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"When" is a conjunction that hooks a subordinate clause ("she is enclosed") to the main clause ("Mary hates"). When you transformed the sentence, you used a verbal phrase, with either a gerund ("being") or an infinitive ("to be"), as the direct object of Mary's hating. No subordinate clause, no conjunction.


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The sentence structure S-V-DO-IO Someone-gave-a book-him. has fallen out of favor, and we now expect the reverse positions of the direct and indirect objects: Someone-gave-him-a book. or that indirect object is replaced by the object of the preposition "to": Someone-gave-a book-to him. The Ngram viewer shows a steep drop in published uses ...


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Someone gave a book him is incorrect, ungrammatical.


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There is no appreciable difference in meaning. However, your first example The pot broke as I kicked it. is clearer, and a more common phrasing. Your second one The pot was broken as I kicked it. is slightly ambiguous, for three possible reasons: 1) "was broken" can be read as passive, yet the sentence says that you (actively) kicked it. 2) ...


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Mr. Alsop is getting old. He needs to be looked after, don't you think? This is passive and is the usual version for people who need care. Mr. Alsop is getting old. He needs looking after, don't you think? This is active (for the reasons given in the comments by others). It has sinister overtones to me. It is reminiscent of 1940s gangster euphemisms ...


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It sounds like you are talking about framing effect The framing effect is an example of cognitive bias, in which people react to a particular choice in different ways depending on how it is presented This is discussed extensively in the book Thinking Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman. It also seems to relate to the broader areas of cognitive bias and ...


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The cases don't really have to do with active/passive or agentive/non-agentive. I am not an expert, but I know that "I think" can be described as a propositional attitude. It wraps the original sentence you had and expresses an attitude about the it. It doesn't really affect the original proposition, but sort of encapsulates it. Some more examples: Claim ...


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"flourish" (in the sense you use it, i.e., to grow and prosper) is an intransitive verb. Such verbs cannot be used in passive tense, as they do not take a direct object. http://i.word.com/idictionary/flourish


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First of all, "flourish" in the sense of prosper is an intransitive verb: it doesn't take an object. It thus cannot be transposed into the passive voice "Flourish" has another meaning, to wave about, and in this sense it is transitive. So in the active voice, you can say The bullfighter (subject)   flourished (active ...


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"will be flourished" is extremely stilted at best and probbaly gramatically wrong at worst. By changing the to passive voice you imply that someone else will perform the "flourishing" which doesn't make much sense as it is the "mind" that flourishes. You can't in general perform the flourishing externally it is an internal process of whatever is flourishing. ...


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In the realms of math and science, we tend to use a passive voice. From Purdue: Also, writers in the sciences conventionally use passive voice more often than writers in other discourses. Passive voice makes sense when the agent performing the action is obvious, unimportant, or unknown or when a writer wishes to postpone mentioning the agent until the ...



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