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7

The reason the spelling wasn't changed is that Noah Webster didn't know about it. The word glamour does not appear in the original 1828 Webster's Dictionary, so he couldn't change its spelling in that dictionary the way that he did for armour, honour, humour, neighbour, etc. In fact, it does not even appear in the 1892 Webster's International Dictionary, ...


15

Because it was not a French word, but a Scottish one. And we did lose a u — just not the u you were expecting. Per the OED, it was a corruption of grammar, which during the 18th century was variously spelled glamer, glamor, glammar, and then in Scotland, as glaumour. That was one u too many, though, and it went then to glamour where it has remained ever ...


4

Because its is a possessive pronoun My head Your head His head Her head Its head Our heads Your heads Their heads Just because its ends in an "s" doesn't mean it takes an apostrophe. To use your example, even though the claws belong to the cat you wouldn't write: The cat licked hi's claws. Similarly, you don't write: The cat licked it's claws. ...


0

My opinion is that there are two possible cases. Bullets may be used as part of a sentence or paragraph, in which case regular capitalization and grammar rules apples. Bullets may be used as a sort of Graphic Communication (eg. in a Presentation) - in which case anything goes For example, under case one, I might list an apple, a banana, and a ...


2

No, you cannot just blindly change all ‑ise words into ‑ize words. Beyond those you mention (which I notice includes ‑yse words, too, which can never be written ‑ize), there are also verbs like all these below which must always end in ‑ise, never in ‑ize. I’ve conveniently sorted these right to left for you so that etymological hints pop out. ‪        ...


1

While they're not generally used as mass nouns, which would describe the "quality" of having errors, the following words can be used as such, and I think these words fit better with the overall theme of the message: solecism: 1) a mistake in speech or writing, or 2) an impolite or improper way of behaving malapropism: The use of an incorrect word in ...


-1

If for no other reason, I use "chequing account" instead of "checking account" when corresponding with my American bankers to avoid redundance of the two identically pronounced words "cheque" and "check", which, when spoken, could be ambiguous. For example: "Please, check check No. 396.", etc. If, instead, one use the distinctive form "Please, check cheque ...


0

Not to say it's not grammatically possible, but I wouldn't try to pluralize that word. Instead say something like "There are entirely too many instances of the word is".


0

I just came across a discussion of examples of syllable inversions in Dialect Notes, volume 4, part 1 (1918), in a comment titled, "Transposition of Syllables in English." The note includes several interesting early examples: An example some centuries old, of syllable-inversion applied to proper name is furnished by one of the Arthur legends. As ...


5

This type of word is a heteronym, which per Wikipedia is: A heteronym (also known as a heterophone) is a word that is written identically but has a different pronunciation and meaning. In other words, they are homographs that are not homophones. Thus, row (propel with oars) and row (argument) are heteronyms, but mean (intend) and mean (average) are not ...


1

It's an American and British English spelling difference: The history of its spelling differences starts in the early 18th century, English spelling was not standardized. Differences became noticeable after the publishing of influential dictionaries. Current British English spellings follow, for the most part, those of Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the ...


5

I would go with Respect: Where Has It Gone?, where the colon represents that what goes before it is the topic of what comes after.


0

This is not a matter of singular vs. plural; it is a matter of whether you are talking about just some institution that is situated in Europe, or an institution that is actually named “European Institution”—and multiple institutions might well share that name. In the case of the Wikipedia article, the capitalization seems random. In the ...


2

The OED does not mention diing and cites references such as this from 350 years ago: 1675 T. Brooks Golden Key 118 He that dyed on the Cross, was long a dying. Die is an Early Middle English word (entered the language around 1100–1300), and was routinely spelled with a y: ... the word appears to have been in general use from the 12th ...


1

Possible? Certainly. Probable? Unclear. Correct? No.


0

The "eery" spelling is, I note after frequent use, given as the preferred alternative by most anagram generation sites when the entered letters do not allow "eerie". Presumably, therefore, "eery" is considered to be perfectly correct as far as the organisers of those sites are concerned. However, I would hesitate to use that spelling when writing ...


1

Just lead by example: Snet form my pohne ... which is both terse and filled with typos! But in all seriousness, I think this is more than sufficient: Sent from my phone; please excuse my errors and brevity. I substituted "errors" for "typos" because "typo" is simply short-hand for "typographical error", so I've applied the plural to the noun ...


3

I would just use typos. It encapsulates the uniquely digital nature of the mistakes you are making. They are not Misspellings as such because you actually do know how to spell the words in question, so you should use a word which is more about input errors than knowledge gaps. Flubs or goofs might also fit in some other context, but it will make total sense ...


1

Consider fat finger: Used to refer to clumsy or inaccurate typing, typically resulting from one finger striking two keys at the same time. So your sig could be: Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S4. Expect brevity and fat-finger mistakes.


8

's shows either possession, or when the following word i.g. is/us/... is abbreviated. Therefore, in this case, 's can only be used if you're talking about something that belongs to "thank", which makes no sense at all; nor if you're saying "thank is" which does not make sense, either. The s at the end of the word "thanks" is just a plural s and adding any ...


0

If a multi-word phrase takes a possessive, you can add ’s to the whole thing: The King of France’s crown The boy she likes’s books Constructions like this are unlikely to occur in formal or written English. Some speakers may not pronounce the extra ’s, in which case it could be written with just an apostrophe. In the case of you guys, it’s hard to tell: ...



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