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1

The OED lists 55 terms with fuck in them. It is am extremely versatile and productive word, occurring variously as an interjection, noun, adjective, participial adjective, verb, adverb, and deverbal noun. As a non-native speaker just learning English, I highly recommend that you learn all 55 of them, because you will encounter them again and again. :) ...


-1

In that context, "fucking" is simply an interjection. The sentence is "someone, somewhere is going to pay." "Fucking" is there for emphasis.


0

If the night club means women under the age of 22, then it can say that: women under the age of 22. If, however, it means any female person under the age of 22 then females under the age of 22 is appropriate. (Here, females is presumed to mean female people and not, say, female goldfish.) If you were to complete the message on the sign for us then we might ...


0

I think women is preferable, for the reasons given by @Brian - unless the sign is also aimed at female horses, guinea pigs, armadillos etc. Maybe the real issue here is: What will the women under 21 have to do? Do men under 21 have to do the same? If so, how are they referred to, as males or as men? And if not, why not? To answer @Frank 's comment above ...


1

At night clubs in the United States (more or less depending on the type of clientele) female is an overtly polite substitute for bitch (which at some night clubs [again, depending on the clientele] is a neutral term for a woman of reproductive age), since many people consider bitch an impolite term. In the right kind of night club, calling a woman a female ...


6

Although OED traces the usage of female as a noun even further back than its usage as an adjective, the adjectival usage has long been more prevalent. Partly for this reason, referring to a woman as a female tends to focus attention on just a single attribute, one that she shares with many other animals and even plants, at the expense of other attributes ...


5

No, it's not offensive at all to refer to women as females. Female is just a little more formal or clinical.


1

Films of the 1950s etc were heavily censored. Writers may have wanted to convey the earthy language used by eg cowboys or gangsters, but they simply weren't allowed. Films are still censored to the extent they are given ratings as to suitable age groups, though in adult films pretty much anything seems to be allowed now. It's up to the adult whether they ...


2

Keep in mind that many people are offended by certain words and phrases, but others are desensitized, and others find nothing wrong with them at all. There are several literary applications. Often, swearing conveys strong emotion. Furthermore, it can reflect the character's personality or opinions. For some characters, it would seem unnatural for them not ...


0

I wrote an answer here on how the meanings of bad and other similar words have changed over time (and actually it was a dupe, and the previous questions' answers may be just as good). The comment on my answer is spot on—that words have often tended to just reverse their meaning. If you imagine, at one point, the meaning of the word badass to be the ...


6

stroke strōk/ noun: stroke; plural noun: strokes an act of hitting or striking someone or something; a blow. "he received three strokes of the cane" synonyms: blow, hit, thump, punch, slap, smack, cuff, knock; (from Google) Your replacement word is just as violent as the word you wish to replace. As a Canadian I can tell you ...


4

Tense is crucial here. In the present continuous—shit happens, for example—the speaker is not referring to any specific past event, but reflecting philosophically on the general nature of life in response to something undesirable happening, and expressing the idea that we shouldn't be surprised, life's like that. Perhaps the speaker is having a ...


1

From @Sven's answer it certainly looks like "stuff happens" pre-dates "shit happens". That doesn't answer the question, rather passes the buck to "stuff". That said, I feel there's a smooth and logical transition from "[event] happens" to "[object] happens", given some objects (like the Star Wars movies) are linked to a particular event (their release). So ...


6

Here is the entry for "Shit (Stuff) happens" in Doyle, Mieder, and Shapiro, The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs (2012, Yale University Press): Shit (Stuff) happens. 1944 Lee Thayer, Five Bullets (New York: Dodd Mead) 232: "Was it just chance? Is there such a thing as pure chance? As 'Vic and Sade' are wont to say, 'Stuff happens.' Yes. Stuff does ...


28

"Balls!", and the synonymous "Bollocks!" which is more common in this usage, are essentially just vulgar exclamations usually expressing annoyance regarding a situation, or rejection of something previously said. In my experience Americans 1 rarely use either of the above. In terms of "vulgarity" it probably falls somewhere between "Dammit!" and "Fuck ...


5

Balls: it is an exclamation of disappointment (interjection). Richard is disappointed by the fact that they can't defeat Thomas by acquiring 51% of the stock since he will issue 2 million new shares making it impossible to beat him. Oh balls!!! An expression of dissapointment and or frustration. "Oh balls, I lost my chemistry homework..." ...


18

A clue is given in the text you quote: “Balls,” he repeated. As he's repeated that, there must have been a mention immediately before it. The line which refers to Richard saying something immediately prior to that is Richard swore uncharacteristically which gives some indication of the type of exclamation. One can then go to a dictionary. ...



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