New answers tagged

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People in the West, but nowhere else, are always pussy-footing about what to call people. Caucasian is a term for a race - an identifiable, genetically stable, sub-group of Homo sapiens sapiens. I prefer to use Caucasoid, to de-stress the connection with the Caucasus. It is not the same thing as European, because most Caucasoids live in South Asia. It is not ...


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Group identifiers generally gain a pejorative connotation when the group they are attached to has a low or negative social status, particularly in relationship to the group that uses the identifier. In other words, the word takes on the prevailing attitudes of the people who use it, regardless of dictionary definition. That's why older words seem so much ...


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May the fleas of a hundred thousand camels infest every orifice of your body...I don't know if it is Arabic or Persian.I am sure both would would approve nonetheless. A guy from Lebanon said it to me years ago.


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Literally, a sheltered workshop is essentially a place where people with limited abilities are given employment. In extreme cases, they perform tasks which are essentially of no value, and it has been seen as a kind of babysitting for adults with disability. When I have heard this word metaphorically it's referring to these attributes: Participants who ...


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It's a little less crude to say "to heck with it," because "heck" is a euphemism for "hell." You may also say "This new policy is for the birds." Of course, the wisest thing to do is keep your feelings to yourself and give reasons why you believe the policy is bad.


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This policy is not worth the paper it's printed on. Uses polite language but is confrontational not diplomatic. This policy will require revision to be fully implementable. Uses polite language, and is bureaucratically diplomatic. The politest idiom for "to hell with it, I'll do what I want" I know is: I'll take that under advisement


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If you allow younger-generation slang, a better translation of your idiom is the (sarcastic) phrase "good game!", often just abbreviated as "GG!". Example: Oops... I forgot to bring the keys! ...wow! GG! Compare with the Farsi version: !آخ... کلید را یادم رفت بیارم !عجب! خاک تو سرت... Nobody would say "rot in hell!" or "drop dead!" in ...


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This is from a native English speaker (American)... talking trash is the best non-vulgar yet informal way to say "talking shit". The other answers are either not informal or not true to the typical meaning of "talking shit". Urban Dictionary has some ideas about synonyms for talking shit, and the best one of these is "talking trash". This is not vulgar but ...


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If you are meaning to suggest it more as someone being relentlessly challenging or confrontational without merit, I first picture "raging on about ...". But though the Google results for it seem to return to a reasonable variety and depth of usage, including a Psychology Today column and a DailyMail "article"... I couldn't find anywhere to officially give ...


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What are you blabbering on for? to talk foolishly or excessively blather "he just blathered on and on" "she began blathering on about spirituality and life after death" synonyms: prattle, chatter, twitter,prate, gabble, jabber, go on, run on, rattle on/away, yap, jibber-jabber, patter, blether, blither, maunder, ramble, drivel informal yak, ...


2

How about talking a lot of baloney? baloney Slang. foolishness; nonsense Origin of baloney: 1915-20, Americanism; alteration of bologna, with substitution of -ey for final schwa Random House a lot/load of baloney Falsehoods, nonsense, or foolishness. Baloney in this sense might have originated from the word "blarney," which means ...


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You could say that they talk a lot of hogwash if you mean talking shit in the sense of being nonsensical meaningless or insincere talk, writing, etc.; nonsense; bunk.


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Quit talking smack yo. Smack talk is also a slang term used in sports. It refers to inflammatory comments made by a person or team in order to insult, anger, annoy or be boisterous towards your opponents. Although it began as a term used by sports fans and athletes, it has spread to all areas of culture where competition takes place. In the United ...


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If you have a look at OALD "touched" you will see they don't list the meaning "not right in the head" any more. http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/touched?q=touched Today one prefers more systematic and neutral terms such as "a disabled or mentally/physically handicapped person". "touched" for crazy (dated) is more a fantasy ...


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It is not based on autism at all. "Touched" refers predominately to people afflicted with schizophrenia or other severe types of psychosis. In certain cultures, particularly Native Americans, considered these individuals as special because they can see and talk to spirits. It is not meant in a derogatory sense.



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