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3

Could insuperable fit what you have in mind? incapable of being surmounted, overcome, passed over, or solved — in·su·per·a·bly adverb


2

"Newbie" is extremely informal, whereas "novice" has a somewhat old-fashioned sound to it. "Beginner" might be a better choice than either of your candidates.


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Industrious. Ambitious. Assiduous. Productive. Hardworking. Hyperactive. There is no word that specifically captures the exact notion you are describing, that is why we use sentences composed of multiple words to express nuanced ideas. The words provided above could fit your needs depending on context.


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As others have pointed out, giving education is not limited to teachers. Parents may educate their children as well as teachers. To develop an intuition about why this is the case, I think it is useful to distinguish between educate, teach, and learn (verbs), and to understand the nouns a teacher, and an education. to educate: to provide schooling for ...


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I think you may be referring to contextualization: To contextualize: to place (a word or idea, for example) in a particular context. to put (a linguistic element, an action, etc.) in a context, esp. one that is characteristic or appropriate, as for purposes of study. Source: http://www.thefreedictionary.com


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Fables are stories that feature animals, plants, or forces of nature that have been given human qualities. They teach moral and ethical lessons, like how to behave or how to treat people. Since the main characters are animals, they are a good way to introduce serious topics to children. Each animal represents a particular human fault or virtue, and what ...


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There's significant difference from a semantic point of view, more than structural/ grammatical. Noun phrases with a verb or any other POS component are more explicit and 'simpler:' lives in New York Verb qualifies noun creating a new noun, 'New Yorker.' On the other hand, nouns/ noun-phrases without this are implicit and 'enriched.' ...


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Depends on the context you want to use the word in Consider: unmatchable eminent beyond or above comparison; "matchless beauty"; "the team's nonpareil center fielder"; "she's one girl in a million"; "the one and only Muhammad Ali"; "a peerless scholar"; "infamy unmatched in the Western world"; "wrote with unmatchable clarity"; "unrivaled mastery of her ...


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It appears that the use of 'poke' meaning a 'bag' has always been mainly regional both in US an UK. Ngran shows that both the expression a pig in the poke and in a poke have actually never gained much currency though still in use. Poke: n. Chiefly Southern U.S.: Regional Note: The noun poke meaning a bag or sack dates from the 14th century in ...


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Meanings of words change over the years. Words fall out of use, or are reapplied, or new words are invented. The "why" is usually just because the people using the language are spending their time speaking about different things than they used to, and the language adapts to suit their needs. A pocket is no longer a small bag; it's usually used to mean a bag ...


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Poke in the sense of 'bag' still clings on today in the admonition expressed by the proverb "Don't buy a pig in a poke". According to etymologist Michael Quinion, who discusses the proverb here, it also remains current in Scotland.


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What about PANDORA'S BOX? It's often used in English for this sort of thing -- depending on the exact shade of meaning you want. Hope it helps.


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If you want a word to warn of danger of usage, I would recommend dangerous or perilous. From Merriam-Webster online, Dangerous adj. involving possible injury, harm, or death : characterized by danger and Perilous adj. full of danger


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There is a concept called work-life balance which is the result of balancing all the different aspects of life. And the person who achieves this is called a work-life balancer colloquially. Work–life balance is a concept including proper prioritizing between "work" (career and ambition) and "lifestyle" (health, pleasure, leisure, family and spiritual ...


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I can't think of a word to describe this but saying "(The person's name) juggles (his/her) work, study, family, and hobbies with grace/poise/great success" is more than adequate.



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