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If you're not talking about the disease then you're just describing the cough. You could use a synonym for whoop: clamor, howl, bark, You could try a different description: a violent cough. You could make a joke out of the confusion: He had a cough that happens to whoop. Not that there is anything wrong with that.


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The hyphenation depends on the pronunciation. /ˈproʊsɛs/: pro-cess. /ˈprɑsɛs/: proc-ess. Why? Because you never1 hyphenate after a "short vowel" in an accented syllable, and "o" counts as a "short vowel" when pronounced /ɑ/ (although "a" counts as a "long vowel" when it's pronounced exactly the same way in father). So which is the preferred American ...


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The noun whoop exists outside of any whooping-cough context. Whilst OED sense 1b deals with the sound made in whooping-cough, it makes clear that the term is also applied to similar sounds - with particular reference to the example from 1899. 1b. The characteristic sonorous inspiration following a fit of coughing in whooping-cough. Also applied to ...


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Wiktionary cites observee:, but it appears to be used mainly in scientific contexts: Noun (plural observees) One who is observed. Ngram: "observee" I do not know the student whom I came to observe, at this point the teacher will assist me by laying her hand casually on the observee's shoulder as she ends her.... From Ready-to-Use ...


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Sometimes, English doesn't seem to work logically. An indefinite article is supposed to be placed before a singular noun or noun phrase. A month is a long period. *A two months is a long period. (Ungrammatical) But depending on how you perceive two months, you can treat two months as a singular unit (quantity of time) as in: Two months is a long ...


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I can't help but notice a similarity between sentences containing the construction you've isolated (indefinite + adjective + unit of measurement) and sentences containing collective or group nouns like 'committee'. They both can appear with indefinite articles in singular and plural contexts, for example: It was an amazing two days. [singular] They were an ...


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Yesterday, today and tomorrow are nouns that can act as complete noun phrases as they are reductions of forms that include a determiner. See e.g. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=yesterday http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=today ...



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