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1

I'm originally from Harrogate, North Yorks, so my local river was the Nidd, which means "sparkling". These days, I live in Perth, Western Australia, where the Swan River flows. Before becoming the Swan River, however, it is known as the Avon River, named after the Avon in England, which of course means River River. Funnily enough though, here it's ...


1

What you are using is one form of posessive, like "Mike's shoes", or "Morpheus' eyeballs". Instead you need a plural. Some words don't have a plural. Some have an awkward plural, that comes from the originating language, like "Ox -> Oxen". The plural of Morpheus is Morpheuses, I'd say. And yes, it's an awkward plural.


3

One never forms plurals out of English words via an apostrophe. The apostrophe indicates a possessive, not a plural. The English plural of Morpheus is simply the regular plural Morpheuses.


0

I've noticed that, at least in the U.S. many English speakers are clueless about accents in Spanish, so personally I would favor Baskov, but with the whole syllable in bold, not just the vowel. Whatever system you end up using, I hope you'll explain to the reader what's going on in a note in the beginning. In my experience, obtuse English speakers have an ...


1

Those of us who are familiar with Spanish will have no problem with Báskov and Baskóv. Unfortunately, because of the irregularity of English spelling there is no foolproof way of ensuring correct pronunciation. Even if you write BASkov and BasKOV, I can tell you from experience that some people will still not get the emphasis in the right place. That is ...


3

Short nicknames are called "Nicknames" Long nicknames are called "Nicholasnames"


1

Traditionally, emails shouldn't have salutations anyway. The salutation's purpose in snail-mail is performed by the email's "to:" header. Putting it in again manually is really just redundant. So if it seems awkward, I'd suggest just leaving it off.


0

No rules: no convention even in a single name. Here are three nick-names for one girl, and the list doesn't even include Beth; Elizabeth, Liza, Betsy, and Bess, All went together to find a bird's nest. They found a bird's nest with five eggs in it. Each took one and left four in it.


5

Incipit: The opening words of a text, especially when used in place of a title to identify an otherwise untitled work. (AHD)


2

Most likely the Wolfs. Because it is a family name it does not have to follow normal pluralisation rules in English.


3

I think an old lady name could work really well because it carries the additional image of an old feeble granny. Something like Gertrude or Agnes or Eleanor sound like they could be someone's great aunt. Other names that could work: Marie Elizabeth, Tiffany, Fleur.


0

The English pronunciation of the s in Louis was reinforced during the 1600s and 1700s by frequent respelling of the French name Louis as Lewis. An Ngram chart for the years 1600 through 2005 shows that "King Lewis" (blue line) was the preferred spelling over "King Louis" until about 1770: Here is a typical instance of "King Lewis" from "The Life and ...


1

His name is Louis like Lewis and his nickname is Louie.



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