even the delivery itself of the joke "bombed". Another ...


3

The victims were violently devoured by the chasm.


2

The phrase like ᴠᴇʀʙing through molasses (AmE) or ... through treacle (BrE) is commonly employed to convey the idea of very slow progress. Typically, this is not due to active resistance, rather it is used reflectively, as a observation made in hindsight. The analogy is possible, as @HotLicks points out, due to the high viscosity of fluids like molasses, ...


2

"Auto parts" is the usual term in the US for parts anywhere on an automobile, but this includes parts of the body, wheels, transmission, etc. Engine parts would refer more unambiguously to parts of the engine, and the term is a perfectly normal usage that is readily understood. Note, however, that if you want to refer to a set of parts that does not ...


2

Busybody is a term you can use: a person who is too interested in the private lives of other people (M-W) Are You Like My Busybody Neighbor? also: Nosy Parker (n, Informal): a persistently nosy, prying person. (Dictionary.com)


2

There's a neologism, not in any dictionary, that's gaining traction and that is "freecycle". Rather than dispose of something unwanted, you freecycle it and someone who wants it takes it off your hands. It has, in large, been driven by the freecycle website. I have no affiliation with said website.


2

Sometimes we say we "heard crickets chirping" after a poor joke. This is also present in cartoons as a sound effect when a poor joke is told.



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