New answers tagged

1

It seems the phrase is more frequently intended to convey the target's uselessness or laziness rather than a desire for their literal death (though I see in #3 that it is more literal there), if I interpret it correctly. For #1 and #2, my response might be "Seriously?! Useless!" "Seriously?!" implying a great disbelief in such obvious stupidity or ...


1

I like “die in a fire”, but “I hope you die in a fire” isn't something I'd say to my sister, if I wanted to stay on speaking terms with her. I'm much more likely to use that in an anonymous situation, like “I hope whoever [did X bad thing] dies in a fire” or “Whoever came up with [X bad idea or policy] can die in a fire.” “Go to hell” (or “you can go to ...


3

I'd probably go with "eat shit and die" (Urban Dictionary) since it covers atonement and belittlement first before telling them to die.


1

It's not modern English, but if you're feeling decidedly overdramatic, the classic Shakespearean insult Infirm of Purpose is the only thing that sprung to mind for me. This expression comes from Shakespeare's play "Macbeth" in which the evil Lady Macbeth uses it to chastise her husband for feeling remorse over killing the King, paralleling your first ...


4

"Die in a fire" does convey much of the meaning you are describing with your Persian curse. However, as far as I'm aware, it's a fairly new phrase. So it will be understood literally, rather than as a general phrase, especially if you're talking to older people. Of note, many people have very different thresholds for what is considered "extreme". A number ...


2

You're going to be pushing up daises! The humorous idea is that when you are in the grave, daisies (small flowers) that grow on the ground above you will actually have their stems lengthen not from natural growth, but from you pushing on their long stems from underground. This phrase was much more common in the 1800s and early 1900s. pushing up (the) ...


0

I don't think it means that you may die and/or be buried. In ancient Persia Jerusalem and even Arab it was a tradition, usually an expression of extreme loss, that on the death of a loved one, or a very respected member of the community, the mourners would put dust and sometimes ashes in their heads. So the curse actually means that the 'cursee' may ...


2

There's the straightforward "I hope you die" (and at Urban Dictionary). Not quite as aggressive as directly telling someone to die, or implying that you're the one who's going to kill them.


4

To convey the idea of not wanting to see the faulty person anymore, you may say: Get out of my sight! It is less harsh than saying that you want to see him six feet under (i.e. you want him drop dead). Example: 'You think this is funny?' Mr Zhao bellows. 'Your stupid trick has destroyed my restaurant, my livelihood – and you think it's one big ...


1

I'm not entirely sure where this aphorism came from. It's in print though; it's on my the refrigerator at my parents' house. I think it matches the tone and pace of your phrase while being wholly American. May your legs curl up in such a manner, that your asshole whistles the Star Spangled Banner This is probably something that you might have ...


13

You can always tell someone to: "Take a long walk off a short pier" Link also makes mention of: "Go play in traffic" The relative, uh, deadliness of either option is certainly debatable; that said, they are often used to communicate a very strong desire for a person to remove themselves in as unpleasant/dangerous a manner as possible.


17

In Britain, if you're very angry with someone, you might tell them to fuck off and die. That phrase doesn't appear in any reputable idiom references (only urban dictionary). However, it is certainly in use, as demonstrated by the esteemed mayor of our beloved capital: Mayor of London whilst out riding his bike tells black-cab driver to 'fuck off and ...


19

One of the simple, all-purpose imprecations is go to hell: Inf. to go to hell and suffer the agonies therein. (Often a command. Caution with hell.) 'Oh, go to hell! Go to hell, you creep!' You can replace hell with the devil or the dickens. Very similar to what Biscuitboy suggested, but you could consider using burn in hell: Statement of ...


0

May God have mercy upon your soul. –Wiki The sentence of this court is that you will be taken from here to the place from whence you came and there be kept in close confinement until [date of execution], and upon that day that you be taken to the place of execution and there hanged by the neck until you are dead. And may God have mercy upon your soul. ...


29

Although I am not aware of an exact English equivalent of the Persian curse, "To rot in hell" is a pejorative and used to aggressively retort to infuriating situations. Usage: What? You forgot to get my anti-hypertension medicine? And you ratted me out to Mom?!? You know what? You and ISIS should just burn and rot in hell!! Update: As some ...


8

A typical, useful expression , though probably less strong than the one you are suggesting, is: God damn you: Used to express anger or annoyance with someone. (ODO) God damn you, why did you not buy my medicine? Why did you give my secret away?


25

The simple, all-purpose imprecation in U.S. English is "Drop dead!"—which is, of course, the usual stage before the soil-on-head stage. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997) has this entry for the phrase: drop dead An expression of anger, rejection, or indignation toward someone. For example, I should do all that work for ...


1

The Hoodlum Band was arrested on December 13, 1866. Refer to The Frederick Bee History Project "Hoodlum" page. From that page: Hudelum means disorderly in a German dialect, Swabian. This is corroborated by the etymology for 'hoodlum' given at WordReference.com: Etymology: dialect, dialectal German; compare Swabian derivatives of Hudel rag, e.g. ...


0

No this is not correct, in fact the complete opposite of this statement is correct. Calling a girl beautiful is a flattering compliment, unless you use it in a posessive or abusive way towards the girl, or follow it with cat calls, wolf whistles or any other degrading gestures or expressions. Calling a girl beautiful is generally a lovely thing to do.


2

What you've been told is absolutely absurd. There are so many diverse situations to consider. Are you talking about remarking to a friend, "What a beautiful girl!" or are you going to tell her to her face, "You're beautiful!" Where does this conversation take place - at a beach, a party or church? How old is she - and how old are you? Are either of you ...


0

If I've read properly between the lines, your Russian phrase translates as Fuck everything and the horse as well. We do have a (rough) equivalent in English: Fuck you and the horse you rode in on. Let's go to the videotape.


2

'Shite' is Scots or Irish slang for the obvious equivalent, although its usage is pretty widespread all over Britain and Ireland, not just by those of Scots or Irish origin. Pronounced like kite would be in whatever British or Irish accent you speak with and used just as the ordinary word is (oh shite, that's a shite situation, this job is a pile of shite, ...


2

It is a vulgar, possibly offensive term: Shite: colloquial modern alternative spelling of shit (n.), preserving the original vowel of the Old English verb. (Etymonline) Shite ‎(plural shites) (Britain, Ireland, vulgar) Shit, trash, rubbish. (Britain, Ireland, pejorative) A foolish or deceitful person. He's a useless shite. ...


3

To be syntactically correct, although just as rude: What do you know about grammar, you idiot? Insert a comma after the word grammar. After all, this is not a sentence you want to get wrong, grammatically or otherwise. Having said that, I would find a nicer way to convey the sentiment. You are, after all, not truly interested in what they know about ...


1

The term “Aspie” was first introduced by Liane Holliday Willey in 1999 in her book ‘Pretending to be Normal: Living with Asperger's Syndrome’ She also wrote one of the first autobiographies by a women with Aspergers and therefore please embrace the term as it was meant, which is in a positive light.


3

It's difficult to know exactly how people spoke in earlier times. Also, when asking this question, it is important to know which class of individuals you are speaking of. "Upper crust" used language differently than the "common" person. Also, swearing is a highly individual matter. One reason this is a difficult question to address is that the printed ...


1

Dictionary.com traces quim to 1613 and explicitly states that her origin is 'unknown'. The Oxford English Dictionary, rather than not giving an origin, likewise states that the origin of quim is 'unknown'. Whereas Wiktionary gives a theory for the origin of quim, that she comes from Middle English queme and quemen (sounds like women—perhaps the earliest ...



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