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32

You may be thinking of the word interregnum, but unless there is no clear line of succession, or there is disputed succession, it does not apply when a monarch dies. Certainly not in an established monarchy like the British one, and probably not in most others either. You have perhaps heard the expression "the king is dead, long live the king"? It's not ...


25

Didactic as defined by Google: in the manner of a teacher, particularly so as to treat someone in a patronizing way.


22

You could call this a double-edged sword. It can be used both for good and bad.


20

I am not sure if you are stuck to the notion of altruism, but in the context of making a show of being nice to others to make themselves feel good, you could use sanctimonious. Sanctimonious is a twist on the words sanctity and sacred, which mean holy or religious. A sanctimonious person might think he's holy, but their attitude comes across more like ...


15

Something chosen at random can be called arbitrary. arbitrary (adj.) - Based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system


14

You’re describing visual hallucinations. These are often part of a syndrome termed psychosis but can also occur in other situations (e.g. alcohol withdrawal, intoxication with a variety of substances, delirium due to a medical condition).* Schizophrenia is the name of a particular psychiatric disease characterized by psychosis. Hallucinations themselves are ...


14

I would call them a know-it-all, someone who just wants to show off how much they know. I can think of a number of other things that you might call them such as 'irritating' or 'annoying.'


12

It seems you want a word for someone refusing to engage in discussion, because they regard the subject as not open to debate. To dismiss out of hand is one option which has already been suggested, or more neutrally you might have to disengage from discussion. In a similar vein I would suggest shut down debate. I also detail how accusations of trolling ...


12

wiseacre A person with an affectation of wisdom or knowledge, regarded with scorn or irritation by others; a know-it-all. Another choice, that's an Americanism is wisenheimer A person who behaves in an irritatingly smug or arrogant fashion, typically by making clever remarks and displaying their knowledge.


12

happenstance (n) A chance happening or event. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/happenstance?s=t Fortuitous (adj) Happening or produced by chance; accidental http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fortuitous?s=t


10

You can consider: there's more to someone/something than meets the eye A person or situation is more complex or interesting than they appear. (Oxford) It's an idiom, not a single word. But it applies to both someone and something, as required.


10

I can think of indiscriminately - In a random manner; unsystematically: or maybe even a less profound alternative like unselective or aimless, depending on the context I think indiscriminately might be a better choice than arbitrary, because I believe the latter has a connotation of personal choice based on a mood. I am, however, not too sure about ...


9

Idiomatically, The best programs we have could not break the encryption but you are saying he can do it in his head? From Oxford Dictionaries Online Phrases, definition 29 (heads up @Julie Carter)... in one's head - by mental process without use of physical aids i.e. - without needing to use a pencil and paper for complex calculations.


9

Doing someone a favor is also used in this context. Favor[1][2] 1: a kind or helpful act that you do for someone 2: do something for someone as an act of kindness ... No, it's just a favor. No payment.


8

What about needs improvement or something along those lines. Variants like needs to be improved could be considered too, but the key concept is that the question is not ready yet, but can be changed so it is ready.


8

The term is sweat. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sweat To collect moisture in small drops from the air, as a cold water pipe. There is no requirement in English for the different possible meanings of a word to reflect an underlying consistency. In this case, the appearance of water droplets on a surface when the surrounding air is hot ...


7

I think that the best term is Pedant. From the Merriam-Webster site: Pedant : a person who annoys other people by correcting small errors and giving too much attention to minor details also one who makes a show of knowledge and one who is unimaginative or who unduly emphasizes minutiae in the presentation or use of knowledge


7

1337 speak: (also leet speak) Leet stands for Elite. Leetspeak is an alternative alphabet for English by replacing it with a number or combination of numbers. '7H15 1S WR1773N 1N 1337 5P34K'


7

If you wanted to be gender-sensitive, you could say to males, Calm your mits. or Calm your man-tits. The alternative versions work: Take a chill pill. Calm down! Woah, there. Woah, Nelly! Naayyy! (like a horse) Chill. More alternatives can be found here.


7

I recommend trying something sing-songy and verging on nonsense, in hopes that the very doggerel aspect of it will have catchy appeal to a 12-year-old. For example: Easy-peasy, don't be sleazy. or Keep cool and don't drool. Both of these have, besides goofy rhymes, a vaguely suggestive component ("sleazy" and "drool") that seems indefinitely ...


6

Maybe 'still waters run deep' or 'there's more to a book than its cover'.


6

Whereas the behavior OP describes is a form of one-upmanship, one who regularly engages in such behavior is usually considered to be lacking in self-esteem, and so, by way of compensation, becomes a boastful person, or a boaster. one-upmanship noun: • behavior in which someone tries to get an advantage by doing, saying, or having better things ...


6

Hypocritical comes to mind. The noun form of the adjective is hypocrisy n 1. The practice of professing beliefs, feelings, or virtues that one does not hold or possess; falseness. TFD


6

As defined by Merriam-Webster, egoism (or egotism) is "a doctrine that individual self-interest is the actual motive of all conscious action." A person who exhibits this egoism is an egoist (or egotist). These terms are discussed extensively in another Stack Exchange entry. What you have described is egoism disguised as altruism--or, as both talmu and Doug ...


6

This dichotomy is surprisingly pervasive in language. It shows up not just in English, but in Sanskrit, most Slavic languages, French, German, Dutch, Irish, Finnish, Swedish, Hungarian, Turkish, Chinese, Korean, and Hebrew. There are some great examples located in the Disparaging associations in language section on Wikipedia. Warning: this is just my ...


5

I always liked the term "short shrift." "The financial planner gave our proposal short shrift." The OED gives the following definition: orig. a brief space of time allowed for a criminal to make his confession before execution; hence, a brief respite; to give short shrift to , to make short work of. The meaning of this seems to have broadened over ...


5

A little imaginative, but what about: send packing to send someone away; to dismiss someone, possibly rudely To dismiss (someone) abruptly. (TFD) If you want to dismiss an individual peremptorily, it’s as simple as sending him or her packing. Meaning: Send away/dismiss someone in a shameful, or underhanded way. ...


5

There is no disease that consists of hallucinations. Hallucinations are a symptom of various diseases and neurological conditions. The state of persistent hallucinations is "hallucinosis," but the nature of the hallucinations is not restricted. The term of art for hallucinating animals is "zooscopy" or "zoopsia," but again this names a symptom and not a ...


5

I call them "Ask-holes". Those are people who ask a question who either know the answer, or ask but don't wait for (or want) the answer.


5

Randomness is the noun form of random, but it doesn't work for usage as "such and such was a randomness". You can use it in the phrase act of randomness, which may be what you're looking for. Unfortunately I think "of randomness" is essentially just an adjective, and therefore it might not be any better than the many synonyms of random that have been given ...



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