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11

The OED defines it as ‘a man or woman who follows or hangs on to a camp or army, without being in military service.’ Camp followers are thus not necessarily prostitutes, but this citation form 1876 suggests they might be: Those unfortunates who are known under the euphemistic appellation of ‘camp followers’. However, as FumbleFingers has shown, the term ...


9

Blackguard rating is not an official term; rather, Nightingale is describing her encounter with Barry as the most scurrilous scolding she had received in her life. Etymonline has blackguard, a somewhat dated term, originating 1530s, scullion, kitchen knave. Perhaps once an actual military or guard unit; more likely originally a mock-military reference ...


6

From wikipedia: Leading zeros are always written out and are required to be spoken, so 5:43 a.m. is spoken "zero five forty-three" (casually) or "zero five four three" (military radio), as opposed to "five forty-three". From a military forum: Written: 0001 (1201AM) Verbalized: Zero oh oh One Hours (or Zero Zero Zero One Hours)


5

The British military term is undoubtedly coup de main, usually though not universally italicised as a formerly foreign term. The Wikipedia article on the Battle of Arnhem (chosen pretty much at random from dozens of examples) has "a troop of Reconnaissance jeeps from the 1st Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron, under Major Frederick Gough on Leopard who would ...


5

Actually Etymonline suggests that the first use dates back to 1917 and is referred to trucks loads while its military application was later, around 1936. Payload (n.) also pay-load, 1917, from pay + load (n.). Originally the part of a truck's (later an aircraft's) load from which revenue is derived (passengers, cargo, mail); figurative sense of ...


5

A rating is a “sharp scolding or rebuke.” A blackguard /ˈblæɡɚd/ is a scoundrel, especially one who uses foul language. (There's even a verb form of blackguard meaning “to ridicule or denounce with abusive language.”) A blackguard rating is therefore an extremely abusive and probably foul-mouthed scolding. Nightingale is saying that she has suffered many ...


5

I was in the military, but not Viet-Nam era. From my own judgment, I don't think it has anything to do with odometers. I think it's a dark humor reference. When sighting in an M-16, the sights are adjusted in clicks. Looking downrange at a calibrated 100 yard target, one click moves the projectile/impact one inch across the face of the target. ...


5

General can be used as a generic title for anyone in the Army of rank O-7 or above. In the cases of 1-, 2-, and 3-star generals, their formal titles are Brigadier, Major, and Lieutenant General, but just plain General can be used, particularly verbally. "We need to clean up around here; General Parker is paying us a visit this afternoon" is a legitimate way ...


5

You didn't say which army, and in the British Army things are slightly different from the rules J.R. gives for the US Army. The NATO equivalent to US Army O-7 is OF-6, one-star general; the British Army equivalent to this rank is Brigadier, and While the corresponding rank of brigadier general in many other nations is a general officer rank, the ...


4

From The First Saint Omnibus: An Anthology of Saintly Adventures (1939), page 269: But the Duchess starts bimbling And wambling and wimbling And threatens to wallop his ducal behind; Such a lovely phrase.


4

It depends on your perspective: RAINA (eagerly turning to him, as all her enthusiasm and her dream of glory rush back on her). Did you see the great cavalry charge? Oh, tell me about it. Describe it to me. MAN. You never saw a cavalry charge, did you? RAINA. How could I? MAN. Ah, perhaps not—of course. Well, it's a funny sight. It's like slinging a ...


3

If your audience is historians or laymen modestly read in history, it need not be translated; the French phrase itself is in wide use in the literature, and is sufficiently Anglicized that it need not be italicized. Wikipedia suggests sucker punch, which is apt but emphatically colloquial—it will be read with quotes around it, whether or not you ...


3

The expression currently has two clusters of meaning--literal and metaphorical. Your search has focussed on the literal meanings related to military encampments. In that sense, the term has been applied to both the families of the soldiers and commercial associates. The distinction between the two is not sharp: the widow of a fallen soldier far from home ...


3

The term arose from the use of forward observed non-line of sight artillery targeting and actually began with the United States Marine Corp during the interwar period between the Korean and Vietnam wars. The M19 mortar introduced at the time had dials for adjusting the azimuth and elevation. It produced a loud "click" sound when both dials where set to a ...


3

I believe that a/the military term is called "skylining." b. Bounding Element. Maneuver is inherently dangerous. Enemy weapons, unknown terrain, and other operational factors all increase the danger. When maneuvering, the platoon leader considers the following. (1) The bounding element must take full advantage of whatever cover and ...


2

Are you thinking of making yourself "silhouetted"? Another term used is "conspicuity". Those terms are used in the U.S. Army Field Manual FM 20-3 "CAMOUFLAGE, CONCEALMENT, AND DECOYS".


2

Your question is a bit confusing. What is the proper way to represent in popular press the status of a commissioned officer of the United States Marine Corps. who is not retired, has a continuing service commitment, but is no longer active for duty? This seems to indicate a person who still has a commitment to the Corps, but is not active duty. ...


2

I recall using this word in the Royal Navy in the 1970s — prior to the Falklands Conflict.


2

As in my question, the following dictionary definitions suggest that the term camp follower has devolved into a derogatory term synonymous with prostitution. Webster: a civilian (as a prostitute) who follows a military unit to attend or exploit military personnel Wiktionary offers a fence-sitting definition albeit one leaning towards the derogatory a ...


2

It's slang and has use not just in military. It refers to older style odometers which produced a just audible click when a kilometer or mile distance passed in a car. Nowadays, with silent odometers, it's more common to refer to k's but, if you're talking to someone about their far holiday trip, you might say "So how many klicks did you do?"


2

Squadron is capitalized when used to refer to a number unit. So, in both examples you give the 12th Squadron would be appropriate. If you are referring to squadrons generally (as I have in this sentence) the word is not capitalized. According to the Air Force Journalistic Style Guide squadron Capitalized when used with a number to designate a particular ...


2

According to Wikipedia the difference between Armed Forces and 'military' is the inclusion in the former definition of the paramilitaty forces: The Armed Forces of a country are its government-sponsored defence, fighting forces, and organizations. They exist to further the foreign and domestic policies of their governing body and to defend that ...


2

In everyday parlance donner un coup de main à quelq'un, means 'to give someone a helping hand'. But as regards the military term coup de main there really is no equivalent English expression. The fact that the term is used so frequently in English testifies to the absence of an equivalent, a bit like it's near namesake coup d'etat At the start of the D-Day ...


2

Hit and run may suit what you describe. It's generally used of drivers who have an accident and leave the scene quickly before they can be held accountable: hit-and-run denoting a person who causes accidental or wilful damage and escapes before being discovered, or damage caused in this way: he was struck by a hit-and-run driver [ODO] As ODO ...


2

These "glyphs" are called kill markings. I couldn't find a good definition anywhere, but I did find numerous references on Google. The most source worthy is a captioned photo of a 1942 fighter plane. This post from an aviation forum discusses whether or not "kill markings" were seen on WWI fighter planes. In my research, I also found some reference to ...


2

I was very interested to read above that there's a strong Falklands link to this word. I lived in Stanley, FI (as a civilian) from 2003-2007. Since returning to the UK I've used the word without thinking about it. Twice recently I've had people ask me what it means/where it comes from. I was surprised, because I had thought it was universal, but on ...


1

You need the other definition of gauntlet: (in phrase run the gauntlet) 1 Go through an intimidating or dangerous crowd or experience in order to reach a goal: she had to run the gauntlet of male autograph seekers 2 historical Undergo the military punishment of receiving blows while running between two rows of men with sticks. From ...


1

You are using an unrelated meaning of gantelet from Old French gantelet (“gauntlet worn by a knight in armor, a token of one's personality or person, and symbolizing a challenge”), diminutive of gant (“glove”). Here it means "a simultaneous attack from two or more sides", originally gantlope, from Swedish gatlopp (“passageway”), from Old Swedish gata ...


1

Like some others here, I'd use coup de main in English. I'll point out that my French is pretty bad, I know the term coup de main as an English-speaker, not as someone who is thinking in French. I would also say, corps, sortie, rendezvous, coup d'état, aide-de-camp, esprit de corps, matériel along with other words and terms about military matters used in ...


1

The concept of a point man is somewhat related, though it's not a command role so much as physically leading the group, and is more relevant to routine movement than a charge.



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