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2

The imperative "hang up" is sufficient, as "the telephone" is implied. What else would the listener hang up? In this case, it acts as an intransitive verb.


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You can: hang up. hang up the telephone. hang up the phone. These three grammatical examples mean the same thing. Originally, it was physically part of the telephone that was hung off a hook which ended the call. Of course, it's a bit redundant to actually say the word telephone, as it's usually clear enough what hang up refers to. You can't however ...


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Hang up itself means end a telephone conversation by cutting the connection. So using the term hang up is sufficient enough.


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From LDOCE: hang up phrasal verb to finish a telephone conversation: I said goodbye and hung up. hang something ↔ up to hang clothes on a hook etc: She took her coat off and hung it up. As you can see, they've got different meanings, and "hang up" alone is what you need in this context; adding "a telephone call" makes it ...


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As tchrist suggests in a comment, "blind [one] from seeing" is more common than "blind [one] to seeing." Here is an Ngram chart of "blind me from seeing" vs. "blind me to seeing" vs. "blind us from seeing" vs. "blind us to seeing" vs. "blind them from seeing" vs. "blind them to seeing": In situations where the thing that one is being blinded to or from ...


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To cache is to store something away for future use (especially if in a hidden place). You could store things in a box or on a shelf but I can't think of any situation in which you'd store something to somewhere. One normally talks about storing things on a particular computer/disk/memory stick so I would use the same for cache.


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To cache something means to store it away, so I think the most natural preposition is in. Cached on is also fairly common. Cached to is very uncommon, but appears to becoming more popular in software contexts. I suspect this is because non-software caches usually require you to be close to them, but software caches are often remote so that the act of ...


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Looking at this figuratively, the action of blinding implies that what you are trying to access is something that "emits something" and goes towards you, such as as light. If you replace truth with "light", "blinds us from" is more natural. Also, "from" implies that you are prevented from reaching something, or something is prevented from reaching you. "To" ...


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"take out your book" means "take your book out of the container it is currently in". In a classroom, at the beginning of a class a teacher might say "Take out your grammar book" , omitting, but implying, that you are to take it out from where it currently is, perhaps in your desk or your satchel. It could be used in similar circumstances too. It's both ...


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To be on something is well-defined as a state of being poised in one position, and as the antonym of that, "off" directly suggests being set in motion or released (I'm off, they're off, the plane takes off, we set off fireworks, etc.). I think a bomb or alarm clock "going off" makes pretty clear sense in that light.


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I would just say "finish your meal"-- neither phrasal form adds anything here (unless you're writing a song). "Finish up" is useful as an intransitive verb, to indicate that you are finishing whatever needs to be finished, rather than any particular subject. "Finish off" is perhaps less obviously useful, but it connotes more finality.


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In the quoted definition of tidy up, order is used in the following sense: The state of being well arranged. [eg] The house is in order; the machinery is out of order. Another sense of order is closely related: Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet. [eg] to preserve order in a community or an ...


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"Tidy up" suggests that there is a state of perceived organizational disorder among some set of objects relative to a broader context, but not necessarily in relation to the objects themselves. In the classic example of tidying up one's room, the judgment is that objects in the room are in some perceived state of disarray relative to the perceiver's ...


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They are equivalent to each other. However, to my ears (as a native speaker of American English), finish up sounds better in this context. More examples: John finished up the dishes after dinner. John finished off a bottle of wine before going to bed. Both have the sense of completion, but there is a subtle difference in feeling between the two. ...


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Although finish off and finish up do have some uses where they are not interchangeable, this is not one of them; here they both mean "bring a task to its completion". So either one works just fine. (In fact, finish with no preposition would work equally well in the example sentence.)


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There are all sorts of alternatives: Testing is XX hours of continual operation ... or Testing subjects each unit to XX hours of ... or Testing requires each unit to perform ... or, if there is more than one test: Testing is in four parts: XX hours of ... Or if you're really tired of thinking up verbs: Testing: xx hours of ...


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Example sentence: Our picnic consists of sandwiches and lemonade. Alternatives: Our picnic comprises sandwiches and lemonade. (Edited- thanks Scott) Our picnic contains sandwiches and lemonade. The components of our picnic include sandwiches and lemonade.


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Imagine a broom sweeping the floor, in one sweeping motion, dust particles are lifted into the air. In the same way when you fall in love with someone, you are lifted off your feet effortlessly. This feeling of elation is felt by both sexes, so I would disagree with @user72209 that the idiom is almost exclusive to women, indeed the touching tribute left ...



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