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I have a simple rule. If we are focusing on the replacement function of a subject, we would say: A is replaced by B If we are focusing on the replacement of the subject itself, we would say: A is replaced with B. Let me know if this works. =)


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While perfectly understandable the combination "grant with" sounds awkward. More normal sounding is "provide his country with..."


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Americans certainly use back-to-back in reference to simple physical arrangements such as back-to-back seats in a railway car.


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I see and use the phrase often as an American, and this cursory search of a UK news source shows it's common there too: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/search/?queryText=back-to-back&sort=recent It's common in both dialects and I've never thought of it as anatomical.


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If they are requirements as to what your application must be or must accomplish, I would definitely use "for". If the "requirements" you think they might memtion are more tangential to the app itself, such as hardware environment, I would use something more specific than "about"; like "related to", "that might affect", etc. , Or else, don't call them ...


1

As others have indicated, the usage seems established, if only by dint of previous usage. However, I find it an awkward expression because it is imprecise, ambiguous (perhaps only to those of us who over-think), and requires interpretation. The problem is with, “She pointed me...” Does it mean, “She physically re-positioned me (to face in a particular ...


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Definition: Point as a verb merriam-webster: to show someone where to look by moving your finger or an object held in your hand in a particular direction. Example:point the way to new knowledge — Elizabeth Hall Used in the sense of 'towards', there this Example construction: merriam-webster: We can leave when the minute hand points to 12. Standard ...


1

There are a couple of phrasal verbs you can consider: model oneself on Take (someone admired or respected) as an example to copy: he models himself on rock legend Elvis Presley [OD] pattern yourself on sb/sth (BrE) to copy something or someone: She patterns herself on her big sister. [Cambridge] There are common phrases ...


0

"turn out" as an intransitive verb (usually followed by "to be") means "prove to be" e.g. "His book turned out to be a failure". "turn out" (not followed by "to be") means "to end up", "to result". e.g. "His painting turned out beautifully.", "Don't worry, everything will turn out fine" Sometimes "turn out" and "turn out to be" are interchangeable. ...


4

You are always emulating her. (Verb) to try to equal or excel; imitate with effort to equal or surpass: to emulate one's father as a concert violinist.... Sons often emulate their fathers. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/emulate (Some dictionaries define it as equalling or excelling [not trying to]. So sometimes people use ...


1

That would be your role model. Merriam-Webster tells us: someone who another person admires and tries to be like


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Indian English has a very logical word for the opposite of postpone: prepone.


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...so we'll have to move it forward to Wednesday.


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"Dragged on like a Methodist wedding" won't go down well with Methodists, but would be understandable to people who consider alcohol a vital ingredient to good wedding. (It's also not very common, but that it stuck in my mind that I heard it says something in favour of its vividness as much as it is probably best not to use it). Less specifically, and less ...


2

Be like watching paint dry: ( fromTFD) Exciting as watching paint dry (sarcastic) .(McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Idioms Dictionary) if you say that watching an activity is like watching paint dry, you mean that it is very boring To me, watching golf on television is about as interesting as watching paint dry.


2

To advance: (fron TFD) to cause to occur sooner. The meeting will be advanced to Wednesday


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Not only is the form you ask about reasonably common today, but use of it goes back more than 200 years. From a letter to Mr. Urban dated September 12, in The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle (September 1808): Now, to arrest the attention of my friends, and dispose the friends of others who may think with me, with your leave, I will point ...


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We don't, they evolve from normal uses of verbs with prepositions or adverbs becoming more specialised or generalised in use until they acquire a meaning that isn't quite the same as before and are then learn the same way that individual words are learnt. Run into in the sense of "encounter" started as a metaphor of actually running and this running ...


6

Colloquially, if A asks B, what are you up for tonight?, A would be inquiring what B would like to do tonight. There is an implication contained that A is interested in making or proposing an arrangement. If A asks B, what are you up to tonight A would, ostensibly at least, be inquiring as to what B's plans were for the evening. Equally A may be about to ...


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Yes, this is a pretty common usage. See Wiktionary. (transitive) To direct or encourage (someone) in a particular direction. If he asks for food, point him toward the refrigerator.


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Susan’s speech and struggle during those rough times has been proved advantageous Susan's speech and struggle during those rough times has been recompensed I advise you to keep your vocabulary simple, however. In that case, perhaps use "rewarded".


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been beneficial, been rewarding, check here for more


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What you are looing for was "on her case"


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You don't get on someone unless you are actually climbing on them. But you can get on at someone. It's highly idiomatic, which means it's not easy to find a reference for it, but Chambers does include it briefly. get on at or to someone colloq to pester or criticize them continually. [Chambers] The "continually" might be a bit misleading; if I say ...


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harangue, which can be used as a verb or as a noun, might fit. My cousin harangued my sister that she should not dare to open her mouth to speak about her wedding, but should meekly comply with tradition, like her mother and grandmothers and their mothers before them.


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Your cousin and (your) sister : They do not get along nicely.



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