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Hard/Soft G is more variable at the beginning of words, but G (or double G) is always hard in the middle of these longer words if it is also so in the root. "Singer" could be hard or soft, depending on if you mean "one who sings" or "one who singes." The only common exceptions I can find are the words that use the word "get" like "forgetful" and a long list ...


0

Yes, it's fine in American English. I have a non-standard theory of this change, according to which it is an assimilation in obstruency of the "palatal" glide of "you" to a preceding coronal obstruent. That is [j] -> [ʒ] after alveolar or palato-alveolar obstruent. Please understand that syllable onset [j] in English is actually not a palatal, but rather ...


1

Both [æz] with stress, and [əz] without stress, sound fine, to me (I'm a native English speaker). But the stress does matter. You can't stress the [əz] version and have it sound like normal American English (I can't say about other dialects). I've used brackets for your examples instead of slashes, since the variation between the vowels [æz] and [əz] that ...


4

The usual linguistic term for the complete loss of a sound is elision; in this case, the sound /t/ was elided when it came after a fricative and before a homorganic syllabic consonant [n̩] or [l̩] (which are usually analyzed phonemically as /ən/ and /əl/, and pronounced that way for some speakers). The Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language ...


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I think the term you are looking for is assimilation: Assimilation has a very precise meaning when it’s related to studies of languages. Is a common phonological process bye which the phonetics of a speech segment becomes more like another segment in a word. In other words it’s when a letter (sound) is influenced by the letter (sound) before or after ...



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