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14

Ligatures and diaereses are not generally used in modern English text. However, whether or not they are "acceptable" depends on many factors. The easiest way to judge if something is acceptable is if you have an institutional style guide that you're supposed to follow. Any reasonably complete style guide should cover this topic. I believe the most common ...


8

It's no longer acceptable or helpful; wikipedia style guide association of art editors style guide It's so old-fashioned that it has become an affectation, and will result in your writing being judged poorly. It's acceptable if you're quoting a language that uses them (that is, if you'd also italicise the word to show it's a foreign word) but modern ...


3

As Prof. Yaffle mentions in the comments, if it were parallel to other forms, it would just be the letter l with an acute accent on top. I've never seen this form used for this purpose, but then again, l with an acute is not common, so it's possible that this form existed before Bullokar's book, and has only fallen out of use in modern times. L is the only ...


2

it's a dark l note that the l in lab and the l in ball are distinct the second includes a raising of the base of the tongue the two sounds map to one phoneme in English, in many other languages they are separate sounds/letters/basic units there is to my knowledge no other separate term in English, and the term dark l refers to the sound not the glyph


2

When Do You Need a Hyphen with a Prefix? There is often confusion over whether a hyphen should be used with a prefix. In other words, should you write re-consider or reconsider, or anti-aircraft or antiaircraft? Unfortunately, there is no simple rule governing this, but there are some guidelines. Guiding Principles for Hyphens with Prefixes If it's ...


2

Some people (including me) have /ɛ/ in catch (this is listed as the second pronunciation by Merriam-Webster) although for me the vowel in this word is more variable than the one in many and any (I might say /kætʃ/, while I would never say /æni/). The past tense of eat, which is standardly spelled "ate," may be pronounced /ɛt/ (see this map from the ...


2

There is no standardized way to indicate this in general There are concepts such as real value and time value etc but outside of a technical context they must be explicitly indicated


1

Both are valid, but they have slightly different connotations. Help whenever possible is, literally, requesting assistance as often as possible. Help wherever possible is more equivalent to Help however possible, which isn't asking for a specific amount or frequency of timing on the help, merely asking for help in whatever capacity the recipient can. ...


1

One of the advantages of using non-WYSIWYG typesetting software such as LaTeX is that it takes care of ligatures for you (and respects the style settings put in effect by the journal editor). See http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/ligatures This won't automatically produce any of the ligature examples in your question, probably because they ...


1

Reorder. With re- words, you should use ‘re-’ (with a hyphen) if the next word begins with an ‘e’ or a ‘u’ (when not pronounced like ‘you’). Otherwise, don’t hyphenate. It’s therefore re-examine, re-urge, re-entry and re-elect, and reuse, reunion, reorder, reinforce and redevelop. Source: ...


1

You can avoid the confusion by pluralizing the name of the letter, ess, into esses. She spent the afternoon ignoring the professor and drawing idly in her notebook, languidly doodling esses and then turning them into dragons.


1

One thousand three hundred and one is the correct way to say it in both American and British English.


1

There are several different approaches to expressing thoughts, and no authoritative answer - or, rather, several, conflicting, authoritative answers. Undecorated thoughts - no quotation marks, no tags, no italics; just a change in tense and/or person - are recommended by people who argue that the most important thing is to avoid breaking up the flow of the ...


1

I agree with the lengthy reply provided by @dodgethesteamroller that ended with "Thus "in situ visualization" is unambiguous because "in situ" cannot be mistaken for two separate adjectives; there is no such thing as "situ visualization." It's fine to put the hyphen in, but it may be perceived as old-fashioned by some copyeditors." However, I would take it ...


1

I have been a newspaper editor for 47 years in Houston. Try thinking of it this way. "On-line" and "online" are just short for "on the line," the line being your connection to the World Wide Web. So we really have three choices. As we say in advertising, "Pick the one that's best for you." Now, after I initially posted this, I had this thought: Consider "on ...



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