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I would expect vernacular Irish to be rather more 'colourful' than its English counterpart. Maybe RTE would have resources? Censorship history might also be useful for evaluating contemporary texts.


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The (probably AAVE) word I always heard for this growing up was ragging. It was kind of a sport at my school. You never knew when an impromptu game of Dozens might break out, so it paid to keep your skills sharp and figure out everyone's weaknesses up front. Ragging doesn't have to be true. However, it will be far more effective the more truth it contains. ...


2

Wind-up is a word I may use, however it may not fit your one word request, so I propose: Antagonise to make hostile; annoy or irritate Definition from Collins Dictionary


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Apart from the plethora of UK colloquial slang, the only single verb I can think of that I still see regularly in books or hear in conversation is; Mock to criticize and laugh at (someone or something) for being bad, worthless, or unimportant to laugh at or make fun of (someone or something) especially by copying an action or a way of behaving or ...


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To poke fun at someone, but benevolently, is to "josh" josh intransitive verb: to engage in banter: joke transitive verb: to tease good-naturedly: kid Examples of JOSH • “Don't take him seriously. He's just joshing” • “Don’t get all hot and bothered! I'm just joshing you” Synonyms: chaff, jive, joke, tease, kid, rally, razz, ...


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Consider the word needle. Google defines it as: provoke or annoy (someone), especially by continual criticism or questioning. Merriam-Webster defines it as: to criticize and laugh at (someone) in either a friendly or an unkind way tease, torment


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Consider razz. It is an informal verb but captures both teasing and criticism. to make playful or unkind comments about (someone) [MW] to deride, jeer; to mock or make fun of (a person or thing). [OED]


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The word is chastise: to criticize (someone) harshly for doing something wrong http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chastise or to inflict suffering upon for purposes of moral improvement; to discipline, especially by corporal punishment. to criticize severely. Archaic. to restrain; chasten. Archaic. to refine; purify. ...


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The term twit might be useful Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humored way. Oxford Dictionaries Online It is usually used when the object of the poke is in the wrong To taunt, ridicule, or tease, especially for embarrassing mistakes or faults American Heritage Similarly, tweak To make fun of; tease. American Heritage ...


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Here are a few that come off the top of my head: knocking someone down to size putting someone in their place deflating one's ego


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The terms "Caucasoid," "Mongoloid," and "Negroid" are inevitably tied to the racial theories of the people who coined and used the terms. These theories included skin color as a determinative, and they have been abandoned by scientists and reasonable people. The terms remain in use in forensic anthropology and are restricted to classification of people by ...


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It's outdated, and like most outdated racial terms, it automatically sounds racist by connotation. This has less to do with any specifics of accuracy, and more to do with the fact that the era of its popular usage was shockingly racist as judged by current standards. In general, a person who uses a outdated racial term is assumed (correctly or incorrectly) ...


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I don't think there is anything wrong in a grammatical sense, which is technically all this site should deal with. But really there is more to it than that: the reason you cannot use mongoloid any more is that it relates to a discredited theory about all humans belonging to one of three races, related no doubt to the three sons of Noah. I am not sure why ...


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This harks back to the days of official censorship in Britain. The censors were equipped with blue pencils, which they used to cross out sections of radio (later, TV) script or written articles which were considered too rude or sensitive for publication. It's usually little remembered outside places such as the BBC or the studies of historians, but the ...


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As a supplement to Sven Yarg's answer, Sulfur is the element that makes black powder (a.k.a. gunpowder) burn blue. Sven Yarg made a good references to why the turn of phrase would reference smoke/haze/air because of battlefields and burning things. But he didn't address why the color was blue and not some other. It was probably the use of sulfur in the ...



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