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In general, single quotation marks are only used to indicate a quote witihin a quote (at least in AmE). In the case of a term that would call for quotation marks, such as a nickname, the single version would only be used if the nickname refernece was part of a quote. Also, in US practice, once a term is defined, such as a nickname, the quotes are usually ...


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It is proper to use regular quotation marks as opposed to singles for nicknames. Most sources seem to suggest as much when discussing nicknames directly. Regarding quotation marks in general, the single quotation mark is reserved primarily for the purpose of nested quotation, that is, quotation within quotation - apparently this is reversed for British ...


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Consider "future-directed anxiety" and "future-oriented anxiety." The term "fear" can replace "anxiety" in both options.


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"Swash" is a word that means any number of things: swash — verb (used without object) to splash, as things in water, or as water does: Waves were swashing against the piers. to dash around, as things in violent motion. to swagger. — verb (used with object) to dash or cast violently, especially to dash ...


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complete list of hypocorisms Aaron Ron RonnE Erin Ronald Abel Abe Ab Eb EbbE Abiel Biel Ab Abigail Ab AbbE Gail NabbE Tabitha Abijah Ab Bige Abiah Ab Biah Abner Ab AbbE Abraham Abe Abram Absalom Ab AbbE Adaline Ada Adela Aline Edith AddE Dell Delia Lena Adelaide Adam Ade EdE Ad Adelaide AddE Adela ...


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Not English per se, but in New Mexico English-speakers call this a tocayo, nicely unburdened of the debt-to weight of namesake and eponym.


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If I'm understanding your question correctly, then the short answer is "no." The use of surnames as given names appears to be a uniquely English phenomenon (although I would love to see data showing otherwise), and the beginnings can be dated to just after the Reformation. Early examples include Lord Guildford Dudley (1535-54) and Sir Warham St. Leger ...


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Doppelganger could be applied here. It is usually applied to someone (possibly famous) who looks like you. It really just means a double though, so it could be applied to someone with the same name, especially if it is exactly the same name.


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This name, Unthank, while not common, appears in Scotland as a placename. Sometimes "Winthank". In Scotish sources the name is given as a corruption of two Scottish gaidhlig words - Uaine - meaning a lamb and, - fanc - meaning a pen for animals. Such pens or fanks are still in use for sorting sheep or lambs. Normally of dry-stone walling around 5 feet in ...


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Homonym, when used to refer to people, has that meaning. I believe (but lack the reference) that, unlike namesake, it does not carry a meaning of intent. The two people just happen to share the same name, without one being named after the other. However, in English, this meaning is largely dominated by the linguistics one, to the extent that I could find ...


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This word has an almost identical connotation but seems to have shifted in meaning in modern American usage towards almost requiring that the thing/person in question is named after whatever/whoever is mentioned. (Wikipedia:) Namesake is a term used to characterize a person, place, thing, quality, action, state, or idea that has the same, or a similar, ...


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The general terms used today are life sciences, not biological sciences, and physical sciences, not natural sciences. For technical sciences, if you want to include computer science, information science, and materials science, there's no umbrella term for these with science in the name. Usually, nobody refers to a single scientist as a life scientist; we ...


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I think it is just one of those cases where the brand is so strong to become the name of the product itself. No need to worry about it. a glass of scotch is a glass of whiskey


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The term "natural scientist" is used rarely these days; more specific disciplines like chemist, physicist, biologist, astronomer, and earth scientist (stilted though it sounds) are more common. For "technical scientist," one would more likely use the words engineer or technologist; I can't recall ever having heard the term before and I don't think it is a ...



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