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3

In this case, as in surprisingly few others involving the word "f*ck," the phrase refers to sexual intercourse. You can say "My boss totally f*cked me!" to mean, "My boss arranged things in such a way that my situation is now untenable." If you said, "My boss totally f*cked my brains out!" however, I would suggest that you either go to a lawyer and file ...


1

In essence, the two phrases have the same meaning, that of explicit, or obscene language. However, I have always found that foul has a more direct connotation of swearing, and that those who are said to use foul language appear to so in full knowledge of its foulness, they choose to be obscene. Merriam Webster backs me up here by defining foul (in the ...


18

Check in a dictionary. Vulgar actually means "common", that is to say as in "lower-class". It's similar to words like "ugly", "crass", "tacky". (The first example given in the OED is "a vulgar check suit", that is to say "a really ugly suit", "a crass suit".) However these days, vulgar is sometimes used to mean "swear words" or "obscene". But the ...


0

It’s just a special kind of noun phrase where a pronoun is described by a follow-on noun (or adjective being used like a noun). The grammatical terms are dense and frankly over my head, but there is a discussion of this in Foundations of Cognitive Grammar where it gives other examples like “we linguists” and “you three”. The personal pronouns are ...


0

"you pig" - The person being addressed displays mannerisms or hygiene comparable to what might be expected from a pig. Note that "pig" here is a noun, not an adjective. "you bastard" - A general insult to the honesty or legitimacy of the addressed person. The word "bastard" used to mean a child of unknown parentage, or the son of a monarch who could not ...



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