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14

I'd say you're talking about a Ulysses Pact: a freely made decision that is designed and intended to bind oneself in the future. The term is used in medicine, especially in reference to advance directives (also known as living wills), where there is some controversy over whether a decision made by a person in one state of health should be considered binding ...


4

The phenomenon and label of the change is one thing, and the result is labeled another thing. In the specific community (of aviation; I don't think I've heard this at all before so I'm assuming it is limited to here), it is simply a change in syntax accompanied by semantic drift. The result, where a passive form is interpreted actively, is called a ...


3

Consider leech: a person who clings to another for personal gain, especially without giving anything in return, and usually with the implication or effect of exhausting the other's resources; parasite. Or(e) colloquially, gold-digger: a woman who associates with or marries a man chiefly for material gain. [Merriam-Webster]


3

Consider embodiment someone or something that is a perfect representative or example of a quality, idea, etc. "She's the embodiment of all our hopes." "He's the embodiment of everything said in that book" "men who greatly embodied the idealism of American life" — A. M. Schlesinger b1917 Such a person can be called an embodier.


3

It’s an example of zero derivation. This means deriving a new word from another word while bypassing the usual derivation rule that involves adding a prefix or suffix such as ‑ify or ‑ize. To illustrate zero derivation, here is an example from the exploding penguin sketch: (1) Oh, intercourse the penguin. [Emphasis added] Monty Python derive ...


2

Consider, Indian taking Indian taker Informal. Offensive A person who steals your property but returns the stolen property to you at a later date. The car thief stole my car but was nice enough to return it the next day. What an Indian taker piece of shit. Urban Dictionary Indian giver One who takes or demands back one's gift to ...


2

This is called verbing; see extended description at the link or in other answers. Here's the obligatory/famous Calvin & Hobbes on the subject:


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Irrevocable, as in "irrevocable directive" or "irrevocable order". For example from Grass Roots by Stuart Woods "I'm going to give you an irrevocable order.” “I would never allow anyone to revoke your orders, sir.” “I mean irrevocable, even by me. If I should weaken, you must be strong and carry out this assignment, regardless of anything ...


2

Leave no stone unturned Fig. to search in all possible places. (As if one might search under every rock.) "Don't worry. We'll find your stolen car. We'll leave no stone unturned." "In searching for a nice place to live, we left no stone unturned." to do everything possible in order to achieve or find something. "Both sides have vowed ...


2

The dualistic voices that command me. One asks me to do ill the other good.


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This common visual trope depicts the conscience: An inner feeling or voice viewed as acting as a guide to the rightness or wrongness of one’s behavior.


1

In British English, a crazy (or extremely foolish) person can be called bonkers, but if that person is particularly "loony" and should be locked up (in a figurative sense) then they are stark raving bonkers. Any parent that calls their baby Lucifer is not just bonkers, they're stark raving bonkers. bonkers [PREDICATIVE] informal, chiefly British ...


1

Discombobulate To throw into a state of confusion. Quote from Sherlock Holmes(film): Sherlock Holmes: [voice-over] This mustn't register on an emotional level... [in slow motion] Sherlock Holmes: First, distract target... [Holmes flicks a handerchief in front of his opponent's face] Sherlock Holmes: Then block his blind jab, ...


1

Consider, put one off [one's] stride Also, put one off one's stroke (chiefly BrEng) Interfere with one's progress, distract or disturb one, as in The interruption put her off her stride for a moment, and she took several seconds to resume her train of thought, or The noise of the airplanes overhead put her off her stroke, and she missed the ...


1

Another possibility (not specific to sport) is: ready for every contingency. A "contingency" is a possible but not very likely future event or condition;an eventuality; a future emergency that must be prepared for. Example: The United States is ready to deal with any contingencies in North Korea, a White House spokesman said on Thursday, dismissing ...


1

I don’t know if the origin of the similar expression: “cover all {the} angles” (from ‘WordReference[dot]com) is related to sports, but as used in the following excerpt from page 17 of Teach'n Beginning Defensive Field Hockey Drills, Plays, and Games Free Flow Handbook by Bob Swope (via ‘Google Book’), it does seem to be relevant to at least hockey (and ...


1

Not specifically related to sports, but consider leave no loose ends untied and dot the i's and cross the t's dot the i's and cross the t's (idiomatic) To take care of every detail, even minor ones; To be meticulous or thorough. Before taking the project to the CEO, let's make sure we dot the i's and cross the t's. Wiktionary


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For Holistic, You can refer http://www.yourdictionary.com/holistic Holistic means treating things as a whole (incorporating many or integrating across) Integrated approach may be used...


1

Perhaps aloofness Dissociation from one's surroundings or worldly affairs fits the sense of the question but does not fill-in-the-blank in your sentence. To say that someone is aloof is neutral by definition. "[The phrase to be seeked, that can encompass every (English) word that has the same nature as the words and phrases in the title ] often do ...


1

You're putting safeguards in place safeguard noun something that serves as a protection or defense or that ensures safety. Random House That is why it is necessary to put in safeguards to ensure that the development guidelines are respected by all governments. Reverso


1

When a person is establishing such safeguards, you may say (in a quite formal manner) that: He is setting up provisional self-protection measures.


1

"I am binding myself to study all day." The origin of this phrase is probably related to the story of Ulysses/Odysseus and the Sirens, as related in JHCL's answer. The phrase "I am binding myself to the mast" makes that connection explicit. But the simple version of the phrase (with no mention of masts) is more general and requires no background knowledge ...


1

IRREVOCABLE -- I'm even surprised this discussion is going on at such length. The answer here seems clear. In many countries there is a legal instrument called an IRREVOCABLE POWER OF ATTORNEY often given, say, by a property owner to a trusted family member when the owner has to travel afar before consummation of a sale. The ...


1

I might use the phrase "self binding," but Wikipedia (quoted above) uses "Ulysses Pact" or "advance directive." I've also heard "burning your ships" as a common figurative phrase referring to Captain Hernán Cortés who scuttled his ships when landing in Mexico to ensure that they could not turn back. This is a little different than "burning one's bridges" ...


1

chaperone (noun) : an older person who accompanies young people at a social gathering to ensure proper behavior; broadly : one delegated to ensure proper behavior (transitive verb): 1 escort 2 to act as chaperone to or for (intransitive verb): to act as a chaperone Chaperone can be used as a noun or verb. You could say, "he's a chaperone", or ...


1

Something cool here could be: "When I want your opinion, I'll tell it to you." - Indicating the speaker has power over the one they are talking too, doesn't care what they think, and he/she has spoken out of turn. Sometimes "I'll tell it to you." can be replaced with "I'll beat it out of you.", when the speaker is more violent. "Know your role, and shut ...


1

Another idea is "swimming through porridge"


1

Someone who is excited or surprised by the mundane is said to be easily impressed.


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excitable; [over-excitable] responding rather too readily to something new or stimulating; too easily excited. –Google Imaginational Over-Excitability: (one of the five descriptors for "OE") Imaginational OE [IMOE]: “As the Imaginational OE reflects a heightened play of the imagination with rich association of images and impressions, frequent use ...


1

May the fleas of a hundred thousand camels infest every orifice of your body...I don't know if it is Arabic or Persian.I am sure both would would approve nonetheless. A guy from Lebanon said it to me years ago.



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