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6

The Simplified Spelling Board of the early 1900s in the United States made gauge one of its targets in the early 1920s, urging the replacing of au with a to yield gage. From Simplified Spelling Board, Handbook of Simplified Spelling (1920): Principles Adopted Its [the Board's] recommendations, accordingly, have been based on the following ...


6

Employe is a rare dated alternative spelling of the more common employee (AHD) Ngram: an employe. Ngram: an employee vs an employe From French employé. Employe (plural employes). 1920, Conference proceedings of the National Electric Light Association Convention, National Independent Meat Packers Association, the University of Georgia College of ...


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As Django notes, Doritos is a brand of the Frito-Lay company, and as such, a proper noun. Proper nouns are capitalized as a general rule. But Dorito is a derivative form (as with Should capitals be used when verbing trademarks? and Should proper nouns used as verbs be capitalized?); Frito-Lay does not use the back-formed singular Dorito or dorito at all, to ...


2

...Spelling-pronounciation, the tendency to allow or encourage the way a word is spelt to influence the way it is spoken, must be as old as the first attempts to commit speech-sounds to paper. In English at least it is traceably very old." From Kingsley Amis's The King's English. (The section goes on for several pages. Tell me if you want some ...


2

According to Middle English Dictionary, Volume 4 By Hans Kurath, gript was one of the spellings all those hundreds of years ago. Beyond that we can look at Google ngram: gript,gripped. From the graph we can see that the 'gripped' spelling took off from 1850 onwards.


2

In Australian English, which for the most part is similar to British English, I have never come across “gript”. “Gripped” is the only form of the word that I have ever come across. I suspect that the former is probably old English, and no longer in use, or looking at the usage example, possibly a “dialect spelling”.


2

Not much to go on but here are a couple of clues: The Latin dictionary (Smith) gives the earliest date for Diphthonga as 450ish. Marc. Carp.; Prisca. Two Roman Grammarians. And Ligature even later. None of the early uncial manuscripts that I have so far looked at show ligatures, apart from the Divine monograms. The same applies to a web-site for ...


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gauging is UK spelling gaging is given as an alternative US spelling here. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gage


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I guess as "Dorito" is indicating the singular of Doritos, a brand name (and not a real word), it should be capitalised in English, too.


1

Google hit counts are extremely unreliable. Even if you know they are unreliable, and you think you are taking this into account, you will occasionally run across searches in which they are orders of magnitude more unreliable than you ever thought they could be. I believe you've just discovered one of them. Google Ngrams are a much better tool for deciding ...


1

EDIT - The sky is the limit. You can write as many words about any picture as you feel like. All you need is a rich vocabulary and fertile imagination. Earlier I understood your question as "Can a thousand words describe a picture exactly as it is?" That's why I wrote the answer below. Literally, the answer is "no". It simply means that showing you a ...


1

I'm from the UK, but will use US spellings in some contexts. Programming languages generally use US spellings, the HTML center tag or the CSS color property for example, and it can be a bit jarring to write stuff like use color to set the colour. The other annoyance is that spell checkers are always either US or UK, so you end up with loads of red lines if ...


1

Spelling pronunciation. Obviously, the words most susceptible to spelling-pronunciations are rare words that people see more often than they hear, or foreign terms that have sounds that don't exist in English.


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I don't know of any particular connection to Indian English. The idea that lower-case "i" is somehow more humble did appear in a New York Times essay by Caroline Winter about the English first-person singular pronoun, "Me, Myself and I" (hat tip to Neil Fein for locating the article in his answer to the question "Is it alright to use lowercase 'i' or should ...


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The base (root) is "cure". cur(e) + i + ous = curious cur(e) + i + o(u)s + ity = curiosity EXPLANATION --The "i" is explained above by szarka. --The "e" is dropped as usual when adding the suffix that starts with a vowel. --The "u" is dropped in "curiosity" as part of another suffix spelling pattern (i.e., when adding the suffix "-ity" to a word ending ...


1

The following is meant to supplement not supplant existing answers. In general, you look at what it was in Latin; however, there are several prominent exceptions. The Etymonline entry regarding this is cribbed and abbreviated from the OED. Here’s what the OED says about these. ‑ance and ‑ence ‑ance a. Fr. ‑ance :– L. ‑ānt‑ia, ‑ēnt‑ia, ‑ent‑ia ...



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