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75

TL;DR: Ignore diacritics when sorting English — except to break ties. When sorting English text — but not the text of various other languages — one does not distinguish letters with and without diacritics as different unless tie-breaking is required because all letters are the same otherwise. In such a case that two entries differ only by their ...


26

The direct answer to your immediate question is because it never had one — and so of course it couldn’t possibly lose something it never had. The problem is that you’ve asked a bit of a backwards question; the frontwards question is: Why did pronunciation, annunciation, enunciation, renunciation all change their vowel for the verbs pronounce, announce, ...


10

The answer to this question is that the 'O' got squashed out of the root by "rhythmic clipping". Let's consider the word pronounce. When we say this word, it is with an /aʊ/ sound in the stressed syllable. One of the typical spellings for this sound in the orthography is the sequence 'OU'. We can see this spelling-sound correspondence in the following ...


8

One could equally ask why isn't coffee spelled coffea, coffe, coffi, coffy, koffee, or kaffe? The word "coffee", pronounced /ˈkɒf.i/, is said to be a loan word from the Dutch koffie. Which begs the question why the dark red-brown beverage wasn't spelled koffee or koffie. In Italian it is pronounced and spelt caffè and etymologists claim it was derived ...


4

When you use Microsoft Word's alphabetize tool, it treats the "ö" as if it were just a regular "o." This seems to match the treatment of other accented letters not typically used in English. For example, piñata retains its "ñ" because it is taken directly from Spanish, but when alphabetized in English, the "ñ" is treated as a regular "n."


2

It appears it is for reproducing the sound of e that otherwise would be mute: There is only just a handful words that have a single [-e] which is pronounced: psyche / recipe / apostrophe / catastrophe / simile / resume'. And of course, one-syllable words with just one [-e], such as “me”, “he”, “we”, “she” or “be”, can’t have a silent vowel! ...


2

Do whatever you please; all three of right hand right-hand righthand are readily encountered in the wild. It’s possible that right-hand is the variant currently the most used, but your environment may not share this predilection. But I have a better suggestion: omit hand altogether.


2

Merriam-Webster doesn't mention a past tense use of the word 'lol'. I therefore don't think there's a rule on what the past tense of LOL is supposed to be like, or at least I was not able to find one. Also both the uppercase and the lowercase version can be used interchangeably. This makes sense considering lol can either mean laughing out loud or laugh ...


1

The word "righthand" is perhaps used somewhere, but it is not recognized by the Oxford Dictionary 12th edition Concise. It's up to you which authoritative reference you wish to adhere to. The important thing is to be consistent throughout, so your readers will know what terms you are using and why. If you stick to the Oxford Dictionary as reference, then the ...


1

I think this has something to do with spellings such as full, but hopeful, grateful and similar adjectives, and also fulfil BrE, AmE fulfill till, but until all, but almost, always and similar words. Unfortunately I have never seen a spelling rule that covers the whole phenomenon and tries to give an explanation. It seems that two identical consonants ...


1

The OED registers the following spellings, just for English, in chronological order: Forms: α. (15 caoua, chaoua, 16 cahve, coava, coave, cahu, coho, kauhi, kahue, cauwa); β. 16 coffa, caffa, capha; γ. 16 caphe, cauphe, cophie, coffi(e), coffey, coffea, coffy, 16–17 coffe, cophee, caufee, 16– coffee. So, as you can see, it took a long time for the ...


1

Such words are obviously new and therefore subject to fairly rapid evolution, but in this case "webdesigner" has long been written as two words and would seem odd as one. From the Oxford English Dictionary, Draft Partial Entry 2001    Originally written with a capital initial, web compounds are now increasingly written with a lower-case w. Since it ...



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