New answers tagged

2

Insofar as suicide without an adjective (e.g., "professional suicide") means to take one's life, then, yes, committing suicide means a person took their own life. One could commit to suicide without (yet) accomplishing the deed, and one can commit professional suicide, through, e.g., choosing to aggravate one's boss beyond tolerance. In conversation, the ...


5

The most common use of the phrase is "to turn oneself in (to authorities)" meaning to voluntarily surrender. For instance, "A man wanted by the state on a parole violation escaped arrest by U.S. marshals in Cambridge on Tuesday, but turned himself in on Thursday." http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/crime-and-courts/wanted-man-turns-himself-in-dane-county-...


2

It means to "rat them out" and inform on their [nefarious ?] doings. With Trump you can never be quite sure. The Collins Dictionary thesaurus provides several terms for turn someone in hand someone over, denounce, inform on, blow the whistle on (informal), shop (British, informal), finger (US, informal), betray, sell out, split on (informal), grass ...


3

English has a grammatical structure for describing the condition(s) that can occur to a person, animal or thing. It is a passive construction (subject + passive: be + adverb) where an adverb is appended after the action verb the subject has experienced or been subjected to. They all function like: He was shot dead. Here are some examples I've generated or ...


1

This is just like "His design improvement made the car fast", with "fast" modifying "car". An instructive contrast is "He drove the car fast", in which "fast" is an adverb modifying "drive". I don't think "dead" can be used to modify a verb, though it can be used as a "degree adverb" modifying an adjective, eg, "dead tired"


2

It's pretty simple - just because you saw a sentence somewhere does not make it grammatical. Your original understanding of "hand in" as a phrasal verb was correct, and you were right to be confused. It should have been The homework was not handed in on time.


-1

Sometimes it helps to rewrite the sentence to see the role a word plays. These two sentences together mean exactly the same thing as your original sentence: He was shot. Now he is dead. but is obviously clumsy and too verbose. But we can see that 'dead' is describing 'he' and so is an adjective, and this is the role 'dead' plays in your original ...


-2

Here I go again… So to sum up: In a sentence with an intransitive verb, and therefore no direct object, English is willing to regard the object of a prepositional phrase to the verb as the 'patient', or receiver of the verb's action (as moderated by the preposition). This can be shown by the fact that the 'patient' becomes the subject of a passive ...


1

The Original Poster's question looks interesting at first sight, but it is based on a superficial understanding of what a passive is. A passive is not merely a construction where the Direct Object of an active voice sentence becomes the Subject of a passive voice sentence. Many types of phrase and clause can become the Subject of passive sentences. These ...


-2

Okay, so to answer my own question (tentatively) because a comment would be too short… An intransitive verb like 'died' can't have an object. "An old man died in that bed." But nevertheless, something has happened in or to the bed, so it is the object of the preposition. And the proposition relates to the verb (because the verb is what happened). And in ...


2

While I agree with the critics that the original question is problematic because no reason is given to believe that the verb+preposition combinations of prepositional passives are actually phrasal verbs, there is still a problem here. I have looked, but so far failed to find, any evidence that passives have any distinction between phrasal and prepositional ...


1

Does every verb/preposition become a phrasal verb in the passive voice? No. First, your examples are not phrasal verbs, but prepositional passives. Second, you can't make a prepositional passive from every sentence containing an intransitive verb and a prepositional phrase. The examples with a * below are incorrect. She slept in the bed. The bed was ...



Top 50 recent answers are included