New answers tagged

1

In most instances a play on words fits the bill as "a) memorable, b) meaningful, and c) distinctive." If you live say, near the Catskills, The Cakehills might be a very effective business name. Good Luck!


1

"The Cake Fairy" is decent, but not a great name. Marketing experts tell us a good name has to be a) memorable, b) meaningful, and c) distinctive. It's also good if it makes sense. "CakeHills" and "CakerHills" fail all three of these tests. "The Cake Fairy" is memorable and meaningful, but not particularly distinctive, unless you live in a small town ...


3

Depending on the context, perhaps fellow: "He was an amiable fellow". Using fellow intentionally avoids using 'boy', implying that the person isn't a boy or necessarily young. Likewise, I would think 'fellow' is too informal to describe an older person. Chap or gent could also work, as a child certainly isn't a "gent".


1

I went to http://babynames.net/names and found the following (just for A and B). There is more information there about the names and famous people who had the name. "Blossom", "Bond", "Branch", "Brand", "Bud".


1

In the US, it is totally the decision of the woman concerned. Jane Doe after marrying John Smith can be Ms Jane Doe, Mrs. Jane Doe, Ms Jane Smith, Mrs Jane Smith, Mrs John Smith. There is no need for a "social" form plus a "work" form, but it is not wrong to be Mrs. John Smith socially, and Ms (or Mrs) Jane Doe at work -- or vice versa. If you are unsure ...


0

The woman disavowed her birth name A. Her maiden name is considered to be surname B until such time as she might choose to restore her birth name in its place. Edit: More specifically, legally, the maiden name is the one that appears on the marriage documents regardless of her later changes of heart. In this case, that is going to be surname B. Frank is ...


1

It's culture dependent. In China, it's absolutely standard for women to keep their surnames during marriage but they also attach importance to their married status. In English, they'll frequently describe themselves as Mrs ~. In the US and UK, it's become more idiosyncratic. You're right that you should default to Ms (no period) and you're right that many ...


4

Yes, the convention is that you place something in quotation marks when you are talking about the name itself, and not about the object of reference of that name. It has nothing to do with if the baby has been born yet or not. Compare and contrast the following: "Jane" is a pretty name. Jane is a pretty girl. Or: We want to christen our baby ...


5

Tie-breaker, or tiebreaker seems like a good fit. something (such as an extra period of play or an extra question) that is used to decide a winner when a game, contest, etc., has ended with a tied score


3

"Richard the Second" (your number 2) is perfectly correct. Have a look at this: http://www.sirbacon.org/graphics/richard2.gif


0

The grammatically correct name would be Gadget World. Noun adjuncts (nouns used to describe other nouns) are almost always used in the singular form. Some examples include: car race (not cars race, even though there is more than one car participating in the race), cigarette packet (there is more than one cigarette in a packet). There are some exceptions ...


2

I am from the Dominican Republic, at one point the biggest export of sugar cane in the world and responsible for supplying 90% of the world's sugar. The two main sugar refineries were located; one in San Pedro De Macoris and the second in Rio Haina ( my hometown ) and no one knows more about the sugar production than the Haina kids because all of our great ...


5

Speaking for the USA only, both the names "Dick" and "Dong" are also slang words for penis. Nonetheless, many people such as former vice president Dick Cheney go by the name "Dick". "Dong" on the other hand is a rare name here. There is a professor Dong Liu at University of Houston, professor Dong Lai at Cornell, and other professors with "Dong" as their ...


0

A generic term that I would probably use for this in day-to-day speech, is slot.


0

The dividers between the cavities are called mullions, similar to the bars separating panes of glass in a window. In an automatic ice maker a mullion heater facilitates ejection of the ice.


0

I am not familiar with an official common name, so people are free to use whatever words they think appropriately describe those things. In addition to other provided answers (cavity, cells) or comments (compartments), I would suggest that a person fills each "section" of the tray with water.


7

they are called cells. Visualize an upside-down ice cube tray, which is called an evaporator, placed upside down atop a molded water plate. The KOLD-DRAFT evaporator is refrigerated and has individual cells. The water plate has a hole for every cell, through which the water is vigorously pumped, injecting it to the top of each cell and down the ...


12

If you consider the ice tray to be a mould (noun definition 3; or mold for AmE) for ice, then the technical term would be a cavity. Mold Cavity Hollow space, or cavity, in the mold, which is used to impart the desired form to the product being molded. - Engineering Dictionary Here's one for sale on Amazon that describes the holes as cavities, and ...


1

Since we're not primarily looking at constructs such as governor general where there are no names mentioned, let's ignore these. For the form (Title) (Name), taking personal preferences seems to lead to a rather polarising discussion. Let's instead look first at accepted conventions with other titles, specifically Mr and the null title. Before looking at ...


0

The guide here is that when you have a set phrase (including titles) made from a noun and a postpositive adjective, the noun takes the plural for the very good reasons that adjectives are invariable. Hence we get professors emeritus, attorneys general, poets laureate, and so on. This can be visualised as having two professors who are emeritus ones; two ...


2

I agree with Nagarajan Shanmuganathan - Answer sheet is appropriate. However if it were a verbal/oral exam then 'Response' would be appropriate i.e. The student responded by saying... or the students' response was...



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