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2

Quinn is unusual as a given name, but as the majority of Anglophone surnames can appear as given names it would strike a native English speaker as uncommon, but not strange.


2

The difference, it seems to me, is that Old World rivers have their own names (often personified as a god or nymph) but colonists typically named rivers after something (e.g. Hudson River after Henry Hudson; Swan River, formerly Black Swan River, where someone saw such a bird for the first time) or descriptively (Little Twisty Green River). "Mississippi ...


0

The names are not alternatives of each other; but it's quite possible for both to be used of the same person. The playwright Shaw was "George" (or "Sonny") to his family but "Bernard" to the literary and theatrical world and on his title pages; only ignorant journalists called him "George Bernard Shaw". My own wife is known by her first name to her family, ...


0

It is not at all unusual, particularly in the nineteenth-century to find people who were known by names other than the ones they had been given in baptismal records, and, after compulsory registration began (in Britain 1853) on birth certificates. They may have been known by their alternate name only to certain people, or at certain times of their life. In ...


2

How would you have it pronounced? Throughout most of the US it's pronounced, as Silenus suggests, LEE-VIES (or LEE-VIZE, as a different spelling for the same sound), where VIES rhymes with "eyes". The term comes from the Levi Strauss company, which has always been pronounced LEE-VIE (rhyming with "eye"). (They once ran a chain of dry goods stores ...


1

The examples are substantively different as one is himself a Life Baron (the lowest level of the peerage, and not hereditary) and the other is the wife of a (hereditary) Earl. Although earls have a surname, King-Noel in this case, they don't use it and instead identify themselves exclusively by their title. Ada's husband, after his creation as 1st Earl of ...


1

I'll expand on my comment a bit: Alphabetization & uniqueness Imagine a bouncer with a clipboard at the door of a nightclub. We all know what's on the clipboard: the guest list, which is an alphabetized list of names ordered by "Last Name" ascending. Why? Organization is better than randomness By maintaining a consistent order via ...


-1

I suspect that the reason this is used in formal documents (note though, it isn't as ubiquitous as the question makes out - I have seen this being used on a ticket for instance one year, only for it to use the order of forename surname the next year) is to list the pieces of information in descending order of genericness (becomes more specific towards the ...


5

Unless she specifically tells you to call her by her first name or suggests some title either verbally or in emails (or you hear it from somewhere), I'd play it safe and address her as Ms. [last name]. Note that it's best to use Ms. because Mrs. denotes that she is married (which would be an assumption on your part - or even if you know she's married, she ...



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