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The following extract from the The Huffington Post tries to trace the possibile origin and different connotations of the term till its more recent usages in rap and hip-hop songs. Its meaning is still not well defined and sexual to nonconformistic nuances appear to characterise the term: In essence, a fuckboy (sometimes stylized “fuckboi” or “...


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J. Sheidlower, in The F Word, 3rd edition, traces the first sense of it to F. I. Gwaltney's 1954 Heaven & Hell (p.233 where he refers to WWII) "Grimes loves the army and the army's using him for a screw-boy." The first actual use he gives is in J. Blake's 1971 Joint (p. 67, referring to 1954) "They were known as pussyboys, galboys, fuckboys, and all had ...


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The British definition of bitch (from your link) includes both the following: bitch noun (UNPLEASANT PERSON) offensive: an unkind or unpleasant woman: She can be a real bitch. bitch noun (CONTROLLED PERSON) offensive slang: someone who will do everything you tell them to do because you have complete control over them Those meanings are not ...


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I would wager it's because a lot of languages lack an accurate translation for "bitch". I know French, Spanish and Portuguese don't. As is the case with those languages, most insults to women are different ways of saying "whore", "slut", or, simply, "prostitute". "Bitch" is actually a very specific concept, if you think about it, and most people wouldn't be ...


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toady (n.)  one who flatters in the hope of gaining favors :  sycophant — M-W By the way, M-W give some interesting etymology ... In 17th-century Europe, a toadeater was a showman's assistant whose job was to make the boss look good. The toadeater would eat (or pretend to eat) what were supposed to be poisonous toads. His or her charlatan ...


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Although I think Brian's answer is the best, I offer two more adjectives: Servile: Having or showing an excessive willingness to serve or please others Subservient: Prepared to obey others unquestioningly


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Lickspittle is somewhat less vulgar, without getting too nice about the matter. Wiktionary: A fawning toady; a base sycophant.


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I always like "sycophant" for the noun, "obsequious" (as mentioned) for the adjective. syncophant, from Merriam-Webster a person who praises powerful people in order to get their approval



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