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30

I'm Indian. And I assure you there's no such thing as the lowercase 'i'. No grammar teacher of mine -- and I've had quite a few good ones -- ever so much as mentioned it. In fact, this is the first I'm hearing of it. The tendency of Indians to write in textspeak is unfortunate, but 'i' is as erroneous as 'u' EDIT: I'd like to point out that almost all of ...


20

Jeega's post has a number of features.  It shows Jeega's awareness of the usual convention.  It hints that Jeega used to follow that convention.  It mentions a reason to defy that convention and follow an alternate.  It alludes to but does not cite a source which would support that reason. There are also, of course, a number of ...


6

Usage and alternative words A simple answer to this one: no, there is no word for pescetarians that is more commonly used or understood than pescetarian (or pescatarian, if you prefer that spelling). It is not a concept that has been spoken about commonly for very long, and pescetarian is, to my knowledge, the only word for it that has any practical ...


5

I'm not aware of any specific link with Indian English ("indian english"?) but I do have an addendum to your list: (4) - Stylistic reasons. One might disagree with it, but the lowercase "i" is often a deliberate stylistic choice, a flouting of convention for effect. It's particularly closely associated with poet e.e. cummings, who also rejected the ...


4

The answer is r, largely due to productive prefixes like re- and pre-. Per the OED, words with a letter followed by ei occur with this frequency for each such letter: 981 r 586 l 518 h 478 w 394 s 366 c 349 v 341 n 315 t 224 d 149 m 145 f 140 b 139 e 124 p 114 g 81 o 73 k 67 u 51 a 50 y 24 i 19 z 4 j 2 x This includes ...


3

This first part doesn't strictly apply to the "roots" of words, but there are a set of prefixes derived from Latin that often cause the following consonant to be doubled. These prefixes usually come from a related preposition that ended in a consonant, but when used as a prefix this consonant assimilated to the next consonant in the word. This explains the ...


2

There is no rule that related segments of words have to be spelled with the same sequence of letters. It might seem more logical to you, but that's never been a successful argument in changing English spelling*. We also write "deception", "deceive" and "deceit", and "reception","receive", and "receipt". In any case, the digraph "ai" in "maintain" is not ...


2

Spelled vs spelt: In American English, spelt primarily refers to the hardy wheat grown mostly in Europe, and the verb spell makes spelled in the past tense and as a past participle. In all other main varieties of English, spelt and spelled both work as the past tense and past participle of spell, at least where spell means to form words letter by ...


2

Middle English use of the word "all" and "al" were both recognized. 14th century constructions likely appeared as both "allways" and "always". In general, the codification of something like this often comes down to a single text that chose one construction. It is possible that something like the King James Bible or a particular author chose one spelling ...


1

Yes, parentheses have spaces before and after the enclosure (your example #1). However, there is never a space between a closing parenthesis and another piece of punctuation (like the period in this or the last sentence). Unrelated to your question, the actual word for an acronym is normally used first and then is followed by the acronym presented in ...


1

The first. Parentheses should have spaces on either side, just like words. For example (taken from The Punctuation Guide): Parentheses (always used in pairs) allow a writer to provide additional information. The parenthetical material might be a single word, a fragment, or multiple complete sentences.


1

It depends on the context. If you are using it as an adjective, you want to hyphenate it. He is a self-employed gardener. On the other hand, if you use it as a two-word noun, you do not hyphenate. He is self employed, and works as a gardener.


1

Based on a quick Google search, convention seems to dictate that "kelly pool" be spelt without a capital K. This is interesting as, according to Wikipedia, kelly pool was indeed named after the inventor (his nickname was Kelly).



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