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12

Whenever you find a computer spell-checking program does not know how to spell something, your best first assumption is that the program is an idiot. You will usually be right this way. Including in this case: Wiktionary lists noöne as an “obsolete” spelling of no one. Did people use it? Yes. Do people use it? Yes, again! Morover, a simple Google ...


8

English orthography, while far from exhaustively consistent, can explain these constructions. Produce has a long U, indicated by the silent E at the end. Adding a C in the suffix -ing (produccing) would indicate a short U. Also, while a C followed by an E, I, or Y is softened to an S sound, the first of a double C is usually pronounced as K (as in succeed) ...


6

No, there was never an alternative spelling of "no one" with a diaresis. Searching Google books, there are no hits for noöne that are pre-2000 and in English. There are three hits since then, one of them explaining that people used to spell "no one" with a diaresis.


3

"Etymologicon Magnum, or Universal Etymological Dictionary" by Walter Whiter (1800) makes the claim that "chiffy", as used in the term "in a chiffy" derives from the Anglo-Saxon word "Caf". "A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language" by Joseph Bosworth (1832) confirms the meaning of "Caf" as "quick, sharp, nimble, swift". This is my oldest source yet, this ...


3

I am not sure if this is official English rule, but it exists and it is called a C-V-C rule - Consonant-Vowel-Consonant: when the last three letters of the verb form a CVC then you need to duplicate the last letter before adding the suffix. Let see your examples. Bleed - VVC - no doubling Swim - CVC - double 'm' Remember not to apply this rule for ...


2

My mother is from a small town upstate New York (Dutch/English and French origin population) that dated back the the mid 17th century and they used the word afeast to describe something distasteful. My father from NYC had never heard of it but guessed on the afeared connection. Jenny


2

Though meant for creating subtitles for foreign users, this link of TED was quite informative for my purposes—deciding line breaks for two/three-line-per-page stories for children. It’s less grammar based and more aesthetic based. A few important rules I understand from above are: Do not break up linguistic units among lines. Maintain balance, similar ...


2

My answer focuses on the lineage of the form giffy, which is reported in a couple of reference works from the 1830s. William Holloway, A General Dictionary of Provincialisms (1839) has this entry for giffy: GIFFY, n. The shortest possible portion of time ; the winking of an eye. Norf. Sussex. Hants. The county citations indicate that Holloway found ...


1

You can certainly assume that English speakers will omit the tone-denoting diacritics in the Vietnamese versions of the names of people and places — partly because they don't understand what they signify, and partly because they would have no idea how to reproduce them even if they wanted to — and that most of them will be confused about the different ...


1

For what it's worth, parameterize has 1,100,000 search results on Google, while parametrize has 500,000. I would take that as evidence that both are acceptable and in widespread usage.


1

The first rule for consonant doubling is that the simple vowels a e i o u are stressed and spoken short as in fat fatter, get getting, sit sitting, hop hopping, put putting, and shut shutting. The logic of this rule is clear. Since English drops the final mute -e as in to hope, when you add an ending such as -ing you should spell it hoping and NOT hopeing. ...


1

This word is used very commonly in news. So, you may like to look at your favorite news outlets (in whatever region is relevant) and follow their style book. For example, the BBC I think tends to use "re-offend" http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-24294671 Traditionally the BBC had Actual Standards (they are a presently a cesspool of incoherence, moral filth, and ...


1

I know I'm late coming to this party, but I was just reading the transcripts of all the communications from the Apollo 13 mission (http://apollo13.spacelog.org/). I noticed that the "alinement" spelling was used throughout. "Alignment" must have been a pretty recent change. 13 was in April of 1970. I was born in August of that year and I don't recall ever ...


1

The two most common ways to handle capitalization in a text head or subhead or in a table or chart column head are "title case" and "sentence case." In standard title case, you capitalize each word (or abbreviated word) unless it is an article (a or the) or a short preposition (how short a preposition varies from one style guide to another, and some specify ...


1

If it is for a label or title, as you say, then do not abbreviate. Especially do not abbreviate using your own, invented abbreviation for your own, invented unit. Use a label or title of Amount/Time or Bushels/Hour, if you are measuring the amount in bushels. (Amount is not a unit; hour is a unit, as is bushel).


1

Different style guides recommend different approaches to hyphenating prefixes, but most sensible ones start from the proposition that the decision to hyphenate or not to hyphenate should be based on the readability and sense of the resulting word. Unfortunately, attempts to spell out a viable general rule entail spelling out multiple exceptions, as we see in ...



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