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7

It doesn't. If it did, spectre (pronounced /ˈspɛk.təɹ/ and spectra (pronounced /ˈspɛk.tɹə/) would be exact homophones, and they aren't, although they do sound similar. Similarly, we don't think Dexter and extra are perfect rhymes, although you could get around this in a humorous poem by pronouncing extra as exter. Maybe some aspect of your native ...


0

There are two aspects to consider here: voicing and aspiration. We make sounds by driving air from the lungs, through the larynx, past the vocal cords and on into the vocal tract. As the air passes through the larynx, it passes between the vocal cords. If vocal cords are vibrating as the air enters the larynx, or start vibrating before the air has finished ...


-1

Likely because IPA is a joke. In a standard non translation dictionary (i.e. not french to english) the native english speaker is using the book to conferm spelling and look up meaning. Accent is not a consideration. While written english is non phonetic compared with alphabets that use visual accents, IPA is in itself a separate language that would require ...



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