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2

The voiced velar fricative /ɣ/ does exist in Liverpool speech, but I'm fairly sure it's a more recent development of intervocalic /g/. I haven't managed to figure out exactly when /g/ does and doesn't change to /ɣ/, but here are two examples. 1. The town-name Maghull [stressed on the second syllable] is pronounced /məˈɣʊɫ/. 2. If you watch just about any ...


3

There is no such thing as, "The whole syllable is aspirated." What you are describing is breathy voicing of the vowel, probably. 'Tis not aspiration. Non-nasal stops may be aspirated. In some languages, voiceless (non-nasal) stops can be preaspirated, but typically aspiration occurs upon the release of the stop. Both voiced and voiceless stops can be ...


7

EDIT: I waited ten hours for other answers to appear, then presented my own findings. I do not pretend that mine is the only possible answer, and would like to hear what others have to say in their own answers. The English word playa is pronounced /ˈplaɪ.ə/ in English with two syllables, with the dot there representing a syllabic boundary. English ...


0

As it is a Spanish word, Spanish phonetical rules should apply, and the semi-vowel, yot (j) would separate the "ai" dipthong from the final "a"


-1

This pronunciation sounds pretty normal, and not difficult to understand. I think somewhat slurred pronunciations of already (among other words obviously) are fairly common around the whole country. For instance, I'm from Michigan and I hear already pronounced something like erredy pretty frequently. That "l" gets lost a lot in North American dialects. ...


1

It's a slurring of the following sounds. In your "similar" examples try replacing them. Thread sounds pretty distinct from tread. Python is not the same a pyson. Going over it in my head and articulating it out I'm realizing Thread is tongue starting from the top of the teeth, Python is the tongue coming back inwards.


2

From John Wells' blog: As I put it in LPD, English [p t k] are aspirated when they occur at the beginning of a syllable in which the vowel is strong. They are unaspirated when preceded by s at the beginning of a syllable when followed by any FRICATIVE, as in lapse læps, depth depθ if immediately followed by another ...


0

The word is pronounced LEK-chur. (Stress on 1st syllable, "k" sound) Pronounced with no "k", it sounds like "lecher" or "letcher", (a pervert)



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