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I would say such a person was brazen ˈbreɪz(ə)n adjective 1. bold and without shame. (Google) For the example given: He’s brazen; he asked me for another $100! or more effectively: He’s a brazen [expletive]; he asked me for another $100!


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I would call this person audacious (adjective) or say that he/she has chutzpah (noun). The word "audacious" can be in a positive or negative fashion, so the speaker can use tone of voice to determine which one is meant. This sort of subtlety lends a certain intimacy to conversations. According to the Cambridge dictionary, audacious means: audacious ...


4

You could say that they have brass neck A type of behaviour where someone is extremely confident about their own actions but does not understand that their behaviour is unacceptable to others. Cambridge Dictionary In your example: He's got a brass neck; he asked me for $100! Alternatively, you could use the synonymous term effrontery. ...


2

Fish is countable when referring to an animal. It is uncountable when referring to food as a substance. This is not a recent development. As a countable noun, its plural form is irregular: it can be fish or fishes. Since we commonly treat fish as food as uncountable, we often say, for example, I had some fish for dinner, even if we ate one fish. That ...


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You might try he's got a nerve to do that or got some nerve to do that. nerve (noun) the rudeness to do something that you know will upset other people. [+ to infinitive] She's late for work every day, but she still has the nerve to lecture me about punctuality. That man has some nerve! He's always blaming me for things that are his fault. ...


2

Perhaps the person is acting entitled. More commonly, for the pejorative sense, the noun form, entitlement is used The belief that one is inherently deserving of privileges or special treatment: no wonder your kids have a sense of entitlement [AS MODIFIER]: this entitlement mentality is completely out of control Oxford Dictionaries Online Also, ...


2

That person sounds ballsy : aggressively bold : gutsy, nervy Definitely slang and somewhat vulgar, it is definitely not to be used in formal writing or conversation with most people beyond your friends.


1

Investopidia defines counterbid as: A purchase offer made in counter to the offer of another potential purchaser. The term is often used in discussing the sale of one business to another. During a bargaining process it is not uncommmon for each side to issue multiple counter offers during the negotiation process. Counter offer/purchase offer is ...


1

Would a "soul" work? eg: There's only so much a soul can take... This sounds poetical to me, so I've likely seen it used that way -although nothing springs to mind at the moment.


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In BrE you could use cheeky, especially in a more humorous context: slightly rude or showing no respect, but often in a funny way You're a cheeky little miss! Apologize at once. Or alternatively to have/got the cheek, which I think is even closer to what you're after and does not carry a humorous connotation. behaviour or talk that is rude and shows ...


1

They are adjectives in apposition to each other. You will know because you could interchange the two words: "Others say that the students will take ethics seriously only if it is taught as a required, separate course.


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Some writers attempt to work around these sorts of ambiguities by using hyphenation to denote compound modifiers. For example, one might say "dark-polka-dot necktie" to clarify that "dark" modifies "polka dot", rather than "necktie". If this approach seems less than universal, that's because it is. When and whether such constructions are used seems to ...


1

I don't see why one reading should necessarily exclude the other. For example, I could be an [old book] [collector] or an [old][book collector]. So it seems reasonable to me that we could have a [dark polka dot][tie] or a [dark][polka dot tie]. In both of the examples above book and polka dot are nouns modifying other nouns, so do I not concur that blue must ...


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One potentially useful term for such a person is a mossback. Wiktionary has a good definition of this term: mossback ‎(plural mossbacks) 1. A turtle that, because of its age, has a growth of algae on its back. 2. (by extension) A very conservative or reactionary person, especially one with old-fashioned views. According to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh ...



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