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9

If you put the accent on the word "teacher", then it means "a teacher from England." If you put the accent on the word "English", then it means "a teacher who teaches English". Or in another way, if you say "a teacher of English", then it means a teacher who teaches English. If you want to say a teacher who comes from England, then a clearer way would be "a ...


7

To a native American English speaker (at least to me), these have different implied meanings: decoding time - Can mean how long the decoding process takes, if you write "Decoding time will depend upon..." or when the decoding happens, if you write "At decoding time, ..." time of decoding - when the decoding takes place data compression - Can refer to the ...


5

Both are grammatically correct, and which one to use will depend on the context. teacher of English: This makes an explicit reference to the subject. It doesn't matter if the teacher is from England or not, it just cares about the fact that the teacher teaches English. Examples where teacher of English is used: ...


4

Of software, one would say: System for topological analysis, if describing the package as a whole as in "Groundswell: The system for topological analysis." System of topological analysis, if describing the algorithms you've used in your unique, patentable system for topological analysis as in "My system of topological analysis uses GPS data." But the ...


4

If you are a programmer, data types has a connotation which is more specific than types of data. A data type, when used as technical jargon, implies very specific domain and format restrictions. For example, a "signed integer stored in 32 binary bits". If you intend to discuss this particular jargon meaning, then you should definitely use data types. ...


3

They mean the same thing, but the first is more often used. Here are examples: The advantages of a car lease is [sic] that the Lessee has no obligation other than to turn in the car when the lease has expired. For business owners, one of the most important car lease advantages would be that you will be able to deduct some of the mileage that you ...


3

They mean exactly the same. Their difference lies in terms of style. 'Car lease advantages' is shorter, the alternative follows the construction of languages older than English. You can use both without fear of having said something wrong.


3

As an IT person, I feel the whole construct is wrong. There are different data types, e.g. text, date, integer, decimal, boolean, etc. (This list is not complete). Then there are different data sources, e.g. SQL database, Oracle database, spreadsheet, tab delimited file, CSV, etc. (This list is also not complete). So, in my world, there are many different ...


2

If topological analysis explains what the system is about, what it consists of/in, what it is, use of. If it is the purpose of the system, in a broad sense, use for. In many cases, both would be possible and correct, in which case of is usually preferred. Sometimes one of these prepositions would be incorrect for no apparent reason, even though it should ...


2

First is ungrammatical, the second is just about grammatical, but in my view too wordy! You need the adjectival form of technology, namely 'technological'. 'The pace of technological development'.


2

The COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English) shows American English having a preference for level of safety over safety level by 3.5 to 1. Records in the BNC (British National Corpus), by contrast, show their use as being more or less equal. We may speculate on why that might be so, but my own intuition suggests to me that the two expressions would ...


1

The first is more eloquent, yet the second is more common especially in business and organisational contexts. We always hear and talk about knowledge sharing to enhance performance.


1

I think the first one is better as it introduces the idea of sharing (which seems to be one of the main concepts earlier in the sentence, whereas in the second sentence it appears tacked on as an afterthought. That is, assuming the main point you are trying to convey is the benefit of sharing, rather than the benefit of knowledge.


1

The two phrases mean the same thing but the first would usually be considered better style. Noun stacking, as in the second example, can make sentences difficult to understand:- ...a steroid-induced GABA channel burst duration prolongation... or sound ugly:- Your staffing-level authorization reassessment plan... although it is often used, as ...


1

Either can be correct if used in the proper context: Case #1 "I am a teacher of English. Teaching the language is my profession and I am current unemployed." Case #2 "I am an English teacher. Teaching the English language is my job at Linwood School." Case #3 "I am an English teacher. My nationality is English and I have a position as Instructor of ...


1

To your question of "why isn't it 'decoding's time', but 'decoding time'?": It is not that the time belongs to decoding, but rather that is the the time associated with decoding. The "'s" usually indicates possession, as does "of", but "of" has many other meanings, "associated with" being one of them.


1

It's often the case that an encoded file (compressed/encrypted, for example), might be decompressed/decrypted several times. Or the machine doing the encoding may be more powerful than the machine which will decode it later. Therefore a lot of software designed to perform these tasks may spend more time (computing power) on the encoding than on the ...



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