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1

It's an American and British English spelling difference: The history of its spelling differences starts in the early 18th century, English spelling was not standardized. Differences became noticeable after the publishing of influential dictionaries. Current British English spellings follow, for the most part, those of Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the ...


4

I would go with Respect: Where Has It Gone?, where the colon represents that what goes before it is the topic of what comes after.


0

This is not a matter of singular vs. plural; it is a matter of whether you are talking about just some institution that is situated in Europe, or an institution that is actually named “European Institution”—and multiple institutions might well share that name. In the case of the Wikipedia article, the capitalization seems random. In the ...


2

The OED does not mention diing and cites references such as this from 350 years ago: 1675 T. Brooks Golden Key 118 He that dyed on the Cross, was long a dying. Die is an Early Middle English word (entered the language around 1100–1300), and was routinely spelled with a y: ... the word appears to have been in general use from the 12th ...


1

Possible? Certainly. Probable? Unclear. Correct? No.


0

The "eery" spelling is, I note after frequent use, given as the preferred alternative by most anagram generation sites when the entered letters do not allow "eerie". Presumably, therefore, "eery" is considered to be perfectly correct as far as the organisers of those sites are concerned. However, I would hesitate to use that spelling when writing ...


0

Just lead by example: Snet form my pohne ... which is both terse and filled with typos! But in all seriousness, I think this is more than sufficient: Sent from my phone; please excuse my errors and brevity. I substituted "errors" for "typos" because "typo" is simply short-hand for "typographical error", so I've applied the plural to the noun ...


2

I would just use typos. It encapsulates the uniquely digital nature of the mistakes you are making. They are not Misspellings as such because you actually do know how to spell the words in question, so you should use a word which is more about input errors than knowledge gaps. Flubs or goofs might also fit in some other context, but it will make total sense ...


1

Consider fat finger: Used to refer to clumsy or inaccurate typing, typically resulting from one finger striking two keys at the same time. So your sig could be: Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Expect brevity and fat-finger mistakes.


8

's shows either possession, or when the following word i.g. is/us/... is abbreviated. Therefore, in this case, 's can only be used if you're talking about something that belongs to "thank", which makes no sense at all; nor if you're saying "thank is" which does not make sense, either. The s at the end of the word "thanks" is just a plural s and adding any ...


0

If a multi-word phrase takes a possessive, you can add ’s to the whole thing: The King of France’s crown The boy she likes’s books Constructions like this are unlikely to occur in formal or written English. Some speakers may not pronounce the extra ’s, in which case it could be written with just an apostrophe. In the case of you guys, it’s hard to tell: ...


1

Complacence refers total self-satisfaction, while complacency referring to a feeling of contentment or self-satisfaction, especially when coupled with an unawareness of danger or trouble, has a wider use and be expressed also with the following expressions: resting on one’s laurels: To be content with one’s present or past honors, ...


-1

Since when do English words sound the way they are spelled? The word you want is "shan't". As an aside: I can not imagine why you would want to sound an "l" in that contraction. Are you sure you are a "British English Speaker"?


-2

I too, believe that the expression of the word vender is more to the noun person,rather than place or thing and the word vendor more Latin in its origin ,for its same meaning , however there is possession in it for place or thing .I could see how you can say vender is person and vendor as thing or place! just saying!!! by the way my name is greek and it ...


4

etymonline.com: 1840 (spacial is from 1838), "occupying space," from Latin spatium + adjectival suffix -al (1); formed in English as an adjective to space (n.), to go with temporal. Meaning "of or relating to space" is from 1857. Related: Spatially. The historical reason why spatial is usually written that way is simply its origins in the Latin word ...


4

It is likely I'm really psyched Excited, pumped up


2

The usage should depend on how the symbol would be spelled out. For example * is an asterisk. It is proper to say this is "an asterisk" so you would say an *. This is due to the way you would read it out loud. When reading: Every list item that is marked with an * is optional. I would say out loud: Every list item that is marked with an asterisk is ...


1

You can probably just add -ing and retain the sounded <e>. This would be the case for the verb recce, a clipping of recconoitre used in British English. I would write recceing. And in your case, karaokeing. In the past the hyphen was call into service for such situations (hence ski-ing) but we are less fond of hyphens these days. For the past tense ...


0

Unlike a case such as "make", in this case the -e represents a vowel in the pronunciation; that vowel remains pronounced when -ing is added, and so there's no reason to remove the -e. Hence: karaokeing. As with a case such a ski > skiing, you may get a slight yod ([j] sound) introduced, but this isn't represented in the spelling.


2

Others have pointed out the difference, as being American vs British. You asked also about the trend. One way to get an idea, yourself, is to use Google Ngram. If you type color and colour into it, for example, you get this graph, which shows that color seems to be gaining in usage over colour in both US English and British English. But not so, for labor ...


2

I'm not even going to mention the fact that "o" is American English and "ou" is British English, as it has been mentioned by every other answer. (Whoops! I just mentioned it;) But since you asked for trends -- I've noticed that in America, "o" is used almost exclusively, except for instances where people try to sound fancy and/or formal, such as wedding ...


0

In examples the hyphen is used almost as "parentheses" grouping words together. For example, food-handling department vs. food handling-department. In those cases they tend to be used to group words that are collectively qualifying a noun. Food handling department would still likely be understood even without the hyphen. Similarly, living-room is not used ...


0

These compounds are so easily read without hyphens that you can definitely eliminate them. No ambiguity results by their omission. One would certainly not hyphenate "income tax queries" or "social security benefits." Some are just so common and clear enough that hyphens are certainly unneeded. Their inclusion is not incorrect either, though.


1

I think it's worth noting that when I saw this thread in my weekly email, I (and no doubt many others) knew exactly what it referred to. It's highly likely that in my mind's ear, I heard it with the "correct" pronunciation, despite the absence of any phonetic indicators. That suggests that context matters, and that simply writing 'potato-potato' might not be ...


1

Harold Wentworth, American Dialect Dictionary (1944) has an entry for young one, young'un, youngin, yo'ng-un, yougern, n. A child. with citations to instances of multiple additional spellings as well between 1840 and 1941. Since the spellings in all instances except "young one" are imitative of the way people pronounce the term in spoken English and ...


1

As an informal turn of speech, it can be used to show that two or more parties are talking about basically the same thing but not in same exact terms, or not quite agreeing on the specifics. You could use color-colour or apologise-apologize, or one of many other spelling differences between AmE and BrE, to express the same thing. I don't think there ...


6

You could use a simpler transcription, that, even if people were unfamiliar with the notation, would still convey that a difference exists: "tomāto, tomäto". The macron (overbar) indicating a long vowel was something I was taught in elementary school, and it's widely enough known that it sometimes gets used in brand names (pūr, fōn, etc). The diaeresis ...


14

Rule: Use a Dictionary Yes, there is a rule, and that rule is that you must look them up in a dictionary if you are not a native speaker. That’s because words beginning with re- in English can, depending on the word, be pronounced with any of eight different vowels: /ra/ /rɑ̃/ /rɒ/ /re/ /rə/ /rɛ/ /ri/ /rɪ/ The last three or four at the end of that ...



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