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1 (subject) plays bingo in Britain. 2 (subject) destroyed loads of houses. 3 (subject / Nigerians ) speak French. 4 (subject) hurt the bus driver.


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I think, here instead of about we can use for, like - Lisa is upset for not being invited to the party.


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Nordquist has a balanced article on jussives that examines different approaches. I'd say that calling 'Let us pray' an imperative usage is stretching the term somewhat. It is far less hortative than '[Get] on your knees!' In the linked article is: '[John] Lyons [Semantics, 1977: 747] argues that the imperative can only be, strictly, second person, ...


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Imperatives can be changed to passive by using "let" "Eat the cake" - "Let the cake be eaten" However, in "Leave at once", the main issue is not with the phrase being an imperative but with the verb "to leave" being, in this case, intransitive (i.e. has having no direct object). "John left", similarly cannot be turned into passive voice, however, "John ...


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'Leave at once' is in the imperative mood. I don't think there is a way of putting it in the passive, at least I can't think of one. However even if it was written indicatively, 'He left at once', it is difficult to see how a passive could be formed, because there isn't even an implied direct object. But if 'leave', were used transitively, in the ...


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Substitute stapled with any similar meaning VERB in the past participle and you get: "The blue page is glued/stuck/fastened/joined/sellotaped/clipped/stapled to the red page" The construction is in the passive voice and the verb be is in the present tense. It is the same as saying: Navel and Valencia oranges are grown in California (plural) and ...


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The blue page is stapled to the red page. In particular, would it be wrong to label "stapled" as past-tense in the above sentence? Well, let's look at this a bit. First of all, your example sentence has only one tensed verb, and that is the verb "is" -- the verb "is" is present tense. There is no verb in your example sentence that is past ...


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It's actually trickier than it looks. The word is used as an adjective when describing a condition that already exists, as in When you open the file you get a surprise. The blue page is stapled to the red page. But you might be describing a process: First, the blue page is stapled to the red page, then the yellow page is placed on top... Here, stapled is ...


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"Stapled" in this sentence is not a verb: it is an adjective. The verb in the sentence is "is". Consider this sentence: "I carried the stapled pages to the filing cabinet." Here, I think it is clear that the verb is "carried". "Stapled" is an adjective describing the pages that were carried. When verbs are used as adjectives, we often use the past-tense ...


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Both sentences are in the passive voice, in that in each sentence, the subject is being acted upon (passive voice). If you want to change the voice to the active voice, you could word each sentence as follows: Only the townspeople had told him about it. Only the townspeople told him about it. As for my putting the word only before the word ...



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