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(US English) In Case 1, the only one that is both correct and common is #4. In Case 2, the ones that are both correct and common are #1, #4, and #5. However, you would never use #5 unless you knew that Mr. Smith likes to be referred to in this way. Some people adopt their middle name as their "handle", and downplay their given first name. Most do not.


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This is not a grammar issue, but at the same time, it is not often style preference because there could be a cultural difference too! There should be no issue with using 'first name' (Mr John in this case). If there are too many 'John's, then Mr John L. Smith should be adequate! I guess in some countries, first names are far too common and they use last ...


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Zoölogical Latin is often invented, but my instinct is to treat it as a second-declension noun like thymus or isthmus, which, even in English, are pluralized with an i: thymi, isthmi, dibami. As in the sentence, "Wow, dibami are creepy, freaky-looking lizard-worms!"


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In British English, the correct pronunciation of the French name Aloïs is more-or-less how the French say it: ah-lo-ISS (though some may mistakenly pronounce it Alwa). Aloïse (pronounced ah-lo-EEZ) is commonly a girl's name in French. As has been pointed out in the comments, however, the different languages spoken in Belguim makes it difficult to work out ...


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Professional Surveyor. sometimes you will see it as P.S. and sometimes as PS. I am a Professional Surveyor. some lawyers are surveyors also.


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Reference- oxforddictionaries.com the new- Produced, introduced, or discovered recently or now for the first time; not existing before: "Innob, the new breath in (the) town. a new- Already existing but seen, experienced, or acquired recently or now for the first time. "Innob, a new breath in (the) town. I proffer: "Innob, the new breath in ...


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Grammatically both are correct, but the meaning is different: "a new ..." refers to one out of many, whereas "the new ..." refers to one specific thing, in this case your product which is (hopefully) unique and therefore attractive for customers. => for advertising purposes, I'd choose "the new xyz".


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On the outside, it's perfectly acceptable to address the envelope to the head of the family alone. For comparison, when you write to your bank, it's traditional to address the letter to "The Manager", even though he/she might not be the one acting on your correspondence. You could also put "Ms. Smith and family" on the envelope. On the inside of the card ...


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In British custom, one would write on the envelope Prof J R Ewing and Dr E M Ewing Note that the surname is repeated, because the wife is notable in her own right and not merely as "Mrs J R Ewing". This is particularly the case if the wife is still using her maiden name: Prof J R Ewing and Dr E M Crump If you wanted to be particularly formal, ...


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If possible avoid hyphenating a surname at all, that is tolerate more spacing in the line than you would generally. This is particularly so if the name is first introduced with this piece and not repeated shortly afterwards. Since you are introducing the name you'd want to be clear that this was a hyphenation due to the end of the line, rather than a ...


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It doesn't, but the language is both too slow to change and too quick for it to prevent them happening. Now, it is true as you say that some people favour rooster over cock precisely because cock had an association with penises. And if everyone both 1) thought "penis" when they heard cock and 2) were terribly upset about this, then the word would die out in ...


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Professors are only called so in an academic setting, using it in a non-university context is stilted. Likewise, Doctor is only used for medical doctors except in an academic setting. At Los Alamos National Labs, my father-in-law is always Dr. Stradling. At home, he never is. I have never heard of anyone using "Professor" except when talking about his or ...


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English often changes names little these days (though your examples include one where it did change names earlier, the O' form used in Anglicising names beginning with Ó, like O'Brian for the Irish Ó Briain). For this reason you can expect all manner of characters to be used in names in English-language contexts. Characters you can safely prohibit: ...



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