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From Sarah Woodbury's website: Romance and Fantasy in Medieval Wales On the use of the word ‘gotten’ Several UK readers have wondered about the use of the word ‘gotten’ in my medieval mysteries. Since the word is not in common usage in England right now, it seems odd to them to read it at all, and a glaring ‘Americanism’ in a book set in the ...


3

According to Middle English Dictionary, Volume 4 By Hans Kurath, gript was one of the spellings all those hundreds of years ago. Beyond that we can look at Google ngram: gript,gripped. From the graph we can see that the 'gripped' spelling took off from 1850 onwards.


3

In Australian English, which for the most part is similar to British English, I have never come across “gript”. “Gripped” is the only form of the word that I have ever come across. I suspect that the former is probably old English, and no longer in use, or looking at the usage example, possibly a “dialect spelling”.


0

I'm from the U.S. In the South, 'done' can be used instead of 'did', just like 'seen' is sometimes used instead of 'saw'. Use of the past participle form in place of the past simple form is pretty common in the South. It is also common to use 'done' in place of 'had'. For example, we sometimes say: "I done told you that" instead of "I had told you that". It ...


0

Many dialects of English, throughout the English speaking world, have different forms from the standard for the parts of verbs. "I done it" is not part of any standard English as far as I am aware (whether British, American, South African, Australian, or any other). But it is widely used in parts of England and parts of the US: I don't know about the other ...


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Your teacher made a mistake, quite possible as we all are human-beings. Or maybe s/he just changed had to take over into took over? Anyway the answer had to took over is grammatically incorrect.



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