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46

When a person’s identity is unknown (which is often the case when a dead body is found, before the body is identified) or must be anonymised, but the person still needs to be entered into some kind of system that requires a name, placeholder names are often used. The most common placeholder names are John Doe for males and Jane Doe for females (as mentioned ...


32

kitchenware: Cooking equipment or utensils.


5

Your examples describe spelling errors, to which the linguistic technical term orthographic can be applied. orthography n, pl -phies      1. (Linguistics) a writing system      2. (Linguistics)           a. spelling considered to be correct ...


5

Culinary is, I think, the answer. It refers to things related to a kitchen or cookery. It is also used as the adjective of kitchen itself.


5

Utensils: noun A tool, container, or other article, especially for household use:


3

If you're looking for a coined single word, consider something like: Culinariana combining culinarian with the suffix -ana from culinarian: a cook or a chef and -ana (or -iana): denoting an assembly of items, as household objects, art, books, or maps, or a description of such items, as a bibliography, all of which are representative of or ...


2

You're better off leaving it as-is. The commas are not needed, and would be inappropriate because they would create a false appositive, linking a plain noun (cat) with a possessive one (Luke's).


2

Probably because of their etymology, according to which in align the French spelling of alignier remained, while in line the old English usage of line prevailed: Align: early 15c., "to copulate" (of wolves, dogs), literally "to range (things) in a line," from Middle French aligner, from Old French alignier "set, lay in line," from à "to" (see ...


2

The change from American spelling to British spelling is, surprisingly, a recent phenomenon in Australia. It was standard for most of the 20th century for Australian newspapers to prefer the '-or' ending to the '-our' ending. Strangely, words such as 'centre' and 'theatre' were generally spelled in the British style. It is only in recent years that ...


1

Simon B. is correct. additional comment: No. But if the luncheon is in honor of a person, for a charity event, or a retirement party the name of the honoree together with the event or occasion's name is capitalized. Examples: Charlie Brown's Retirement luncheon. but, Healthy Octogenarian Club's Annual Fundraising Luncheon.


1

Cutlery or kitchen ware is the correct word I think.


1

Although is sounds broader, the term "housewares" generally refers to stuff you'd find in the kitchen.


1

I checked the BNC (British National Corpus), and found the example: ...but he had been a frequent visitor at the Stevenses' home... I think you can use both variants. In one way, you can leave Rogers or modify to Rogerses because Rogers is already carries in a way the plural meaning as it is the family, which consists of several persons, name. Rogers ...


1

It's not a word, so it has no formal spelling as of now. The English language's main strength is its adaptability, so one day it will most likely be officially accepted as a word, but for now, it has no defined spelling. I would personally keep the e, as there are 3 consonants before it, and that makes me want to balance the scales a bit, and that's how it ...


1

Use a hyphen to link those words. "Exhaust gas after treatment" sounds like an instruction to vent gas upon completion of treatment. I think that 'exhaust gas after-treatment' conveys the the idea you're trying to convey without having to create a whole new word; MS word should allow it too. Edit: I do agree with the notion put forward in HotLicks' ...


1

All furniture is made by someone - even if it's produced in a factory (possibly in China) by mass production methods. The only furniture NOT produced by someone would be an objet trouve; some suitably shaped piece of rock or timber lugged in to be used as a chair, table or some other article of domestic furniture. Dan Bron is absolutely right: ...


1

I don't know if this is correct, but it may be related to 'doofers', Scots for 'horse shit' which also doubles up as an insult. Source: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/27/robert-macfarlane-word-hoard-rewilding-landscape [from the excellent Cambridge academic Robert Macfarlane]



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