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No (frequently stylized №) is the abbreviation for Latin: numero (in number). It’s used even though the word being abbreviated is English: number. Other examples of this practice: lb, abbreviation of Latin: libra (balance) – used as abbrevation for English: pound &, a stylized way to write Latin: et (and) – used as abbreviation for English: and Why? ...


5

Both spellings are used: Sus, also suss: (noun) Suspicion of having committed a crime; suspicious behaviour; often in phr. on sus. 1936–. (Oxford Dictionary of modern slang) Sus or suss: (Britain, Australia, New Zealand, colloquial) Suspicious. 2001, Mo Hayder, The Treatment, 2008, Bantam, UK, page 244, ‘Yes - OK, OK. Try not to ...


3

The single word for this is variant. More completely variant spelling. variant spelling noun A different spelling for a single word. Typically a US vs. UK or US vs. Commonwealth distinction. For example, color and colour are the same word spelt in the American and British styles respectively. You'd think there'd be a word for this that ...


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The Associated Press Stylebook specifies that you capitalize "Communist" when you're talking about a specific political party. If you're talking about someone who adheres to the more general political philosophy, then you'd use the lower-case c "communist" and "communism."


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The answer is complicated and requires knowing the etymological and phonological history of English. Doubt for instance comes to English ultimately through the Latin verb dubitare (to hesitate), in which the "b" is not silent. But it first took a detour through the Old French word douter, which had lost the letter "b" and its sound. The OED notes that ...


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According to the Grammarist both spellings are correct but the original one "Neanderthal" still remains the more common: Neanderthal is the more common spelling of the noun denoting the species of robust humanlike creatures that went extinct around 30,000 years ago. Neandertal is preferred by a few scientific publications. Neanderthal, the original ...


1

Is it a curve that has or expresses neutral stability? If so: "neutral-stability curve". Or is it a stability curve that is neutral? If so: "neutral stability curve". You say that it is a ""curve of neutral stability", so you would use the first of these - hyphenate. The point of joining "neutral" and "stability", in "neutral-stability", is to apply ...


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As an editor, it happens to me all the time. Every time an author writes "seperate," for instance, I doubt my own knowledge that it should be "separate." I double-check the spelling of common words all the time when I'm editing. My advice is never become an editor -- it slows your reading, makes writing nearly impossible, and has few rewards. All credit for ...


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One thousand three hundred and one is the correct way to say it in both American and British English.


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You can avoid the confusion by pluralizing the name of the letter, ess, into esses. She spent the afternoon ignoring the professor and drawing idly in her notebook, languidly doodling esses and then turning them into dragons.


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There are several different approaches to expressing thoughts, and no authoritative answer - or, rather, several, conflicting, authoritative answers. Undecorated thoughts - no quotation marks, no tags, no italics; just a change in tense and/or person - are recommended by people who argue that the most important thing is to avoid breaking up the flow of the ...


1

Google Books examples of 'eightteen' A Google Books search turns up a boatload of instances where eighteen is spelled eightteen, but the majority of them appear to be straight-up variant spellings, with no line break involved. Still, in a considerable number of instances—probably too many to be merely coincidental— eightteen appears at a line break and is ...



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