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Alex Gooch of the BBC answered a question on the differences between 'made of' and 'made from.' Gooch concluded that if you are referencing something that keep its form, you would use 'made of,' and if you were to reference something where the form is changed during the process of making, then you would use 'made from.' Examples from the article for 'made ...


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'Lemonade is made of lemons' or 'from lemons' is correct. 'Lemonade is made with lemons' is a mistake. 'Made with' is used for tools or other means of producing action: Lemonade is made of lemons with an electric juicer


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Typically, "of" is used when you are listing all of the components. "With" means that there are other components in addition to what you've stated. To continue with your example, if you suppose lemonade consists of lemons, water, and sugar, you would say: A lemonade is made of lemons, water, and sugar. or A lemonade is made with lemons.


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In my dialect of American English, you "fill out the form" by "filling in the blanks" on the form.


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OED's entry for to have off, as of March 2015, is (abridged): to have off trans. colloq. to have it off rare in U.S. use. a. Criminals' slang. To successfully carry out a crime, esp. a robbery or burglary. Cf. sense 3. Now rare. 1977 ‘E. Crispin’ Glimpses of Moon xii. 235 He had had it off all right, thanks..to making careful ...


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As far as I know, "I have off " means that I have time-off from work. It's usually expressed like: "She has off next week."


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It seems that the phrases have it off and have it away have the same definition on ODO: British vulgar slang Have sexual intercourse. Macmillan concurs: have it off (with someone) to have sex with someone have it away (with someone) to have sex with someone Three's a charm with Cambridge: have it off (also have it away) UK slang ...


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Stating that you are "down for that" appears to be a relatively recent phrase coming from slang. It is common in chat rooms and other online social hangouts, but does not often appear in writing. It shocked me the first time I heard it (sometime in 2013, if I remember correctly). I thought the speaker was confused, at first, until I heard it repeated in ...


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Only The equipment should not be overloaded. is valid. Use the past participle ("overloaded'). If this is formal, do not use contractions. For instruction on the passive voice and examples, read several of the threads here.


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Despite the noted synonymous definitions, I think the tell in these phrases is is often one of connotation. A come-on, through other uses, often connotes a sinister or self-serving action or a pretence. "You come on as if you own the joint." "Did you come on to my sister?" To "come off (as if)..." is also used when appropriate (not in the second example ...


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I wouldn't say they are synonymous. In my opinion, come on as implies the person was actively trying to project a particular image. Come across as simply describes how he was perceived by others, maybe without him intending to do so. From your quoted definition: come on as something: to appear to be something; to project one's image as something.


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I agree with The McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs, the two phrases are indeed synonymous. Although I would break up your example sentences into more than one sentence, each.


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Phrasal verbs often have idiomatic combination and meaning that cannot be guessed from the verb alone, or from the adverb or preposition that follows. In the idiomatic expression (that uses phrasal verbs), He's been pushing up the daisies for a year. it matters little whether the "up" in "push up" has a syntactic or semantic purpose. Nevertheless a ...


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The word pay in both expressions holds them very close together, but they have unique connotations Pay off: v. To pay the full amount of some debt: She paid off the mortgage ahead of schedule. He paid his college debt off six years after he graduated. To result in profit; be lucrative: Your efforts will eventually pay off. To ...


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Pay back has two meanings, the first literal, to make good on a loan by returning money to a lender and the second figurative, to exact vengeance. I'll pay you back later today if you lend me $5 for lunch. Some day, I'm going to pay you back for that insult. Pay off also has two meanings, the first, to return money to a lender to completely satisfy a loan ...


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"From where I was sitting" means more-or-less what it sounds: "from my perspective". "From where I was sitting, it looked like the President was lying." (It does not usually mean that literally, the placement of my seat gave me a better view, just that my opinion on the matter is such.) "I don't want to speak out of school" is much more interesting. ...



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