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19

The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) has 277 instances of chaperone and 60 instances of chaperon from 1990 to 2015. (I excluded the spoken sections.) ...


9

The variant "chaperone" appears to be from a mistake: Chaperon: 1720, "woman accompanying a younger, unmarried lady in public," from French chaperon "protector," especially "female companion to a young woman," earlier "head covering, hood" (c. 1400), from Old French chaperon "hood, cowl" (12c.), diminutive of chape "cape" (see cap (n.)). "... ...


9

I think part of the premise of this question is incorrect: it's not actually the case that "u" was added to the word bilden to form build between Middle English and Modern English. Modern English spelling is standardized, so we can talk about "the" spelling of most specific words. But there are usually multiple attested Middle English spellings that all ...


5

As explained in the Oxford English Dictionary entry for the term: The standard spelling is supersede rather than supercede. The word is derived from the Latin verb supersedere but has been influenced by the presence of other words in English spelled with a c, such as intercede and accede. The c spelling is recorded as early as the 16th century; although ...


4

When two words are frequently used together people might start to hyphenate them, and then some time later they might start to concatenate them. It's a question of you having a feel for the usage and seeing which you are most comfortable using and with what audience, e.g. 'blogpost' with Tumbloggers and 'blog post' with your parents. But maybe that's your ...


3

Longest words I've found so far: thousandfold (12 letters, three syllables); the Oxford English dictionary says it is from Old English þúsendfeald drunkenness (11 letters, three syllables): Old English druncenness; there also are attested cases of oferdruncenness which would be even better if it were a modern English word overshadow (10 letters, four ...


3

Purely to move things along, here is the text from Ricky's link, best as I can transcribe it (from Notes on English Etymology by Walter William Skeat, 1904): Build. I have shown that our build is the A. S. byldan derived by vowel-change from bold, a dwelling. I have also considered the A. S. bold as borrowed from Icel. bōl, a dwelling. But I find ...


3

Here is what Grammar Girl has to say about it: Numbers in Parentheses "Don't put numbers in parentheses after words." By Mignon Fogarty, Grammar Girl July 23, 2015 Two readers recently asked whether they need to repeat a number in parentheses after they write out the word. Note that I did not write two (2) readers. ...


3

As stated by Etymonline auntie is originally an AmE term and aunty was just a variant. Checking with Ngram both terms were used from the late 18th century both in British and American English: Ngram Auntie BrE vs AmE Ngram Aunty BrE vs AmE Auntie(n.): 1787, also aunty, familiar diminutive form of aunt. As a form of kindly address to an older woman ...


2

As the following Ngram charts indicate, both spellings in each pair have a long history of use, but in each case the supersede version is significantly more common than the supercede version. Here is the chart for supercede (blue line) versus supersede (red line) for the period 1680–2008: Here is the corresponding chart for supercession (blue line) versus ...


2

It appears that in the British English corpus the hyphenated version, non-stop music (blue line), is much preferred. Whereas in American English, the spelling nonstop music (red line) is overwhelmingly preferred, and has been since the 1980s. Dictionary.com informs that nonstop (without a space) was first used between 1900 and 1905. Choose whichever ...


2

The earliest match that I could find in a Google Books search for the exact spelling pescatarian is from DeCherney, DeCherney, Marshall & Brook, The Fiddlehead Cookbook: Recipes from Alaska's Most Celebrated Restaurant and Bakery (1991) [page readable on first view of the link, but not thereafter]: Most New England chowders start with bacon or salt ...


2

They are known as Heterographs, if they are spelled differently and have different meanings. Heterographs are words that sound the same, but are spelled differently and have different meanings. They are also known as homophonic heterographs. See the below Venn Diagram(From Wikimedia Commons) Source : Wikipedia


2

It stems from the Latin term "convertibilis", which means changeable. The term "convertible" is Old French, dating back to the 13th-14th century. I'd imagine they kept the i because it was more familiar with the original term.


2

From Wikipedia The romanization of Japanese is the application of the Latin script to write the Japanese language. This method of writing is sometimes referred to in English as rōmaji If you know this (I didn't), your mind will automatically think romanji instead of romaji You have taught me a new word and how to misspell it in less than one ...


1

The way the Japanese people write a foreign word or a loan word is unique and it is done using Katakana. The capital city of Italy, Rome, is "ローマ" and you pronounce it as Ro Ma with a long o sound. The word ji in ローマ字 means a character. So, the word ローマ字 (Romaji) means the characters of Rome or Roman characters. That's why it is written that way. The ...


1

Colour for the UK and color for the US. (Colour is the better way ;-) Its just the way different peoples start to spell words, that originate from the same word. Colour is older by about 200 years than to color. Most non US use 'colour' and depending on how you have your keyboard input settings, it may give error indication from either one.


1

A grill was used at the counter when you went to the bank It protected the bank teller and was made of steel rods so you couldn't put your hands through and touch the cash So I think it means get away from my counter translated into get away from my face


1

According to The Guardian, the -y and -ie suffixes have different origins in English: y or ie? As a general rule: -y is an English suffix, whose function is to create an adjective (usually from a noun, eg creamy); -ie was originally a Scottish suffix, whose function is to add the meaning of "diminutive" (usually from a noun, eg beastie). So in ...


1

The parentheses are intended to make the number easier to find for later reference. Technical writing has many guidelines, for good reasons, that would, also for good reasons, be considered violations in general writing.


1

The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) does a nice job of identifying where mainstream UK and U.S. style preferences tend to diverge on the issue of how to handle prefixes such as non-: 5.10.2 Prefixes and combining forms Words with prefixes are often set as one word, but use a hyphen to avoid confusion or mispronunciation, particularly where there is a ...



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