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40

I suggest: Nip it in the bud Which means cut it off before it has a chance to grow. McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs to put an end to something before it develops into something larger. Wiktionary (idiomatic) To stop something at an early stage. If you see a bad habit begin to develop, try to nip it ...


21

Oink oink might be closest in form in American English. This is the English word for the sound a pig makes, and can be used to mean "greedy" (similarly to the trough idiom, I think). "Oink out", for example, equates to "pig out", meaning overeat or binge (see, for example, The Free Dictionary), and I might say "oink oink" as a humorous admonition to my child ...


16

"Go the long way around" (AmE) or "Go the long way round" (BrE).


14

You want to eliminate gossip in your group by heading it off at the pass. From Uncyclopedia Head them off at the pass is a stock strategy of the heroes of Hollywood Western movies (or "oaters"), as they defeat the villains. "The pass" is a mountain crossing, so narrow that they's horses done hafta cross it in single file. "Them" (usually ...


14

This may not be a direct answer to the question, but it will get there, eventually Scenic route — Dictionary.com noun, informal the long route or way to a destination; a road or path designed to take one past a pleasant view or nice scenery and usually less direct "We took the scenic route home after having trouble reading the map." The ...


12

I have seen all of these words used : dilly-dally, dither, vacillate, waver Also a nice idiom: beat around the bush dilly-dally: to waste time, especially by indecision don't dillydally on the way to the store dither: to delay taking action because you are not sure about what to do She did not dither about what to do next. ...


9

"Hem and haw" would be appropriate. Wikitionary: To discuss, deliberate, or contemplate rather than taking action or making up one's mind. 'If you hem and haw long enough, someone else will do it first.' Merriam-Webster: To take a long time before making a decision about what to do. 'The city council hemmed and hawed for a year before ...


6

Aghast: "filled with horror or shock: when the news came out they were aghast." (New Oxford American Dictionary) This is quite a strong word, but I think it fits the bill nicely. Dumbfounded: "greatly astonish or amaze: they were dumbfounded at his popularity." (New Oxford American Dictionary) Although it doesn't necessarily suggest a negative outcome, I ...


6

We have to eliminate the tendency to gossip in our group of friends with a preemptive strike: Jenna must be eliminated. 1.pre-emptive strike - a surprise attack that is launched in order to prevent the enemy from doing it to you - see Fairfax


6

A very comparable idiom is "to cut the head off the snake" It means to stop a larger problem by aiming at the source - often the leader, or a major culprit. The implication is that the rest of the problem will naturally die off without that source. It is sometimes used in military situations to mean targeting the head of an organization. So, to use your ...


5

I think that what you are talking about is a personality trait known as being able to laugh at yourself and not taking yourself too seriously This quote of course can also describe someone's sense of humor and can mean a lot of things. For one, it could mean that you are so optimistic about your friends enjoying an embarrassing story about you ...


5

I would say of the suggestions people have submitted, the word "deliberated" would fit your initial 3 examples best: "You know how my friends are, they always deliberate so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At the restaurant, when I was asked what I wanted to order, I deliberated before finally ordering the steak." "Stop deliberating, this has ...


4

How about just uncanny? That plant looked uncannily liked a human To her, the noise the bird made sounded uncannily like screaming The word itself implies a certain sense of fear or dread mysterious; arousing superstitious fear or dread; uncomfortably strange: Dictionary.com


4

In American English, that would probably be "Lining his own pockets" if you mean he's making sure he gets some kind of money at the end. To be more like just stealing from the position, you could say he "has his hand in the till [cash register]".


3

I agree with appalled. I think that it’s the best word for the context you’ve given. Here’s an interesting diagram for you! It displays several versions of emotions. Maybe you will find it useful. Edit: Under the category 'surprise,' the wheel lists startled, confused, amazed, excited, shocked, dismayed, disillusioned, perplexed, astonished, awe, eager,...


2

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2

Shocked would be appropriate. It generally has negative connotations — as opposed to surprised, which has positive connotations.


2

You might call such a person a fair-weather friend: One who is friendly, helpful, or available only when it is advantageous or convenient to be so. (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fair-weather_friend)


2

how about: To cry wolf? As it relates to the taxi example: "Make a mountain of a molehill" or perhaps more on point: "To lay it on thick". As for Perfidy, i believe it would be acceptable to use Perfidity.


2

In the UK, they're call them postgraduate students or (if the context is clearly students) post-grads for short, which seems far more sensible. From Wikipedia, A graduate school (or grad school) is a school that gives advanced academic degrees, such as master's degrees(M.S. or MBA ...) and doctoral degrees (Ph.D.or L.L.D. or D.D.S. etc.). A graduate ...


2

Probably it's just "go around" or "go round": go around or go round: v. To form or follow an indirect path that avoids something: Go around the fence if the gate is locked. Don't try to cross the marsh—go around.


2

Detour — ODO noun 1.1. An alternative route for use by traffic when the usual road is temporarily closed. "A closed road and a detour on the way, but I manage to find my way around that." verb 1. Take a long or roundabout route "he detoured around the walls."


2

Consider HEADLESS From Webster without a head without a leader or even simply Leaderless Although it does not show as an individual entry in the dictionary, its' the most common. Compare leaderless with headless and rudderless, the later does not even register in Ngram.


2

"Acephalous" is a rare word, but it's legitimate English - basically a Greek calque off the word "headless."


2

You may consider nonrecurrent. nonrecurrent: not recurring recur: to occur again after an interval : occur time after time


1

You might consider procrastinate or one of its synonyms: delay or postpone action; put off doing something. "it won't be this price for long, so don't procrastinate" synonyms: delay, put off doing something, postpone action, defer action, be dilatory, use delaying tactics, stall, temporize, drag one's feet/heels, take one's time, play for ...


1

You should consider rudderless to describe the organisation when no (real) boss is present. rudderless (adjective) (of an organization) without anyone in control and therefore unable to take decisions You should check unaccountable from the perspective of the staff when no (real) boss is present. unaccountable: : not required to explain ...


1

In Scots English, there is 'to swither' From OED, http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/swither (Verb) Be uncertain as to which course of action to choose


1

Some colourful (Australian slang) options: farnarkling [+about/around] (alternative spelling: farnarkeling) the group activity whereby everyone sits around discussing the need to "do something" but nothing actually happens - Urbandictionary.com eg: "You know how my friends are, they always farnarkle about so I can't expect an immediate answer." "At ...


1

There are probably better options already stated, but to add a little (possibly chiefly British) variety to these: The verb "to potter" and its associated constructions would work well here. Sense 4: To occupy oneself in an ineffectual or trifling way; to work or act in a feeble or desultory manner; to dabble in or with something. or 5: To move ...



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