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This can be interpreted several different ways. If a big boss tells his secretary "get him back", that means she should attempt to reach "him" on the phone (or some other medium obvious from the context). Ie, reestablish contact with "him". If you hear a rough looking character say that he going to "get him back", referring to some other individual, it ...


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To "get (someone) back" means to return the same that they did (or gave) to you. If they wronged you, you'd try to get revenge. If they loaned you twenty bucks, you might say "Thanks - I'll get you back," meaning: you'd return the favor.


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As Anton comments, "Get him back" can mean to make someone return. But there is another meaning. If you "get someone back", you could be getting revenge on them. They "got" you and you "got" them back". get someone back: to do something unpleasant to someone because they have done something unpleasant to you: I'll get you back for this, just you ...


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He went away and now we need him again, so we would say to someone "Get him back". I understand it as a short version of "Get him (Ask him, Compel him, Make him, Fetch him ...) (... to come) back (to here)". It is very short but that is how it is usually understood.


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Someone may have hexed you with the curse of literal mindedness. Your local faith healer may be able to help. This is a figurative use of the word "sweat," so the thermodynamics isn't an issue. The beads of moisture on a cold container look like beads of sweat on my skin, so applying the word to the container conjures an image. If I said, "I flew to my ...


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The term is sweat. From http://www.thefreedictionary.com/sweat To collect moisture in small drops from the air, as a cold water pipe. There is no requirement in English for the different possible meanings of a word to reflect an underlying consistency. In this case, the appearance of water droplets on a surface when the surrounding air is hot ...


1

We say water "condenses" on the can and that water is called "condensation." You can say the can helps the water to condense. The can is dehumidifying the air, not dehydrating as a reader stated. Dehydration removes water from things, but we don't use that for the atmosphere, only for objects. This is why we say dehydrated food not dehumidified food, and ...


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Honestly a can wouldn't be doing anything that could be described except for sitting somewhere. The action is all in the air changing form. You could say the can looks condensed or looks like it's condensing.


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Technically, you can say the cold glass dehydrated the air around it: dehydration reaction: an elimination (condensation) reaction in which the small molecule that is removed [in this case, from the air] is water but that would sound pretty lame, I think. Really, the jar isn't doing anything. There is no active process the jar is participating in. The ...


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mist up phrasal verb if a piece of glass mists up, or if something mists it up, it becomes covered with very small drops of water so that you cannot see through it The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Online


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Proceed is an "intransitive" verb: it cannot be used with a direct object, only with a subject. That is, you cans say "X proceeds", but not "We proceed X". As such, you also cannot use the passive voice ("be proceeded") since the point of passive is to express that an object gets acted upon; since there can be no object, there can be no valid passive ...


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The second is correct. "Preceded means "come before," and doesn't make sense here.


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Here's a tentative distinction, that sort of fits what vague feelings I have for what little I've read from this period. 'to want for' = 'to lack something'; The object is not integral to the subject, which is usually animate, hence OED defines this as "to be ill-provided with": "hee cannot want for money" 'to want of' usually means 'to be missing ...


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I believe that TIM is irritated that Kemp can't see that invisibility has changed the old rules of behavior and thus is tied to them like a marionette In the second instance, TIM means that he has tied a man in a sheet, closing the loose ends of the sheet with string in such a way that the unfortunate man's head is at the opposite end of shroud and his feet ...


1

Because it is always ambiguous, you have to add context: It's (I'm) too cold! Turn down the A/C. (or turn off the A/C, meaning "make it stop blowing cold air on me—now!") It's (I'm) too hot! Turn down the A/C. (or turn on the A/C, meaning "make it start blowing cold air on me—now!) Or if the heating/cooling is controlled by a thrrmostat, just avoid the ...


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I have heard the term plenty of times among my hippie friends. I suppose that the verb to "love on" is simply the loosened-up, new-agey kids' version of the term to "dote on" someone, combined with the common saying of "putting your love on" someone. The former has been around a long time, the latter more like since the seventies. There doesn't necessarily ...


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I occasionally listen to born-again preachers (since I need it more than most), and I've heard this usage for some years. Many of the people using it are intelligent, they are choosing to speak creatively to make a point. I suspect, but don't know for sure, that many such flourishes derive from the black churches in the U.S. The rhetorical poetry of black ...


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Cut is one of those verbs that has a lot of different phrasal varieties, which can make it confusing (cut off, cut through, cut over, cut away, etc.) But I think this also makes the possible usage of cut by itself much more limited. In the case of both cut down and cut down on, they have very specific meanings, and I would rarely if ever use cut by itself to ...


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With some verbs the distinction is easy to see, e.g. Part 1 Don't pick me. versus Don't pick on me." The use of 'on' turns 'me' from a direct object into an indirect object. 'on' in this context means 'with respect to' So - Don't pick me. means Don't choose me. Don't pick on me. means Don't pick/choose (a fight) with respect to me. Part 2 You ...



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