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Certainly two different tenses is perfectly fine, and in fact, changing the second to present tense, as was suggested, would completely change it's meaning. As written, the implication is there are areas where experiments were simply not performed. If you change this to aren't performed, it implies that as a rule, experiments are not performed in this area. ...


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You can also say the whole sentence in present tense: "Try to find an area where science isn't needed, where experiments aren't perfomed." to keep the consistency. Although your version is just fine too.


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"Need(s) to" is simply a phrasal verb meaning "must." Examples abound in English: Those pants need to be washed, dried, and ironed. This mess needs to be cleaned up. "Need(s) to" is not always followed by a past participle: A swimmer needs to be careful in shark-infested waters. Judges need to be impartial when weighing evidence.


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You ask if there are better ways to express the idea: It should not have been closed. The statement is a perfectly acceptable way to express the idea*emphasized text*. Whatever might be considered better, would have to depend on the purpose of the statement. If, for instance, the author/speaker wants to convey outrage, the utterance might be, "The ...


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..."refer to a question that someone closed—but the expression seems defective because it doesn't get at the fact that the closing already occurred." The appropriate way to voice that an action had already previously been performed is to use the past tense. "This question should not have been closed." This question was not to be closed. The issue ...


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The passive voice in the simple present This question is closed This question isn't closed This question should be closed This question shouldn't be closed The passive voice in the present perfect This question has been closed This question hasn't been closed This question should have been closed This question shouldn't have been closed The ...


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This question should not have been closed indicates 1) that it was closed 2) you think that this should not have occurred which is exactly what you are after.


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"It was not to be closed" should be avoided. You could use sentences like, "It was closed unjustly" "It was closed in err" or maybe, "It was closed prematurely" There's a thesaurus full of words that you could put in there, whichever you feel most appropriate. "It was not to be closed" or anything with "was not to" (in this form, followed by as past-tense ...


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"The question was not to be closed" (or "is not to be closed" in the usual, less dubious construction) can only be properly used from a position of authority; consider "The door should not be closed, because I like the draught" as opposed to "The door is not to be closed: fire regulations forbid it". Such authority probably does not exist in the English ...


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explain the difference between the alternative expressions and give the context in which one should be preferred to the other(s). This is the main part of the question, so ... "this question should not be closed" doesn't get at the fact that the closing already occurred. Right. Let's break it down. "should not be" differs from "will not be" ...


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This may seem flippant, but: This question was not to be closed. = Spoken by Gandalf. This question shouldn't have been closed. = Spoken by everybody else.


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This question was not to be closed. Possibly underlies the possibility that it is no longer possible to reopen the question. This question should not be closed. The above-mentionned possibility is less probable in this case. It seems to be more of a constatation. Both seem honestly okay to use.


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If I were condemned by the Passive Voice Inquisition to forfeit one of my toes each time I wrote a sentence in active voice, I might attempt a workaround like this: The problem was addressed through application of this method. But your original wording—"I applied this method to the problem"—is superior to that formulation in just about every possible ...


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The use of passive voice doesn't necessarily mean that "by" has to be used always in such sentences. "By" has to be used to denote the person who does the action in a passive voice sentence. In the above sentence, the person who does the action is the mayor. The mayor has replaced old buses with new ones. Since the action was not done by new buses, the ...


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This is an example of Whiz deletion. The sentence is short for: There was something which had been placed on the table... The relative pronoun which and the past perfect form of BE (had been) have been omitted. This is a type of reduced relative clause. For more info on Whiz deletion see this post of John Lawler's on Whiz deletion, and also visit ...



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