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11

According to my NOAD the informal expression "be fresh out of" means "have just sold or run out of a supply of (something)." You can see an example also on the OALD. So he basically meant "I ran out of pies to throw at you."


10

It means that there are ordinary, run-of-the mill dinner jackets, and then there are special, well-cut, expensive dinner jackets, of the sort that a millionaire, master criminal or international secret agent would wear. The idiom can be used for other things too: I've tried pizza and I don't really like it. Ah, but there's pizza, and there's pizza. ...


9

To add to the dictionary definition Alenanno provides, I feel obliged to point out that the expression "fresh out of" is a colloquialism that is often used in a confrontational manner. In the film Full Metal Jacket, for instance, the belligerent Marine called "Animal Mother" confronts the film's protagonist, Private Joker, by saying: "Hey, asshole. Cowboy's ...


7

The character Aldo Raine is from Maynardville, Tennessee and is a hillbilly who enjoys bootlegging moonshine. While I'm unsure about the accuracy of Pitt's accent for the time period, it certainly sounds (possibly intentionally) overdone to my ears.


7

The general term for this is exposition, and TVTropes gives a long list of ways it's been achieved in film and fiction (covering the methods you describe, and many more); the expositions that appear at the beginning of a work are usually qualified with "opening", as in "Opening Narration", "Opening Monologue" (your On Poppy Hill examples), or "Opening ...


6

There are answers and then there are answers. This is, in wider sense, a ploce : The repetition of a single word for rhetorical emphasis. The term is from Gk. plekein, "to plait". Also sp. ploche, ploke, conduplicatio, diaphora, doubler. In this case, specifically, it could be: 1) Antanaclasis (from Gk. anti “against or back,” ana “up” and klasis “a ...


6

"Khakis" is often used to refer to pants (that are khaki-colored, or made of the khaki textile). For example, Old Navy has a khakis page that lists various pants [1] and one specific to men's khakis [2]. In the context of the movie, khakis are another 'material good' that Tyler denounces, like cars, ikea furniture, etc. [1] ...


5

What you should realize about the Austin Powers movies that may not be immediately obvious to a non-native speaker is that the character is written by USA natives to be an exaggerated parody of a British guy from the 60's. As such, a lot of his tag lines aren't so much phrases in common use in England, but rather an American's view of phrases in common use ...


5

Why not ask Higgins himself? ELIZA: Garn! HIGGINS: "Garn"-I ask you, sir: what sort of word is that? HIGGINS: It's "ow" and "garn" that keep her in her place, Not her wretched clothes and dirty face. Why can't the English teach their children how to speak? This verbal class distinction, by now, should be antique. If you spoke as she ...


5

I grew up in Tennessee and live very close to Maynardville. Pitt's accent is the closest I've heard from a non-native. He would pass for a local. It's that good.


5

Having grown up in east Tennessee, I can confirm that his accent is consistent with the older generation of locals from the deep mountains. It is likely that Brad Pitt spent some time in the area and adopted the thickest accent he could muster of those he heard in the region.


4

"Mashed up inside" isn't a medical term and so doesn't refer to a specific injury to a specific organ. He is saying that he feels he has has multiple severe internal injuries. He is much more likely to be referring to physical rather than mental injuries.


4

Yes it can. "Hidden in plain sight" isn't a widely known idiom however, so make sure it's obvious to your reader.


4

According to the Pacific Rim wiki, Stacker Pentecost was born in Tottenham, London, and holds British citizenship. I don’t know the movie at all, but the wiki also says he is the head of the Hong Kong Shatterdome, so perhaps his native British English has simply been influenced somewhat by Hong Kong’s colonial English accents.


4

AFAIK, to give someone a pass means to be granted a reprieve from something bad; "given a pass"; forgiven for one's sins or indiscretions. prior uses of pass late 13c. to go by (something), to cross over, from Latin passare "to step, walk, pass" is attested from c.1300. Not known when usage of example came into language. He could have said a lot of ...


3

Garn is, as Prof. Lawler tells you, Shaw's orthographic approximation to Eliza's pronunciation of the phrase Go on!. Go on, however, has little to do with the literal meaning of those words: it is a lower-class colloquial expression which dismisses what the previous speaker has just said as false, incredible, or absurd. There are similar expressions ...


3

His accent is consistant with the dialect spoken by natives of the Appalachian Region of the U.S. Commonly spoken by individuals from NW Georgia, W NC/SC, VA, E TN, & SE KY. JDnTN I'm with you 100% it is a pretty authentic accent, my granddad, & all of his brothers sound much like Raine,& Use similar wording/idioms. I'm from NC btw. My question ...


3

George Lucas called it a rollup. Hampton Fancher and David Peoples Blade Runner didn't call it anything. Peoples (the original screenwriter for Blade Runner, and who wrote the screenplay for Unforgiven) referred to the stills expositions in the script (which is full of technical information) for Unforgiven as crawl A Glossary Of Screenwriting Terms & ...


2

It's like saying, "There are men, and there are men." It really depends on the context. But in this context, I reckon Vesper Lynd is really saying: There are alright dinner jackets, and there are good dinner jackets; this is the latter... "This is the latter" refers to the second of the dinner jackets, which I am presuming, is "good". (I haven't ...


2

Here's the evidence to support OP's suggestion that make a pounce was more common in the past... But here's the evidence to show that relatively speaking it was never actually "common"... It's also worth noting this from etymonline.com... pounce (v.) 1680s, originally "to seize with the pounces," from Middle English pownse (n.) "hawk's claw" (see ...


2

It means Behave properly, and its use is not confined to Austin Powers movies.


2

It's a reference to her fake name. Cameron's character is named Carly Whitten The Really? is a sarcastic expression meaning You did not seriously choose that specific name now, did you? Kate then refers to the Carmela which is the wife of Tony in The Sopranos. Meadow is their daughter Big Pussy is the nickname of Sal Bonpensiero, also from the ...


2

It's a reference to the show "The Sopranos." She means that the name "Carmela" makes her friend sound like a member of a New Jersey mafia family. "Big Pussy" and "Meadow" are also names of characters from the same show. The reason for the joke is that the name "Carmela" is relatively unusual and most people would know it primarily from the show.


2

An "offshore" company is one which is created under the authority of a foreign government, typically in order to realize tax advantages or to pursue activities which are hampered or prohibited under US law. Operating at a total loss means that the business has no revenue at all, only expenses—suggesting that is not a legitimate business but a device ...


1

As your comments will indicate, this is an instance of referential humor dealing with various instances of young adult fiction dealing with teenage girls. The joke is that the character uttering them wants to differentiate herself from the themes contained therein, specifically an idealized portrayal of romance.


1

I think what you're seeing here is an artifact of an imperfect/sloppy attempt to compress the title and subtitle into a single line of text for the convenience of computer databases. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love the Bomb The "or:" introduces a subtitle or alternate title, and the line break before it helps to delimit the ...


1

Program music is “A form of art music that attempts to convey a scene, image, or mood”. The soundscape-related terms keynote sounds and soundmark also may be slightly relevant: ...keynote sounds may not always be heard consciously, but they "outline the character of the people living there" (Schafer). A soundmark is a sound which is unique to an area ...


1

In the context of Austin Powers, it has a sexual connotation to it. Something along the lines of 'stop flirting with me', or more precisely 'continue flirting with me'. Another example is user in the Carry On movies where 'Oooh Matron' is used with similar effect.


1

I come across those words when reading novels all the time. However, they are almost never used in conversation. The only one on the list that is somewhat archaic is "tarry", but its still a perfectly acceptable word that you might expect to come across in a new novel if the situation calls for it.



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