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39

I would go with disillusionment. A feeling of disappointment, akin to depression, arising from the realization that something is not what it was expected or believed to be, possibly accompanied by philosophical angst from having one's beliefs challenged. [Wiktionary] An example from vocabulary.com: Disillusionment is when the hard truth of ...


38

Bearing in mind your specific request for non-vulgar terms, and being concerned with my own health and safety, the most commonly used words I use to address my better half when she is in such a state would be honey dearest baby princess sweetheart buttercup pumpkin cupcake darling This is one of the rules to be found in the Handbook for ...


35

The woman is often referred to as "a new mother". P.S. I would be reluctant to advise that she be called a "postpartum mother" or a "postpartum woman" because there are bound to be readers who would take that phrase to mean "a woman with postpartum depression". Sometimes writing is much like defensive driving. The New Mother - Taking Care of Yourself ...


30

Abstainer, teetotaler, Puritan? An abstainer is literally one who abstains, typically from some passion or pleasure. The word teetotaler (nothing to do with "tea") comes from the Temperance Movement of the late 1800s, when people claimed to "t-t-totally abstain" from alcohol. Nowadays, we would say "totally with a capital T", but back then, you would ...


25

Puerperal - Relating to, connected with, or occurring during childbirth or the period immediately following childbirth. FED "Puerperal women are especially vulnerable to these effects because....." The link between depression and... A tumor of the kidney in a "puerperal woman" ...to report the experience of the nursing care provided to ''a ...


24

Intoxicate: to excite or please (someone) in a way that suggests the effect of alcohol or a drug. I was intoxicated by the intoxicating aroma coming from the kitchen


22

In addition to "sheltered", the word cloistered describes the condition of being cut off from the outside world. cloistered adjective 1. secluded from the world; sheltered: "a cloistered life." (from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/cloistered) In addition to separation from outside, natural elements (weather, landscapes, etc.), it can ...


20

"Grumpy." I do not ever call my wife a bitch, or even say that the is acting like one. I would definitely not call her bitchy. I might, while using one of oerkelens' terms of endearment, tell her, "You seem grumpy." If that does not express the idea accurately, I might say "especially grumpy."


19

If you wanted a slightly humorous answer you could make use of "buzzkill" Noun: (slang) someone or something that stops people from enjoying themselves However a suitable adjective might be "straitlaced" excessively strict in conduct or morality; puritanical; prudish:


18

"Ramping up" is a driving metaphor for getting up to speed, getting past the initial learning stages, with a task. It is good for a team or new employee. It isn't perfect for a meeting, but has some flavor that might be useful.


18

I would call them continuity announcers


15

Buyer's Remorse is the sense of regret after having made a purchase. "[The] Bears may suffer 'buyer's remorse' over Cutler, but real leaders admit it" -Phil Rosenthal, Chicago Tribune See also, Caveat emptor; Buyer Beware. Even if it was the trip of a lifetime, you'd be lucky (though, irresponsible) to not feel a tinge of remorse at having spent ...


14

The Australian English term for someone like this is: wowser. In Australian English this is a very insulting term and should be used carefully. Addition: here's the pronunciation. The BrE version is pretty close to Australian English.


14

I'm not sure if this is in dictionaries (so it might be considered slangy) but it is a term most American-English speakers will be familiar with and means exactly what you're asking for: straightedge (adj)


12

Hormonal You seem a little hormonal this week, why don't you pour a glass of red and run a bath. You convey that your partner is 'acting up' but acknowledging it is neither persons fault - biology is biology after all and can't be helped.


12

out-of-sorts is both accurate and not gender-specific. I think what gets up my nose the most is the assumption that my mood must necessarily mirror my hormone levels. Most times my mood is proportional to the amount of assitude in the air. ;)


12

Performance anxiety might work. Definition here: http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/performance+anxiety I know you disqualified "stage fright" because it relates to anxiety, but is the effect not anxiety-driven? I do seem to remember some research about both typing speed/accuracy and shoe-tying speed when being watched. I have failed to ...


12

Is island fever the phrase you are looking for? Defined as the feeling that one is stuck on an island, and doesn’t have the freedom to just go somewhere and drive for a few hours to ‘get away’. Island fever usually hits first timers that moved to the islands after six months or a year. The sudden realization that – this is all there is. Sure Hawaii is ...


11


11

I’d call this period at the start of a meeting settling time or settling-in time. This time is characterized by people entering the room, finding seats, positioning/connecting devices, arranging papers, etc. I would describe this as “getting settled in”. After this intermission, you might hear someone say “OK, everyone settled? Let’s begin.”


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10

In the US, at least, by far the most common metaphor used for "an entry point to a life of crime" is "gateway". We see this, for example, in "gateway drug": This is a study of the occurrence and timing of young people’s first use of various types of illicit drug and their first experience of various types of offending, including truancy. Its aim is to ...


10

Bewitched or any of its many near synonyms seems appropriate: To place under one's power by or as if by magic; cast a spell over. - TFD captivated, entranced, enthralled, mesmerized, transfixed, etc. Rudd brands, arrived at Anchor in 2011 and was immediately mesmerized by the aroma of hops permeating the brewery and distillery. - Weekly Pint


9

He might be called a square but this word is not specifically about substance use but rather refers to someone with a normative or conservative way of thinking. In the 40s, someone who didn't appreciate jazz was called a square. In the 60s, there were the hippies, and most everyone else was a bunch of squares. I don't think it is commonly used anymore ...


8

I wonder if the OP wanted a word to describe this female partner, rather than a term of endearment to placate them? I think a great word to describe somebody who is being unreasonable because of the way they are feeling is "Prickly." Google defines prickly as "ready to take offence" which seems to fit quite well.


8

This isn't menstruation specific or even gender specific, but the term we use is either "cranky" or the slightly more humorous "cranky-pants". It's a non-inflammatory way of either asking or stating that there's something bothering you/them which isn't related to the other party and allows for comedic exchanges. "I think you really need to change your ...


8

I come from a technology field so perhaps this is somewhat specific to that but I have heard the period of time from when something starts until it is somehow useful of functioning described as the: spin up time I probably would not use this term in a serious report but in casual conversation I would be surprised if people didn't know what you meant in ...


8

I would use drawn (by or to), especially for the aroma of food or drink. It is also a good fit for the pictures that you provided. In the cartoons, the characters are physically drawn to the aroma and it is a depiction of this figurative speech. Entering the market you are immediately drawn by the aroma of freshly baked apple cider donuts coming from the ...


8

Gender neutrality is fine, I even like it. But sometimes it is carried so far, it's burdensome. I am a member of mankind. That doesn't bother me on a gender level. It is no more charged for me than humankind. I may well not represent the majority here. If you're going to talk about a poor man's oyster, I'd much rather you kept the word man in there. If ...


8

"Disenchanted" is another one. It strikes me as somewhat less deep and abiding than "disillusioned", and may be a good fit for the OP's examples.



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