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1

My son went to a Montessori school from pre-school through 2nd grade. They worked on phonemes -- they were required to say their names as phonemes, so my son was d/e/v/i/n. While I think a certain amount of phonemics can be used, it's also an extremely limited way to teach reading. The best approach is a combination of both approaches, phonics and whole ...


6

Phonemically, the consonant cluster at the start of queen is usually analysed as two successive phonemes, a stop and a glide (or semivowel), so as /kw/ not as the labialized /kʷ/. Phonetically it may in fact be [kʰʷ]in some speakers, but this is not a phonemic distinction, only an allophone. That means the phonemes of queen are /kwin/. Compare twin ...


1

These two vowel sounds are pretty similar, the difference between them is that the /ə/ is used in weak (unstressed) syllables & the /ɜ/ is used in the stressed ones. Yes, these two sounds are the central ones and the position of the speech organs seem to be correct in your description. Speech therapists also recommend raising the back of the tongue a ...


0

The pronunciation is the same, except that the "er" is held longer in bird to aid the pronunciation of the "d;" otherwise, it sounds like a "t" making the name "Bert." Please note that this is the North American pronunciation and that British or Australian pronunciation might be different...I'd be willing to bet they are.


1

The way I pronounce wikinames is /'wɪkiˌneimz/, where the first syllable has the same vowel as wick and is stressed.


0

There are specific rules for the elision of /t/ in consonant clusters. However, these do not apply to the /t/ we see in negative contractions in English. The /t/ in negative contractions in English can have three main realisations. In increasing order of likelihood (all other things being equal): it can be a full /t/ it can be dropped altogether it can be ...


2

Some of the answers and comments here seem to say that the /k/ in asked is not elided in standard Englishes. To counter this misconception, as well as to through some light on masked and risked, I thought it might be a good idea to put some information here from vetted published sources, and world-renowned professional phoneticians of English. The following ...


2

In some dialects in Britain (particularly around the Thames Estuary) you will hear for example asked pronounced without the 'k'. Example 'I never said as 'ow 'e shouldn't; I only arst yer if it was the sime.' 'Yea, thet's 'oo I mean.' ''Is nime is Blakeston—Jim Blakeston. I've only spoke to 'im once. Liza of Lambeth: By Somerset Maugham Note: In the ...


1

No. Some people may not always pronounce these words clearly, some people do. If you want to come up with a rule for others to follow (good luck with that!), how about "pronounce words clearly so they are not confused with other words". For the record, I have never heard masked pronounced as mast, though the difference can be subtle and those for whom ...



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