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25

If what you are looking for is this sentence "he was a great revolutionist" then the correct way of saying it would be: he was a great revolutionary; " Che Guevara was a great revolutionary." Revolutionary: a person who either actively participates in, or advocates revolution. Also, when used as an adjective, the term revolutionary refers to something that ...


17

This appears to be slang, concentrated mostly in the Southern US. It is widely reported there, particularly in the Carolinas and Georgia, and its definition is just as you have it. For example, from the blog The Room Mom: What is a Sirsee? Spelling variations: circe, circi, surcy, surcee Definition (n): word used in the South to mean a small, ...


15

The relevant anatomical term is glabella, defined by Oxforddictionaries.com as The smooth part of the forehead above and between the eyebrows. (The plural of glabella is glabellae, though I can't think of many situations where I might have to use it.) According to Wikipedia, A bindi (Hindi: बिंदी, from Sanskrit bindu, meaning "a drop, small ...


8

We almost always use revolutionary (versus revolutionist or revolutioner, etc.) to name (noun) or describe (adjective) someone who caused, led, supported, or was important to a revolution (major and fundamental change). From the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA): And here's a young girl on a horse who was a great revolutionary heroine, so ...


3

In a thousand words or less: (courtesy of Mari-Lou) anatomybodygallery.com


3

Almost anything normally uncountable - certainly it applies to most food items - can be made countable if one uses a simple plural as an alternative to varieties of. e.g. There are countless cheeses (Varieties of cheese), whiskies, wines, beers, yoghurts, breads, meats, hams, etc. It can also apply as substitute in the case of bottles of, jars of, cups of ...


3

Here is the more scientific response. Hope this helps! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glabella "The glabella, in humans, is the skin between the eyebrows and above the nose."


3

According to The New Fowler's Modern English Usage- The form in -ist is first recorded as a noun in the sense 'one who instigates or favours revolution' in 1710 and was the customary word until the mid-i9c. Since then it has been challenged by revolutionary (the OED entry leads off with a quotation of 1850 from Charles Kingsley's Alton ...


2

It is an awkward word, and we used to get round it (architect's office) by referring to the tender and not the tenderer, so when the results were out, we'd write something like "7 tenders were received" and "the successful tender was submitted by..." to avoid using tenderers.


2

I'm English and so a native English speaker, and I consider that in 95+% of cases I can pronounce with certainty both on the grammatical and semantic correctness of an English utterance, although I could not with much certainty identify all of the grammatical terms of the utterance. The answers given here are fascinating and eye-opening when I see that ...


2

Among other things, just about any liquid could be a countable and uncountable (mass) noun in the same word. Take beer, for example. Give me some beer. [mass noun] Give us five beers. [count noun]


2

In this video, Pahud master class, the great flutist Emmanuel Pahud, explains to a student how to place flute tone in the nose rather than in the mouth. He calls the perceived place of resonance, in the nose between the eyes, the "wasabi point", I suppose because that is where you feel the burn when eating wasabi.


1

My answer (from introspection as a native speaker of British English, not from a reference): The inner noun phrase can be definite or indefinite: of image edges and of the image edges are both grammatical, and have somewhat different meanings: the use of the implies that you are talking about some particular edges (or edges of particular images), and that ...


1

When a writer acknowledges working for the company that makes a product that he or she has been reviewing or talking about, the acknowledgment most certainly is a disclosure, which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines as follows: disclosure n (1567) 1 : the act or an instance of disclosing : EXPOSURE 2 : something disclosed : ...


1

Assayer- Old formal word used for taste testers to check for poison in food.


1

This is a rather difficult point. I once heard a rule along the lines of 'states precede, definitions follow', meaning that if you want to use a past participle to describe, it goes before the noun but if you want to use it to define the noun it must follow. Thus 'The concerned people' means something different from 'The people concerned'. it is not always ...



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