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10

In English, the only real difference between these two is that [ʌ] occurs in stressed syllables, and [ə] occurs in unstressed syllables. There is a slight acoustic difference between the two ([ʌ] is supposed to be a tiny bit lower and possibly backer than [ə]), but it is so slight that it is virtually indistinguishable. Also note that many full vowels ...


10

For RP, doesn't khan, con, corn work? If you allow widely-known foreign foods, how about pawed, pod, pad, where pad is as in pad thai (and that one even works for rhotic accents).


5

A phoneme is the smallest sound component of speech. A syllable will often consist of more than one phoneme. Speech synthesis software operates by playing a sequence of phonemes to produce intelligible sounds. Allophones are phonemes with differing sounds. For example, the B in trouble and bitter are considered to be allophones as they both consist of ...


4

The two l s in little are allophones - they're two different sounds representing the same phoneme (basic sound)/grapheme (symbol representing a sound). Native speakers don't normally think about those two l s as making a different sound. In Japanese, はげ can be pronounced haɣe instead of hage, so this is an example of g and ɣ being allophon In some ...


4

See the lot-cloth split section of Wikipedia. Here are two excerpts: The lengthening and raising generally happened before the fricatives /f/, /θ/ and /s/. In American English the raising was extended to the environment before /ŋ/ and /ɡ/, and in a few words before /k/ as well, giving pronunciations like /lɔŋ/ for long, /dɔɡ/ for dog, and /tʃɔklɨt/ for ...


4

I'm betting you can find this in a Scottish or Irish English accent. I'm no expert, but I would suggest looking at cat/caught/cot as a possible triple of those vowels. You'd have to find one that escaped the caught/cot merger, and that has a rather back variant of the BATH vowel. To wit: cat /kɑt/ caught /kɒt/ cot /kɔt/ In addition, most ...


4

There's no single word for it. It’s the diphthong /ɔɪ/, a glide which ‘begins between back half-open and open positions, moves upwards and forwards towards [ɪ]; lips open rounded changing to neutral’ (‘Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language’).


4

Do these work? Sawed, sod and Sade. (Sade being the last name of Marquis de Sade.) Bought, bot and Baht. (Baht being the currency of Thailand.)


3

I have found the following triple, which however is only valid for non rhotic accents : bard /bɑːd/ bod /bɒd/ baud /bɔːd/


2

æ The near-open front unrounded vowel, or near-low front unrounded vowel, is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨æ⟩, a lowercase ae ligature. Both the symbol and the sound are commonly referred to as “ash”. ɑ The open back unrounded vowel, or low back ...


2

I believe I’ve just discovered something that sheds light on this mystery. Peter Shore kindly pointed out this vowel chart, in which figure the following two charts (amongst others). First, the American one: And now the British one: This probably explains why it’s so hard for me to find a minimal triple, since General American has only two vowels ...


2

Right, This happens to be a very interesting question, unfortunately I think I can only help in part, but we'll see! You're right, there is a historic reason for the differing orthography; if we look at the etymologies of the words, we find two very different historical roots. We will start (for no specific reason) with fur, whence inflected to form furry. ...


1

I think the problem is to do with the accents represented in the audio source. The vowel in appetite might be better represented as /a/ rather than /ӕ/. This is the value of the TRAP vowel in many younger RP speakers. The person who says Mark sounds as if she is a Northern English speaker. Northern English speakers often lack the back /ɑ/ vowel, and they ...


1

I did some investigation and I have determined that the dictionary entries returned by the Google define: operator are from the New Oxford American Dictionary, including the pronunciation symbols. The OxfordDictionaries.com site has a complete key to these pronunciations. To determine this, I started the Wikipedia article that compares many of these ...


1

I don't think one can attempt to answer the question as is. By definition, if you merge, in production two sounds in your own dialect with respect to another (or rather rewrite one sound to an existing one), then two words that started in the standard dialect as different but are pronounced the same in the dialect are by definition indistinguishable ...



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