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41

For one, because the etymology is different. -ise (-ize) is a causative suffix in formalise, realise etc. (to make something formal, to make something real...) But enterprise is not "to make something enterpre" or similar (whatever that might mean). The prise bit comes as a past participle of French prendre (to grasp, to take). Another answer is that ...


14

Inches (like seconds of arc and seconds of time) are denoted by the double prime mark, not a quotation mark, although for ease of typing, it is common to see the straight quotation mark (the "dumb quote" found on most computer keyboards) used in its place. The most typographically correct presentation would be 4⅝ × 3¾″ and not ∅ 4⅝ × 3¾" ...


13

All letters in English are silent. Letters are visual signs, and they don't make any noise. What you're all peeving about is the fact that Modern English spellings don't represent Modern English pronunciations. And it's true; they don't. That's because they represent Middle English pronunciations. Before Caxton set up his printshop in England in 1470 ...


12

The name Tokyo is represented by two characters in Japanese: 東京 and the syllables (some fussy linguists insist those be called morae) used to sound those out are four: とうきょう or to-u-k[yo]-u. Japanese is an isochronous language, meaning every syllable has to be expressed as a (roughly equivalent) duration in time; whatever you call that duration, Tokyo has ...


8

I'd circumvent the whole issue, and, while at it, satisfy a certain subset of the puritanical prescriptivist party by writing it as: "around four or five thousand dollars", just as you did in the question itself. It's unambiguous, accurate, and a literal transcription of what was said.


7

This is a list that I, a speaker of standard southern British English, compiled some time ago: b: debt, subtle, lamb, tomb c: science, rescind, muscle, indict, Leicester, Connecticut ch: yacht d: sandwich, Wednesday, grandson g: gnaw, gnome, sign, phlegm, reign h: heir, hour, dishonest, ghost, annihilate, vehicle, hurrah, rhyme, khaki, thyme ...


6

No. A hyphen can appear in an English word as well. For example: a five-year-old boy


5

It is Stock Market or equity market: (from Wikipedia) is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares); these may include securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. Definition of 'Stock market': (from ...


4

You won't find compeled in the American Heritage Dictionary, Webster's New World College Dictionary, or ODO's US English corpus, either. The Corpus of Contemporary American English, which samples published texts from 1990–2012, returns zero matches for compeled versus 2651 for compelled. For that matter, it also returns zero results for expeled (vs. 2057 ...


4

Since the expression is an interjection—a cry of surprise or delight, really—many dictionaries (including Merriam-Webster's, evidently) don't consider it a standard word; in any event they don't list it. As Mari-Lou A points out, several online dictionaries—Wiktionary, YourDictionary, and Urban Dictionary—have entries for hoowee. But the Urban Dictionary ...


4

I am from Viet Nam. In my school, when we learn English, in our books and my teacher teach us that: 1) Đà Nẵng -> Da Nang, Việt Nam -> Viet Nam 2) Hai Bà Trưng -> Hai Ba Trung 3) Bình Trị Thiên (include: Quảng Bình, Quảng Trị, Thừa Thiên - before 1976) -> Binh Tri Thien. 4) Lý Minh Nhật -> Ly Minh Nhat 5) Hồ Chí Minh -> Ho Chi Minh (but we always speak/write ...


4

Direct from Greek ῥυθμός (rhythmos). "rh" is not an unusual word start in Greek, "y" is just a vowel, "-os" turned into "-us" in Latin then fell off when accepted into English, so the vowel that would have been in the syllable with "m" went away.


4

Explaining to a 5-year-old English spelling is quirky. English spelling tends to be more influenced by how people spelled words over a thousand years ago than by how we pronounce the word today. Yes, that means that word pronunciation has changed drastically over time, and our language today is not the same as the language that was spoken back then. One ...


4

I think it depends on the etymology of each term. During centuries of separation from Britain, American English retained the original -se ending in certain words borrowed from French, while British English modified it to -ce. finance (n.): was originally spelt with the suffix '-ce '. c.1400, "an end, settlement, retribution," from Old French ...


4

You need to revisit your list. It's erroneous. Silent letter is a letter that, in a particular word, does not correspond to any sound in the word's pronunciation. Please consider the various comments above and also these silent letters. F/J/Q/V/Y: There are no words (I could recall) that take a silent letter. R- Yes, there are no words in ...


3

The original question was asking about silent "z" and silent "m" Silent "z" occurs in recent French loans: "laissez-faire", "répondez s'il vous plait" and the already mentioned "rendezvous". Silent "m" occurs in initial Greek-derived mn-: "mnemonic", "Mnemosyne", but is pronounced after a prefix (amnesia).


3

"shot-shot" is not acceptable. Probably you should also include the word "from" i.e. "... is the mean change in the mean energy of the bunch, fluctuating from shot to shot". In written English, using "-" in place of "to" is generally restricted to uses that involve time intervals eg 10am-2pm or M-F and would be used in notices or signs rather than in a ...


3

There are the graphemes, œ and æ, which appeared first in medieval Latin to represent the Greek diphthong. They are still used in everyday English (at least in the Queen's version), in words such as encyclopædia and fœtus. (At least they are usually written ae; those characters are not available on most keyboards). I have noticed that Americans pronounce ...


3

With regard to your question number 4, here (for what it's worth) is the style advice of The Oxford Guide to Style (2003): Vietnamese Vietnamese names should not be transposed: although the family name is first, the correct reference is to a person's second given name: Nguyen Vo Giap becomes General Giap. (This does not apply to Ho Chi Minh, which ...


2

This word is derived from old German. In the German alphabet the letter s is pronounced with a "sh" sound, and a double s is pronounced "es". The double s in German is ß and sounds like our English s. That having been said, the word gets pronounced thresh-hold and not thres-hold.


2

This depends a bit on how one defines "correct". Various dictionaries might accept either or both uses. If you go by the scientific literature, both seem to be widely used. On the other hand, if you are looking for a spelling that is suggestive of the correct meaning, then you should go with "parametrize" (or "parametrise"). You are not transforming the ...


2

I don't think there's a rigorously correct answer; it seems like a matter of author's preference, or a matter for the style guide for the intended publication. That said, I would choose "V", because I think the quotation marks are the clearest way to emphasize that the "V" is meant as the shape of the letter, not an abbreviation or other usage. Exceptions ...


2

Dialog vs dialogue and analog vs analogue are simply spelling differences, and are not recognized in any major dictionary (that I was able to find) as having distinct definitions. Technological vocabulary, specifically related to electrical and computer engineering, prefers the shorter forms, and because of this we are seeing those forms being adopted in ...


2

In marketing, the benefit of "everyday low price" is that in THAT store, the customer does not need to wait for a sale, miss a sales price because of not being a member of the "customer loyalty" program, etc., so the sign that reads "Everyday Low Price" is correct in this context.


1

If we define "a correct spelling of an English word" as one that appears in a reliable dictionary, then, like ' (the apostrophe) and - (the hyphen), we must also include / (the slash) in the repetoire of valid English orthographic characters, because and/or appears in the Oxford English Dictionary: and/or: a formula denoting that the items joined by it ...


1

A rule of thumb guide for consonant doubling before suffixes is this: If the last syllable of the root is: stressed ends in: consonant vowel consonant we usually double the final consonant before the suffix. There are some letters that we don't generally double before suffixes. The most important are 'w' and 'y'. The letter 'l' is not one of these ...


1

With regard to a person's voice/singing it would be "vocal cords". "Chord" is basically a harmonic set of three/more notes and it's more music based than human based.


1

There doesn't seem to be much of a consensus for which is proper, but looking on the Internet, it seems that Web Design would be a better choice. According to this source (albeit written in 2011) shows that Web Design is the more popular word for search engines. In this digital age, SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is very important for a company. Using Web ...


1

Write it any way you want! There is no standard spelling of this interjection as illustrated by Sven Yargs. Thankfully, this one place were English still allows improvisation. Yeehaw, go for it! (this would have been a comment to the above answer but I don't have enough reputation!!!)


1

You said: You can make-up the makeup exam. Unless it's a make-up exam about cosmetics, this wouldn't be what you're looking for, especially since "make-up" is a descriptor and "make up" is an action. You can make up the make-up exam. Would be correct. [Make up] is the action and [make-up] is the descriptor. Makeup is a compound word used to ...



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