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A phrasal verb is a fronted object complement. 'Wake up the boy' = 'Wake the boy up' = 'Wake the boy [[to] be] up'. 'Fire off a shot' = 'Fire a shot off' (presumably to make the shot be off {of the deck of the gunship}). Phrasal verbs come in two varieties: literal and idiomatic. In the idiomatic variety, the position is not literal -- it has either been ...


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There is nothing in the expression "fire off" to suggest the intent, or the lack of intent, to hit a target. However, that suggestion is carried elsewhere in the sentences you cite. A "warning shot," for example, is just that: a shot fired off to warn an adversary or threatening other against persisting in some action. Warning shots are aimed away from ...


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NO INTIMATE IS NOT SHORT FOR IMPLY,and infer is short for inferred.Debate word,lawyer lingo.my time on this site is short so forgive me if I got it wrong.


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Your (1) can work; (2) and (3) don't. Intimate 2 verb [with object] 1 State or make known: Mr Hutchison has intimated his decision to retire verb [with clause] 1.1 Imply or hint: he had already intimated that he might not be able to continue - ODO In usage, intimating is a hint or statement made intentionally. This precludes ...


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The process of confirming a user's credentials and logging them in is often known as 'authentication'. Therefore, a commonly accepted term for a user's state before logging in would be 'unauthenticated'. (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/unauthenticated) This would apply equally to registered and unregistered users as well as users ...


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Just end with "as effectively as we can", which is excellent English and sidesteps your problem.



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