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-1

Maybe you are asking for a diacritic. How about this for example? knightḧood Other symbols that may be useful: ḥ ḫ You can find their specifications at http://graphemica.com If you are writing a scholarly article, all you have to do is define what it means before the main text. Definition of diacritic in English: noun A sign, such as an ...


3

According to Middle English Dictionary, Volume 4 By Hans Kurath, gript was one of the spellings all those hundreds of years ago. Beyond that we can look at Google ngram: gript,gripped. From the graph we can see that the 'gripped' spelling took off from 1850 onwards.


3

In Australian English, which for the most part is similar to British English, I have never come across “gript”. “Gripped” is the only form of the word that I have ever come across. I suspect that the former is probably old English, and no longer in use, or looking at the usage example, possibly a “dialect spelling”.


2

Not much to go on but here are a couple of clues: The Latin dictionary (Smith) gives the earliest date for Diphthonga as 450ish. Marc. Carp.; Prisca. Two Roman Grammarians. And Ligature even later. None of the early uncial manuscripts that I have so far looked at show ligatures, apart from the Divine monograms. The same applies to a web-site for ...


-1

I think the answer should be "three half-day". For Ex: I have taken three half-day leaves. We cant't use plural nouns with compound adjectives.


0

MIT has a course called Mechanisms of Drug Actions.


1

Google hit counts are extremely unreliable. Even if you know they are unreliable, and you think you are taking this into account, you will occasionally run across searches in which they are orders of magnitude more unreliable than you ever thought they could be. I believe you've just discovered one of them. Google Ngrams are a much better tool for deciding ...


0

How many actions are you referring to? "Mechanisms of action" says there are many mechanisms producing one action. "Mechanisms of actions" says there are many mechanisms, and many actions. I would use the one that matches up to what you're writing about.


1

EDIT - The sky is the limit. You can write as many words about any picture as you feel like. All you need is a rich vocabulary and fertile imagination. Earlier I understood your question as "Can a thousand words describe a picture exactly as it is?" That's why I wrote the answer below. Literally, the answer is "no". It simply means that showing you a ...


1

The following is meant to supplement not supplant existing answers. In general, you look at what it was in Latin; however, there are several prominent exceptions. The Etymonline entry regarding this is cribbed and abbreviated from the OED. Here’s what the OED says about these. ‑ance and ‑ence ‑ance a. Fr. ‑ance :– L. ‑ānt‑ia, ‑ēnt‑ia, ‑ent‑ia ...


0

"[Whatever] to excellence" is a common tagline attached to company names or profiles. My guess is that in this case the author is using this misspelling for rhetorical (humorous) effect. See: catachresis


0

You might want to consult Bryan Garner's Modern American Usage. In that book, he writes about conventional words and spellings in American English and British English. (For example, if you read American newspapers, you'll rarely see the world "whilst." You'll see "while.")


1

I'm from the UK, but will use US spellings in some contexts. Programming languages generally use US spellings, the HTML center tag or the CSS color property for example, and it can be a bit jarring to write stuff like use color to set the colour. The other annoyance is that spell checkers are always either US or UK, so you end up with loads of red lines if ...


0

It all depends on your target audience, whether it is British or American. Using British spelling for an American audience, or vice-versa, does look odd to your audience and detracts from the message you are trying to put forth.


0

Pick one and stick with it. Both are acceptable in just about any case, as long as you don't switch back and forth. The only time I could imagine it mattering is when submitting a literary or scientific piece that's required to be in a certain format.


-2

During my elementary education of phonics, we were taught to double the consonants after a short vowel before adding a suffix. It was explained to us little ones as: adding a double consonant to make two creates a “wall” to keep the -ing from creeping over and changing the vowel sound. Therefore, the -ing would change the short vowel to a long vowel if ...


0

I am Scottish but moved with my family to England as a child. Having been brought up most of my childhood in England I always used the 'liquorish' pronunciation but was told off by my Scottish mother who always wrote it 'licorice' - using the 'riss' pronunciation


1

The base (root) is "cure". cur(e) + i + ous = curious cur(e) + i + o(u)s + ity = curiosity EXPLANATION --The "i" is explained above by szarka. --The "e" is dropped as usual when adding the suffix that starts with a vowel. --The "u" is dropped in "curiosity" as part of another suffix spelling pattern (i.e., when adding the suffix "-ity" to a word ending ...


0

If you have to take a test over, you make up the test. The test you make up is a make-up test. Be sure to put on your makeup before making up the make-up test. (When used as an adjective, make-up requires a hyphen.)


0

With the German forms mögen (infinitive), er mag ( he may), er mochte/er möchte (he might) you may get an idea about historical sound changes. The German stem mag/mög has a regular past with -te, but g changes to ch, which is easier to speak before t. In English g vanishes, but y in may reminds us that there was a g. English might is parallel to German ...


-1

Mought is actually an alternative, obsolete or dialectical form of might. Examples appear in Old English texts but it is obsolete, somehow morphing into 'might'. 'Mought' can still be heard today in regional USA dialects (South Middle USA). South Middle USA is a long way of saying 'Appalachia' where some old English words have survived in communities ...


6

The Simplified Spelling Board of the early 1900s in the United States made gauge one of its targets in the early 1920s, urging the replacing of au with a to yield gage. From Simplified Spelling Board, Handbook of Simplified Spelling (1920): Principles Adopted Its [the Board's] recommendations, accordingly, have been based on the following ...


1

gauging is UK spelling gaging is given as an alternative US spelling here. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gage


6

Employe is a rare dated alternative spelling of the more common employee (AHD) Ngram: an employe. Ngram: an employee vs an employe From French employé. Employe (plural employes). 1920, Conference proceedings of the National Electric Light Association Convention, National Independent Meat Packers Association, the University of Georgia College of ...



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