Hot answers tagged

7

It appears that it was simply the use of the colour of the root of ginger applied to (the lighter shades of) red hair. Interestingly a very early citation of ginger as a color dates back to the 16th century: Ginger-color in ginger 1538 ELYOT, melinus, na, num, whyte, russette or a gynger-coloure 1552 HULOET, Gynger coloure, after a whyte ...


6

There's a possible explanation that is very simple — maybe the ginger root (or some of it) that was imported to England in the 18th and early 19th century really was reddish. From the web: Multiple varieties of ginger can be found, the color of the flesh of the root will range from yellow, ivory, red or light green depending on the variety and age. ...


4

'Ginger' in slang dictionaries and regional glossaries The earliest dictionary instance I've been able to find in which ginger is used in connection with a description of hair color is in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1785), which has this entry: GINGER PATED or GINGER HACKLED, red haired, a term borrowed from the cock pit,...


3

I hate to add this rather robust listing of answers, but I believe this may have been missed. I believe that (speaking on behalf of my age) the term came about because ginger was often pickled for storage, adding longevity and preservation for its use. As a result it is very red in color.... Pickled ginger images So the reference was a natural association ...


3

This is a Community Wiki post, which means anyone is free to edit and add further details, no rep points are earned or lost. The Many Shades of Ginger The etymological background of ginger is as tortuous as its knobbly features. Many sources trace its history to Sanskrit çṛŋgavēra which means “horn body,” due to its semblance with antlers, while the ...


3

I would just use subjects to refer to the collective. "The role of her subjects; the role of the empire's subjects." I don't know of a singular noun that means the same thing (and subjects works fine in that sentence). I would also use "citizens" over "citizenry" though.


1

What you have there is good, but i will add my "perception" on the difference between those 2 words, "comprehension" and "perception", and also propose a few other ways you could say or mean "I understand what you just said". Comprehension, a more long term understanding, as in "reading comprehension", to understand what new words mean, and knowing that ...


1

I would suggest: (1) input gain mismatch or input gain shift. Since this is describing the technical aspect, the effect is caused by either of: Switching to an input source with a different impedance, or pre-amp level output. The final amplification has no way to discern the amplitude increase that will result. Also contrinuting to this is that [now ...


1

It's a simple adjective-noun phrase, grammatically equivalent to saying "We have red hair". Free means "Unrestrained" and "will" means "choice" or "choices" in this context. There's really nothing more complicated than that. It's equivalent to saying "We have unrestrained choices", ie "We can choose to do whatever we want." It's not a compound.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible