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18

I came across the phrase bargain-basement while researching for an appropriate answer. (adj.) markedly inexpensive (bargain–basement rates) [Merriam Webster] From The 8 Steps: Your Business or Your Life - Getting All You Want Out of BOTH:: By David Shepherd, customers can be broadly classified into 4 groups (The Harvard Model): Thus, I feel ...


15

There is a word miscegenate, from the Greek for "mixed race" (misce-, -genus) which would provide a clue. The Greek for other is allos, which provides prefixes allo- (as in allophone) and the Latin al- (as in alibi). So a word one could coin is allogenate or possibly allogenous or allogeneous. In fact, allogenous is mapped on to allogeneous in OED: ...


14

I just came across the answer to my own question while searching the Net. high-end clientele is to low-end clientele as carriage trade is to coach trade. The railroad recognizes that the change in dining car patronage from the carriage trade to the coach trade necessarily shifts the emphasis from high-priced meals to lower-priced dishes Railway Age - ...


11

I would suggest mass market. According to Wikipedia: The mass market is the largest group of end consumers for a specified product. It is the opposite of the term niche market. The carriage trade is a niche market, but obviously there are other niche markets, so if you want a term to use in isolation (i.e. not mentioning carriage trade) then it ...


8

The term budget is used to refer to customers who generally have a limited and predetermied amount of money to spend. Without referring to low-social classes, I'd say that "budget customers" are those that may convey the idea of low, careful and restricted spending, just opposite to what the big spenders, like the "carriage trade", convey. Budget: ...


7

I don't think there is an appropriate one-word adjective to use in your sentences. You could consider using racially different to mean that they are of different race. The Racially Different Psychiatrist—Implications for Psychotherapy The race of the therapist can play a significant role in the manifestation of transference and ...


6

It's not an exact match, but you could consider using "Trade (business) with bargain hunters." A bargain hunter means: a ​person who looks for a ​place to ​buy something at a ​price that is ​cheaper than usual. [Cambridge Dictionaries Online]


5

I'd probably go with "eat shit and die" (Urban Dictionary) since it covers atonement and belittlement first before telling them to die.


4

"Die in a fire" does convey much of the meaning you are describing with your Persian curse. However, as far as I'm aware, it's a fairly new phrase. So it will be understood literally, rather than as a general phrase, especially if you're talking to older people. Of note, many people have very different thresholds for what is considered "extreme". A number ...


4

animated full of movement and activity or (although it's not as broadly usable as animated) gesticulator one who gesticulates, where gesticulate means To say or express by gestures.


3

I think you can describe it as a semi-automated process: partially automated. (Dictionary.com)


3

These images are one type of meme aka Internet meme EDIT: perhaps as mentioned in Tim Ward's comment that is not specific enough as not limited to 'quotation images' Anyway quoting http://www.macmillandictionary.com/buzzword/entries/meme.html noun [countable] a concept or idea that spreads very quickly via the Internet ... a piece of ...


3

The first picture is an example of a inspirational quote. It fits in the broader category of motivational posters. The second picture is an example of an Internet meme (a portmanteau of "mime" and "gene", coined by Richard Dawkins). Specifically, a meme that involves an animal is sometimes called an advice animal.


2

What about "bereft", as in, "bereft of his watch, his wrist felt naked"?


2

Commonplace clips perhaps. By sharing the ones we like on Facebook and such we are, effectively, making collections of 'commonplaces' (striking or notable passages, noted, for reference or use, in a book of common places, OED) for ourselves and our friends. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonplace_book


2

You could consider using "what happened here / what happened between us stays between us (you and me)". There are many similar idioms like "what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas", "what happens on the road stays on the road" or "what happens on tour, stays on tour" which all mean: In essence, the phrase means that all exploits during the tour must be ...


2

I think they are generally referred to as service spaces: Service spaces are those used for galleys, pantries containing cooking appliances, lockers and store-rooms, workshops other than those forming part of the machinery spaces, and similar spaces and trunks to such spaces. (www.iadclexicon.org)


1

I'd suggest, wait station (area) The wait station is the area that holds supplies for your servers. The Everything Guide to Starting and Running a Restaurant sidestation (area) might also fit the bill. Bussers are typically expected to stock the sidestation and restock it as needed throughout the meal F&B: Bussers - Who Needs 'Em? ...


1

"Don't be a tattle-tale" is another phrase often used in this connection.


1

Trying to find an expression/idiom to match these two phrases about providing bad solutions? So say I'm looking for an opportunity (say a job) and a friend of mine gives me an option; but their offer is horrible(say working for less than minimum wage, 80+hour weeks, no vacation, doesn't use my degree; etc.) What is a phrase or idiom for what they are ...


1

A rat (aside from being a disease infected large mouse-like animal) is someone who tells other people about the misdeeds of someone else. Thus there is the expression: No one likes a rat Which basically means: Don't tell people about the misdeeds of others. No one will like you if you do.


1

There is a popular (and vulgar) slang in English - cover one' ass (Also, cover one's hide or oneself) Make excuses or otherwise take action to avoid being blamed, punished, or harmed. [The Free Dictionary] So the conversation in English would be something like: A (after breaking B's vase in presence of C): C, you did not see anything! Cover my ...


1

"Damn you, you deluder! You said you were gonna buy me KFC! Instead... A deluder is someone who deceives thoroughly. Not specific for "false hopes", it often conveys that meaning, though. delude - to mislead the mind or judgment 0f, deceive ("delude" implies deceiving so thoroughly as to obscure the truth. e.g. "we were deluded into thinking we ...


1

Commenting to the attempt to coin (or perhaps resurrect) the terms "allogenate(n.) or possibly allogenous(adj.) or allogeneous(adj.)". In the medical field the word "allogeneic" (or allogenic") is standard terminology for biological material coming from a person who is not genetically identical to the recipient. The antonyms in either direction are ...


1

It's not modern English, but if you're feeling decidedly overdramatic, the classic Shakespearean insult Infirm of Purpose is the only thing that sprung to mind for me. This expression comes from Shakespeare's play "Macbeth" in which the evil Lady Macbeth uses it to chastise her husband for feeling remorse over killing the King, paralleling your first ...


1

Someone who is obsessed with video games is “an obsessive gamer.” The age or gender of the subject is irrelevant. Anyone can be obsessed with video games.


1

You could say, items include but are not limited to [list]. Or, at some point before or after the list, you could simply say, this list is not comprehensive. EDIT: I realise that I haven't really answered your question, sorry! I think the phrase this list is short of being exhaustive conveys that almost all the items are included, or at least ...


1

I like “die in a fire”, but “I hope you die in a fire” isn't something I'd say to my sister, if I wanted to stay on speaking terms with her. I'm much more likely to use that in an anonymous situation, like “I hope whoever [did X bad thing] dies in a fire” or “Whoever came up with [X bad idea or policy] can die in a fire.” “Go to hell” (or “you can go to ...


1

It seems the phrase is more frequently intended to convey the target's uselessness or laziness rather than a desire for their literal death (though I see in #3 that it is more literal there), if I interpret it correctly. For #1 and #2, my response might be "Seriously?! Useless!" "Seriously?!" implying a great disbelief in such obvious stupidity or ...


1

Soil could allude to faeces, such as "to soil oneself". So this could possibly equate to "shithead" as in "You total shithead!"



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