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3

Literally, it means that whoever did the choosing, did so voluntarily. Whatever the author meant was not stated clearly. Can someone be “chosen voluntarily”? – YES. It happens in the military all the time (on TV at least). Case in point: in Paths of Glory, one of the accused drew the shortest straw, 'voluntarily' choosing himself. That is to say that he ...


4

When a study is done, it is designed to measure certain parameters. Subjects are chosen for studies based on their fitness for the study parameters. Technically, all subjects (for medical studies, anyway) are volunteers; still, if a person with an ulcer volunteers for a study excluding ulcer patients, they will not be chosen, no matter how enthusiastically ...


-1

I think the sentence means something different than the writer intended. Let me offer an illustrative example. In the movie "Sophie's Choice" a mother is taken to a Nazi death camp and is forced to choose which of her two children lived and which died. She chose, but she did not voluntarily choose. Perhaps a less unpleasant example: Mom says to son -- you ...


0

I've seen it before and I agree it is awkward as it sounds like an oxymoron (two words together that have opposite meanings ) I would read it as they were chosen voluntarily (i.e. they volunteered) as opposed to being chosen randomly, chosen by phone etc


2

I believe it is a shortening of Smith is lying there being watched patiently by Jones, which makes use of a present passive participle. The participle functions as an adjective modifying Smith. But as Scott mentioned, it could also be a compound predicate — that is, it is a shortened combination of Smith is lying there and Smith is being watched patiently ...


0

Here's my simple, logical passive-voice version of the sentence where the subject in the original sentence (carrier) becomes part of the predicate and the object (manufacturer) of the verb (requires) becomes the subject. "The manufacturer is required by the carrier to install the software code on the iPhone." As for your question, "Did I change the meaning ...


0

The following thoughts/comments are all from a southern British English perspective: "I watched the house get/be burned down." "be burned down" - or, more usually, - "being burned down" sounds deliberate. "get burned down" is ambiguous as to whether it was accidental or deliberate. "I watched the house burned down." This also sounds ...


7

This is the Get-Passive, a variant of the Be-Passive. The difference is explained in the link. Get is the inchoative form of be, so it already means come to be, or become; there's no difference. Both are grammatical rules of English, and neither one is more correct than the other. Like almost everything in English grammar, there are a lot of correct ways to ...


1

You say that someone is engaged to the person they are going to marry. ... You "get" engaged. You dont "become" engaged. You "get" yourself into being engaged in the relationship. You dont "become" engaged, as nothing to do with your personality changes. Since the context your using the word engaged here is a verb and not an adjective. Its best for you ...


-1

I would use "became engaged" in this context. Got engaged seems like someone got engaged for a moment and then got disengaged, but in the given context ("During the course of summer"), became engaged sounds like the engagement went on for a little while (During the entire course of summer) .


1

We are looking at two different verbs here. 'Fall' is when something itself comes down, and takes no object (intransitive). 'Fell' is the verb when you cause something else to come down. It takes an object (transitive). So: The tree falls but The man fells the tree. Life is made a little more confusing because the past of 'fall' is 'fell'. The ...


1

Because the verb is fell (meaning "to cause to fall") not fall. Fall is intransitive, so it cannot be passive.



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