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84

You may be thinking of the word interregnum, but unless there is no clear line of succession, or there is disputed succession, it does not apply when a monarch dies. Certainly not in an established monarchy like the British one, and probably not in most others either. You have perhaps heard the expression "the king is dead, long live the king"? It's not ...


60

The definition of the word "cruise" is as follows: Sail about in an area without a precise destination, especially for pleasure. (Oxford) Although that pertains more to sailboats, I do believe it can also be used for land vehicles as well. You can say that you were "cruising around town," as an example.


35

According to Merriam-Webster: implicate: (3a) to bring into intimate or incriminating connection evidence that implicates him in the bombing So I would write this: Lucy realized she found the proof that implicated Robert in the murders. You can omit "in the murders" if it is implied by context.


34

A no-nonsense person just gets it done.


30

There is the idiom of a diamond in the rough: someone or something whose good qualities are hidden This film is one of those diamonds in the rough, a wonderful gem that almost no one has noticed. Etymology: based on the idea that you cannot see the beauty of a diamond (jewel) when it is rough (not yet cut and filled with brightness) The ...


28

industrious could work From Merriam Webster: constantly, regularly, or habitually active or occupied : diligent e.g. an industrious worker


27

"One-off" is, as you say, slightly British. "Stand-alone" is frequently used in Britain and North America. "One-shot" is also used for comics.


26

I would use the idiom cuts both ways. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/cut+both+ways cut both ways to affect both sides of an issue equally.


23

It seems you are looking for existence. If you want to emphasize the fact that "just being extant" is in and of itself a main reason for its influence, you could use its mere existence or something of the kind.


22

You could call this a double-edged sword. It can be used both for good and bad.


19

A publication that is not serial is a one-time publication. This usage beats out stand-alone even in Ngram’s American corpus. It is official terminology for Canada Post, though lumped together for postal purposes with annual publication. The term is also sometimes used in a slightly different sense, though, associated with the granting or selling of ...


19

A lily among thorns. Something positive that stands out from the negative {snakeeyedbarbie at Yahoo! Answers} As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters Song of Solomon 2:2; KJV


16

They would be committing a "tu quoque" logical fallacy, where they do not deny guilt, but attempt to mitigate criticism by pointing out that the accuser is also guilty. Tu quoque (/tuːˈkwoʊkwiː/; Latin for "you, too" or "you, also") or the appeal to hypocrisy is an informal logical fallacy that intends to discredit the validity of the opponent's logical ...


16

You may like busy bee Noun 1. busy bee - an alert and energetic person synonyms: eager beaver, ... doer, actor, worker a person who acts and gets things done ... a zealously energetic person (especially a salesman) Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc. Another informal term is a grafter.


15

Excursion applies to a brief pleasure trip, usually no more than a day in length. It is the preferred term esp. in railroad and steamship use. An excursion is taken more for pleasure than for practical reasons. Jaunt carries a stronger implication of casualness and informality and is esp. applicable to short trip away from one's home, usually ...


15

This person is diligent. From the OED: Having or showing care and conscientiousness in one’s work or duties.


14

I think you are referring to the choice between the: lesser of two evils: the less bad thing of a pair of bad things. I didn't like either politician, so I voted for the lesser of two evils. Given the options of going out with someone I don't like and staying home and watching a boring television program, I chose the lesser of the two ...


14

Lucy realized she finally had enough evidence to indict Robert on the charge of murder. Indict in·dict /inˈdīt/ verb, North American –Google past tense: indicted; past participle: indicted formally accuse of or charge with a serious crime. Because of double jeopardy, one had best be sure you have all your ducks in a row before you indict a ...


13

A conscientious person would feel guilty if he/she didn't repay a small debt or favour through forgetfulness. (vocabulary.com) very careful about doing what you are supposed to do : concerned with doing something correctly (MW)


13

I agree that the verb convict pretty much means found someone is guilty of a crime. The proving part is the prosecution process itself. If you are looking for a more direct way to apply the proof in your sample sentence, I would use committed: Lucy realized she had proof that Robert committed the murders.


12

interregnum noun: 1: the time during which a throne is vacant between two successive reigns or regimes 2: a period during which the normal functions of government or control are suspended (Merriam-Webster online)


12

"between the devil and the deep blue sea" means between two dangers and by avoiding one there's danger of falling into another. from Wikipedia - "Between the devil and the deep blue sea" is an idiom meaning a dilemma—i.e., to choose between two undesirable situations (equivalent to "between a rock and a hard place"). from TFD - if you are between ...


12

You already have the most common phrase: the evidence to prove [ or that would prove] Robert guilty. If the word proof is important, simply the proof that Robert was guilty would work well.


11

scrupulous - having scruples, or moral or ethical standards; having or showing a strict regard for what one considers right; principled (dictionary.reference.com/) In some contexts, scrupulous can have significantly positive or negative connotations, but scrupulous about repaying debts, for example, can be simply a "value-neutral" description of how someone ...


11

Something that would fit that sentence, and your probable meaning since "extant has the connotation not only of 'existing' but more specifically 'still existing'; i.e. it suggests that something has survived over time", is longevity: long existence or service Although many similar works were written, none of the others have survived. Its longevity ...


11

Persistence? The fact of continuing in an opinion or course of action in spite of difficulty or opposition. The continued or prolonged existence of something. Oxford Dictionaries http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/persistence


10

"go for a hoon (in the car)" works in New Zealand english.


10

change the subject This is indeed an idiom in its own right. e.g. I can't get any straight answers from you if you keep changing the subject.


9

More poetically, there's "between Scylla and Charybdis". This is a reference to a passage in The Odyssey in which the ship had to traverse a narrow strait between a whirlpool and the lair of a monster. See the Wikipedia article.


9

A person who does not utilize the talent/brains/charm they are perceived to have (by others) - whether due to insecurity, or other neuroses - is usually referred to as an "underachiever".



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