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12

Silver-tongued A tendency to be eloquent and persuasive in speaking. - Google


8

Ciceronian : in the style of Cicero: characterized by melodious language, clarity, and forcefulness of presentation: Ciceronian invective. a Cicero: Roman statesman, orator, and philosopher. A major figure in the last years of the Republic, he is best known for his orations against Catiline and for his mastery of Latin prose. His ...


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If you want something very unusual and yet historically resonant, you might try chrysostomic (that is, "golden-mouthed"). Here's the OED definition of that word: Chrysostomic a. rare. {f. Gr χρυσοστομος golden-mouthed, an epithet applied to favourite orators which became a kind of surname of Dio and John Chrysostom.} Golden-mouthed. [Example:] 1816 ...


7

The one and only correct answer to this question is, quite obviously, slick whistle-stopper. I will now use my prodigious rhetorical skills to prove this point. Firstly, I did a Google search for that term, which produced the following: No results found for "slick whistle-stopper". And here is the Google Ngram: No valid ngrams to plot! Ngrams not ...


6

Perhaps asocial: Avoiding social interaction; inconsiderate of or hostile to others Or loner: A person who prefers not to associate with others. Or Reclusive: Avoiding the company of other people; solitary.


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In our neighborhood, we refer to a person like this as a hermit: noun 1.0 A person living in solitude as a religious discipline. 1.1 A reclusive or solitary person. The synonym troglodyte has broader connotations.


6

An excellent orator is a rhetorician. Since you are asking for an uncommon term, you might enjoy referring to them as a grandiloquent rhetorician.


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Rhetorical magician: rhetorical adjective 1 Relating to or concerned with the art of rhetoric: magician noun 1.0 A person with magical powers. 1.1 A conjuror. 1.2 informal A person with exceptional skill in a particular area. The art of rhetoric tends to be a black box to the masses, who experience the impact of great ...


5

melliloquent (literally honey-tongued) Speaking sweetly or harmoniously. Latin mel, mellis honey + loquens speaking, present participle of loqui to speak.


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doctiloquent A reference to someone who talks about a subject which he or she has studied and knows a great deal about omniloquent Being capable of talking about any and all subjects. suaviloquent [Latin. suaviloquens; suavis sweet + loquens, p. pr. of loqui to speak.] Sweetly speaking; using agreeable speech. ...


4

A recluse would behave like this: noun A person who lives a solitary life and tends to avoid other people:


2

It's hard to believe no one's mentioned this term yet. You could also refer to such a person as you've described as a cunning linguist.


2

John was walking at grade and slipped on a patch of ice. When John slipped he did not fall to grade as he caught himself with his right hand [...] In construction, grade has several potential meanings: grade Definitions (8) The surface or level of the ground. A classification of quality as, for instance, in lumber. The existing or ...


2

You can consider the adjective Demosthenic, derived from the famous historical figure Demosthenes who is considered the greatest orator of antiquity. (and perhaps all time; even Cicero presents Demosthenes as the greatest orator of all time in De Optimo.) Of or relating to Demosthenes or his oratory; typical of or resembling Demosthenes or his speeches, ...


2

Rather colloquial, but Speech maven would do the job: Webster's Maven: Synonyms: ace, adept, artist, authority, cognoscente, connoisseur, crackerjack (also crackajack), dab [chiefly British], dab hand [chiefly British], fiend, geek, guru, hand, hotshot, maestro, master, expert (also mavin), meister, past master, proficient, scholar, shark, sharp, ...


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Raconteur One who tells stories and anecdotes with skill and wit. - The Free Dictionary


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A verb derived from a noun with the same pronunciation is "denominal". There is a difference in English between the stress patterns of verbs and nouns: nouns (and adjectives) can have two contiguous unstressed syllables, but "real" verbs cannot. Compare the noun "advocate", with stress only on the first syllable, with the verb "advocate", with stress on ...


1

Your sentence is probably not technically incorrect, because you can omit a noun in some cases. But you should only omit the noun if the meaning is clear without it, and in this case the meaning isn't clear. The hyphen isn't correct. While you do want a hyphen in a compound adjective, e.g. state-of-the-art technology, you do not want a hyphen between an ...


1

Offering: a thing produced or manufactured for entertainment or sale. "Hollywood's latest offerings for the European market."


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The construction is generally called a "right node-raising" construction, following Paul Postal. What things are grouped together in each conjunct is not of direct significance -- instead, what matters is that you start out with conjuncts having one constituent in common at the end of each conjunct, then this constituent is lost in every conjunct, but ...


1

I thought to excerpt this article because it mentions the etymology, and concludes by using use and usage in the same sentence. https://coachdes.wordpress.com/2005/10/24/english-use-and-usage/: What is the difference between ‘use’ and usage’? Both come from the same Latin word usus (noun), which in turn is from the verb uti - to use. So how do they ...



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