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I apologise for not being able to match you in the phonetic alphabet. I never learned it. But no, I don't hear the same stress as you. I would stress the "expect" but not the "some". Why would one want to stress "someone" – to create a contrast with possible "something" or "non-human"? Hardly. Whereas one would stress "expecting" because your sentence is ...


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There is no general principle underlying this rule; it might possibly be a useful rule of thumb in some cases, but that is somewhat of a coincidence. Rather than laying out more specific examples, then, I'll simply talk about why this rule generally holds. With very few exceptions, "g" can only be soft when it comes before one of the letters "e", "i" or ...


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It can be acceptable, and is certainly common in some dialects of English (particularly American Louisiana Cajun/Creole). Here in Michigan, USA, it seems that we typically do enunciate both letters in your sample sentence. But every dialect has oddities. For instance, in my Midwestern American dialect (and somewhat specific to Michigan) we say ...


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It looks to me like the exercise may be about the vowel sounds. English vowels can generally be divided into two categories. One category of vowels, called "lax vowels", have restricted distribution in stressed syllables: they can only occur before a consonant, and not before another vowel or at the end of a word. In contrast, the "tense vowels" can occur ...


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The majority of English speakers do not exactly pronounce a "w" at the end of a syllable like "show" or "fellow". There is a written w, and a consonantal "w" sound did indeed exist in these words historically. However, because of the historic tow-toe merger, the sound in these words is now identical for speakers of most dialects to the "long o" sound used in ...


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On that symbol. It's here: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/help/phonetics.html that symbol is the short vowel "u" of "foot" and "book." See also: http://my-english-blackboard.blogspot.ca/2014/12/british-english-vowels.html http://my-english-blackboard.blogspot.com.es/p/pronunciation-tips-u-and.html


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There is a basic rule for the pronunciation of /r/ in non-rhotic varieties of English, for example Southern Standard British English. We only pronounce /r/ if it precedes a vowel sound (sound, not letters are the important factor). So in standard British English we see the following: kærət (carrot) rəʊd (road) pa:k (park) In the words above we see ...


3

The relevant rule: Elision of alveolar plosives /t/ /d/ In rapid, casual speech the alveolar plosives are commonly elided when preceded by the following consonantal sounds: In the case of /t/ preceded by /s, f, ʃ, n, l, p, k, tʃ/ ... In the case of /d/ preceded by /z, ð, n, l, b, g, dʒ/ Working with Words: An Introduction to ...


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It isn't obvious, but this is a duplicate of a question I answered a few days ago, here: Why the extra syllable?. It's not obvious, and supposing I've correctly understood this question, because (1) the glides [j]/[w] of this question were there all along, and just become more obvious when the following [l] is syllabified, and (2) the syllabicity of the [l] ...


3

Simple answer: no. There is no phonological rule that I’m aware of that requires ‘doubling’ any final glides (or making a diphthongal offglide out of a long monophthong) in any variety of English. It’s certainly true, however, that many speakers (not just of American English, but also of other dialects) add a brief [ə] between any high vowel and an [ɫ], but ...


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The rule you cite works fairly well for adjectives that are NOT followed by a noun: I'm hungry. This class is so boring. This test has me confused. It gets a little more complicated and perhaps more subject to personal variations when it comes to stressing with adjectives before nouns, particularly if they are stacked: Oh, look at that cute little ...


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I definitely put a higher stress on 'time', as in the first case; however, the difference in stress between 'good' and 'time' are slight. In this particular example, my intonation is more prominent than my stress pattern - the more enthusiastic, the greater the difference between "have" (low) and "time" (high). In a broader sense, in the case of an ...



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