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5

In a novel I've read, I've come across the word "afterglow" used in the context of post-orgasmic contentment. I thought it was an excellent non-technical euphemism for this as opposed to a dry clinical phrase like "refractory period". The word afterglow is defined by Merriam-Webster (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/afterglow) as: afterglow ...


5

You can consider refractory period. In human sexuality, the refractory period is usually the recovery phase after orgasm during which it is physiologically impossible for a man to have additional orgasms. Though it is generally reported that women do not experience a refractory period and can thus experience an additional orgasm (or multiple ...


4

"Postcoitus" is a bit odd, very clinical and only works for a brief period of time immediately after sexual intercourse. Since it is a technical term, it is worth noting that the formative word, "Coitus" strictly refers to the act that involves union of both male and female genitalia. Considering the preceding factors, it applications may be of limited use ...


4

It is because craft is a collective term and OED mentions that it might be originated as an elliptical expression. Craft itself is used as aircraft as well. OED includes the following explanation for the fifth definition of craft: V. Applied to boats, ships, and fishing requisites. These uses were probably colloquial with watermen, fishers, and ...


4

The phrase person with x or person dealing with x is often used. The terms patient, victim, sufferer and the like all have a significantly negative and helpless connotation that many of us reject. Even survivor is tinged with victimhood that many reject. We are not defined by our diseases, but are people who happen to be living with (and managing) them.


4

You might call it "the recovery period" In medicine, after intense physical activity, it's the period of time needed for the heart to slow down and the blood pressure return to normal levels. Applied to sexual activity, it might be the period of time between the last orgasm and the moment both partners feel like getting into action again.


3

Assuming it was steamy passionate sex, a metaphorical use of cool down: Fig. to reduce someone's passion or love. (Reducing the "heat" of passion.) McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs After three hot rounds of mad passionate sex, they decided to get dressed and cool down with a round of golf.


3

The word craft is obviously related to German Kraft (plural Kräfte), meaning might, power (or in physics force). It still had this meaning in Middle English. Etymonline explains the connection to boats: Use for "small boat" is first recorded 1670s, probably from a phrase similar to vessels of small craft and referring either to the trade they did or the ...


2

How about inter-coital periods? i.e. between the (multiple) acts of coitus.


2

Someone who slowly produces high-quality work is said to be painstaking. From the OED: Done with or employing great care and thoroughness; painstaking attention to detail - 'he is a gentle, painstaking man'.


1

Yes. The OED supplies both adjectival and noun meanings. The latter are senses B1 and B2a & b. B1 is the grammar sense, of 'the imperative' - that part of the verb expressing command. 2a derives from the grammatical sense as a command of someone for something of great importance. 2b concerns the the categorical imperative a philosophical concept ...


1

Your first example 'What is your suggest?' is wrong. To rephrase that example to be correct would be 'What do you suggest?'. To reply, one would say 'I suggest ...'. The definitions just for clarity to how to use suggest and suggestion: Suggest verb (used with object) 1. to mention or introduce (an idea, proposition, plan, etc.) for consideration or ...


1

'What do you suggest?' and 'What is your suggestion?' are the correct formations. 'What is your suggest?' is incorrect as suggest is a verb and cannot be used a noun.


1

The most natural way to fill in that blank is: I finally blurted out.



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