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0

Till and Til are most likely different because the concept of standardized spelling wasn't really thought of when the word was coined. Till was most likely the more popular spelling during the time.


0

The "to" in "into" means towards: toward the inside or middle of something and about to be contained, surrounded, or enclosed by it The only case I can think of off the top of my head to use "in to" over "into" would be in something like: She went in to see if anyone was there. In this case "to" means "for the purpose of doing" instead of ...


-1

In short, both are correct. Though in the purest sense, it could be that neither are. Most dictionaries seem to contain only the classical definition ("a disturbance or fuss") rather than the modern one that most people use today ("something to be completed"). I was unable to find any "task" definition other than in Wiktionary and The Free Dictionary; at ...


4

There's some triple compound words that are overlapping double compound words: backwoodsman - backwoods and woodsman crossbowman - crossbow and bowman overlordship - overlord and lordship but what about words like fate - fat and ate? Is this really an interesting problem, or one best suited for a computer search?


2

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, criteria and criterions can both serve as plural to the singular criterion. Here's the link.. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/criterions


3

Once we know the correct spelling, we can look up facet in the dictionary: noun 1 One side of something many-sided, especially of a cut gem: a blue and green jewel that shines from a million facets 2 A particular aspect or feature of something: a philosophy that extends to all facets of the business 3 Zoology Any of the individual ...


0

It's known either as simply a prefix, or, more technically, a nobiliary particle. (As always, Wikipedia weighs in as well.)


0

It's called a prefix, just like for other words. See this question for some more detail and explanations of what some common prefixes mean: Etymology for “Mc‑” and “O’‑” prefix in surnames


2

From Wikipedia: "A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but differs in meaning, and may differ in spelling. The words may be spelled the same, such as rose (flower) and rose (past tense of "rise"), or differently, such as carat, caret, and carrot, or to, two, and too."


2

I don't know. Guarantee and guard are two words that seem to have a superfluous 'u', and in French they both omit the 'u' (garantie and garde). Normally the 'u' would be there to harden a 'g' before 'i' or 'e' in words of Latin origin, but it's useless here and therefore I can't think of an easy way of doing it!


1

There's not really a "rule", but most words with this rhyme are spelled with -itch and not -ich. See RhymeZone on "witch": the only common words it has spelled with "ich" are "which" and "rich" (for some reason it doesn't list "sandwich" or "ostrich", perhaps because these words are often pronounced to rhyme with "midge" instead). This pattern also applies ...


6

This text has a very annoying way of talking down to children by using absurdly short sentences. It also has one blatant astronomical error ("The moon takes 28 days to go round the Earth."). But I do not think it contains any real grammatical errors, just infelicities.


3

British vs American spelling? It's not that simple. I'm British, despite the Polish surname (father was one of the Polish RAF pilots in WWII), and when I was at school in the 1950s and 60s it was "organization"; which is still the preferred spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary, - despite the Media spelling it with an 's' instead of a 'z'. What you ...


1

There are actually companies whose business is the manufacturing of what I have always known as gauges and whose company name includes the word "Gage". What I have found is that there are some who believe gage is correct. I'm sticking with gauge. Gage is just wrong to me.


0

It may be beneficial for you to learn Latin roots, prefixes and suffixes and your answer may become more clear. For the word "necessary", the root is "cess". It's relatives are cede and ceed. They all share the meaning of "to go, go away, withdraw, or yield". The prefix "ne" is related to "not". Literally it means "do not yield". The suffix to this ...


-1

The entry for error (v) in OED has not been updated since 1891. As such, it's unlikely to include modern usages which arise from computing. Even the Oxford Dictionary of Computing is now six years old, which is rather a long time in the field. Error is used as a verb. It's jargon, and means "produce an error message" or "fail with an error condition" or ...


3

According to oxford, error isn't a verb. Err is, and here are its forms: Not to knock wiktionary, but I wouldn't consider errored a verb form. Note that the entry doesn't cite any examples for this sense. Its examples as an adjective seem passable, though, especially in a technical sense. The mean number of errored bits per errored symbol is ...


2

Further Choster's reply, and somewhat counter to the other answers, in the United States it appears "foodservice" is an (if not the) accepted and expected industry term. In terms of writing correctly for this industry in the U.S., based on the number of industry groups and industry publications that use "foodservice" in their name, it would be incorrect to ...


23

You may have noticed that "programmed" and "programming" stand as an exception to the usual tendency for final consonant doubling to occur in two-syllable words when the second syllable is stressed (for example, we double the final r in occurring but not in harboring). I use "tendency" guardedly here: Various other exceptions to this tendency exist, and ...


5

Here are the main guidelines to choose the right suffix among -sion, -tion, and -cion. The first two are the more common while -cion is actually quite rare. (ODO) Words ending in -sion If the ending is pronounced as in confusion, then it should be spelled -sion. Here are some examples: collision; division; revision; persuasion; explosion; ...


1

The state of the art The accepted answer is wrong because OP has been misled by incorrect comments: there is no prefix 'at-', and no derivation from Latin. The English verb 'attach' has 2 t's because it derives from the French 'attacher' (ancien français estachier = ficher, du francique *stakka = pieu) The root of both words is Proto-Germanic stakô ...


-3

the prefix at- literally means to, toward, near, in addition to, by. The prefix de- means from, down, away, to do the opposite, reverse, against. The only difference is that attach has a "t" in its prefix.


4

They are different simply because the are derived from two different 'Old French' words: attacher (from Old French: attachier) detacher (earlier: destachier) source: Oxford (pp. 141, 649, since Middle English, from Old French estachier = fasten ) Note : The French words themselves are not derived from Latin but a from Proto-Germanic root, but this is ...


2

It depends on where the stress is. If the stress is on the final syllable, the consonant will usually be doubled.


1

Because the stress is different. Emit is stressed on the second syllable, edit on the first.


1

Given enough time, I believe it's likely that the English word "you" will increasingly be superseded by lowercase "u" for the simple fact that it sounds identical, it intuitively and immediately carries the identical meaning, and does the work with 2/3 fewer letters. Glance through the etymology of the word "I," which historically "cost" the scribe at least ...



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