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1

The thing you need to remember about the word wherever is that it used to be two words, and began life that way. For quite a while it was written that way, too, but then it started getting hyphenated. When finally the hyphen itself was lost, it made no sense to write with two e’s the sound of just one of them. The OED says: Orginally as two words (and ...


0

A little side note to add... It might be like the word "colonel" (the common pronunciation of which bothers me immensely), where the modern English term is pronounced "CUR-nul", taking from old French versions "coronel" and "coronella", but where the word in writing takes after the earlier Italian form "colonella". "Gage" also derives from French. Like ...


2

In British English. Practise with an S is a verb, with a C a noun. The same is true for License/Licence. Advise/Advice is the same again - but sounds different, so it's a good way to remember which is which, if you find it difficult!


2

I had a coworker that used "postphone" when she wanted to postpone something. What was particularly funny about it was that she initially wrote "postphone" and in subsequent emails changed to "post phone" and "post-phone". My guess is that she was trying to figure out why Outlook didn't like her spelling.


-1

Languages evolve, Americans spell and pronounce words differently to British. To me hireable looks less likely to have the word mispronounced. Hireable without an e looks problematic as without the e after the first r the I sound has several options. Possibly a short I sound ?


0

The fiercest defender of diereses I know of in the professional world is The New Yorker magazine, which still spells it "coöperate," and even they don't spell it "noöne."


0

Summary of some other jobs of Silent E Job #1: Silent E makes the vowel before it long, as in note. Job #2: Silent E can make c and g soft, as in race and page. Job #3: Silent E keeps u and v from being the last letter in a word, as in clue and give. Job #4: Silent E adds a vowel to words with the Consonant+l-e syllable pattern, as in handle. @Araucaria ...


2

It is generally called the silent e rule: Suffix addition: dropping silent e The silent e rule is more consistent than the doubling rule. The principle: since the silent e's "job" is to change a vowel sound, if there is another vowel to take its place, the e can go away. Therefore, if the suffix begins with a vowel, you drop the e. It doesn't ...


0

One should add that "ee" is an irritating vowel group if it is not a long /i:/ as in to feel, to see, knee, wheel etc. So it is useful that a final and silent e is omitted when a syllable is added. If we spelled live +ed as liveed you would probably read /li'vi:d/, and then in a second reading you would recognize that the past form of to live is meant.


3

As a gross general rule of thumb, word final single 'e' gets deleted before suffixes beginning with vowels, especially grammatical suffixes. So we don't have: liveing liveed giveer blueish trueer trueest sizees Instead we get: living lived giver bluish truest sizes Wherever seems to fit this rule of thumb. Hope this is helpful!


3

Jiffy in Great Britain We have in 1796 the following entry in Francis Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. Note how he spelt the word with an -e. That spelling variant has haunted me ever since I saw it. The letter -e substituting -i leads me to pronounce jeffy as | ˈdʒefi | whilst jiffy is pronounced as | ˈdʒɪfi | Until I stumbled upon ...


1

T. O. Churchill, A Grammar of the English Language (1823) identifies two somewhat surprising culprits as being responsible for the deplorable rise of the apostropheless its: printers, and English speakers who inexcusably use of the wrong contraction for "it is." Here is Churchill's argument: The word it's in particular, is now generally robbed of the ...


3

Grammatically speaking, all the three constructs are correct. The non-contracted first one is more formal. The choice between the other two can be made only by euphonic considerations, i.e. whichever sounds nicer or is easier to pronounce given the surrounding words. The very colloquial I'd've is not unheard of either.


0

This is not really an answer because I'm also lost but I'd like to point out something that seems to be overlooked in these three ways to write "runtime", "run time" or "run-time". I would risk saying that all three mean different things, that I believe should be applied in different cases: run time: this is how much time your program took to execute. If, ...


3

Interesting question! Here's what the OED has to say about -ious: a compound suffix, consisting of the suffix -ous, added to an i which is part of another suffix, repr. Latin -iōsus, French -ieux, with sense ‘characterized by, full of’. ... by false analogy in cūriōsus curious (from cūra): see -ous suffix. and, re: -ous: Nouns of quality from ...


24

Quyer and choir possibly have different meanings. From the context you gave, it looks like quyer is the equivalent of the modern-day word quire. A quire is not a group of singers, but rather it's the part of a church where those singers sit. Choir is clearly a strongly related word, describing the group of singers. To muddy the water a bit, the spelling ...


6

etymonline says this: c.1300, queor "part of the church where the choir sings," from Old French cuer, quer "choir of a church (architectural); chorus of singers" (13c., Modern French choeur), from Latin chorus "choir" (see chorus). Meaning "band of singers" is c.1400, quyre. Re-spelled mid-17c. on Latin model. Contrary to my initial instinct, the qu ...


2

You can certainly assume that English speakers will omit the tone-denoting diacritics in the Vietnamese versions of the names of people and places — partly because they don't understand what they signify, and partly because they would have no idea how to reproduce them even if they wanted to — and that most of them will be confused about the different ...


0

When there are two vowels before a consonant, you do not double the consonant; however, qu has its own sound, so the u is not "counted" as a vowel.


1

For what it's worth, parameterize has 1,100,000 search results on Google, while parametrize has 500,000. I would take that as evidence that both are acceptable and in widespread usage.


1

The first rule for consonant doubling is that the simple vowels a e i o u are stressed and spoken short as in fat fatter, get getting, sit sitting, hop hopping, put putting, and shut shutting. The logic of this rule is clear. Since English drops the final mute -e as in to hope, when you add an ending such as -ing you should spell it hoping and NOT hopeing. ...


4

My answer focuses on the lineage of the form giffy, which is reported in a couple of reference works from the 1830s. William Holloway, A General Dictionary of Provincialisms (1839) has this entry for giffy: GIFFY, n. The shortest possible portion of time ; the winking of an eye. Norf. Sussex. Hants. The county citations indicate that Holloway found ...


7

English orthography, while far from exhaustively consistent, can explain these constructions. Produce has a long U, indicated by the silent E at the end. Adding a C in the suffix -ing (produccing) would indicate a short U. Also, while a C followed by an E, I, or Y is softened to an S sound, the first of a double C is usually pronounced as K (as in succeed) ...


3

I am not sure if this is official English rule, but it exists and it is called a C-V-C rule - Consonant-Vowel-Consonant: when the last three letters of the verb form a CVC then you need to duplicate the last letter before adding the suffix. Let see your examples. Bleed - VVC - no doubling Swim - CVC - double 'm' Remember not to apply this rule for ...


1

Different style guides recommend different approaches to hyphenating prefixes, but most sensible ones start from the proposition that the decision to hyphenate or not to hyphenate should be based on the readability and sense of the resulting word. Unfortunately, attempts to spell out a viable general rule entail spelling out multiple exceptions, as we see in ...


4

Chiffy "Etymologicon Magnum, or Universal Etymological Dictionary" by Walter Whiter (1800) makes the claim that "chiffy", as used in the term "in a chiffy" derives from the Anglo-Saxon word "Caf". "A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language" by Joseph Bosworth (1832) confirms the meaning of "Caf" as "quick, sharp, nimble, swift". Jiffin This is my oldest ...


1

This word is used very commonly in news. So, you may like to look at your favorite news outlets (in whatever region is relevant) and follow their style book. For example, the BBC I think tends to use "re-offend" http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-24294671 Traditionally the BBC had Actual Standards (they are a presently a cesspool of incoherence, moral filth, and ...


-2

(No hyphen) It is a word but it is nonstandard, meaning that the majority of speakers don't really use it. Source: Wiktionary


0

It will depend on dialect, and probably even more so on its written history. If it's a book oriented towards the majority of the English-speaking world (or expecting many non-native speakers to read it), the apostrophes become more important. If the book is oriented towards people already familiar with the dialect in question, you are less likely to need ...


6

No, there was never an alternative spelling of "no one" with a diaresis. Searching Google books, there are no hits for noöne that are pre-2000 and in English. There are three hits since then, one of them explaining that people used to spell "no one" with a diaresis.


12

Whenever you find a computer spell-checking program does not know how to spell something, your best first assumption is that the program is an idiot. You will usually be right this way. Including in this case: Wiktionary lists noöne as an “obsolete” spelling of no one. Did people use it? Yes. Do people use it? Yes, again! Morover, a simple Google ...


1

I know I'm late coming to this party, but I was just reading the transcripts of all the communications from the Apollo 13 mission (http://apollo13.spacelog.org/). I noticed that the "alinement" spelling was used throughout. "Alignment" must have been a pretty recent change. 13 was in April of 1970. I was born in August of that year and I don't recall ever ...


1

The two most common ways to handle capitalization in a text head or subhead or in a table or chart column head are "title case" and "sentence case." In standard title case, you capitalize each word (or abbreviated word) unless it is an article (a or the) or a short preposition (how short a preposition varies from one style guide to another, and some specify ...


0

It is interesting that spell check can proscribe spelling. It's something that I've found a bit disturbing in fact. However, to the point, the voiced th as someone has already pointed out is typically written in English as ...the. Although different spellings were acceptable, and could even appear in the same journal entry or tract, the different ...


1

If it is for a label or title, as you say, then do not abbreviate. Especially do not abbreviate using your own, invented abbreviation for your own, invented unit. Use a label or title of Amount/Time or Bushels/Hour, if you are measuring the amount in bushels. (Amount is not a unit; hour is a unit, as is bushel).



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