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70

If you want to put a positive spin on it without straying too far from the sound, try rep-hound. From hound n 1.1 [with modifier] A person who avidly pursues something: 'he has a reputation as a publicity hound' (see Oxford Dictionaries: hound)


58

Why not rep-junkie. Oxford Online defines junkie as [WITH MODIFIER] A person with a compulsive habit or obsessive dependency on something: power junkies A Google search shows some minimal usage (sometimes as repjunkie), but ngram does not. Obviously, you could use the longer form reputation junkie, but it lacks the punch.


58

The term rep-farmer is also used. Discussed here http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/126987/what-is-rep-farming


29

We refer to that salesman as a hawker: A person who travels about selling goods, typically advertising them by shouting: I have always carried the word picture of a hawker swooping down to seize his customer with that shrill falcon scream, but the two hawks are homophones from different semantic roots: hawk (n.) c.1300, hauk, earlier havek ...


27

I too find that phrase a bit offensive, so I often opt for rep-monger monger 2 : a person who attempts to stir up or spread something that is usually petty or discreditable —usually used in combination I've also see whoremonger (for promiscuous men) and deathmonger (common in Sci-Fi and Fantasy genres). I prefer rep-monger as two words because I ...


22

One phrase: The power behind the throne. Another: éminence grise, which though French is used in English. From Wikipedia: An éminence grise (French for "grey eminence") is a powerful decision-maker or advisor who operates "behind the scenes" or in a non-public or unofficial capacity. This phrase originally referred to François Leclerc du ...


21

Many tourist guidebooks will warn you against the tout [all dictionary definitions below are from AHD]: tout, n. 1. One who solicits customers brazenly or persistently: "The administration of the nation's literary affairs falls naturally into the hands of touts and thieves" (Lewis H. Lapham). A British tourist who was murdered … was seen ...


16

The simplest and least pejorative terms would simply be occupied or minded. These remove the implication that the person being discussed is doing something improper through their efforts, which isn't always the case. He's extremely rep-minded, he always puts a lot of time and thought into his posts She's fairly rep-oriented, she doesn't answer ...


15

Use a sledgehammer to crack a nut. to do something with more force than is necessary to achieve the result you want When he sent ten men to arrest one small boy, he clearly used a sledgehammer to crack a nut. Better yet: Use a sledgehammer to swat a fly! idioms.thefreedictionary.com


12

The quintessential exclamation from the person receiving this sort of "help" would be: With friends like these, who needs enemies? It's also possible that you'd find that The cure is worse than the disease In that accepting their assistance is worse than just living with your original situation. You might also say that I can't afford any ...


12

Concept As in Concept Car or "This energy neutral house was built from natural materials as a concept." Companies often build such "concept products" as a marketing excercise and many are very well engineered, though not economically viable and the company has no intention of selling it, at least not in the immediate future. If they built it with the ...


11

Cuckquean is the word you need, a female cuckold (cuckold being the more common word for wittol). Cuckquean refers to a woman with an adulterous husband. In modern English it generally refers to the sexual fetish in which sexual gratification is gained from maintenance or observation of sexual relations by a man with a woman or a number of women besides ...


11

An English idiom which has the derogatory, perjorative connotations you describe is "out of his depth". Quoting from Dictionary.com: out of (or beyond) one's depth: in water deeper than one's height or too deep for one's safety. beyond one's knowledge or capability The image it conjures in my mind is a swimmer who has strayed too far ...


10

As Frank commented on Robusto's answer, the most common abbreviation for this I'd expect would be TBC (to be confirmed). You can use TBA in a slightly different context. I'd find it plausible to see, for example: Lecture A1. Topic: Frogs. Location: Lecture Hall X Lecture A2. Topic: Fish. Location: Lecture Hall Y (TBC) Lecture A3. Topic: Flies. ...


10

Hustler - hus·tle (hŭs′əl) v. hus·tled, hus·tling, hus·tles v.intr. 1. To move or act energetically and rapidly: We hustled to get dinner ready on time. 2. To push or force one's way. 3. To act aggressively, especially in business dealings. It obviously has additional meanings, but it fits and its more colloquial than other suggestions I ...


9

A suitable word for your brief introduction is preamble. It's not as formal as preface, and can be as short as a sentence (which would be unusual for a preface). Preamble can be countable or a mass noun, as Oxford Dictionaries shows: A preliminary or preparatory statement; an introduction: he could tell that what she said was by way of a preamble ...


9

Rep-reaper. As in "reaping (un)deserved fruits of (others) labour". However, I would like to point out that Political Correctness is not something that should ever be used when talking about descriptive terms. I would even say it does not have any place in communication. To communicate an idea requires objective precision - not subjective correctness. PC ...


8

There's an English proverb that goes: The road to hell is paved with good intentions. It's pretty broad in its scope of application, but it would certainly apply here. There's another saying that might fit this situation: No good deed goes unpunished.


8

Usually a parenthetical TBD (to be discussed or to be determined) or TBA (to be announced) would suffice. edit I'm including @Frank's "TBC" even though I've seldom seen it. This answer should probably encompass all the TB* variations. No doubt there are others as well.


8

I'm not sure if it needs padding out as a simile or can be used just as 'It's a Betamax'. From Wikipedia: Betamax Developed by Sony Home movies, Home video Betamax (also called Beta, and referred to as such in the logo) is a consumer-level analog videocassette magnetic tape recording format developed by Sony, released in Japan on May 10, ...


8

I most often hear this called winging it, meaning plunging into a conversation or task without adequate preparation or knowledge. From Etymonline: Verbal phrase wing it (1885) is said to be from a theatrical slang sense of an actor learning his lines in the wings before going onstage, or else not learning them at all and being fed by a prompter in the ...


7

Heavy-handed? http://www.usingenglish.com/reference/idioms/heavy-handed.html If someone is heavy-handed, they are insensitive and use excessive force or authority when dealing with a problem. In other words, I love the Chinese idiom with a similar meaning: 用高射炮打蚊子(literally: to shoot a mosquito with an anti-aircraft gun)


7

There's a whole range of answers concocted in a veritable arms race: That's like using a hammer to kill a ladybug That's like using a sledgehammer to kill a fly That's like using a pistol to kill a cockroach That's like using a shotgun to kill a mosquito! That's like using a bazooka to kill a flea. That's like using a cannon to kill a mosquito ...


7

A spouse of either sex willing to tolerate infidelity might be called complaisant:- complaisant - showing a cheerful willingness to do favors for others; "to close one's eyes like a complaisant husband whose wife has taken a lover"; [The Free Dictionary]


7

Descriptively wittol is currently attached to men who know their wives are unfaithful. Prescriptively, it seems like a prime candidate for gender neutrality. Being formed from the root wit and the pejorative suffix -ault, there is no natural gender: (n.) "compliant cuckold," late 15c., witewold, probably from witen "to know" (see wit (v.)) + ending ...


7

I would suggest rep-chaser, parallel to phrases such as paper-chaser (someone will stop at almost nothing for money) or celebrity-chaser (someone similarly obsessed with celebrities).


7

A huckster: One who uses aggressive, showy, and sometimes devious methods to promote or sell a product. (TFD)


6

I would have said that the link was an onomatopoeic one. It is based entirely on the closeness of sound, as opposed to meaning. Onomatopoeia is defined as 'the formation of a word from a sound associated with what it is named'. Usually that 'sound' is a natural sound e.g. cuckoo or sizzle. But I see no reason why it shouldn't be another word, especially ...


6

PETULANT adjective: petulant (of a person or their manner) childishly sulky or bad-tempered. "he was moody and petulant" Synonyms: peevish, bad-tempered, querulous, pettish, fretful, cross, irritable, sulky, snappish From Google.com SULKING verb: Sulk; 3rd person present: sulks; past tense: sulked; past participle: sulked; gerund ...


6

Well, let's see... A demagogue appeals to the "popular" will, and will tend to tell people what s?he thinks they want to hear. Think polling. An opportunist will do whatever it takes to advance his/her own position. A sellout is bought and paid for by a greater power. In the case of a politician, the power is typically economic. Think lobbies. Note that ...



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