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47

Love is blind, comes close to what you are referring to : (Cliché) If you love someone, you cannot see any faults in that person. Jill: I don't understand why Joanna likes Tom. He's inconsiderate, he's vain, and he isn't even good-looking. Jane: Love is blind. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary)


22

rapprochement: noun (Especially in international affairs) an establishment or resumption of harmonious relations: The entry from etymonline.com: "establishment of cordial relations," 1809, from French rapprochement "reunion, reconciliation," literally "a bringing near," from rapprocher "bring near," from re- "back, again" (see re-) + ...


19

Perhaps the word rejuvenating. This refers to something or someone gaining strength or vigour it once/previously had.


17

A living thing would revitalize. revitalize (v): to make (someone or something) active, healthy, or energetic again; to give new life or vigor to. A light would brighten or intensify.


17

The item you are describing is prerequisite for whatever more comprehensive thing will be based on it. The term prerequisite certainly indicates that your subject is required or necessary, but also implies that its establishment or attainment is not the main goal. The noun form, referring to your subject as "a prerequisite" for something else, may be clearer ...


17

Anti-intellectualism is a handy (and self-explanatory) term, particularly in American politics today. It has great currency in the news media of late, largely with regard to situations such as the one described in your example.


17

I suggest this old saying by Tucker Max "How were you supposed to know he would stoop so low? After all, the devil....... Tucker Max - an American author and public speaker.


15

If they are reading and commenting about it after the fact, I’d call them “Monday-morning quarterbacks.” If the event is still occurring and they don’t have the skills, means, and/or opportunity to do anything except comment or complain, I’d call them “Armchair quarterbacks/generals" or perhaps even “kibitzers.” Finally, if it’s still occurring and they do ...


15

Reconciliation: an act of reconciling, as when former enemies agree to an amicable truce. dictionary.reference.com Example: Adoption results in a child becoming a son and heir, redemption results in a slave becoming a servant and reconciliation results in an enemy becoming a friend. The English Connection: The Puritan Roots of ...


15

That missile is a single point of failure device, which is why it's not man rated.


14

There is a rare word misosophy defined as the hatred of wisdom or knowledge. An example from OED: Much of modern philosophy is in fact not at all a ‘love of wisdom’ but a hatred of it so that it should appropriately be called ‘misosophy’. S. H. Nasr, Ideals & Realities of Islam, 1966 It is from the ancient Greek μισόσοϕος hating wisdom ( ...


13

As a noun, you can consider trifle. A trifle is something that's totally unimportant. If your friend is freaking out over which shoes to buy and you call her dilemma a trifle, you're saying she shouldn't get so worked up over nothing. [vocabulary.com] or fuss. an expression of anger or complaint especially about something that has little importance ...


13

There's the term world's smallest violin, which is used to express mock sympathy. In conversation, it's often accompanied by a hand gesture, as if someone is playing a miniature violin. For example, to that "A" student complaining about his B on the math test, I could say something like: Aw, that's a shame. Here's the world's smallest violin, playing I ...


13

You could call it a barbed joke. From Reverso Dictionary: A barbed remark or joke seems polite or humorous, but contains a cleverly hidden criticism.


13

Just negate the term with non- to form non-redundant (or nonredundant). As with redundant itself, an engineering context directs the reader or hearer to understand the term in the engineering sense. Wiktionary gives primacy to the closed spelling; OED offers only the hyphenated one, with examples but no definition (since defining the negation of redundant ...


12

Shakespeare's Strange bedfellows comes to mind. I'll admit that it's maybe not ideal here, though. Unlikely companions or allies; often used in the phrase “politics makes strange bedfellows.” [Dictionary.com] You can also use make common cause (with) To cooperate, to enter into an alliance for a shared goal. [Wiktionary]


11

1. I've been through a lot in my life and turned me into a fighter. 2. The experience determined the very things that didn't kill me but made me stronger. There are connotations here of ORDEAL, TRIAL, TESTING, and of a process of distillation, in the sense of separating or extracting the essential and vital elements within, and of a refining process, in ...


10

I believe "veiled" insult is what you are looking for. Although I am sure this is in fairly common usage I cannot find a good definition of it, but Collins has 'veiled' as: adjective disguised ⇒ a veiled insult www.collinsdictionary.com ...Though I admit this does not necessarily imply humour as the veil.


8

Whine: 1.3 A feeble or petulant complaint: ODO White Whine: A collection of first-world problems Updated daily The worst part of car shopping ... I have to call the sellers. Ugh. A coffee mug that is too big for any of your cup holders is a total nightmare... Whitewhine.com


8

Area, the only phrase I can think of that's like this is, you sometimes hear variations on "sign on their head" or "sign hanging over their head" or "sign over their head..." So, "assholes don't go around with signs over their head" or "I wish idiots had a sign over their head alerting me to the fact they were idiots.." sort of thing. As I mention in a ...


8

The single word that you would use is striking. That strikes the attention of an observer; producing a vivid impression on the mind; telling, impressive, unusually remarkable. [OED] People in red satin evening gowns, the pyramids in Egypt, and platform heels with fish in them are also striking. [vocabulary.com] There is also the idiom not ...


8

Slacktivist seems to fit (especially online), if their comments are intended to get people to agree that something is bad but they don't actually do anything about it or contain a "call to action" besides "Like this post".


8

Not precisely opposed to knowledge or intellectualism, but a close relative nonetheless is philistinism. A philistine is one who is hostile or indifferent to culture and the arts. Adjective is philistine as in a philistine government. This sense of philistine (no capital letter) arose as a result of a confrontation between town and gown in Jena (now in ...


8

I think you are looking for : Jump for joy: to be extremely happy: Tina jumped for joy when she found out she'd be in the team. "So how did Robert take the news?" "He didn't exactly jump for joy." (Cambridge Dict.) The expression can refer both to physical and metaphorical Joyful jumps.


8

A word that fits the bill pretty perfectly is giddy. This word is used to describe childishly obnoxious joy. A giddy person is pretty much always smiling, usually giggling or laughing, and typically dancing and/or jumping, bouncing, or otherwise being energetic.


7

You could also use detente, though the meaning is somewhat similar to rapprochement: noun the easing of hostility or strained relations, especially between countries


7

‘regenerating’ or perhaps ‘reviving’ It's often used in sci-fi for example Dr.Who regenerates This is really context dependent. Who comes back to life? Why? How should we feel about it? Was he dead or just injured? Was this a physical or brain injury? Is the healing magical, mechanical or by providence?


7

A person would be recovering. A light would be intensifying. A houseplant would be perking-up.


6

Foe turned friend would perhaps answer. This is actually something Benjamin Franklin did, by asking an opponent for the loan of a rare book, in the nicest possible way, while using his reputation of having discerning literary tastes. Furthermore a slightly related quote is: “An injured friend is the bitterest of foes.” – Thomas Jefferson. Backwards, I know ...


6

How about something related to the word awe, as in awe-inspiring, awesome (in its original meaning), a thing that leaves you awe-struck, or a synonym like breathtaking.



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