Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Both are correct as they are both conjugated the same way with "get" acting as a helping verb in the former example. To mix up and confuse are similar enough in definition to be used interchangeably, but the preference of one over another and either conjugation are colloquially driven.


0

The split verb question aside, what the sentence really needs is tightening. You don't need the word "out." It should just read - This really helps a broke college student. And in channeling our inner William Zinser, we should also get rid of "really." This helps a broke college student.


0

The want+preposition is less often used now, except as preserved in old expressions like "to want for nothing", or "wanting in courtesy/manners/common sense etc". I don't know if this was the original sense, but to the modern ear, the presence of a preposition denotes that the less common, archaic meaning of "want" (ie to be lacking or needful) is ...


0

Even though the "to" use is noted as old/archaic, the construction can be thought of in contemporary terms. In general, the presence of the preposition "to" in front of a verb is just an infinitive phrase. In that context, "to want" is not really that different even in a contemporary context from other infinitive phrases such as "to eat," "to walk," etc.


0

Even if a street or a road is horizontal you can hear people say they go down or up the road. Only local people know whether down or up is the proper adverb to use. They know how the land lies, often these adverbs are in accord with the flow of a river. But other factors may play a role. So it is of no importance when someone says he is going to the park or ...


0

Moving "down" almost always means moving to a lower place, either literally or figuratively, but there are several usages where the meaning is "away" from the speaker's current location, no matter its elevation relative to his destination. We have "down the line" (either literally a rail line or figuratively the course of the future), "down the block," ...


0

Latin tractare is a verb that developed quite a lot of uses. When used of writers and their topic it could be used with accusative/object case (tractare aliquid) or with the preposition de + topic. In English the typical prepositions used with topic are on (a treatise on logic) or of (to talk of politics). "Of" is parallel to Latin de.


2

The expression here should be to catch up on (chores/reading/accounts). "I cannot (or can not) catch up on all of these." Examples for "to catch up with": Succeed in reaching a person who is ahead of one: "You go with Stasia and Katie, and I’ll catch up with you." Talk to (someone) whom one has not seen for some time in order to find out what he or she ...


3

This is a question that well illustrates the inconsistency of analyses surrounding these whotsits. From UsingEnglish.com Phrasal Verb: Put on {Separable (optional [except with pronouns])} Meaning: Start wearing Example: I PUT my coat ON [You should put some clothes on.] [Put it on.] (choosing the obviously corresponding usage from those ...



Top 50 recent answers are included