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1

One of your examples was from the BBC, so I attempted to find any mention of diacritics in the BBC Style Guide, but I could not find anything. I did find an incredible page on Wikipedia that is not an article, but is rather a User Page, and it has an unbelievably detailed explanation of diacritical marks, including recommended usages from most major style ...


2

As mentioned in comments, since the diacritical markings (and crossed-letter letters) don't (generally and currently) have an analog in English language, the markings will be ignored for the common English speaker who will make a best guess at what the characters resemble from A-Z and what they sound like from their closest A-Z analog. To an English ...


0

Also consider syllable stress. I just read on Wikii that the original rule generally requires the doubling of the consonant (specifically a consonant following an 'e') ONLY WHEN THAT CONSONANT IS PART OF THE STRESSED SYLLABLE. For example, 'refer', 'referring', 'referral', or 'compel', 'compelling'. 'Cancel', however, is not stressed on that final ...


2

Broadly agree with @tchrist (lazy, impatient, ignorant). I would add as well, however, that English speakers are extremely comfortable with impenetrable and unfathomable pronunciation differences. Memorising an enormous variety of irregular pronunciation is part of what we are used to doing. As such, we don't expect to be given guidance on pronunciation ...


1

your hunch is right sir: "Fatah" is a mistaken use of the wrong word.Fatwa is the word for Islamic religious ruling.For more explanation please see: http://www.islamicsupremecouncil.org/understanding-islam/legal-rulings/44-what-is-a-fatwa.html


0

Ngram viewer shows NO instances of "rewirable" in the American English corpus. British English shows a real horserace between the two forms, with "rewireable" ahead through the turn (1950s)and , then "rewirable" leading for awhile in the backstretch (1960s & 1970s), neck-and-neck through the last turn to the homestretch, and "rewireable" pulling ahead in ...


0

I suggest that one reason that Americans drop the E in many -able and -ing words is that in general, American spelling favors dropping UNNECESSARY letters. As several posters have pointed out, sometimes it is necessary to keep the E, to retain pronuciation of a consonant, and/or to avoid confusion with a similar word (singing VS. singeing). Usually, it is ...


0

At Grammar School, in Britain, circa 1955, we were taught that the correct spelling was alright. I have no objection to anyone spelling it all right, but for me alright it shall remain until my dying day.


2

Yes, you should capitalize Global Liveability Rating, as it is a title for something. If the name is turned into an acronym (GLR), then you should definitely capitalize each initial letter of each word of the acronym. Yes, liveability actually a word. It is the British spelling of the American Livability.


1

inapproachable is used in the sense of inaccessible (remote/ not well connected), an archaic meaning of unapproachable. see: unapproachable ODO inapproachable MW


0

In Australian Financial Services, the legislation uses the spelling Adviser so that is the source of truth in Industry. In regular Australian vernacular both spellings are used.


0

Dictionaries do indeed allow both spellings shier and shyer. However, the spellings are not pleasant to the eye. I tend to avoid them by substituting another adjective, such as bashful.


2

All due respect, Mr. Kowal, but I have always spelled it nutsac. (And apparently, Coolio, and other artistes of of his genre, agree.) I have also learned (in researching this particular question) that there is apparently a sport called disc-golf (which really shouldn't surprise me because I went to a hippie college where the only sport was "freestyle ...


1

Sack is short for nut sack or nutsack, meaning the scrotum. (In case it needs spelling out, the allusion is to a bag containing nuts, i.e. testicles.) A word spelled sac also exists, which Oxforddictionaries.com defines as A cavity enclosed by a membrane within a living organism, containing air, liquid, or solid structures. The latter spelling is ...


0

When referring to it as a noun, is it "lay off", "layoff", or "lay-off"? All three are found and are correct. Layoff seems to be the most popular if we compare plurals to help restrict the cases to noun uses. What about when using it as a verb in both present and past tense? A space would be much more common here. In particular the phrase is ...


1

I am curious to know if 'hance' was ever used as 'hannes or hanes' in English literature. If so, where can this source be found? c1400(1375) Canticum Creat.(Trin-O 57) It's not a verb there, but I understand you to be looking merely for a possible relationship?


5

Lifecycle is perfectly correct, it's just not the most common form of the compound. Normally that can leave one unsure which form to choose. Here though you don't have that problem since one of the perfectly correct forms is favoured by the very thing you are writing about. So use that, unless you've some great personal loathing of the form. If you do ...


4

At one point, a common conjugation of to have was: I have Thou hast He hath She hath It hath One hath We han Ye has They han Now I say "a common conjugation" because there were plenty of variations, and you might find someone using "we have" while still using "they han", or "we han" with "they hast" or "they ...


3

Was this standard usage a century ago, either in the U.S. or in Britain? No. The vast majority of books of the period that don't follow that convention. Is this the sort of authorial quirk (like the use of “sha’n’t” in Winnie the Pooh) which should be preserved in a reprinting? Apparently not. Some writers have had general opinions on apostrophes ...


0

"Eew!" or "eww!", or "ew!", is a common expression of disgust. (AmE) "Er", is known more as an expression of uncertainty, or even, apology or regret. So, "Er, it's all wet," would have a much different meaning to a reader in the US. "Why aren't you wearing the new necktie I got you for the party tonight?" "Er, it's all wet. It fell into the sink while ...


2

The traditional spelling was Ugh (or sometimes Eugh!) but this may be being supplanted by the American Eww! Since the word is near-onomatopeic, I would suggest you write it the way it sounds to you when your daughter says it.


2

Comes from the latin word "nuntiare" what translates to announce


1

The apostrophe was not intended to mark the combination of two words, but rather the omission of letters. Origin of the Apostrophe "The 16th-century printers not only contributed marks for interpolations to the general repertory but also developed new marks to indicate omissions. The apostrophe is a peculiarity of written language: it was ...



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