New answers tagged

1

A slightly more muscular construction might avoid the triple past participle. "The idea that had presented itself during the meeting plagued him all night, and he lay awake dwelling on it until... "Had lain" is correct, but it just sounds sort of, well, lame, at least to my ears. The revision would set the "idea" off better as something remote and ...


1

Lain is correct. Lain is the past participle of Lie. Laid is the past participle of Lay. You Lie on the bed reading the book. You Lay the book on the bed.


0

The passive voice here would be: When the sentence is written (present); When the sentence was written (past); When the statement has been written (present perfect); And just for good measure: when a future is meant, the present passive voice would be used. For example: When the statement is written, we will issue it.


0

Past Perfect Progressive: I had been eating oranges for two hours before I decided to order steak. Future Perfect Progressive: By the time you pick me up tomorrow I will have been eating oranges for two hours.


0

Present Perfect Sophia: "Have you eaten oranges today?" John: "I have eaten oranges for more than two hours now." Past Perfect Sophia: "Had you eaten oranges before you had steak for dinner last night?" John: "I had eaten oranges before I ate the steak at last night's dinner." Future Perfect Sophia: "What will you have eaten before you visit me ...


0

Present perfect: Have you eaten (any) oranges today? Past Perfect: Had you eaten oranges before you ate the steak last night? Future perfect: Will you have eaten before you visit me tomorrow? Past perfect progressive: Had you been eating oranges before you ate the steak...? Yes, I had been eating oranges before... Future Perfect Progressive: Will you ...


10

Prepositions and -ing forms: Many prepositions take noun phrases as Complements, for example the preposition of: I'm scared of spiders. In the sentence above, we see the noun phrase spiders occurring as the Complement of the preposition. When we want to use a verb (technically a clause) as the Complement of a preposition like of, we need to use an -ing ...


2

It is correct. But if the sentence were better punctuated you would understand more clearly what has happened. Had I written it, I would have put parenthetical commas around he'd never heard of. In other words the of is not operating in conjunction with the verb which follows, but forms part of the previous clause. Some might argue that it should have ...


0

some character he'd never heard of is the subject of the sentence. It is certainly reduced from Now some character that he'd never heard of had underbid and outperformed him. Hear of is a phrasal verb which also means agree, obey, accept



Top 50 recent answers are included