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The basic forms of the verb to break are break broke broken. The third form is called past participle. The Latin term participle means something that takes part (in two things) and the third verb form is called participle because it is a verb form that can be used as an adjective as in - a broken window/ a broken man/ The window is broken or as a form with ...


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There is no "difference" in the sense that a word i necessarily one or the other. The participle (present and past) can be used as an adjective in many cases, in exactly the same way other adjectives would be used. What the teacher said, has interested the student. The student was interested in what the teacher was saying. The interested student ...


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Adjective: a word that describes/qualifies noun or pronoun. E.g., He is a good boy. Here, in the above sentence good is an adjective which describes the noun boy. Past Participle: it is considered to be the third form of verb. You need to perceive the usage of past participle by learning more about English grammar. If you have knowledge about ...


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In the example given, I would use "gotten." But that's only if you think the word "gotten" has a place in our language. To me, there is a legitimate and useful difference between "got" and "gotten." To say you've "got" something means that you have it, now. To say that you've "gotten" something means that you've obtained or received it in the past. The ...


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The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (2006) says that eighty-six as a noun referring to "an order barring a person from entering a bar or other establishment" dates to 1943, and that eighty-six as a verb meaning "to eject; to bar from entry" dates to 1955. Will McGough's Mental_Floss website has a concise collection of competing ...



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