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0

Hold On!!! When you use "think in" you don't mean the same as "think of". For "think of" or "think about", the following word is the object of your thoughts, but after "think in", the following word would be a situation, or maybe a place. So when you say "I'm thinking of Brazil", Brazil is what you're thinking of; but when you say "I'm thinking in Brazil",...


2

Both sound correct to me. The only caveat I have is that I think "stormed out" only really applies if there's a room to storm out of. If someone was leaving an open field in a huff, I'd say "stormed off" instead.


0

Both options are ambiguous, but 'with' is the better choice. String 'x' is replaced with 'y', by the computer, using the algorithm. 'By' can refer to the 'agent' of a passive clause. 'With' can refer to an 'instrument' (tool), but 'using' is stronger. FYI, note the ambiguity here: (because robots can be agents, patients or instruments) Robot A was ...


12

Though one answer analyses this as an example of the single-word verb 'will', and this probably explains the development of the construction, Wikipedia considers 'will on' a transitive multi-word verb (it uses the term 'phrasal verb'). Wiktionary has a definition for the term: will on Verb [Categories: English lemmas ... English verbs ... English ...


4

To will something is to [try to] cause or change by an act of will or volition. Merriam-Webster (third usage) will - transitive verb - decree, ordain This is something you can do, whether or not you have to authority or power to follow through: I can will my bowling ball to turn back toward the center of the lane, even as it tips into the gutter. It ...


4

But I will be willing you on. This means "I will be wishing for you to progress/advance." "Willing something/someone on" is like when your team has the ball and is advancing and you try to "wish" them forward to a goal. Sometimes it implies physically cheering them onward, sometimes the "cheering" is unspoken and the most an observer of you might see is ...


19

In this context, to will means something like [WITH OBJECT AND INFINITIVE] Make or try to make (someone) do something or (something) happen by the exercise of mental powers: 'reluctantly he willed himself to turn and go back' 'she stared into the fog, willing it to clear' Your example doesn't include the infinitive, but rather the small ...


3

She finally succumbed to the torment / to the heartbreak(s). succumb, Dictionary.com to yield to disease, wounds, old age, etc.; die


0

She (just) gave up. Give up - To resign, surrender; to part with (OED)


2

I'm nothing if not obedient @Rathony. :-) Here's my comment, copied into an answer... If he was shot, he was hit, not merely shot at. "Shot" doesn't give any indication whether the injury was fatal. Headlines tend to use "He was killed" or "He was shot dead" or something that also specifically mentions death by the gunshot wound, if that is ...


4

And what would you think of a headline "He was shot in the street". Is the man dead or was he just 'shot at'? Neither. "He was shot in the street" only means he was shot. There's no ambiguity. It means a bullet from a gun struck him. It doesn't mean that the bullet missed him. It also doesn't mean he was shot dead. It makes no implication about ...


-3

Three problems with this sentence. First, unclear antecedent. Who is "he?" Second, "was shot" is in the passive voice. Third, unless "the street" is a part of "his" body, then you need to split this sentence or rearrange it. Example: "The kidnapper" (Now we know who "he" is) ran into the street (now we know where he was), where he was shot (now we know what ...


3

The first usage is not a common usage. The second two use the word "stall" to denote a lack of activity. Often wrestlers or boxers get penalized for 'stalling.' The word "around" is added as a preposition. The best usage is "He is stalling," not "He is stalling around."


3

In the first two sentences, stall around is a phrasal verb roughly equivalent to hang around, or loiter in the vicinity of. In the third sentence, it is not a phrasal verb. It means that fighting stalled, specifically the fighting that was happening around her.


1

To answer your question, in idiomatic English I maintain that if the sentence (or fragment of a sentence ) is successful in conveying the intended meaning, it is allowed. It may not be grammatically proper, but languages evolve. I will not attest to the etymology of 'fork out', but it may refer to the act of 'forking out' manure on a farm. Both connote an ...


0

This question was asked and answered quite a while ago, but I think there's another interesting facet to the story so I'm asking this answer. This is an old-fashioned AmE idiom, but with a slightly different meaning than the BrE idiom which would make it inappropriate in the given situation. Specifically, it is used between adults (often from someone in a ...



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