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32

Terminology will depend on the weapon. A rifle might be plugged, usually by installing a plug in the barrel or chamber. Something larger, like a tank or a warship, might be decommissioned or, colloquially, mothballed (from the practice of preserving woolen clothing with paradichlorobenzene pellets.) Cannon may be converted into quakers, non-firing ...


14

"Safing" covers a lot of territory. I would say "safing for display" to distinguish that from safing-for-transport or safing-for-maintenance. It may be more appropriate for some weapons than others. In the missile business, we installed safing plugs into electrical sockets. Safing: As applied to weapons and ammunition, the changing from a state of ...


13

Disabled weapons is a catch-all term used here in the UK. Unfortunately as a pair of words it's more common in other senses but a search for '"disabled weapons" legal' will return hits such as this Australian example. Unlike safing a weapon, disabling it is intended to be permanent, though reactivated weapons are a notable source of funds for criminals. As ...


12

Deactivation is the legal term in the UK which is applied to the approved methods that can be used to render a firearm inert in a way that prevents it being converted back into a live firing weapon. You even get a certificate to go with your deactivated firearm. If it's a tank or something similar, the term is only applied to the gun in it, not the whole ...


12

You might think this word applied only to territory, but demilitarize does in fact appear to be the word that the Department of Defense of the United States uses for this purpose. From a presentation by the US Defense Logistics Agency: To Demilitarize or DEMIL a piece of property means to remove its offensive and defensive capabilities. From US Army ...


11

The OED defines it as ‘a man or woman who follows or hangs on to a camp or army, without being in military service.’ Camp followers are thus not necessarily prostitutes, but this citation form 1876 suggests they might be: Those unfortunates who are known under the euphemistic appellation of ‘camp followers’. However, as FumbleFingers has shown, the term ...


9

Blackguard rating is not an official term; rather, Nightingale is describing her encounter with Barry as the most scurrilous scolding she had received in her life. Etymonline has blackguard, a somewhat dated term, originating 1530s, scullion, kitchen knave. Perhaps once an actual military or guard unit; more likely originally a mock-military reference ...


8

This is typically known as a baton in English (we imported the word from French). From Wikipedia's article on the martial baton: The ceremonial baton is a short, thick stick-like object, typically in wood or metal, that is traditionally the sign of a field marshal or a similar very high-ranking military officer, and carried as a piece of their uniform. ...


8

Consider, incapacitate To make unable or unfit; esp., to make incapable of normal activity; disable. YourDictionary neutralize To render safe mines, bombs, missiles, and boobytraps. Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms


7

Klinger is striving for a Section 8 because being booted out of the Army for any reason is still preferable in his mind to the alternative of getting shot and killed in Korea. "Bucking for" is not solely a negative expression. A young person could be working very hard to get straight A's and could be said to be "bucking for" straight A's on his/her ...


6

Actually Etymonline suggests that the first use dates back to 1917 and is referred to trucks loads while its military application was later, around 1936. Payload (n.) also pay-load, 1917, from pay + load (n.). Originally the part of a truck's (later an aircraft's) load from which revenue is derived (passengers, cargo, mail); figurative sense of ...


6

From wikipedia: Leading zeros are always written out and are required to be spoken, so 5:43 a.m. is spoken "zero five forty-three" (casually) or "zero five four three" (military radio), as opposed to "five forty-three". From a military forum: Written: 0001 (1201AM) Verbalized: Zero oh oh One Hours (or Zero Zero Zero One Hours)


6

The British military term is undoubtedly coup de main, usually though not universally italicised as a formerly foreign term. The Wikipedia article on the Battle of Arnhem (chosen pretty much at random from dozens of examples) has "a troop of Reconnaissance jeeps from the 1st Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron, under Major Frederick Gough on Leopard who would ...


6

I was in the military, but not Viet-Nam era. From my own judgment, I don't think it has anything to do with odometers. I think it's a dark humor reference. When sighting in an M-16, the sights are adjusted in clicks. Looking downrange at a calibrated 100 yard target, one click moves the projectile/impact one inch across the face of the target. ...


5

A rating is a “sharp scolding or rebuke.” A blackguard /ˈblæɡɚd/ is a scoundrel, especially one who uses foul language. (There's even a verb form of blackguard meaning “to ridicule or denounce with abusive language.”) A blackguard rating is therefore an extremely abusive and probably foul-mouthed scolding. Nightingale is saying that she has suffered many ...


5

General can be used as a generic title for anyone in the Army of rank O-7 or above. In the cases of 1-, 2-, and 3-star generals, their formal titles are Brigadier, Major, and Lieutenant General, but just plain General can be used, particularly verbally. "We need to clean up around here; General Parker is paying us a visit this afternoon" is a legitimate way ...


5

You didn't say which army, and in the British Army things are slightly different from the rules J.R. gives for the US Army. The NATO equivalent to US Army O-7 is OF-6, one-star general; the British Army equivalent to this rank is Brigadier, and While the corresponding rank of brigadier general in many other nations is a general officer rank, the ...


5

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


4

From The First Saint Omnibus: An Anthology of Saintly Adventures (1939), page 269: But the Duchess starts bimbling And wambling and wimbling And threatens to wallop his ducal behind; Such a lovely phrase.


4

If your audience is historians or laymen modestly read in history, it need not be translated; the French phrase itself is in wide use in the literature, and is sufficiently Anglicized that it need not be italicized. Wikipedia suggests sucker punch, which is apt but emphatically colloquial—it will be read with quotes around it, whether or not you ...


4

I believe that a/the military term is called "skylining." b. Bounding Element. Maneuver is inherently dangerous. Enemy weapons, unknown terrain, and other operational factors all increase the danger. When maneuvering, the platoon leader considers the following. (1) The bounding element must take full advantage of whatever cover and ...


4

It depends on your perspective: RAINA (eagerly turning to him, as all her enthusiasm and her dream of glory rush back on her). Did you see the great cavalry charge? Oh, tell me about it. Describe it to me. MAN. You never saw a cavalry charge, did you? RAINA. How could I? MAN. Ah, perhaps not—of course. Well, it's a funny sight. It's like slinging a ...


4

WIA (Wounded in action) or Medical casualty is as far as I get.


4

The closest I can think is spiking a gun. Initially the term was used for sabotaging a gun barrel so it can't be easily used by an enemy. It still generally looks the same on the outside, but it can't be actually used to fire without a lot of work removing the spike. Displayed military hardware typically has a more thorough version of the same operation ...


4

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


3

These "glyphs" are called kill markings. I couldn't find a good definition anywhere, but I did find numerous references on Google. The most source worthy is a captioned photo of a 1942 fighter plane. This post from an aviation forum discusses whether or not "kill markings" were seen on WWI fighter planes. In my research, I also found some reference to ...


3

As in my question, the following dictionary definitions suggest that the term camp follower has devolved into a derogatory term synonymous with prostitution. Webster: a civilian (as a prostitute) who follows a military unit to attend or exploit military personnel Wiktionary offers a fence-sitting definition albeit one leaning towards the derogatory a ...


3

The expression currently has two clusters of meaning--literal and metaphorical. Your search has focussed on the literal meanings related to military encampments. In that sense, the term has been applied to both the families of the soldiers and commercial associates. The distinction between the two is not sharp: the widow of a fallen soldier far from home ...


3

I was very interested to read above that there's a strong Falklands link to this word. I lived in Stanley, FI (as a civilian) from 2003-2007. Since returning to the UK I've used the word without thinking about it. Twice recently I've had people ask me what it means/where it comes from. I was surprised, because I had thought it was universal, but on ...



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