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19

The one-word option that is the closest match to the French original is "something." She has a certain something about her. This has the same figurative meaning and close to the same literal meaning as the French phrase. There's a Cole Porter song called "She's Got That Thing" that uses "thing" to express the same thing as "je ne sais quoi": She's ...


12

Consider corpus. a complete or comprehensive collection, as of laws or writings of a specified type: the corpus of civil law Source: Webster's New World College Dictionary Copyright © 2010 For example, Wikipedia lists below corpora: Hippocratic Corpus, the lectures and writings of Hippocrates Corpus Inscriptionum Etruscarum, an index of ...


12

Je ne sais quoi is a loan phrase in English so it is English already. This phrase captures the idea more precisely than any other equivalent and has the sense of that indescribable elegance, so that would be why it is loaned from French. One word equivalent would be something but it is used with the adjective certain and makes sense in a context. An ...


8

In the UK, you would probably say a block of flats, or -- especially in the case of public housing -- a tower block or high-rise, if it was more than about ten storeys tall. If you perform Google image searches on those terms, you'll get a good idea of what they represent. I've never heard an apartment building being referred to as a 'flat building'.


7

I am not sure if it captures the tone you want, but automaton means someone who behaves like a machine and shows no feelings [Macmillan] Such a person lacks joy, enthusiasm and sorrow, as well as compassion. Also consider brute A cruel, unpleasant, or insensitive person: what an unfeeling little brute you are [ODO]


7

Perhaps you're thinking of codex (obsolete) a code, or body of laws [Collins] As noted, its not much in use today. There are also several compendia of law in specific fields called restatements (law) Any of several treatises published by the American Law Institute in which a group of legal scholars within a field of law set forth the principles of ...


5

Canon carries a strong connotation of officialdom (hence, canonical). Noun canon (plural canons) A group of literary works that are generally accepted as representing a field. "the durable canon of American short fiction" — William Styron from Wiktionary


4

Vulcan parallels Philistine well because it too is the name of a race, albeit a fictional one. In Star Trek, Vulcans are known for rejecting emotion in favor of logic. The term has been adopted into geek, nerd, and Trekkie slang to refer to someone heartless, cold, and logical. "She's a Vulcan who never cries when the dog dies at the end of a movie." ...


4

Monster comes to mind. It is a noun which is used figuratively to describe a cruel person and it covers the adjectives unfeeling and heartless. someone who is very cruel He's a heartless, unfeeling monster. Source: http://www.macmillandictionary.com Also, robot is used figuratively to describe a person who seems to have no feelings or ...


4

An official collection of laws is a "code", as in "Revised Code of Washington" (RCW), "United States Code" (USC), or "International Residential Code" (IRC). One meaning of "library" is a collection of books.


4

The question may be "How many peas?" (countable) but the answer is expressed by quantity not count (ie, "A spoonful," as if a mass noun). Presumably this is because although the items are theoretically countable like apples, they are practically uncountable, like sand.


3

It is very common for uncountable nouns to have countable senses. In particular, if an uncountable noun describes a substance, the countable sense often indicates multiple kinds of that substance. There are many kinds of carbohydrate and fat in your diet, or in a McDonald's meal, so this usage is appropriate.


3

According to Ngram the preposition of is more used, especially with the singular form of price, but both prepositions are acceptable. It appears that there is not much different between the two preposition used to indicate the price of something.


3

I suggest allure to convey the idea of an undefinable attractiveness about her: high, often subtle attractiveness: charms that still allure. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Allure


3

Although a bit clinical, 'sociopath' is a possible choice. There are various degrees of sociopathy, from extreme behavior that drives young men to shoot and kill children in schools and movie theatres, for example; to milder behavior which make a person unfeeling and heartless. (Note: I'm not a psychiatrist, so take what I've written with a grain of salt.)


2

In The Daily Show's America: The Book, je ne sais quoi is half jokingly, but not entirely inaccurately translated as "it", as in "some people got it". Perhaps not the best term for formal writing, but "it" may be the closest equivalent that is actually used in English speech. Original Quote (on page 127): The French call it "je ne sais quoi." Americans, ...


2

Although this might not count an answer directly concerning your question, I think some nouns perform as adjectives when collocating suitably with a second noun. In this case the first noun is called an attributive noun. The following is the way my Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary [11th edition] briefly puts it: [Some nouns are] often used as an ...


2

A pretty general word can be "digest". But I don't know if it can apply to your case (it does not seem (to me) very "official-sounding"): we should see the context. Google reports one definition: "a compilation or summary of material or information." Other similar words might be: body, compendium.


2

Take a look at this link for better understanding on usage of certain prepositions. The definition of "OF" as a preposition- Of Used for belonging to, relating to, or connected with: Examples of "of" as a preposition- The secret of this game is that you can’t ever win. The highlight of the show is at the end. The first page of the ...


2

Variety – (singular) the state of being varied or diversified: (to give variety to a diet.) Varieties – (plural) a different form or kind within a general category; sort: (varieties of behavior) (Dictionary.com) The main difference and a general rule is that whenever “variety” is used it is used with singular “a”, unlike “varieties" where no ...


2

This could be answered in many ways that all depend upon who is being lobbied and what their position and organization to which they belong is. (e.g. Senator, Chairman, Legislator, etc.) Some suggestions that are irrespective of who or what is being lobbied: target : a place, thing, or person at which an attack is aimed Merriam-Webster Has the ...


1

This doesn't answer the question in English, but in German the word is "Verzeichnis" - as in, the "Ryom Verzeichnis" - the works of composer Antonio Vivaldi, as collected by Peter Ryom circa 1974. Catalogue would work as well, in a more modern sense.


1

The lobbyist "lobbies." The legislator is "lobbied."


1

Nouns may be used as either count or mass. Different constructions distinguish between them. If a noun is normally of one type, using it in a construction limited to the other type signals a different kind of meaning for the noun. It's a mistake to think of a noun as being "a mass noun" or "a count noun", as if it were fixed. It's not fixed. It's a matter ...


1

The question is very general so I will provide the general answer. English nouns convert to adjectives in unpredictable ways. Many nouns have convenient adjectives, often with common suffixes like -ly, -ish, -like, or -esque: Wife -> Wifely Arab -> Arabesque Imp -> Impish Life -> Lifelike Electricity -> Electric There may be more such suffixes which I am ...


1

I think rat can also convey the idea ( animal personification): a person who deserts his or her friends or associates, esp in time of trouble a despicable person. Source: Collins English Dictionary


1

I don't know if there is a standard ESL guideline for this but we ask our team/colleagues to mentally substitute very nearly for almost and see if the sentence makes sense to them. If it does, almost can be used. This isn't foolproof and probably won't make sense to native speakers, but it works in almost all the cases we encounter on a regular basis! PS: ...


1

X factor or X-factor X factor means some advantageous quality that someone or something is attributed to have, a quality that is regarded as mysterious and difficult to describe or isolate. (source) Apparently it was coined in 1934 (source), but the recent popularity of the eponymous television show might make this word less appropriate for your ...


1

Charisma, “personal charm or magnetism”, is another term to consider. Charisma is perhaps not undefinable, but often is recognized without being pinned down to any specific characteristic of a person.



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