New answers tagged

2

Just in case if anyone is wondering which one is more popular: (Queuing!)


1

Yes, OED does give the definition "risqué" for the word risky, with an example from 2004 C. Bazalgette in M. Bonham Casino p. xi, She loved to show off and to tell risky stories. It seems the story is using risky with this meaning.


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Risky is a fully Anglicized version of the French risqué. It's comparatively rare now†, but from the 1880s down to the end of WWII it was far more common to write of risky stories and jokes than of risqué ones. —Google Ngrams (I do not include uses with risque, which outstrip all of these and really are mis-spellings.) This was not mere ...


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The journalist misspelled risqué Selena Gomez has posed braless in a risky [and sultry] new photo-shoot... The same celebrity news is reported in Highsnobiety, but there risquè is written correctly. Selena Gomez Strips Down for Risqué Album Artwork Looking on the Internet, I found no reputable website that suggested risky is a spelling variant ...


1

risqué in the English sense of naughty, sexy, salacious seems to translate to the French scabreux (among many others) Wicktionary notes that risk and risqué share the same French root risquer - to risk - although it notes that the English use is a borrowing or loanword from French. Might your quote be playing it straight in saying the photo might in fact ...


0

People unfamiliar with the French-derived word “risqué” (‘slightly indecent”) often write “risky” by mistake. Bungee-jumping is risky, but nude bungee-jumping is risqué. (Paul Brians, Common Errors in English Usage) The article you cite blurs the line between this use, and the use of risky as dangerous.


5

No. Risky and risqué do not have the same meaning. Something that is risky is dangerous, or prone to loss. "Investing in junk bonds can be lucrative, but is risky." Something that is risqué is in questionable taste, especially in a sexual way. "She wore a dress that was a little risqué for the office party."


0

Being a Brit, I've always pronounced hello as hallo, and spelt hello as hallo and never known "hello" could be a correct spelling! When I left the UK in 1994 I became convined non-native and US speakers were mispronouncing and mispelling hello!


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For "2": "2" is a digit,1 as "as a digit;" if it were "42" it would "as digits" figure2 is also used for this, particularly in British English and older American English Merriam-Webster uses "as a number" or "as numbers" for this form in its definitions, such as for figure above For "two": "as a word;" "forty-two" would be "as words" (While it's ...


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The AP style guide refers to representations such as 2 or 10 as "figures," not "numerals," since "two" or "ten" is also a numeral: nu·mer·al (no͞o′mər-əl, nyo͞o′-) n. A symbol or mark used to represent a number. (The Free Dictionary) If you don't believe that, Dictionary.com calls words numerals explicitly: noun 1. a word, letter, ...


7

'2' is an Arabic numeral (here). 'Two' is a word. You can also call it a number word.


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When written as "2", it is a numeral. When written as "two", you could refer to it as spelled out, written out, or possibly longhand.


2

The word transfer is stressed on the first syllable as a noun, and either the first or second syllable as a verb. In general, you double an "r" at the end of a word when the second syllable is stressed (referrer, referred), but not when the second syllable is unstressed (caterer, catered). Since transferred is treated as though the second syllable is ...


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It's transferrer/transferor. If you look at the ODO definition, it's a derivative of the word transfer. If you search for transferer you get No exact match found for “transferer” in British & World English By looking at the OED definition, it can be seen that transferer is used, but only in place of transferrer and transferor: [...] used ...


0

Thai language which is also known as Siamese is the national and official language of Thailand and the native language of Thai people. I think the difference in their spelling comes from the fact that Thai belongs to Tai–Kadai languages which is a language family of highly tonal languages found in southern China, northeast India and Southeast Asia. ...


3

Like many languages outside Europe, Thai distinguishes between aspirated and unaspirated plosives (eg [tʰ] and [t]). These both occur in English, but they are not treated as distinct sounds, so it is usually hard for English speakers to hear and produce them reliably. The word "Thai" in Thai starts with an aspirated consonant. To percieve the difference, ...


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Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Please do not mistake my brevity and/or malapropisms (darn predictive text) for disrespect or attempts at humour. I think the above sounds cooler.


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Typographical error is a mistake in printing, typesetting, or typing, especially one caused by striking an incorrect key on a keyboard. Historical Examples Page 34: The typographical error "w ash" was changed to "wash." [American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition and Dictionary.com]


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You have to keep in mind that <l> and <ll> are both extremely common in English, regardless of region. For example, bill is always spelled <bill>, and nil is always spelled <nil>; excel is always spelled <excel>, and retell is always spelled <retell>. There are a lot of individual rules, but there's no single over-arching ...


2

This isn't strictly an "answer", but I thought you would be interested to see this pot-pourri of spellings of cipher/cypher from the 16th century onwards. It is from sense 5 of the word cipher/cypher in the Oxford English Dictionary. Of course the word began life from the French cuffre (modern French chiffre) with an entirely different meaning (the figure, ...


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Semiannual is one word, without hyphens, according to Merriam-Webster. Semiannual


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From the ODO: phantasy, n. Variant spelling of fantasy (restricted to archaic uses or, in modern use, to the fields of psychology and psychiatry). As seen in an ngram, phantasy is still used, albeit much more rarely. So yes, it is still acceptable (you might get a few weird looks though, depending on context).


0

It is axiom that the Judeo-Christian God, when identified using the root, "god," will always be capitalized in proper English, and that "God" will never be pluralized as in "Gods." Inferior, mythological "gods" may be pluralized and will always maintain as lowercase in proper English. This is a common assumption.


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You would never use the "ies" rule with pronouns: use "-s", or "-es" if the word ends in an s. Also, referring to "Mortys" suggests that the two people involved are a group of some kind: for example, two friends called Morty who often hang out together. For this reason, you would tend to not use this construction in any other context. eg "Are the ...



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