Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

Jargon, apparently. According to David A Cory (emphasis mine), Although not found in Dorland's Medical Dictionary, the term ditzel is universally recognized among radiologists as a very small nodule found in the lung. ... The origins of this word are obscure. The only similar word I could find, ditz, emerged in the 1970s to describe a silly or inane ...


10

They are both correct, they differ in usage: "gray" is AmE while "grey" is BrE spelling; gray and grey , (American vs British usage): are different spellings of the same word, and both are used throughout the English-speaking world. But gray is more common in American English, while grey is more common in all the other main varieties of ...


5

1. Is 'bronc' now the primary term in the bronc/bronco/broncho series of variants? Merriam-Webster’s decision to put the main definition of the term under the bronc entry took effect in the Ninth Collegiate Dictionary (1983). Both the Seventh Collegiate (1963) and the Eighth Collegiate (1973) have this brief entry for bronc: bronc n : BRONCO and this ...


5

For the most part, gray is the American English spelling and grey is the British English spelling.


5

From "The Yiddish Handbook": bissel Or bisl – a little bit. My mom used to use all kinds of Yiddish words that I thought she had made up. This one rang a bell with me. :-)


3

There is a Russian jargon term «децл», pronounced as /'dɛtzɘl/, which means exactly «a little» and is thought to be originating from the word «deciliter». Here's the Wiktionary page, which might be helpful if you either know Russian or are willing to feed the link to Google Translate. I doubt it's what you're looking for since this word is unlikely to be ...


3

Since propagable appears in dictionaries, it might be considered more useful and appropriate in formal or technical writing: adjective capable of being propagated Collins Dictionary It is derived directly from the Latin propago and the suffix -able: 1560s, "to cause to multiply," from Latin propagatus, past participle of propagare "to ...


2

I would do just the opposite of what you do. In other words, if I'm using it as an adjective, I would do what one has always done when two words form one adjective--use a hyphen. Hence: "It's an on-line project." I am also out of step with the rest of the world in that I see two words, period, when the expression is used as what you call a predicate ...


2

The OED, at least through its paper editions, doesn't record "ninehammer," and "nini-" is the only variant spelling it finds with one "n."


2

Staff Sergeant is usually abbreviated SSgt without the period, in rare cases it may be abbreviated SSG but I don't believe I've ever personally seen it abbreviated S.Sgt https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_sergeant With that being said, in any rank system usually the rank is the one that the 's' is added to to make plural and the qualifier is left alone. ...


1

The plural of an abbreviated rank is formed by adding an "s" to the principal element in the title before the period. The examples given by the AP Stylebook are "majs. John Jones and Robert Smith"; "Maj. Gens. John Jones and Robert Smith"; and "Spcs. John Jones and Robert Smith." Thus, the plural for "S.Sgt." would be "S.Sgts." That said, "S.Sgt." does not ...


1

Use the hyphen or the solid form to mean 'relaxed': you are using an adjective, and many compound adjectives which include verbs tend to be at least hyphenated wherever there's even a possibility that the reader might parse the compound could be misread as two separate words (assuming the author is paying attention). Going is also a noun which can refer to ...


1

It reads poorly with two ampersands - by that I mean the reader will likely read it as John Smith, Advocate and Notary and Mediator which sounds awkward. John Smith: Advocate, Notary, & Mediator - is worth a try. However, if your logo is more graphic design and not plain text, take artistic license and go for it, people can understand it just fine. You ...


1

Years (and years) ago everbody learnt the mnemonic rhyme 'i' before'e', except after 'c'; unless its 'e:' like beige, or sleigh. That was helpful to those of us who couldn't detect 'the height of a beige ceiling.'


1

Foreign is from Old French and entered the English language in the 1300s. At this time it was spelled (most of the time) 'ferren, foran, foreyne'. The spelling was altered in the 17th century most likely to match other French origin words like 'sovereign' and 'reign'. Friend is from Old English 'freond'. Its pronunciation was probably influenced a lot by ...


1

"Was there ever a movement or attempt at reforming the spelling system in order to bring it closer to phonetics?" Indeed there was. "Orthoepy" was a preoccupation in England in the 16th century and later. You'll find in Chomsky and Halle's SPE quotes from John Hart, writing in 1550 on the speech of his time, for instance, in their summary of the historical ...


1

I thought to quote this excellent overview of 'silent letters' herefrom. Q[uestion]: Why do words like “caught,” “ought,” “thought,” “bought,” “naught,” “laugh,” and “should” have endings with no bearing on the way the words sound? A[nswer]: I think you’ve asked a much larger and more complicated question than you realize! Our spelling ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible