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2

toady (n.)  one who flatters in the hope of gaining favors :  sycophant — M-W By the way, M-W give some interesting etymology ... In 17th-century Europe, a toadeater was a showman's assistant whose job was to make the boss look good. The toadeater would eat (or pretend to eat) what were supposed to be poisonous toads. His or her charlatan ...


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Although I think Brian's answer is the best, I offer two more adjectives: Servile: Having or showing an excessive willingness to serve or please others Subservient: Prepared to obey others unquestioningly


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Lickspittle is somewhat less vulgar, without getting too nice about the matter. Wiktionary: A fawning toady; a base sycophant.


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I always like "sycophant" for the noun, "obsequious" (as mentioned) for the adjective. syncophant, from Merriam-Webster a person who praises powerful people in order to get their approval


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Apple-polisher, backscratcher, backslapper, bootlicker, doter, fawner, flatterer, flunky, bobblehead, kowtower, lackey, sycophant, minion, teacher's pet, and yes-man (or yes-person) all seem to convey the idea of that type of person sans vulgarity.


2

If you speak 'British' and define "swear words" as vulgar slang, then yes. Otherwise this is all poppycock. bollocks bol·locks /ˈbäləks/ British vulgar slang noun plural noun: bollocks; plural noun: ballocks; noun: bollix; plural noun: bollixes the testicles. used to express contempt, annoyance, or defiance. –Google


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Well, the law is on your side; quoting Wikipedia ... Perhaps the best-known use of the term is in the title of the 1977 punk rock album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols. Testimony in a resulting prosecution over the term demonstrated that in Old English, the word referred to a priest, and could also be used to mean "nonsense". Defence ...


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British south-wester here. Honestly bugger is a mild word, bollocks would be considered stronger, yet still acceptable (as opposed to vulgar, depending on how you say it). Also i have never once heard the word "sugarbush" not even in films.


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Bollocks, while not "formal" language, and certainly not the kind of thing you say around Queeny and Prince Charles, is not considered a swear word (considered a bit vulgar) and, in fact, would generally be more acceptable than "bugger". It's very unlikely someone will call you out on that kind of language. Note: This answer applies for British English and ...


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Yes it is. A bollock is a small ball, and I'll let you work out exactly what kind of ball it's talking about. It's a relatively mild swearword but you shouldn't use it in polite company. You'll hear it on late night TV but not mainstream and definitely not kids shows.



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