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There needs to be a phrase for there to be a phrasal verb. The prepositions "in," "by," "off," and "out" when added to "drop" make phrases. In "Just drop it," the verb is only the single word "drop." This is simply an idiomatic use of "drop" meaning to abandon a topic of conversation.


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Early instances of 'loving on [someone]' The phrase "loving on [someone]" appears to have arisen fairly recently. A Google Books search turns up an instance from 1914, but it is put in the mouth of a native speaker of Arabic, for whom English is something of a language adventure. From Lucille Van Slyke, "Glad Rags," in Pearson's Magazine (1914): "Take, ...


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Without going into the swamp of grammar, to me this is a matter of usage. A native would naturally say, 'I'm going on a cruise (safari, tour, etc.). The thing is that we go on 'trips' organized for us where we are 'captive' of the 'organizers'. We take trips that we ourselves organize. e.g., I'm taking a trip to Atlanta (the person is driving. Just because ...


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As user 5jj posted on usingenglish.com... Unfortunately for learners, there are many different types of what are loosely called 'phrasal verbs'. He identifies Verb + Preposition, Verb + particle, Prepositional Verb, Phrasal Verb, Intransitive verbs followed by a particle/adverb, and Intransitive phrasal verbs as the 6 main subtypes, each with different ...


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You can certainly use either one. I usually bring up a topic and change the subject But this is just habit.


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Yes, that is a (transitive) phrasal verb. To "run after" someone means to chase them with the intent to catch them and interact with them in some way. If you parse it as a verb + a prepositional phrase, you would have a meaning of "to run at a later time than someone", which in most cases (including your example) does not make sense. According to ...


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After is a preposition which makes "...after the rich man" a prepositional phrase. The sentence has only one verb, which is ran. Since ran is an intransitive verb, the answer to your question is that ran is intransitive. Don't think of it as "ran after" because it's more like the old beggar ran ... after the rich man. You could change that prepositional ...


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Probably just a typo - should be The army clamped down on them . . .


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Camp down pitch, set up - erect and fasten; "pitch a tent" I think you're witnessing poetic licence being taken here. The sentence is meant to evoke the idea that rape and murder are what the army used to set up camp. Makes a kind of macabre sense. Kill enough people and the housing market will open up to the point that you don't need a tent.


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I agree with professor_feather -- I have definitely seen this in the Christian community. Based on the content, I expect your examples are influenced by this -- probably from a church bulletin or Christian non-profit. The Dictionary of Christianese gives a definition that matches my experience: http://www.dictionaryofchristianese.com/love-on/ love on ...


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It's a slang term, which loosely means to shower someone (or something) with attention. A group of three sisters that I rode horses with when I was very young used the term quite often, as did every member of their family. For example, if a horse was being especially biddable, they would say "He done good! Be sure and love on 'im!", or "I just sat on 'im ...



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