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Depending on what silly things you may have done to route the string over to your bed, it would almost qualify as Rube Goldberg Contraption A Rube Goldberg machine is a contraption, invention, device or apparatus that is deliberately over-engineered to perform a simple task in a complicated fashion, generally including a chain reaction. The ...


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I think that what you added was an extension: a something that can be extended or that extends another object. (Collins)


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I've always known the non-Heath Robinson version as a lazy betty. Though I haven't found a dictionary reference, This article from Sue's Considered Trifles concurs: A lazy Betty is a pull-cord light switch, which may be operated from a bed. In answer to the obvious follow-on question 'Why is the light switch above beds called a lazy betty? Who was ...


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The individuation of names is a debated issue in the philosophy of language. But your question boils down to how we use the phrase "the same name." There'll be high variance on this, depending on the interests of the participants in the conversation. In some contexts, John Francis Smith and John Francis Smith might be said to have different names. After ...


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There are many names that are considered diminutive, or alternate, forms of other names, for example: Bob and Bobby for Robert Jim and Jimmy for James Kate, Katey, and Cat for Katherine While many people with these names have preferences about how they like to be addressed, they'll usually answer to the alternate forms (unless they like to be ...


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In your example, the principle that determines whether to capitalize wild terrain should be whether a name or term is unique and perceived as a proper noun by the writer. There could be many wild terrains in anywhere in the word. We can't capitalize it just because the terrain is wild. If you contrast wild terrain with Death Valley, you could notice that ...



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