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Archetypal Moorland What are Moorlands ? Moorland is the name given to areas usually dominated by shrubs such as Bell Heather, Ling and Gorse or various rough grasses and sedges. On Exmoor Moorlands include upland heath type habitats as well as the often wetter and more peaty mires. They usually occur on the poorer, peaty soils on the higher parts ...


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Praise from Caesar means praise on an action from the top person in that field. Michael Jordan praising your basketball technique. Albert Einstein praising your scientific ability Pavarotti praise singing Etc Etc


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As an adjunct to the very good answer submitted by ScotM, I'm going to focus on the question "when did the connection [of drones] to menial (especially) or routine and boring work arise?" To gauge of actual usage, I will rely on the definitions provided by dictionaries through the years. This is an inexact measure, obviously, because dictionaries typically ...


0

I'm going to do my best to try and answer this question in such a way that you'll be able to make some sense out of this, and then apply these guidelines in the future. The first sentence is an example of the so-called second conditional If you were a king, what'd your wife be called? Rightly so, edyta—the OP—said this is an impossible situation. The ...


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A moorland farmer farms the moorland! Moorland is a large region: noun [MASS NOUN] (also moorlands) chiefly British An extensive area of moor: A moor is a specific kind of land: noun chiefly British 1 A tract of open uncultivated upland, typically covered with heather: Because it is hilly it is not easy to cultivate, but it is ...


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It is an traditions expression used to refer to farmers who usually rear sheep and cattle in the uplands. It is often referred to as hill farming. Farming on moorlands brings its own rewards – and problems! The land is less fertile than in lowland areas and the weather can be harsh. Moorland farmers often have to adapt their farming methods and ...


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I would say one that wasn't mentioned would be Social Engineer It is mostly used in the field of cyber-security but it can be used outside of that. It's a bit hard to find a relevant definition for this but in short it is someone who will manipulate others with a specific goal in mind.


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The difference between the second and third conditional is not whether it is possible or not, but whether it's set in the present or the past. If you were a flying unicorn, what color would you be? Second conditional because it's set in the present, even though it's completely impossible. If William Quantrill had buried a quarter of a million ...


2

Both have negative connotations: mor‧al‧ize also moralise British English [intransitive] to tell other people your ideas about right and wrong behaviour, especially when they have not asked for your opinion [= preach]: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/moralize And I am sure the above isn't only BrE, but also AmE. Now ...


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"If you were a king, what'd your wife be called?" [present time "If you had been a king, what your wife would have been called?" [past time


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"If you had been a king, what your wife would have been called?" has the sense of referring to a [specific] time that occurred in the listener's past, which makes it completely impossible -- because we cannot change the past. "If you were a king, what'd your wife be called?" asks a hypothetical question about a situation that, while unlikely, could still ...


4

The simple expression I am humbled is full of emotional, relational, and cultural complexity with ancient connotations. To some extent, saying I am humbled is tantamount to saying I am in touch with my humanity, because the English words humble and human seem to share the same Latin root humus: human mid-15c., humain, humaigne, from Old French ...


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Technically, that could be a psychopath. Psychology Today: The psychopath can appear normal, even charming. Underneath, they lack conscience and empathy, making them manipulative, volatile and often (but by no means always) criminal. This article illustrates things to a degree: As I wrote in a recent article on Gizmodo (link is external), when ...


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You have a few more in similar context: sycophant: A person who tries to please someone in order to gain a personal advantage


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It is established in common dialect (Scottish - proper English) that a user is someone who uses another person to serve themselves heedlessly. Simply using the word user might be straightforward enough! A word which springs to mind for me, due to my locale, is a skag - also someone who uses another person. Opportunist/parasite/freeloader. Interestingly ...


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The difficulty with the example is that The Hindu leaves some portions of its sentence implicit. The use of "pantheon" would be more clear (but less poetic and metaphoric) by this rewording: On the 125th birth anniversary of Dr. B.R. Ambedkar, on April 14, India still finds itself unable to induct him into the pantheon of all great Indian economists ...


2

A parasite: One who habitually takes advantage of the generosity of others without making any useful return. (AHD) or a sponger: a person who lives off other people by continually taking advantage of their generosity; parasite or scrounger The Free Dictionary


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There's parasite: : a person or thing that takes something from someone or something else and does not do anything to earn it or deserve it source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/parasite Along the same lines are freeloader, sponge, and mooch: freeload: to get or ask for things (such as food, money, or a place to live) from people ...


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This is the same problem that has happened with many actor vs. acted verbs. We have changed the verb into an adjective over time. The original statement would have been I'm amazed and made humble by...


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"opportunist" comes to mind. "one who takes advantage of any opportunity to achieve an end, often with no regard for principles or consequences" TFD Depending on context, you could use: designing (adj) "showing or exercising forethought" TFD manipulating (adj) "controlling or playing upon by artful, unfair, or insidious means especially to ...


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I would suggest leech: a person who clings to another for personal gain, especially without giving anything in return, and usually with the implication or effect of exhausting the other's resources; parasite.


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As a native speaker of American English I've heard this phrase used a lot, usually in contexts where some honored person is making public remarks to an audience after receiving some formal recognition, reward, or even just a big and enthusiastic audience. I believe the quoted dictionary definitions, as observed by the OP and in other answers, do not really ...


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The dominant usage of the phrase has negative connotations; you would have great difficulty convincing someone that it was a compliment. If you want "upright", you might be looking to integrate the straight and narrow.


5

Use focused for a positive touch, if that's what you mean.


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Use the present-perfect (have completed) only when the action has bearing upon present circumstances. The present perfect is ungrammatical if the action was completed in the past and has no bearing whatsoever upon present circumstances. For example: When you were ten years old (now you're in your 30s, say) you were in the Boy Scouts and back then you ...


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It depends on context. Present Perfect (have completed) implies a strong connection between the past activity and the present time. If the task was completed long ago, and/or has no special relevance to the time of speaking/writing, use Simple Past. Consider... 1: By dancing naked on the table-top just now you annoyed me. 2: By dancing naked on the ...


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Nope, no difference in meaning. Both refer to a task that has been completed (past tense) owing to the accomplishment of "both" subtasks. That being said, they do sound unnatural, the following may be preferable: You completed both, and the task is done.


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You're totally off. You need (see "usually" and "infiltrated") an antonym for "men of high moral values" and reprobates and rogues are the only ones fitting.


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The hint is "was to blame for the fact". It clearly hints that prohibiting background check has caused infiltration of men who are not "men of high moral values" i.e reprobates and rogues. Sense the antagonism implicit in the sentence, i.e the practice brought good people and banning it brought bad people. gentries and vassals do not mean bad people.


2

It means Stark will [probably] appear again in season 6. compare: will reappear in Season 6 (means exactly that) will not reappear in Season 6 (he might appear later, but not in Season 6) will not reappear until Season 6 (implies, but does not guarantee, that he will appear in Season 6. But it is certain he will not appear before then.) will not ...


-1

Sell the sizzle not the steak means you don't only sell the product but sell the idea behind it.


-1

The term "drop up or down a river" describes manouvering a sailing ship into and out of port when the wind or tide were in the wrong direction, and the sails could not be used in the restricted space. This was done by carrying an anchor away from the ship in a rowing boat, dropping it to he bottom of the river, and hauling on the anchor rope to move the ...


4

Departing ships appear to sink beneath the horizon thanks to the curvature of the Earth. When someone sees that happen depends on how far they are from shore and how high they are above sea level. Kirk is an old Scottish word for church. Churches, with their high steeples, oftentimes were the tallest structures in town. Someone at the top of the steeple ...


0

Quite succinctly, the definition of "accumulate" is "build up in number". The reason your sentence is incorrect is because you have left out the preposition "to" or, if you do not want to use "to", you need to write the sentence in future tense. This leaves you with two options: The banks will begin to accumulate interests on debtors. The banks will ...


13

As the ship sailed further from shore first the church, then the hill, then the highest point of the lighthouse fell out of sight (because of the curve of the earth). Of course, at the same time the ship ceased to be visible from the shore. This is a poetic metaphor, and not to be confused with the modern drop out of sight which means either literally to ...


0

I agree with the previous comments - that "even" can be in either position, but the second will probably sound more correct to the ear. However, I think the most important point is that the sentences around this one are necessary to provide adequate context for the reader/hearer to understand the meaning. Also, the awkwardness arises partly from the ...


0

The first part of the post has already been answered at When should I use "shall" versus "will"? and it's slightly complicated. I shall/you will used to be the standard construction for the future tense of to be, while I will/you shall was used for to express determination or certainty. Both constructions have changed since Austen's time, ...


2

'Will' in the first sentence is a standard usage. 'Shall' in the second sentence is used to convey order, requirement, and determination. Actually we can rephrase it as 'Tell her she must not'. Shall in The Free Dictionary: b. An order, promise, requirement, or determination: You shall leave now. He shall answer for his misdeeds. The ...


1

Today, even in the UK: she shall not ->> she should not [obligation] I shall wear it ->> I will wear it [intention/volition]


1

The pipe in this context is the kind one smokes tobacco in. This just means to empty the bowl of the pipe by knocking it against your shoe or boot (which would normally be leather or some material which protects you from the heat of the pipe if it was recently lit) to loosen the contents and shake them out. This could also be metaphorical but we would need ...


0

Intra-ethnic conflict is a kind of conflict between or among people within the same ethnic group: prefix (Added to adjectives) on the inside; within: ODO


1

They are both correct, but might convey a slightly different meaning, depending on the context. We painted (everything) even the floor. It suggests that you were painting the house already, but you weren't sure whether the floor was part of the deal. You did it anyway, just in case. We worked so hard. We even painted the floor. It also suggests ...


3

You are right that it is archaic. It's a fairly literal translation of Latin1 written by Lactantius, a "pre-Nicene Father of the Church" — he lived c.250–c.325. The translation appears to have been made by Rev Dr William Fletcher, probably in the nineteenth century. The use of permit to take a direct object in that passive-voice sentence is ...


0

I think the OP's friend is absolutely right. What I am reading is that people find it difficult to believe he was directly involved in the building of the entire Ottoman Empire, but it can be safe to say he was directly involved in the ones in Istanbul, except those built near the end of his life. I think that the OP might be struggling with "however", not ...


1

ODO gives, under the definition of an excuse for examples for both excuse for and excuse of, which would imply that they can be used interchangeably. Although I have to agree, Google Books did give over 33,000 hits for sorry excuse for a vs. somewhat less than 2,500 for sorry excuse of a.


3

A view of the corpus indicates that sorry excuse for is more idiomatic. It seems that the corpus from the great island over the sea is more decisive than the one from American English.


6

A small ambiguity of pronunciation set up a dual lyrical standard. Clearly the original song by Ron Angel used the word spinners, as confirmed by colorantshistory.org: I've worked among the spinners I've breathed in the oil and smoke. emphasis mine The spinners clearly referred to machinery operated by employees of British Nylon Spinners (BNS), and ...


2

You could use either slightly or a bit here; there is negligible difference in meaning. However, the use of even is not appropriate. You are contrasting opposites ("younger . . .but in fact . . . older), not comparing magnitude in the same direction , where even would be appropriate ("he was old, but she was even older")


2

To give a further sense of how claptrap was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, I offer these instances as supplements to those given in choster's excellent answer. From a review of "Othello acted by gentlemen and ladies, &C." in The Scots Magazine (March 1751): The gentlemen and ladies who acted, were sumptuously dressed and with great ...


0

Here the core phrase is not "with little to" ; rather it is "with little to no conflict". It means "with little conflict or with no conflict". The original sentence could have been written with better punctuation, for clarity. In other cases, there a Different Phrase "with little to show for it". Eg "I went to the casino and won a lot of money, but I came ...



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