Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

English is context dependent when it comes to choice of words. A few senses- Bring all open files**: "open" could mean files that are not sealed, unfolded or tied. E.g. an open book Bring all opened files: e.g. the formerly classified files. (TFD)


0

This depends on the context of your writing, if your writing about the past tense I would use 'all opened files'. For the present tesne I would use 'all open files' since the open files (to me) makes out that the files are there infront of you. working on from this; I have opened all the files (Past) I have the files open (Present)


3

"Opened files" does indeed mean "Files that have been opened" [and are assumed to be still open], but the adjective "open" does the job well, and sounds more natural to me.


0

It should be either "endogenously and exogenously derived acetaldehyde" or, less elegantly but still intelligibly, "endogenously- and exogenously-derived acetaldehyde". Without the hyphens the adverbs both unambiguously modify the (past-participial) adjective, while with only one hyphen the adverb without a hyphen is left dangling.


0

One does not hyphenate -ly adverbs that precede adjectives.


5

That term "past participle" is the very worst piece of terminology that linguistics has inherited from traditional grammar. It has nothing to do with the past at all, at least in current day English. It ought to be called "passive participle", and in your example "He is trapped", even if "trapped" is interpreted as a participle, there is no past tense ...


5

There is only one tensed verb in: He is trapped. Since is is the present tense third-person singular indicative of to be, this sentence is in the present tense. As for trapped, it is an adjective. You may call it a participial adjective if you’d like. But it is not a verb, and therefore it is not a past participle. Note that English has two sorts ...


2

I do not think the second sentence is grammatically incorrect in the technical sense, but it is a bit awkward. The word "while" implies that the action following it (James walked through a glass door) will be continuous: you might say "when something happened," but when you say "while something happened," it implies that that "something" took a noteworthy ...


2

You have misunderstood what is meant by Energy Imbalance Market. What they have intended here is to highlight the imbalanced draw on energy resources (e.g. drawing at night from power reserves stored from a solar grid). It is almost an Energy Imbalance System, but because there is no formal description of the interaction of the players, it is simply ...


6

In general, these verbs used to end in a g, k or ch /tʃ/ sound. In some of the modern forms of these words, this sound has changed, such as in "buy". The "t" of the ending is just a form of the past tense suffix, as in "burnt" or "learnt". Before this -t, a g, k or ch sound often alternated with a kh-like sound /x/ in older forms of English (this sound is ...



Top 50 recent answers are included