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"I have never seen..." should be used in most cases. You could use "I never saw that movie" if you have not seen it and you know that there will be no more opportunities to see it. Unlikely, unless it has been banned, or you are certain that all copies have been destroyed. As you suggest, saw is more definite - consider the difference between "I have never ...


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As written the two phrases in the question mean exactly the same thing. "I never saw that movie" covers the entirety of the past as written. "I have never seen that movie" also covers a period which is the entirety of the past. These phrases will begin to differ when used with qualifiers, and some qualifiers will make sense with only one or the other, so ...


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The main grammatical is that if you want to specify a past time, you are limited to the simple past: I never saw that movie [when it came out | last year] I have never seen that movie [ * when it came out | last year] The present perfect expressed a past action that generally is relevant to the present in some way. So if you say that you never saw a ...


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I disagree with the previous answers in that I think the 'invite', 'accept' and 'decline' forms are here most naturally understood as infinitives. If you were writing the application in French you would, I believe, use 'inviter' (infinitive) rather than 'invite' (imperative singular).


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In the context you specify, invite is indeed an imperative form, a command from the operator to the software program, and likewise accept and decline. Invited is a past participle, functioning either as an adjective, as in “Linda is invited,” or as part of a present perfect passive construction, “Linda has been invited.” But while the ...


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Just like a button that says PUSH, a button that says INVITE is an imperative verb form. As you suggest in your question, once the inviter presses the button designating a target invitee, the target is then invited. In this case, the past participle is an adjective form describing the status of the solicited person (no matter who is looking at it). So are ...


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If someone is concerned they're really just worried, but they don't want to sound like a worry wart, which makes them a lying toad.


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meanings are vague there are no exact synonyms synonyms overlap to varying degrees 'worry' is closer to inactionable concern 'concern' is closer to actionable worry (but I disagree with Stephens; I don't think it is at all implying that a solution to a problem is being found. lots of statements about the nuances of words tend to overstate (push to a ...


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The following sources seem to confirm H. Stephens distinction between the meaning of the two terms: Concern: syn: concern, care, worry connote an uneasy and burdened state of mind.: concern implies an anxious sense of interest in or responsibility for something: concern over a friend's misfortune. Care suggests a heaviness of spirit caused by ...


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Unless he is very clear (in context OP does not provide) to point out which senses of the words he is restricting his discussion to, Stephens is wrong in that he is not acknowledging the wide range of shades of meaning associated with each of these two words. They are synonyms (ie the ranges of their accepted meanings overlap). Though most people would agree ...


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OED doesn't mention skewen or skewn, which means that the use is extremely local. Every dictionary has a lower limit below which they don't list a word; OED's is very low indeed. However, the entry dates from 1911 and an update is awaited. Their earliest citation for skew in the sense "crooked, oblique" is 2.a. To take an oblique course or direction; to ...


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It appears that the use on 'skewen' as past participle of to skew is local/ regional since it is a regular verb. Probably from its Middle English origin. To skew: ( regular verb) skewed, skewed. is to turn or place at an angle. When you build a house of cards, you must slightly angle, or skew each card, so structure will stand up. From the ...


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"The cost proposed is..." is fine. "Our cost proposed is..." is awkward. This is because "The cost proposed is..." is the same as saying "The cost (which was) proposed is..." but you would not say "Our cost (which was) proposed..."


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Sometimes it is necessary to put past participle as an adjective after the noun. For example: The wars and political developments (that had been) occurred/ taken place in Indian history is not a concern of my research.


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I grew up as a restaurant brat. I was told the expression came from the fact that most alcohol was 86 proof. A drunk patron was 86'd (cut off or removed from teh bar) when he was so drunk his blood was "86 proof".


-1

In health care reports, it is always "as evidenced by".


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"Open" is correct because it's an adjective. An open world is a world with fewer closed doors (barriers), presumably. But I wouldn't trust anything that guys says about his company's "mission."


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I don't think there's a set answer to this question, partly because the usages tend to evolve over time. For example, you can look up "he was over-dressed" on Google books. You'll find several hits, although many (yet not all) of them are from works written in the 19th century. Perhaps unsurprisingly, changing the search to "he was overdressed" returns ...


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There is nothing grammatically wrong with your sentence, except a bit of possible ambiguity: it's not completely clear whether you mean My pet dog died last summer; she was the only one I had, but I was sure that after a year I would get over it. or My pet dog died last summer; she was the only one I had, but after a year, I was sure that [at some ...



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