Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

It is mostly recommended for any positive thing the third person must be placed at the beginning followed by the second and the first person and for any negative thing first person must be placed at the beginning followed by the third and the second person.Example: You, he and I have won the match. I, you and he have lost the match. Though this is ...


2

You are free to choose any order you like, so long as 'and I' comes last.


0

The word 'ESK' almost certainly has origins much more ancient than Celtic tradition. I suspect the word derives from ancient biblical texts which references 'ESEK', a spring or well of water. ESEK first appears in Genesis 26 as the name given by Isaac to a well dug by his people. Local herdsmen, jealous of Isaacs growing wealth and influence, contested the ...


0

As StoneyB commented, It's called right-dislocation and is common in conversational English For more details, see Right dislocation in Northern England: frequency and use — perception meets reality (PDF) by Mercedes Durham, University of Aberdeen.


2

You should treat it as as a geographical name or business name: capitalize but not italicize or quote.


0

One reason is that company names are often registered in legal paperwork, before they generate a "wordmark" or logo. Even after the initial "wordmark" or logo is created, it is later updated, modernized, changed for changing social standards. Ask a graphic artist if they would accept a job with the limitation that a logo match the legal name of a company.


3

The company's official, legal name is the one by which it is registered with the government agency of the country in which the corporation is incorporated (e.g. here in the UK, Companies House). The company can have as as many logos as it likes and they can look like whatever it wants them to, but that doesn't change the legal name of the company (which ...


0

Being a Penhallow the name is pronounced as follows, disregarding local accents. Pen ( like something you write with) ha ( A like that in bat, cat etc) llow ( like grow, toe etc) the emphasis is very subtly on the ha. in Russian it is translated as пенхаллоу ( this is my name in the credits of a Russian to show I worked on)


1

This site, howjsay.com gives the pronunciation of Aurelius as most speakers of Southern British English pronounce it. Aurelius: awe + really + ous (as in famous) IPA: /ɔː'riːliʊs/


3

I think there might be slightly different versions of correct pronunciation, but here is one I know: /ɔːˈriːliəs/



Top 50 recent answers are included