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2

An "official Latin binomial taxonomical name", as governed by international codes (International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, etc.), is not pluralized. The first part of the binomial, designating genus, is designated by a Latin or latinized capitalized singular noun. (Merriam-Webster,...


2

According to the ODO: Allium (plural alliums) A bulbous plant of a genus that includes the onion and its relatives (e.g. garlic, leek, and chives). As shown in the following extract from the ODO there is no fixed rule to form the plurals of Latin words in English. The more common trend is to use both original (Latin) and English ...


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I think it is safe to concede there is no definitive answer. Per Wikipedia, the trend is toward the informal: The general trend with loanwords is toward what is called Anglicization or naturalization, that is, the re-formation of the word and its inflections as normal English words. Many nouns (particularly ones from Latin) have retained their original ...


21

I believe this is because the name element (now) usually expressed "Mc" is actually an abbreviation for "Mac"; at one time, superscript (often with an underline or under dots) was a common way of writing abbreviations without resort to an apostrophe. This is preserved in the symbol № for "number". You can see an example of this in the signature on the ...


15

Pronunciation. The 'upper-C' is a type of diacritical mark. In the 'good old days' this used to have a line under the superscript C called macron. All these tend to alter the actual pronunciation of the name. All this is to differentiate between Mick and Mack. The 'upper-C' is denoting the pronunciation to be Mack (as is Old MacDonald). It should also ...


5

1. Are there any examples of dogs actually being named "Tiger", let alone a shortened version of "Tiger"? The earliest example I could find of a dog named Tiger is from "Select Poetry, Ancient and Modern, for April, 1791," in The Gentleman's Magazine (1791): The inclosed Occasional Epilogue ["Occasional Epilogue, For Mr. Stanton's Great Dog Tiger"] was ...


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I believe "Tige" is indeed a shortening of Tiger, and would be pronounced like tide with a hard g in place of the d. From a story in the Atlantic Monthly published in 1860, apparently by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr (father of the famous American jurist by the same name): Tiger, or more briefly, Tige, the property of Abner Briggs, Junior, belonged to a ...


4

I believe they're called tie rods - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tie_rod There's a famous case of a massive engineering failure involving walkways held up by steel rods - the 1981 Hyatt Regency disaster: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyatt_Regency_walkway_collapse The walkways collapsed onto the people below, and it turned out to be because the steel ...


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The name is an anglicisation of the Irish name Tadhg, meaning poet or philosopher. Other common spellings are Tighe, Teague.



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