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0

I think some of the issues come from the evolution of the English language. One of those dinosaur words from old English that we use every day is "of". We say the word with a "V" sound instead of pronouncing the "F". This is from the fact that V and F were basically the same letter in old English.


2

Middle English use of the word "all" and "al" were both recognized. 14th century constructions likely appeared as both "allways" and "always". In general, the codification of something like this often comes down to a single text that chose one construction. It is possible that something like the King James Bible or a particular author chose one spelling ...


2

There is no rule that related segments of words have to be spelled with the same sequence of letters. It might seem more logical to you, but that's never been a successful argument in changing English spelling*. We also write "deception", "deceive" and "deceit", and "reception","receive", and "receipt". In any case, the digraph "ai" in "maintain" is not ...


1

Based on a quick Google search, convention seems to dictate that "kelly pool" be spelt without a capital K. This is interesting as, according to Wikipedia, kelly pool was indeed named after the inventor (his nickname was Kelly).


0

In my view, "all right", as a phrase, means "OK", "nominal", or "acceptable", as in "The fix was all right, but clearly not intended as a long-term solution." The claim that "all right" somehow implies "correct in every way" is belied by the fact that while it juxtaposes the two words, it doesn't form an integral phrase. This is emphatically conveyed by ...


3

This first part doesn't strictly apply to the "roots" of words, but there are a set of prefixes derived from Latin that often cause the following consonant to be doubled. These prefixes usually come from a related preposition that ended in a consonant, but when used as a prefix this consonant assimilated to the next consonant in the word. This explains the ...


0

I'm fairly certain the word is syncope: the loss of one or more sounds or letters in the interior of a word (as in fo'c'sle for forecastle) - MW


2

Spelled vs spelt: In American English, spelt primarily refers to the hardy wheat grown mostly in Europe, and the verb spell makes spelled in the past tense and as a past participle. In all other main varieties of English, spelt and spelled both work as the past tense and past participle of spell, at least where spell means to form words letter by ...


0

Mainly a correct British variant. In perhaps the best AmE dictionary: spell verb spelled \ˈspeld, ˈspelt\ (audio pronunciation) or chiefly British spelt \ˈspelt\ (audio pronunciation) ; spelled or chiefly British spelt; spell·ing; spells 3 a : to name in order the letters of Merriam Webster Unabridged Dictionary


4

The answer is r, largely due to productive prefixes like re- and pre-. Per the OED, words with a letter followed by ei occur with this frequency for each such letter: 981 r 586 l 518 h 478 w 394 s 366 c 349 v 341 n 315 t 224 d 149 m 145 f 140 b 139 e 124 p 114 g 81 o 73 k 67 u 51 a 50 y 24 i 19 z 4 j 2 x This includes ...


6

Usage and alternative words A simple answer to this one: no, there is no word for pescetarians that is more commonly used or understood than pescetarian (or pescatarian, if you prefer that spelling). It is not a concept that has been spoken about commonly for very long, and pescetarian is, to my knowledge, the only word for it that has any practical ...


-1

I have and would always use shalln't. It was taught to me that way and I went to a grammar school (read elocution). But i think it does tend to depend where you live and the resultant accent. For example my "bath" has a long vowel a sound (as in car) equally tooth has an oo as in too not as in must (which would be the common pronunciation locally). Because ...


0

There is "no such thing" as whether an expression is "grammatical or not". Almost any expression is "grammatical" as long as it conforms to any form of grammar. Even pidgin English is "grammatical" if it conforms to a particular set of published or unpublished grammatical pattern. The questions should be is the expression grammatically acceptable is the ...


0

Apparently until the start of the 19th century, it was merely an estate in an area which may have been named after a church in Middleburg.


1

Cutlery or kitchen ware is the correct word I think.


3

If you're looking for a coined single word, consider something like: Culinariana combining culinarian with the suffix -ana from culinarian: a cook or a chef and -ana (or -iana): denoting an assembly of items, as household objects, art, books, or maps, or a description of such items, as a bibliography, all of which are representative of or ...


5

Culinary is, I think, the answer. It refers to things related to a kitchen or cookery. It is also used as the adjective of kitchen itself.


1

Simon B. is correct. additional comment: No. But if the luncheon is in honor of a person, for a charity event, or a retirement party the name of the honoree together with the event or occasion's name is capitalized. Examples: Charlie Brown's Retirement luncheon. but, Healthy Octogenarian Club's Annual Fundraising Luncheon.


1

Although is sounds broader, the term "housewares" generally refers to stuff you'd find in the kitchen.


5

Utensils: noun A tool, container, or other article, especially for household use:


32

kitchenware: Cooking equipment or utensils.



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