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The verb "to find" can be either simply or complexly transitive.  That is to say, in the active voice, it can take a direct object as its sole argument or it can take a pair of arguments, that pair being an object and its complement.  The original sentence has a simply transitive "found".  The direct object is a content clause.  ...


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A recent study found that posting photos of oneself correlates with lower levels of intimacy. This sentence has a declarative content clause as the Complement of the verb find: that posting photos of oneself correlates with lower levels of intimacy. In English we do not like to use declarative content clauses as Subjects. They usually sound awkward and ...


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They are both correct, but have slightly different meanings. The first could be used if several vendors operated out of the same shop (which has a monopoly on the vegetable trade). The second can only be used if all vegetable sales go through the shop owner's hands.


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I don’t understand whether the thrust of this question is the apathy / detachedness, which Mari-Lou A got in ahead of me, or the facility with which you switch to other pursuits.  If it’s the former, I’d add not invested: To devote morally or psychologically, as to a purpose; commit: “Men of our generation are invested in what they do, women in what we ...


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Despite the question title, and the OP brother's phrase: He cares but he doesn't care There is nothing in the actual description which suggests the person does care, the OP describes himself as: I'm extremely passive as long as something doesn't directly affect me. which hints at apathy, rather than passivity. lack of interest in or concern for ...


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Comments seem to provide the answer, so I'm summarizing them so this question can be marked as answered. The first sentence is incorrect because a leading participle clause without a subject is deemed to take the subject of the following main clause as its subject. The second sentence seems to be well worded and clear. Please consider the target audience ...


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Here's the norm: I'll force (the) people to admire the winners. I'll encourage people to admire the winners. I'll persuade people to admire the winners. but 'make' is an exception: I'll make (the) people admire the winners. but in the passive they all take to + vb: People should be forced to admire the winners People should be ...


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I've just been posing and grappling with a similar question myself. Here is the best answer I've come up with… In a sentence with an intransitive verb, and therefore no direct object, English is willing to regard the object of a prepositional phrase to the verb as the 'patient', or receiver of the verb's action (as moderated by the preposition). This can be ...


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"I am finished the website for now" is plain wrong. Bad English. You're confusing the uses of 'finished'. In "I am finished" 'finished' is an adjective, and can't have a direct object like "the website". 'Am' is the verb, a form of 'to be' (I am, you are, he is…) You are confusing 'finished', the adjective, with 'finished' the past tense of 'finish'. You ...


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The literal passive version would be "a hotel can be stayed in by passengers" or just "a hotel can be stayed in". Both are clunky--and also cold. They make it sound like you want no part in the action and couldn't care less what the passengers do. If you're asking for a better solution, I think some have already been given.


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Here I go again… So to sum up: In a sentence with an intransitive verb, and therefore no direct object, English is willing to regard the object of a prepositional phrase to the verb as the 'patient', or receiver of the verb's action (as moderated by the preposition). This can be shown by the fact that the 'patient' becomes the subject of a passive ...


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The Original Poster's question looks interesting at first sight, but it is based on a superficial understanding of what a passive is. A passive is not merely a construction where the Direct Object of an active voice sentence becomes the Subject of a passive voice sentence. Many types of phrase and clause can become the Subject of passive sentences. These ...



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