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Project Gutenberg contains more than 33000 classic books for free, downloadable in different formats. Also, look at the affiliates sites, where you can find even more books. EDIT: you may try to contact them to see if there is a way for you to download the books "painlessly" (e.g. with an automated script). I would suggest you ask permission before trying ...


7

It depends on the dictionary. Some, perhaps most, place the most common use of the word first. The Oxford English Dictionary, 'the definitive record of the English language', places its definitions in the order in which each word is first used. That is to say, the earliest known meanings are given first. As the OED itself explains, While the headword ...


7

It really depends on the dictionary as to what order they are. Some group meanings logically, others chronologically, and most according to how "common" they are - but that commonness is usually subjective. If you want word frequencies, you need a corpus, not a dictionary. Look at Google Books search, for example, if you want to know how frequently a word ...


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Project Gutenberg is a poor choice if you are looking for contemporary language, as most of the PG texts are from the early 20th century and earlier. For large samples of more recent text, you want one of the many available text corpora, such as the following: American National Corpus British National Corpus Corpus of Contemporary American English The ...


4

Google has many results for such a query, though quality sites may be buried under other sites that are better marketed (or more engaged in search engine optimisation). One main remark: what you are looking for (listings of synonyms and related words) is called a thesaurus (plural: thesauri or thesauruses). Now, for the sites themselves, I myself am quite ...


2

http://www.synonym.com/ - in their own words: Synonyms Thesaurus with Antonyms & Definitions Synonym.com is the web's best resource for English synonyms, antonyms, and definitions. Type in a word and the synonym finder will come up with a list of synonyms. Check out the most popular online synonym searches to find the right word for any ...


2

You could subscribe to Michael Quinion's magazine here. That's a weekly, though, although it does have plenty of rare words.


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If n-grams are fine (i.e., you don't need complete sentences and such), you could also try the Google n-grams dataset.


2

The number of senses a dictionary reports depend a good deal on how much space it has and how long the lexicographers are allowed to parse the data. Typically, the more they look, the more they find. The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English uses corpus data to sort its senses by frequency though they don't provide the sense frequency information. ...


2

If you understand regexs, you can use this. For example, '^mo.s.$' yields: moist moose mosso mossy mouse mousy


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Generally words in dictionary definitions are ranked in order of commonality of use or "usualness of meaning". For a word with a large number of meanings, the top few definitions may be of similar likeliness of meaning in common use, but definitions towards the bottom of the list will be ones which are rarely used and/or whose meanings are obscure or ...


1

The Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms is the only resource that I know of. It has more than 6000 entries, accompanied by etymological information related to the idiom. It has a searchable app on the AppStore for iPhone, iPod Touch and iPad users. It also comes in hard copy book format if you don't own these devices. Both of these options are a bit pricy. ...


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You might try this spot, SF: http://www.visualthesaurus.com/app/view and Rodale's "Synonym Finder" (a paper book; no online presence that I know of) is also quite good for more extensive idiomatic phrases.


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The Gutenberg project has a specific page for getting offline dumps efficiently - Information About Robot Access to our Pages


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I think you're looking for More Words. Here are some basic word search options: Use a hyphen (dash) to give the location of a missing letter: w-rd or -are Use an asterisk (star) for any number of unknown letters: lett* or *gry or ar*ct Exclude words containing the letters that follow a caret (hat): ma-e ^kt Or enter a few letters (without hyphens ...



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