New answers tagged

1

You can avoid the confusion by pluralizing the name of the letter, ess, into esses. She spent the afternoon ignoring the professor and drawing idly in her notebook, languidly doodling esses and then turning them into dragons.


0

according the the Merriam-Webster dictionary there are two ways to write the plural for ´s´: 1. s's 2. ss


0

I would use S's. I want to spell apostrophes but I have no S's.


1

One thousand three hundred and one is the correct way to say it in both American and British English.


1

As an editor, it happens to me all the time. Every time an author writes "seperate," for instance, I doubt my own knowledge that it should be "separate." I double-check the spelling of common words all the time when I'm editing. My advice is never become an editor -- it slows your reading, makes writing nearly impossible, and has few rewards. All credit for ...


2

The answer is complicated and requires knowing the etymological and phonological history of English. Doubt for instance comes to English ultimately through the Latin verb dubitare (to hesitate), in which the "b" is not silent. But it first took a detour through the Old French word douter, which had lost the letter "b" and its sound. The OED notes that ...


0

According to this Ngram, both 3d and 3D are acceptable to use. Furthermore, different dictionaries show a different form of abbreviation for "three-dimensional". Some are 3-D, some 3D, some 3d, and so on. From this I would conclude that none of these are incorrect to use. 3-dimensional is not something that is recommended though, as shown from the results. ...


1

Google Books examples of 'eightteen' A Google Books search turns up a boatload of instances where eighteen is spelled eightteen, but the majority of them appear to be straight-up variant spellings, with no line break involved. Still, in a considerable number of instances—probably too many to be merely coincidental— eightteen appears at a line break and is ...


5

Both spellings are used: Sus, also suss: (noun) Suspicion of having committed a crime; suspicious behaviour; often in phr. on sus. 1936–. (Oxford Dictionary of modern slang) Sus or suss: (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) Suspicious. 2001, Mo Hayder, The Treatment, 2008, Bantam, UK, page 244, ‘Yes - OK, OK. Try not to ...


2

According to the Grammarist both spellings are correct but the original one "Neanderthal" still remains the more common: Neanderthal is the more common spelling of the noun denoting the species of robust humanlike creatures that went extinct around 30,000 years ago. Neandertal is preferred by a few scientific publications. Neanderthal, the original ...


0

Google Ngram shows that "bases" is the normal thing. "baseis" seems to be a dictionary corpse seldomst used. Ngram for basis and baseis


0

A board by any other name: It's really no different than blackboard. Inevitably, "leaderboard" will become increasingly more formally accepted. If in doubt: If in doubt, I'd hyphenate the two words: leader-board ...or... Leader-Board Purpose of one-word usage: From the usage I've seen online, the advantage of the one-word variant is concision ...


0

It is a compound noun (no hyphens), usually appearing as the/a neutral stability curve. It is used in naval architecture to depict an aspect of ship stability and also in a few other branches of fluid dynamics to delineate stable regimes of flow from unstable ones. Direct Numerical Calculations of a Neutral Stability Curve for One-Dimensional Detonations by ...


1

Is it a curve that has or expresses neutral stability? If so: "neutral-stability curve". Or is it a stability curve that is neutral? If so: "neutral stability curve". You say that it is a ""curve of neutral stability", so you would use the first of these - hyphenate. The point of joining "neutral" and "stability", in "neutral-stability", is to apply ...


0

I'd call it a malapropism, the use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound resulting in a nonsensical utterance. In a strict sense, a malapropism occurs in spoken language. Also, we tend to think of them as humorous as in these written and spoken examples provided by Melissa Bowersock. Still, it's the aptest term of which I know for ...


6

No (frequently stylized №) is the abbreviation for Latin: numero (in number). It’s used even though the word being abbreviated is English: number. Other examples of this practice: lb, abbreviation of Latin: libra (balance) – used as abbrevation for English: pound &, a stylized way to write Latin: et (and) – used as abbreviation for English: and Why? ...


3

The Associated Press Stylebook specifies that you capitalize "Communist" when you're talking about a specific political party. If you're talking about someone who adheres to the more general political philosophy, then you'd use the lower-case c "communist" and "communism."


0

Generally, one would only capitalize "communism" or "communist" in instances in which the word is a (or a part of) a proper name. Examples: "The Fall of Communism resulted in the failed dreams of many communists." "The Communist Party believes in the ideals of communism."


3

The single word for this is variant. More completely variant spelling. variant spelling noun A different spelling for a single word. Typically a US vs. UK or US vs. Commonwealth distinction. For example, color and colour are the same word spelt in the American and British styles respectively. You'd think there'd be a word for this that ...


3

Ngram evidence Let's start by looking at U.S. preferences in the spelling of the aesthetic/esthetic/æsthetic family of words over the years. Here, to begin, is an Ngram chart for aesthetic (blue line) versus esthetic (red line) versus æsthetic (green line) for the corpus American English over the period 1800–2005: Here is an Ngram chart for aesthetics ...



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