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English has a grammatical structure for describing the condition(s) that can occur to a person, animal or thing. It is a passive construction (subject + passive: be + adverb) where an adverb is appended after the action verb the subject has experienced or been subjected to. They all function like: He was shot dead. Here are some examples I've generated or ...


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This is just like "His design improvement made the car fast", with "fast" modifying "car". An instructive contrast is "He drove the car fast", in which "fast" is an adverb modifying "drive". I don't think "dead" can be used to modify a verb, though it can be used as a "degree adverb" modifying an adjective, eg, "dead tired"


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It's pretty simple - just because you saw a sentence somewhere does not make it grammatical. Your original understanding of "hand in" as a phrasal verb was correct, and you were right to be confused. It should have been The homework was not handed in on time.


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Sometimes it helps to rewrite the sentence to see the role a word plays. These two sentences together mean exactly the same thing as your original sentence: He was shot. Now he is dead. but is obviously clumsy and too verbose. But we can see that 'dead' is describing 'he' and so is an adjective, and this is the role 'dead' plays in your original ...


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phrasal verb A phrasal verb is a combination of words (a verb + a preposition word or verb +adverb) that when used together, as a rule interpretation of an alternate intending to that of the original verb. Phrasal Verb Examples break down, check in, tear up When we use phrasal verbs, we use them like normal verbs in a sentence, regardless if it’s a ...


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Here I go again… So to sum up: In a sentence with an intransitive verb, and therefore no direct object, English is willing to regard the object of a prepositional phrase to the verb as the 'patient', or receiver of the verb's action (as moderated by the preposition). This can be shown by the fact that the 'patient' becomes the subject of a passive ...


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The Original Poster's question looks interesting at first sight, but it is based on a superficial understanding of what a passive is. A passive is not merely a construction where the Direct Object of an active voice sentence becomes the Subject of a passive voice sentence. Many types of phrase and clause can become the Subject of passive sentences. These ...


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Okay, so to answer my own question (tentatively) because a comment would be too short… An intransitive verb like 'died' can't have an object. "An old man died in that bed." But nevertheless, something has happened in or to the bed, so it is the object of the preposition. And the proposition relates to the verb (because the verb is what happened). And in ...


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While I agree with the critics that the original question is problematic because no reason is given to believe that the verb+preposition combinations of prepositional passives are actually phrasal verbs, there is still a problem here. I have looked, but so far failed to find, any evidence that passives have any distinction between phrasal and prepositional ...


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Does every verb/preposition become a phrasal verb in the passive voice? No. First, your examples are not phrasal verbs, but prepositional passives. Second, you can't make a prepositional passive from every sentence containing an intransitive verb and a prepositional phrase. The examples with a * below are incorrect. She slept in the bed. The bed was ...


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A mess (noun) is a situation that is very complicated or difficult to deal with - MW To mess up, then, (as a verb) means To cause to be confused or troubled: The divorce really messed him up. It's an idiom, like "messing with one's head" or "messing me up". Nurses may feel bad about their sick patients, maybe worrying that they will suffer and ...


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The nurse means that she is psychologically harmed or damaged by the cruel fate that caused the girl in the tunnel to be killed. "To be messed up" is also used for physical damage to the body and for other mood altering things such as inebriation (e.g., "He is really messed up."). It is also used to describe situations that have either been made or have gone ...


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A phrasal verb is a fronted object complement. 'Wake up the boy' = 'Wake the boy up' = 'Wake the boy [[to] be] up'. 'Fire off a shot' = 'Fire a shot off' (presumably to make the shot be off {of the deck of the gunship}). Phrasal verbs come in two varieties: literal and idiomatic. In the idiomatic variety, the position is not literal -- it has either been ...


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There is nothing in the expression "fire off" to suggest the intent, or the lack of intent, to hit a target. However, that suggestion is carried elsewhere in the sentences you cite. A "warning shot," for example, is just that: a shot fired off to warn an adversary or threatening other against persisting in some action. Warning shots are aimed away from ...



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