New answers tagged

2

The second sentence of Harry’s response, “My Swift and my Armour” (58) refers to corporations which illegally pursued profits, presenting money as a corrupting influence. Swift and Armour were meatpacking corporations based in Chicago that were, according to Paul Street, part of a group that “dominated the industry through the 1940s”. Harry’...


1

Off the top of my head: Marked/markèd Deserved/deservèd Banished/banishèd (the latter a Shakespearean word, actually from Romeo and Juliet) Pinched from Wikipedia: Lēad/lĕad Mate/maté Pinched from other answers here but which I agree with: Dogged/doggèd Blessed/blessèd It's most interesting to note how different the meanings are despite the words ...


0

A devolutionist or words relating to devolution seem to fit particularly well here, at least to my BrE mind, as devolution is often talked of in regard to the giving of more powers to the Scottish, Irish, Welsh( and other) assemblies. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a transfer or allocation of authority, esp from a central government to ...


4

There are certainly occurrences of "anlysis" much earlier than the 1970s, but these look to me like either typos or a degree of illiteracy. For example, this 1914 agriculture bulletin: The selection of samples for chemical anlysis is more important in obtaining true results than is the chemical anlysis itself. Portions of the Feed to be analyzed ...


3

It is spelled cashed. From McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions, via TFD: cashed 1. mod. expired; depleted; burnt out. (From cashed in.) My pen is cashed. Where can I get a new one?   2. mod. tired. Man, I’m cashed. Can we rest here for a while? Wiktionary backs up this sense of cashed (again, ...


0

This can be explained by looking at where these words come from: French. In French, to maintain is maintenir, literally: to handhold. Stress is, as expected, on the last syllable. So what is I maintain in French? It is je maintiens, literally: I handhold. Forget about that closing -s, it is silent. What matters is that, once again, stress is on the ...


1

I would posit it has very little to do with pronunciation and quite a lot to do with trade mark and copy right laws. Putting an accent on the 'e' magically transforms it from a "word" into a "uniquely identifiable brand name" which Nintendo can legally stop any one else from using. Haagen Das, Nescafe and many well known brands use non standard punctuation ...


1

For me, the (sp?) method has connotations of school homework. Although it's a little long-winded, if it's only to be used once in the letter I would prefer (my apologies for any misspelling)


-3

I think it would be bad form to spell somebody's name incorrectly in a FORMAL business letter. A formal letter carries the weight of the "extra effort" involved in drafting and providing the letter; even acknowledging the error would ruin the "formality" of the letter. I would avoid using the first name if I could. Formal English gives you many, many ...


2

This is just a question of regional convention. British English doubles the 'l' before adding a suffix, and American English doesn't. For instance, traveller (Brit) vs. traveler (US), or marvellous (Brit) vs. marvelous (US).


2

It indicates proper stress in pronunciation, just as an accent mark is intended to. Natural pronunciation of words in English does not adapt well to Japanese loan words. The reason is stress patterns. For native English speakers, trochees, spondees, and dactyls are the most natural, especially with nouns. That said, we can safely assume that English ...


5

Surely the accent is there to indicate that the é isn't silent. If the accent wasn't there, Pokémon would be pronounced poke-mon, according to the rules of English. The accent is probably being phased out because 1) people were most likely leaving it out due to laziness and 2) it doesn't really matter because Pokémon is now an established brand and everyone ...


175

The mark in question is an acute accent mark and is absolutely intended to mimic the native Japanese pronunciation, which itself is based on the English words "pocket monster". Because of English orthography, there is considerable ambiguity surrounding the pronunciation of the character "e". (Compare the way you pronounce the "e" in "pocket" with the way ...


19

In French loanwords, é (e accent aigu) is often pronounced as [eɪ] or [e] (as in fiancé, exposé, etc), so therefore Pokémon would likely indicate to most English speakers that the word is pronounced "po-kay-mawn".


24

It's a stylistic choice that also emphasises that the "e" is pronounced. Think about how the word "Pokemon" looks devoid of two decades cultural osmosis. Given that "poke" is a slangy sexual term, the marketers did their due diligence and found a flashy looking way to keep the Japanese title.


-11

The reason seems very simple. It is stylized. Taken from wikipedia; Pokémon Go (Japanese: ポケモン ゴー, stylized as Pokémon GO) is a location-based augmented reality mobile game developed by Niantic If something is stylized it means it's represented in a non-naturalistic conventional form. Update: It seems the wikipedia page is changed but search ...


161

It's probably to indicate that the "e" is pronounced, not silent. The word "sake" (in the meaning of the Japanese rice wine) is sometimes spelt saké for that reason.


1

It seems to me that there is a very slight difference between the original version ("on-line operation") and the modern use ("to go online"). In 1950, being "on-line" meant that a device was working over a line of communication ("on the line" as someone else pointed out). Now "being online" describes a full user experience, and not just the method by which ...


0

a(d)- and de have different spelling patterns due to Latin influence I agree entirely with the following part of JEL's answer: the spellings of 'attach' with a single tee in Middle English as well as in Old French were subject to a classicizing influence. Using the spelling att- at the start of a word makes it look more like a classical Latin word, ...


6

This is an interesting question which shows the difficulty of working with historical sources especially without specialized knowledge of the history itself. The answer comes from a mixture of somewhat circumstantial evidence, including what we know about Early Modern English spelling, what we know about Early Modern English writing, and what we know of the ...


2

Because Champagne is the name of the region in France where the sparkling wine comes from. You don't just change the names of people or places without their consent. In most cases Champagne the drink must come from Champagne the place to be called that. In those places where this is not the case, nobody will put 'champen' on their bottles as it would be a ...


2

Words like "vowel" and "consonant" and "semivowel" properly refer to the sounds of English. Now, the way that English spelling works, there's some correlation between letters and sounds; there are five letters that are usually involved in representing vowel sounds, twenty letters that are usually involved in representing consonant sounds, and one letter ...


1

"Or" normally occurs in the spelling of Latin roots The British English practice of using the spelling "our" in some words where Americans use "or" usually reflects sound changes that occurred between Latin and French (in Modern French, as Peter Shor mentions in a comment, the "ou" has often changed further to "eu"). Therefore, we would expect to see "or" ...


2

British English spelling is — or has been — more variable than one might imagine. (Microsoft Word’s spelling dictionary and its ilk seem currently to be forcing a standardization — or ‘standardisation’, as it would have me write.) Using individually compiled printed dictionaries as reference, here are some relevant extracts from Chambers and the Oxford ...


0

My dictionary, Gyldendal's Red Dictionary translates from Danish to British English and vice versa and is the most reliable one in Denmark (which is very reliable, even though Denmark is a small country). It knows the word "favourable" and not the word "favorable". And it spells "vaporize" as so, just like the American spelling. Cambridge on the other hand ...


5

Metonymy — Wikipedia Metonymy is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is called not by its own name but rather by the name of something associated in meaning with that thing or concept. For instance, Wall Street is often used metonymically to describe the U.S. financial and corporate banking sector, while Hollywood is used as a ...



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