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91

I found the term "grawlixes" here: The Lexicon of Comicana. Grawlixes Typographical symbols standing for profanities, appearing in dialogue balloons in place of actual dialogue. I also came across the terms "profanitype" and "symbol swearing." I think I like "grawlixes" best.


74

I think there is a slight difference in what you're emphasizing. They both refer to female breasts, but tits emphasizes the nipples (pointy bits) whereas boobs evokes an image of the round parts.


61

Nails ‘Nailing’ something is basically the equivalent of hitting the nail on the head. Hitting the nail on the head is, as anyone who’s ever tried hanging a picture on a wall knows, something that requires great precision and the proper application of force (and in my own case, often also the proper application of a few Band-Aids or similar). As such, it ...


59

As someone with Asperger's, I'm going to take a contrary view to A.P.'s answer. Wikipedia mentions that Aspie is used amongst sufferers: People identifying with Asperger syndrome may refer to themselves in casual conversation as aspies (a term first used in print by Liane Holliday Willey in 1999). Wikipedia Oxford Dictionaries has a number of ...


54

http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=boob Noun S: (n) dumbbell, dummy, dope, boob, booby, pinhead (an ignorant or foolish person) S: (n) breast, bosom, knocker, boob, tit, titty (either of two soft fleshy milk-secreting glandular organs on the chest of a woman) Verb S: (v) drop the ball, sin, blunder, boob, goof (commit a faux ...


54

No, there is no equivalent, but if there were... It would probably be something like ouvrier. The reason English has different words for the animal and the food is that the word for the food comes from French - the language of the ruling class. From the link: mutton = mouton (sheep) beef = boeuf (cow) veal = veau (calf) pork = porc (pig) ...


52

As others have said, both refer to a woman's breasts, but the main difference is actually in the connotation. While both are euphemisms, boobs is a slightly more socially acceptable term. Women, in my presence at least, use the term boobs; tits is more a term that men use and generally in a more lurid fashion.


51

I think the obvious answer (the one you already know!) is the best: You can refer to a female dog as a female dog. You can refer to a male dog as a male dog. Of course, if you really need to specify that they're adults, you could do that: An adult male dog could be referred to as an adult male. An adult female dog could be referred to as an adult ...


49

Using Jew instead of Jewish as an adjective is usually done by people more interested in classifying than describing, which is why it is particularly pejorative. The use of a noun to identify someone is often seen as pejorative anyway, because it doesn't capture the full complexity of a human being's behavior and traits. For instance: He's a cocaine ...


48

This is a difficult question, because English is in the middle of a shift of social mores with regards to obscenities and vulgarities. The "traditional" swear words (fuck, shit, ass, damn, etc.) have had their offensiveness gradually worn down over the past century, to the point where in many communities they're generic modifiers. Large parts of the ...


45

As Jo Bedard mentions in the comment to Sumit's answer, there are sexual overtones (they are too explicit to be called undertones indeed). The general meaning of all three expressions is that the speaker's reputation and / or career may depend on the outcome of the current project or undertaking and he urges the other person not to contribute to a failure. ...


42

The primary theory appears to be that it derived from the "Greek monogram for Jesus, IHS or IHC" (World Wide Words) which is standard for the Greek name of IHCOYC (Christian Origins) which comes from ΙΗΣΟΥΣ (Persus Digital Library; see also the comments below; it is possible to render ΙΗΣΟΥΣ as IHCOYC in Greek, because C is in the Greek alphabet an ...


41

Perhaps they are members of a mutual admiration society.


41

“Patting each other on the back” would fit the bill. For example: If you’re finished with this circle jerk, maybe we could move on to new business. Could be replaced with: If you’re finished patting each other on the back, maybe we could move on to new business.


40

These have also been called obscenicons. Several links on Language Log offer an in-depth look at their usage. More on the early days of obscenicons Obscenicons a century ago CALL ME... UNPRONOUNCEABLE The "word" represented by the symbols could be pronounced bleep: So people came up with a small set of conventional euphemistic readings for <...


40

“Faith-based beliefs/belief systems” is used and contrasted with “science/evidence-based beliefs/belief systems” in the linked ‘Science 2.0’ article: Belief systems are the stories we tell ourselves to define our personal sense of "reality". Every human being has a belief system that they utilize, and it is through this mechanism that we ...


39

If you are referring to a breeding pair and offspring, you can use dam and sire instead of bitch and dog. However, the best answer may be to use a different animal for your example. While many animal terms can be applied pejoratively to humans, few will provoke a visceral reaction like bitch can. Pigs and horses make good examples because they both have ...


38

They all can mean women who sleep with men for money. Prostitute is the most technical term. Hooker seems most commonly used in the United States, while in Britain this term is reserved for a position in rugby. Whore sounds much more violent to me. If one were seeking a woman to pay to sleep with him, he probably wouldn't say "I'm looking for a whore tonight,...


38

Although there have been euphemisms for human meat, you seem to be wondering specifically about why human meat in particular doesn't have a well-known "dead meat food name" like other meats. It would just be "human". The reason is that "food" words are the rare exception, not the rule, due to an historical accident. I mean "rare" here in the sense that, of ...


36

Let's just go ahead and say, no. It's questionable to use expletives here, so... unless you're writing a dissertation on the usage of the word in question, again: no. You shouldn't use any word you don't know the definition of, but here at Stack Exchange you may use them to talk about them. They are permissible when they are the context.


35

The punning here is obscene. It means If bang cock invaded your booty, would grease help? cock = penis booty = ass grease = lubricant


33

Although I am not aware of an exact English equivalent of the Persian curse, "To rot in hell" is a pejorative and used to aggressively retort to infuriating situations. Usage: What? You forgot to get my anti-hypertension medicine? And you ratted me out to Mom?!? You know what? You and ISIS should just burn and rot in hell!! Update: As some ...


32

Rather than getting confused, let me post an answer: In both British and American English, the word "ass" is used for "donkey". For "buttocks", British English uses "arse", while American English uses "ass". In British English, the two words are not interchangeable. "Arse" means only "buttocks", while "ass" means only "donkey". In American English, there ...


31

They're both terms for female breasts. Women tend to refer to these as "boobs" and not "tits"; with men it can go either way, but a good part of the time they'll use "tits". Other (somewhat vulgar and borderline spring-break moronic) terms are knockers, twins, hooters, hoo-hahs, etc. Puritanical people sometimes call them bosoms, which is strange because ...


31

The adjective form of shite is shite: That was a shite film. I feel shite about it. Mondays are always a bit shite.


30

Consider extraneous, "Not belonging to, or dependent upon, a thing; without or beyond a thing; foreign", and synonyms like superfluous ("in excess of what is required or sufficient") or pleonastic ("Using an excessive number of words"). Other synonyms of superfluous include excessive, extra, supernumerary, surplus, unnecessary, extravagant, some of which ...


30

The simple, all-purpose imprecation in U.S. English is "Drop dead!"—which is, of course, the usual stage before the soil-on-head stage. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997) has this entry for the phrase: drop dead An expression of anger, rejection, or indignation toward someone. For example, I should do all that work for you?...



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