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It is Titanic, created in 1997 by James Cameron. No, you can’t post-modify a proper noun with an 'integrated' subordinate clause. The only solution is to use a 'supplementary' adjunct, the loosely attached kind set off with a comma (or dashes), and spoken as a separate intonation unit. But note that supplements are not modifiers, so although the created- ...


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You would need a comma after "Titanic," or after any proper noun, and before the participle, whereas you do not with the common noun example. Another example: "It was a book read by many high school students," versus "It was Moby Dick, read by many high school students." The first sentence answers the question: what type of book, what characterizes the ...


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Sure, proper nouns are subject to the same modifiers as common nouns. Here's the start of a review of the movie in question: The movie "Titanic", written, directed, and produced by James Cameron centers on the sinking of the RMS Titanic, while also focusing on a fictitious love story between two forbidden loves.


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There is a contemporary vernacular usage generally meaning "clothed", though it can also mean "covered" which would be closer to the usage you are describing. There is also a jargon term in construction meaning "to cover one material with another". Being an industry term, and with a vastly more common usage that is similarly specific, this usage seems ...


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Concerned isn't modifying anything, because it isn't an adjective here. It is the past tense of the verb concern. The subject of that verb is Obama's anger. It's not all of his anger, of course, but just his anger towards Clinton, further limited to that part of his anger with the greatest magnitude (or perhaps the anger at that moment when its magnitude ...


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This really is not a grammatically correct sentence, though it is perhaps excused a little given that it is a description of what someone said, which is to say the NYT correctly reported a grammatically incorrect sentence by the original speaker. You can argue that it is an elipsis: The angriest [moment] Obama [had] with Clinton concerned... But to ...


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"Angry" is an adjective, "angriest" is the superlative form of that adjective. The thing is, adjectives modify nouns. They are not nouns themselves and they cannot serve as subjects. "Angriest," in other words, describes Obama, and yet "the angriest Obama became with Clinton" is treated as the sentence of the subject, which doesn't work. We need a true ...


3

The angriest Obama became with Clinton /referred to/had to do with/was about/was related to/ the Arab Spring and the uprising in Egypt's Tahrir Square. concern - To have to do with or relate to: an article that concerns the plight of homeless people.


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A slightly more muscular construction might avoid the triple past participle. "The idea that had presented itself during the meeting plagued him all night, and he lay awake dwelling on it until... "Had lain" is correct, but it just sounds sort of, well, lame, at least to my ears. The revision would set the "idea" off better as something remote and ...


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Lain is correct. Lain is the past participle of Lie. Laid is the past participle of Lay. You Lie on the bed reading the book. You Lay the book on the bed.



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