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One of the things specific for English and few other languages is that although a long way from being phonetic, common pairs or common combinations are still strong guiding principles and rules. We are talking in general that there are (oh) so many exceptions, so that we cannot be certain about every particular rule. This absolutely does not mean that there ...


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Diacritics—as opposed to normal, phonemic IPA transcriptions—are not good for dictionary entries for several reasons. The most important of these is that an individual speaker will vary their pronunciation of a word in different environments. Each different type of pronunciation would require different diacritics. Many other things can affect a ...


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ðɪs ɪz ə letə ɪn fəni:mɪk skrɪpt ‖ ɪts wʌn θɪŋ tə bi eɪbl tə seɪ ə wɜ:b | bət ɪts ənʌðə tə bi eɪbl tə bi ʌndəstʊd pəhæps | ju dʒəs ni:d tə meɪk ðə həʊl θɪŋ ə bɪp mɔ:r ɪntrestɪŋ | fə jə sʌn fər ɪgzæmpl ‖ ju kʊd gɪv ɪm səm rɪdlz | ɔ: sm dʒəʊks hɪəz ə dʒəʊk fə ju ‖ waɪ wəz sɪks efreɪd əv sevn? bɪkəz sevn eɪt naɪn! ɔ: ju kʊd dʒəs raɪt ɪm səm letəz ...


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Some native speakers may say that they can pronounce any new word they see, but they can't. And so if us native speakers can't, neither can anyone else! A simple way to show that this claim isn't true even for native speakers is to take the letter cluster : -ough This can have nine different pronunciations in English. Here are some example words and ...


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For starters, how about all the words with 'ough' that can be pronounced half a dozen different ways? TOUGH, THROUGH, COUGH, DOUGH, THOUGHT, PLOUGH... For the record, I believe learning phonetic pronunciation can be helpful, but it should be taught in conjunction with etymology so there is a fuller awareness of why things happen the way they happen in ...


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There are thousands. Just off the top of my head ... lead (v), led (past tense of lead), lead (n), lede (n) bedridden, bedraggled, bedroll house (n), house (v), lose (v), loose (adj) retake (n), retake (v), remake (n), remake (v) smooth (adj), smooth (v), thesis, these, theses Afterthought: I've found that kids can sometimes get motivated to learn ...


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Any word with silent letters is likely to be a trap. Answer is one such; there are differences between tongue and plague; there is a difference between timeline and Bakelite. In fact, many names can be awkward — the classic example is Featherstonehaugh (pronounced Fanshaw). Words where the verb has the same spelling as the noun. Process, record, ...



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