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8

A slice is always a piece, but a piece is not always a slice. In general, a slice is a portion created with a single cut, and either it is wedge-shaped, or it is relatively thin in one of its dimensions because it is a cross-sectional cut of a much longer object; while a piece is a portion created by any means at all (cutting, tearing, shattering, biting, ...


4

In your phrase, hidden layer is an attributive noun: it's a noun which behaves as an adjective modifying sizes. In English, adjectives are not inflected for number; that is, the form of an adjective doesn't change depending on the number of what it's describing. [This differs from French, for example.] One red apple Two red apples Thus your ...


2

I would opt for hidden layer sizes. I'm guessing the label is for a table or graph and you're labeling a list of different sizes. Since you're showing multiple sizes, so you pluralise "size". "Hidden layer" is simply a specifier; it specifies the things that have the sizes that you are showing. @FumbleFingers makes a very good point in the comments: ...


2

The Oxford English Dictionary dates this usage to 1580 (another early citation is Shakespeare's Love's Labours Lost, act II, scene i). It describes it as "chiefly poetical".


2

Both versions are equally grammatical and mean the same thing. The version without is is a simple ellipsis of the version with it.



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