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The rule you cite works fairly well for adjectives that are NOT followed by a noun: I'm hungry. This class is so boring. This test has me confused. It gets a little more complicated and perhaps more subject to personal variations when it comes to stressing with adjectives before nouns, particularly if they are stacked: Oh, look at that cute little ...


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I definitely put a higher stress on 'time', as in the first case; however, the difference in stress between 'good' and 'time' are slight. In this particular example, my intonation is more prominent than my stress pattern - the more enthusiastic, the greater the difference between "have" (low) and "time" (high). In a broader sense, in the case of an ...


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The loanword llano from Spanish. n. an extensive grassy plain with few trees.


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That practice is called transcription: 1.2 A form in which a speech sound or a foreign character is represented: ODO Transliteration is not necessarily a phonetic operation: Transliterate: Write or print (a letter or word) using the closest corresponding letters of a different alphabet or language: ODO Because Arabic has a ...


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The general rule has [ði] before phonetic vowels, [ðə] before phonetic consonants. This is parallel to the use of "an" and "a". However, there are a few complications: [ði] is also used in some cases as an emphasized form of the definite article; this can occur no matter what sound the following word starts with. You might on occasion hear an English ...


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the is pronounced with as a long "thee" [ði] before the vowels.


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Metagraphy [1]2 The rendering of letters of an alphabet of one language into the possible equivalents of another; transliteration. Just unconfirmed (according to Wiktionary). I knew what orthography was (the conventional spelling system of a language) and understood that ortho is the Greek etymological root for 'straight' (orthography meaning ...


2

In her paper "Spelling-Manipulation and Present-Day Advertising," Louise Pound calls this phenomenon by several names: spelling-manipulation re-spellings spelling-perversions Pound theorizes that originally, a few advertisers used this to catch consumers' attention, as the incongruity of seeing "Nite Lite" or "EZ Walker" instead of the expected spelling ...


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I don't think there is a single word answer. As you can see from this Venn Diagram, the point where the blue and red circles overlap (same meaning/same pronunciation/different spelling) there is no single word credited. This is likely due to the fact that it happens very rarely.


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Texting abbreviations are obviously the most commonly mis-spelt versions of many words but understood and pronounced correctly. eg: sis m8 go2 ny 2moro


2

I guess you're right, there is a slight difference, based on the roundedness of the following vowel. For consonants it is called labialization. But in English the degree of labialization is very minimal, and is totally non-phonemic. I wouldn't want to call it a 'labialized s' because that would give the impression that it was far more labialized than it ...


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It is called allegro speech. The deliberate misspelling, respelling, or non-standard alternative spelling of words, usually with the purpose of conveying rapid or informal speech patterns. [grammar.about.com] This is also related to the very nature of English language (and most languages) where there is no exact one-to-one correspondence between ...


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Based on the example you've given, I think the most clear answer is: Advertisement and Marketing. Words like "nite" as in "Nick at Nite" or "thru" as in "Drive Thru", "tonite" as in "Tonite Only", even "donut" as in "Dunkin' Donuts", are all marketing and advertisement inventions--mostly of the American variety. While donut predates Dunkin' Donuts by ...



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