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26

It’s a pier or a dock or a wharf. From Wikipedia: In American English, a dock is technically synonymous with pier or wharf—any human-made structure in the water intended for people to be on. The structure shown is clearly a human-made structure in the water intended for people to be on. Therefore, it is a dock in American English. Whether it is also ...


22

This is known as seeing someone to < somewhere > The host saw his guest to the door His friend saw him to the airport. to see out : 1. To escort some visitor to an exit. The butler saw out the visitors. Will you please see Dr. Smith out? 1 If the seeing out was exceptional you can add in all the way to: He saw his friend all the way ...


19

While it was very common to hear "doggie bag" years ago, the expression has become pretty rare in the last few decades. Unless there is an actual steak bone left on your plate, most people will say, "Can I please get this 'to-go'?" (US)


16

(US English speaker) I would use it informally to refer to the practice, but not when addressing the wait service. The way I would ask this question is "Can I get a box for this?" or simply "I'd like to take this home."


16

Doggie bag is an American expression and custom. Though it is a a regular practice in US, at an informal level, it might appear unusual in other countries to ask to take home your lunch or dinner leftovers. From my personal experience I have never seen it in the U.K., while I have often seen it and done myself in the U.S. A box for this (the food) please is ...


15

One word is jetty. A landing stage or small pier at which boats can dock or be moored: Ben jumped ashore and tied the rowboat up to the small wooden jetty [ODO] It appears that this is a British-English usage of the word and American English uses different words for various marine structures — or uses the same words in different ways. ...


15

I suggest this old saying by Tucker Max "How were you supposed to know he would stoop so low? After all, the devil....... Tucker Max - an American author and public speaker.


14

see someone off Accompany a person who is leaving to their point of departure: they came to the station to see him off [OD]


13

You could call it a barbed joke. From Reverso Dictionary: A barbed remark or joke seems polite or humorous, but contains a cleverly hidden criticism.


13

If they are reading and commenting about it after the fact, I’d call them “Monday-morning quarterbacks.” If the event is still occurring and they don’t have the skills, means, and/or opportunity to do anything except comment or complain, I’d call them “Armchair quarterbacks/generals" or perhaps even “kibitzers.” Finally, if it’s still occurring and they do ...


12

As a noun, you can consider trifle. A trifle is something that's totally unimportant. If your friend is freaking out over which shoes to buy and you call her dilemma a trifle, you're saying she shouldn't get so worked up over nothing. [vocabulary.com] or fuss. an expression of anger or complaint especially about something that has little importance ...


10

I'd usually refer to them as a "pontoon". Jetty, dock, quay and pier all tend to be non floating. The OP's original picture is a device that floats with the tide but is kept in place by the upright poles so the boats are always at the same level as the "artifical ground level" created by pontoon. The floats under the decking are often referred to as ...


10

It certainly couldn't be as simple as irony: The use of irony in literature refers to playing around with words such that the meaning implied by a sentence or word is actually different from the literal meaning. Often irony is used to suggest the stark contrast of the literal meaning being put forth. The deeper, real layer of significance is ...


10

I believe "veiled" insult is what you are looking for. Although I am sure this is in fairly common usage I cannot find a good definition of it, but Collins has 'veiled' as: adjective disguised ⇒ a veiled insult www.collinsdictionary.com ...Though I admit this does not necessarily imply humour as the veil.


9

There's the term world's smallest violin, which is used to express mock sympathy. In conversation, it's often accompanied by a hand gesture, as if someone is playing a miniature violin. For example, to that "A" student complaining about his B on the math test, I could say something like: Aw, that's a shame. Here's the world's smallest violin, playing I ...


8

I have lived in the UK for my entire life (currently 30 years), and this is the first indication I've ever heard that the practice is a 'foreign' custom, or that it is in any way unusual, although the specific phrase may be euphemised depending upon the formality of the context. As a general rule, I would say that if it's the kind of restaurant that you ...


8

The single word that you would use is striking. That strikes the attention of an observer; producing a vivid impression on the mind; telling, impressive, unusually remarkable. [OED] People in red satin evening gowns, the pyramids in Egypt, and platform heels with fish in them are also striking. [vocabulary.com] There is also the idiom not ...


7

Slacktivist seems to fit (especially online), if their comments are intended to get people to agree that something is bad but they don't actually do anything about it or contain a "call to action" besides "Like this post".


7

Whine: 1.3 A feeble or petulant complaint: ODO White Whine: A collection of first-world problems Updated daily The worst part of car shopping ... I have to call the sellers. Ugh. A coffee mug that is too big for any of your cup holders is a total nightmare... Whitewhine.com


6

Escort is actually an appropriate word for this. According to Wiktionary, escort as a verb means: (emphasis mine) To attend to in order to guard and protect; to accompany as a safeguard; to give honorable or ceremonious attendance to You could also use accompany.


6

In the US, we often use the term "crack", which is short for "wisecrack" which is basically a (somewhat) witty insult. Ex: "When she showed up at the funeral in that red dress, people were making cracks, like: "You look lovely - where's the fire?" and "Hey, the Devil is here to pick up Bob."


6

Area, the only phrase I can think of that's like this is, you sometimes hear variations on "sign on their head" or "sign hanging over their head" or "sign over their head..." So, "assholes don't go around with signs over their head" or "I wish idiots had a sign over their head alerting me to the fact they were idiots.." sort of thing. As I mention in a ...


6

How about something related to the word awe, as in awe-inspiring, awesome (in its original meaning), a thing that leaves you awe-struck, or a synonym like breathtaking.


6

A possible description is passive spectator: a person who looks on or watches; onlooker; observer. not active, but acted upon; receiving impressions or influences; not actors in the scene. The Free a Dictionary


5

It is variously a pier, dock, wharf, jetty, or pontoon, depending on the local dialect and sophistication of the speaker. Call it a "dock", and everyone will understand what you're talking about while only a few of them will yell at you for mis-using terminology. English has an enormous and highly-detailed vocabulary regarding ships and their support ...


5

"A pier is a raised structure, including bridge and building supports and walkways, typically supported by widely spread piles or pillars. The lighter structure of a pier allows tides and currents to flow almost unhindered, whereas the more solid foundations of a quay or the closely spaced piles of a wharf can act as a breakwater, and are consequently more ...


5

We had a phrase in the army - As beautiful as a can of smashed assholes Which certainly evokes the imagery of your original phrase, and also a dig at canned food, which we so frequently ate.


5

Generally the mind hungers rather than thirsts. Feed your brain, don't water it! For a general phrase, I would use "intellectually starved for a good book" or something similar. This is usage number three from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/starved


5

stabbing or fatal stabbing From oxford An act or instance of wounding or killing someone with a knife:


5

Snide adjective 3 : slyly disparaging : insinuating < snide remarks > Snide remarks Snide remarks are the kinds of things people say with a sneer on their face. When you leave a movie theater and your friend says, “I can't believe someone was actually paid to write that screenplay,” he's being snide. Another possibility, which ...



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