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3

"give in" does not = "hand in" nor does "give in" = "hand over" HAND IN is what students would do with a completed assignment. Suppose the teacher "handed out" question sheets to all the students. Then when they had filled in answers, they would "hand in" the completed sheets to the teacher. She first spread them "out" (to students), then gathered them ...


1

Yes people do use this phrase but it is somewhat associated with old fashioned style - especially with regard to face to face selling. Indeed you're likely to find parodies of old style shop interactions 'Could I interest Sir in one of our fine silk ties...?" If you search Youtube. I'm pretty sure Monty Python did several. I would not be surprised if ...


3

Well according to Cambridge Dictionaries Online AmEn speakers use this term; Can I interest you in something › Would you like to buy or take something: Can I interest you in a cup of coffee? As of question # 2 I believe we do not buy or take special relationships.If you are addressing a lady I will suggest saying something like " would you allow me to ...


-1

I am not a native english speaker. But i heard that "thing" comes from "think". In the sense metioned above it is something you can't named yet but you think about. I wonder if it is the etimology origin of "thing".


4

A relatively common if still somewhat colorful phrase for this situation these days is to declare the earlier problem or proposed solution rendered moot, which includes both solutions which subsume the original and those which cause the original action to no longer apply for some other reason, as in: My need to find a ride to the airport was rendered ...


0

Obsolete The problem was made obsolete with the new technology.


0

There are two slightly different idiomatic meanings: 1) It may be used as in "He backed into a buzzsaw (or fan) with that one," meaning that the person in question was moving backwards away from one thing he was trying to avoid and blindly encountered something much worse. 2) "He backed into his job there," meaning that he was presumably working in some ...


-1

Well to back is to mean that "To support with money " or " to support someone " Example : 1 she aggreed to back him for his recovery 2 lord CArnarvon agreed to back him for his discovery


2

Supersede - to take the place of (someone or something that is old, no longer useful, etc.) : to replace (someone or something) (merriam-webster.com)


2

Subsume verb: [with object] Include or absorb (something) in something else: 1.Subsume is to absorb, contain or include something into something else. See, Oxford Dictionary, “subsume” Link • The task of fixing the dripping faucet was "subsumed" in the renovation of the whole bathroom. • The problem of fixing all the typos in the ...


0

englishclub.com has a list of 200 phrasal verbs that I think is good and useful. https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/phrasal-verbs-list.htm They also have a second list with 1000 phrasal verbs. The optical presentation is good. I don't think that there are rules or tricks as to this class of verbs. The only way to get acquainted with these verbs is to ...


-1

To memorize the phrasal verb easily you may visit, http://www.tutorialpoint.org/EnglishGrammar/Phrasal_verb_page1.html All the phrasal verbs are described in a paragraph easy to remember way.


1

I often use the phrase "fish out of water" to describe a person who is doing something which they are not familiar with. This phrase carries no negative connotation, and indeed is often used in lieu of others in order to convey this meaning without insulting the subject. For example, "I'm pretty good at baseball, but my brother is more of a fish out of ...


3

Why not lost; bewildered or confused; " he is lost"; " I'm lost—can you start over?"


0

If he finds himself confused and unable to continue coherently, he is "at a loss for words", or "fumbling for words". If he makes no sense, he could be called "incoherent". If he lacked preparation, he could be described as "unprepared" or "not up to the task". If he wanders from the subject, he is "off track". If he has only a shallow grasp of the ...


2

Your question title, and descriptions, don't seem to match up to a single phrase in English. Other people are answering as if you mean "someone who is normally capable, who has agreed to do a job but lacks the experience and knowledge to do the job properly - or who could do it if they prepared, but did not prepare and are now making it up as they go along, ...


1

A very recent development is the phrase poster child for the Dunning-Kruger Effect. Dunning and Kruger published a research paper on metacognitive deficits titled "Unskilled and Unaware of It: How Difficulties in Recognizing One's Own Incompetence Lead to Inflated Self-Assessments". This won them an IgNobel in 2000. The concept, that low competence levels ...


0

I'd go with "Out of their depth" but closer to the spirit of the original could be; the lights are on, but nobody is home This is an English colloquialisms, and generally used to describe someone who is dim witted, or vacant.


0

And if the the person is literally intoxicated or mentally incapacitated and not making any sense, you would say "He's out of his mind".


2

It depends upon the context. If the comment being made is regarding something someone is saying, for example, giving an opinion on the speakers content; you might say something like the following: "He's babbling" - much like a baby makes noises that have no meaning "He's full of it" or "He's talking to hear himself speak" - meaning the speaker is not only ...


11

An English idiom which has the derogatory, perjorative connotations you describe is "out of his depth". Quoting from Dictionary.com: out of (or beyond) one's depth: in water deeper than one's height or too deep for one's safety. beyond one's knowledge or capability The image it conjures in my mind is a swimmer who has strayed too far ...


-2

The expression to speak off-the -cuff may suggest the idea: Fig. to speak without preparing a speech; to speak extemporaneously; to render a spoken opinion or estimate. (As if one's notes had been written hastily on one's cuff.) she is capable of making sense and being convincing even when she speaks off—the-cuff. I find it very difficult to ...


8

I most often hear this called winging it, meaning plunging into a conversation or task without adequate preparation or knowledge. From Etymonline: Verbal phrase wing it (1885) is said to be from a theatrical slang sense of an actor learning his lines in the wings before going onstage, or else not learning them at all and being fed by a prompter in the ...


1

The dominant idea of keep is hold onto: [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Have or retain possession of: Origin late Old English cēpan 'seize, take in', also 'care for, attend to', of unknown origin. OED The meaning of keep expands as the notion of hold onto is applied to various conditions and situations: 1.1 Retain or reserve for future use: ...


4

I think you are confusing the meaning of the individual words going and out with the meaning of the phrase, which, as has been said, depends on context. The opposite of The fire is going out. would not be The fire is coming in. The phrase has too many contextual variables for a single answer:- The candle is going out. I am going out with Bob. That fashion ...


1

It should be coming in, from come in; made famous by John Le Carre's international bestseller The Spy Who Came In From The Cold. "But no, I was out for stars: I would not come in. I meant not even if asked, and I hadn't been." Robert Frost http://quotes.dictionary.com/search/come+in?page=1#xIyet8I5KkjjiZB3.99 "When you go out, check the look of the sky; ...


0

The opposite of going is not always coming; in your situation I would say it is staying. If I'm not going out then I'm probably 'staying in'.


6

The answer to your question depends on what "going out" means as a single entity. In its most common usage, it means "leaving the house, especially for an evening's entertainment." In that sense, its opposite is "staying in." If you use "going out" to mean something else, then its opposite becomes whatever is the opposite of that sense of the two words ...


0

I think that the most hard-to-explain idiomatic wording here is "fall in love with." After all, we don't say that we "fall in friendship with," "fall in sorrow with," "fall in appreciation with," "fall in envy with," or "fall in fear with" others, any more than we "fall in anger" with them. And yet we don't seem to view love as existing entirely on a ...


1

Literally, organization X called Y together: [WITH OBJECT] Announce or decide that (an event, especially a meeting, election, or strike) is to happen: But organization X gathered Y together: [WITH OBJECT] Bring together and take in from scattered places or sources: Calling Y together is a part of the process of gathering Y together, ...


3

In its oldest senses, of meant something like “away from”, which of has lost but is preserved in off (“come off the porch”, “what a rip-off!”). It comes from the same Indo-European root as the Latin word ab, which roughly means from or “the source of”. The general meaning of indicating where something came from, or coming away from something, is still ...


1

Susan’s speech and struggle during those rough times has borne fruit. or Susan’s speech and struggle during those rough times has come to fruition.



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