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In the U.S. there's a clearly related though gentler expression: "to toot." Mothers generally prefer children to say "toot" rather than "fart," as you can see on this Circle of Moms Question and answer page. There's also a children's rhyme, which you can read variations of on Wikipedia: Beans, beans, the magical fruit The more you eat the more you toot, ...


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It appears to be mainly a BrE slang expression: To trump: Over the centuries, fart has not been without linguistic rivals. Since the early fifteenth century, for example, trump has served as a synonym for fart, or rather to denote an especially noisy fart. (A Dictionary of Culinary Curiosities) by Mark Morton Trump: Verb. To break ...


2

Well one word is euphemism. euphemism /ˈjuːfəmɪz(ə)m/ noun: euphemism; plural noun: euphemisms a mild or indirect word or expression substituted for one considered to be too harsh or blunt when referring to something unpleasant or embarrassing. "the jargon has given us ‘downsizing’ as a euphemism for cuts" synonyms: polite ...


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The term is minced oath. That is, the profanity has been cut up a little, and mixed with other stuff. Per Wikipedia: A minced oath is a euphemistic expression formed by misspelling, mispronouncing, or replacing a part of a profane, blasphemous, or taboo term to reduce the original term's objectionable characteristics. Some examples include gosh, darn, ...


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I'm surprised I haven't seen this posted, but I would think gross. It's short and well-known so it works well as a replacement pejorative. gross: 6a : coarse in nature or behavior 6b : gravely deficient in civility or decency 6c : inspiring disgust or distaste


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It looks like you are confusing camp and kitsch. Camp is phony, self-obsessed, over-the-top theatrical attention-whoring. It was very strongly associated with gays before they were main-streamed and reality TV basically obsoleted it. From WordNet 3.0 camp adj 1: providing sophisticated amusement by virtue of having artificially (and vulgarly) ...


6

I would suggest "pathetic". See http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pathetic A combination of definitions 1 & 4 appropriately convey the condescension you feel toward something ridiculous.


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The first two may be a bit too British (I'm not sure from where the questioner originates). The third is North American but I certainly hear it a lot in the UK. wet: Brit. Inf. Sense #2 "Showing a lack of forcefulness or strength of character" moist: Urban Dictionary " "... used to describe an 'uncool' person" sappy Inf. chiefly North American Mawkishly ...


-2

For garish, the 1913 Webster's has: Gay to extravagance; flighty. [1913 Webster] So even the dictionary associates it with the old non-politicized meaning of gay.


4

I would consider an action rather than a word. For example you could pretend to vomit/wretch or make a disgusted face. This has a bit more effect than some of the words suggested, which to my ear sound a bit dated. In text, emojis/emoticons are perfect! :-# :| =/ or even better (on devices which can render colour emoji) 😷 😬 😐 (Note: As ...


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"Twee" has always been my fallback for just this situation. It has just the right level of contemptuous disdain. Unfortunately, Merriam-Webster.com says it's chiefly British, so it may not work so well universally: Twee: adjective \ˈtwē\ : sweet or cute in a way that is silly or sentimental Chiefly British: affectedly or excessively dainty, ...


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I would go with "lame," since it seems to me that people use "gay" to describe lame stuff that isn't necessarily sappy.


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poncey: Brit. pretentious or affected pansy: effeminate or homosexual If you're a Beavis & Butthead fan wuss


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To refer to the behaviour that you find objectionable (in others), I would suggest a more neutral but nevertheless descriptive word: saccharine, which means artificially sweet to a distastefully excessive extent. As per the Merriam Webster dictionary: Full Definition of SACCHARINE (a) : of, relating to, or resembling that of sugar (b) : ...


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Here is an adjective for the excessively emotional or sentimental behavior: sappy adjective U.S. 3a: overly sweet or sentimental 3b: lacking in good sense: silly (Merriam-Webster online) sappy (adj.) "full of sap," Late Old English sæpig, from sæp (see sap (n.1)). Figurative sense of "foolishly sentimental" (1660s) may have developed ...


2

There are a few examples of Dutch defence usage before 1789 that refers to war terminology, plus the Phrase Finder cites its usage in legal context. It is reasonable to assume that Elias Stein referred to an existing expression and adopted it to describe a tactic in chess game. From: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling: In Four Volumes, Volume 2 Di ...


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My theory also comes from aviation. It is purely speculation and just me connecting the dots. I saw a gif of a topless girl in a plane that did a roll. When upside-down her "tits" were "up" towards her face. I took it to mean upside-down, broken, oriented incorrectly.


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"Expunge Nazism" If Nazism can be expunged as a force, would you let a few crazies live and mumble among themselves? How about: "Freedom Party of Austria represents the resurgent ideas of Nazi scum and their sympathizers; Nazism must be expunged from our political life." Resurgent: "That rises again from death, torpor...." Expunge: "To blot out" ...


2

...not fully eradicated verb destroy completely; put an end to. Might be preferable: It's a little less murderous and evil than exterminate; It leaves room to be interpreted as simply the destruction of the ideology.


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decimated kill, destroy, or remove a large percentage or part of, e.g. Cholera decimated the population. Decimate originally referred to the killing of every tenth person, a punishment used in the Roman army for mutinous legions. Today this meaning is commonly extended to include the killing of any large proportion of a population. In our 2005 survey, 81 ...


-1

How about "dregs" or "rump"? The dregs are the unpalatable bits left at the bottom of a drink, and "rump" in this case means the small or unimportant remnant of something larger, as in "he was left to run the rump of the company after the mass layoffs".


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You could use the synonym extirpate without rewording the sentence. extirpate - 1. to remove or destroy totally; do away with 2. to pull up by or as if by the roots; root up: The problem is that exterminate is too literal when discussing a group of people. It means kill. Extirpate, which derives from destroying plants, would be clearly the ...


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My father was born in 1898, was well-educated and was on the route to Oxbridge until World War 1 intervened. He was not given to swearing very much but he sometimes used the adjectives "damned", "blasted" and - a milder expletive - "dashed". Because he served in the trenches in WW I, I can presume that he knew others of a more sexual nature but did not use ...


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My father, who was born in 1898, was not given to swearing very much but he sometimes used the adjectives "damned", "blasted" and - a milder expletive - "dashed". Because he served in the trenches in WW I, I can presume that he knew others of a more sexual nature but did not use them within his young son's hearing.


3

If you're looking for something non-vulgar that conveys the same meaning, try "Loafing around" or "Goofing off" Other more specific phrases might be "Holding up the wall" or "Keeping the bench warm".


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The past tense does not sound right to me, but a version of this term was actually used in Canada ca. 1980 and I'm fairly sure it would be understood today. Q: "What are you up to?" A: "Just f*cking the dog." The meaning was that the person was idle or engaged in pointless or useless activities. Source: personal experience


1

It's not something my grandmothers say. Some parents may use it, but it is still definitely vulgar. But I think it's definitely misogynistic, both the noun and the verb. The noun is specific to women. The verb implies that acting in a certain type of specifically female way is wrong/annoying. Just think about if you substituted a different pejorative term ...


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Recent slang dictionaries on the origin of 'wank' and 'wanker' I note at the outset that every recent slang dictionary ultimately concedes that 'origin unknown [or obscure]" remains the final word on these terms. Nevertheless, some dictionaries are more inclined than others to entertain speculation. Starting with the most cautious treatment, we have John ...


2

Muck has been used and is still used as an euphemism for 'fuck' because of its similar sound: The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English at muck says: mucked up: (adj) euphemism for fucked up (US 1951) mucking: (noun) euphemism for "fucking". Literary euphemism from the days when it was not permissible to reproduce ...


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The commonest expression I can think of to express boredom is "to twiddle one's thumbs". "Screwing the pooch", while an idiom, has an entirely different meaning: to spectacularly mess up, usually in an embarrasingly public way.


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I don't know how commonplace it is, but the phrase jerking around is what I would use in this situation: "Quit jerking around and do something productive!"


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If you want an idiom that's still mildly vulgar, but still gets used in daily speech: "We are just sitting here with our thumbs in our asses, (waiting for something to do)"


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"Fuck the dog" (or its milder variant, "screw the pooch") comes from an old joke. There are various versions, but a drunk man ends up shooting the wife and screwing the pooch (instead of the other way around). Reddit It is certainly not about idleness, but epic failure to get a sequence right. Janus Bahs Jacquet's suggestion of using the literal ...


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If you wanted to capture the spirit of the German, you could say We're just sitting here playing with ourselves while upper management is deciding which approach to take. or I'm not doing much of anything, just sitting here playing with myself. In a workplace context, it would not be taken literally. :) P.S. It's not the sort of thing men would ...


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Here's part of an answer given by Michael Foot to a question that he was asked during a Radio 4 programme that was broadcast on 10 June 1973 (which was within just a few months of the setting of the TV programme mentioned by the questioner), called Politics in the 70's. This programme was noteworthy because it placed Foot in conversation with Enoch Powell, ...


3

When dismantling segregation was still casually status quo in the western hemisphere, as was the case in the 1970's, several words were used as substitutes for overtly racist adjectives and the word 'Coloured' was accepted as one of those substitutes to be used in/for/with polite company. In January of this year (this is being written July of 2015) a ...


0

Merriam-Webster online gives one definition of sticky as: unpleasantly warm and humid And lists synonyms "humid, muggy, clammy". You can have a "sticky summer day" meaning much the same as "humid" but it also contains a dual meaning (a pun) in terms of memory, c.f. a "sticky port". I think this would serve your purposes very well.


1

Muggy is an adjective that describes hot and humid weather. Definition (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/muggy): muggy adjective mug·gy \ˈmə-gē\ : unpleasantly warm and humid As the definition states, the word carries a negative connotation, though. And frankly, I don't know if 'muggy' really fits your 'catchy' title. I just came up ...



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