New answers tagged

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Merry isn't a bad word, Depends on how you use it. Be drunk, Sell the weed and merry. If you use merry as above, It hasn't a good meaning "Merry" means "be happy", "be funny". You can find the origin of "Merry" and Why we say Merry Christmas instead Happy. Why Do We Say Merry Christmas?


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Reductive. I see Gary has commented "Reductio ad absurdum" but you could simply use "reductive" since each additional element in your statement reduces its impact. Another example: "The boat sailed" is a strong statement but it is reductive to add "on the sea, which is made of water." "I read the book..... by turning the pages, looking at the printed ...


1

One of the senses of spoof is to imitate something in order to make fun of it. imitate (something) while exaggerating its characteristic features for comic effect. Google "define spoof" a funny and silly piece of writing, music, theatre, etc. that copies the style of an original work: Cambridge dictionary spoof


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Possibly bathos. TVTropes has a category here which seems to be similar.


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In the context you've mentioned, parsing is the process of taking text in a readable format (e.g. the source code you create) and converting that into a less verbose format that other parts of the compilation process can use. It might help to think of it like 'passing' a ball (although this is purely for analogy the words have different roots) - if you ...


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The difference is about what was expected. No1 shows you saw someone having problems, did nothing then felt guilty later. No one is expecting any help to be given The 2nd indicates that you had previously offered or been told to help but not done so. Either the person or a third-party is expecting you to help.


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A tangent to a curve in a certain point of it is the straight line that is most similar to the curve in the proximity of that point. As you move away from the point generally both lines diverge. In Spanish it's usual to say "se fue por la tangente" ie: "he went along the tanget" meaning that he began talking about something but derived to another topic. ...


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Used as an expletive repeatedly by Adam in The Goldbergs television series. His usage supports many of the definitions offered above. As a Brit it makes me chuckle every time he says it as it is such an English expression.


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The word tangentially is derived from Latin tangens, which means touching. In maths, a tangent is a straight line that touches (not intersecting with) a circle or ellipse. The discussion about the costs of living touches the discussion about job in the sense that they have something in common (in NYC, you earn a lot more money, but life is more expensive)....


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If I say "I'm fake/I'm faked", It's equal (Indeed, in this case it is wrong) , But in this case It changes a lot of. "The body was discovered to be faked." This mean that the boy was omitted, It was changed and something like that. "To pretend; Simulate" Example: In a crime the killer have faked the body. "The body was discovered to be a fake." This ...


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Well it's really a difference between a verb and a noun. A fake is an object that is not genuine. Faked is the past participle of to fake, which is to represent something fraudulently as being other than it is. In the example you give, the first sentence is not really grammatically correct. You would say "The body was discovered to have been faked." But ...


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Crenulate is the diminutive of crenate (having rounded, scalloped teeth), and does not refer to the size of the object but rather to the size of the "teeth": if they're small and fine, use crenulate. Both terms are commonly applied to things in the natural world. Crenelated is an architectural term meaning "furnished with crenelations", as in the ...


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If you tie a rope to a weight, sling the rope around over your head in a wide circle, then suddenly let go of the rope, "tangent" mathematically describes the path the weight will take as it flies off. With this image in your head, it's easy to understand the metaphorical use of the word "tangent". The weight goes off in a somewhat unpredictable direction (...


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I really like this question. I see four distinct meanings here instead of two, namely: (1) an act or instance of choosing, (2) a thing that can be chosen, (3) the set of things that can be chosen among, and (4) a thing that has been chosen. In these terms, I think you’re looking for a noun that means 1 but cannot mean 2 and cannot mean 4, and you’re also ...


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It helps to be familiar with Napoleon Hill, one of America's self-help gurus, who had a successful career as an author touting a philosophy and way of life to help people be successful in general and as salesmen in particular. One tenet of his teaching is that to sell a product to a customer, you must first sell yourself as a sincere and trustworthy person. ...


1

It seems that the kernel of this question is about the use of "America." Even though "North America" and "South America" name continents, "The Americas" refers to them both, and "The States" is how the US is often referred to in, say, Europe, most citizens of the US refer to their own country as "America." Since the term was developed in the US by US ...


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It means the most recent previous June. For an unambiguous example see the 3 January 1874 The Church of England Magazine at page 15: I gave an account last June* of the happy death of one of my little Sunday-school children... *See "Church of England Magazine" June 30th, 1873. Or more specifically concerning writing "last June" during October, ...


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Tangent does not have conflicting meanings. In the first example you were talking about jobs in NYC, started talking about something that was tangentially related (cost of living), realised that you were going off on that tangent, and took it back to talking about the job. In the second example you were talking about jobs in NYC (I think), started talking ...


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If you say something is the last of something, it can either mean the newest in a series of something, or the only one from multiple things that is remaining. "I liked the last Star Trek film" or "I was the last one to get onto the train" - both place the subject at the end of a sequence. However, "Daniel was the last of the soldiers." could mean either he ...


56

"Tangent" is a math term that's been picked up by the language at large. It describes a straight line that contacts a circle or curve at exactly one point. It doesn't intersect; it makes contact and then keeps going on the same side of it. On the one hand, two subjects that have one point of contact are "tangentially" related. On the other, once you start ...


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May it be an evening star shines down upon you. May it be the shadow's call will fly away. Let's examine the line and try to interpret from the text. "May it be an evening star shines down upon you." The language is poetic "May it be... down upon you" the mood conveyed here is one of beauty. An evening star is a symbol of love, a symbol of hope, of ...


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It's poetry, and therefore it's meaning is subjective. On the face of it, "May it be the shadows call will fly away." is quite ungrammatical and nonsensical. It's called "artistic licence". But, let's have a guess anyway. First of all, this song is from the film(s) The Lord Of The Rings, and so may be referencing story points from the film/books. "May ...


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When we were trying to write songs, a friend of mine once pointed out that if you make lyrics meaningful then people will see the meaning and think, "OK, got that". In other words, they come to the end of the meaning very quickly. And the meaning may not be all that profound in the first place. On the other hand, if the lyrics are vague and not meaningful ...


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As it stands, the sentence is wrong. The inclusion of "that" is the most glaring error, but the reporting of a question is not a question and should be ordered differently. As @deadrat says in comments, English interrogative clauses have a different word order from English declarative clauses, and indirect speech counts as the latter. The principal ...


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The expression actually was a law during the era of the Roman Empire some 2,016 years ago. The law allowed a Roman Solider to recruit help for carrying his heavy pack from any non-Roman. The law required the individual to help for a mile. This law is also mentioned in the Bible in Matthew Chapter 5, verse 41. It states that instead of carrying the pack for a ...


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Off the top of my head: Marked/markèd Deserved/deservèd Banished/banishèd (the latter a Shakespearean word, actually from Romeo and Juliet) Pinched from Wikipedia: Lēad/lĕad Mate/maté Pinched from other answers here but which I agree with: Dogged/doggèd Blessed/blessèd It's most interesting to note how different the meanings are despite the words ...


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Oxford learner's dictionaries cinch something (especially North American English) to fasten something tightly around your waist; to be fastened around somebody’s waist Merriam-Webster verb: to fasten (something, such as a belt or strap) tightly around someone or something So she was saying that the piece of clothing is tightened around your ...


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I am not sure who first phrased it this way, but this saying goes back to before King Solomon, who was King of Israel from 971-931 B.C. While King Solomon authored much of the Book of Proverbs, he collected some from other sources. This saying is based on Proverbs Chapter 23, verses 6-8, which was a collection of proverbs from a group called "the wise." ...


3

Growing up in England over 60 years ago I remember it as 'See it wet, see it dry, hope to die if I tell a lie'. You had to lick your index finger and then wipe it dry on your clothes, showing the results to the listener to make your point. Funnily enough I had just finished the Lord Peter Wimsey story mentioned and came on this site to see if it was still ...


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After translating Homer for 10 years, I've come to believe that winged words connote words of unusual truth, urgency, or import. They usually occur before an action or change of setting, and thus convey the forward motion of the story.


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Q1: What does 'office of call-boy' mean? A: Here, "office" means role or job, and the job was discharged, or performed, by the Belgian police official. A call-boy is a "person in a theater who summons actors when they are due on stage." (See http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/english/call-boy ) This might be similar to the role of production ...


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"clack" is a sound effect, ie a word representing the noise of something. "premature" means that the author would hear the sound more quickly than she was expecting to. Typewriter key levers can be very large, and there's a natural expectation that you have to push them down quite far before something happens (like a piano key, for example). However, ...


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Mathematically: The required words should not be less than 5 The required words should NOT be "<5" The required words should be ">=5" (taking the negation) At least 5 words are required. Hence, the minimum no. of words is 5.


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And thus was the curtain rung down on the first act. The author uses a stage/theatre metaphor to explain that the first part of the story has come to an end. The second act opened only a couple of days later, He continues the use of the state/theatre metaphor to explain that the story he is telling continues… the office of call-boy — to pursue ...


0

Your answer seems to be grammatically correct, but the following sounds better: A solution is hypertonic to a cell if its concentration of nonpenetrating solutes is greater than those within the cell.


4

The word is being used hyperbolically here. Meaning: "How can I make amends?" ref: 'make amends' You can clearly see a relationship between the word penance and the phrase "making amends" if you consider the transitive verb: - Expiate v.tr. To make amends or reparation for; atone for: expiate one's sins by acts of penance. ref: Expiate


0

The OED gives this as one of the many definitions of that: that, pron.: Referring to a preceding n., and equivalent to the with the n. e.g. The proportion..between the load at the maximum and that by which the wheel is stopped. So yes: in your example, that is a pronoun equivalent to "the concentration of nonpenetrating solutes". It is grammatical,...


2

A characteristic of a sycophant is the search for personal returns by flattering influencial people. A lickspittle generally exhibits just a more "servile" attitude. Sycophant:, is a person who tries to win favor from wealthy or influential people by flattering them. Also known as brown-nosers, teacher's pets or suck-ups. Sycophant is from Latin ...


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Yes this is exactly correct. The key distinction is motive. A sycophant is always acting out of personal interest. A lickspittle is simply obsequious.


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It's an assertion that the truth is being told, from what little I've managed to glean just now researching your question. As the first part of a rhyme asserting the truth here (see 246) "See that wet, see that dry. Whack my back if I tell a lie.” and here "See that wet see that dry cross my heart and hope to die!"


2

Done for means "done on [someone's] behalf". If someone was trying to commit suicide, but the police did it for him, it isn't clear how grateful his survivors would be. But since the "for" means the subject is doing what the object wants done, yes, most of the time, the object will experience it as a positive. Off topic, but in British English, "done for" ...


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Positive "do to" You do something to me, something that simply mystifies me. Tell me, why should it be you have the power to hypnotize me? (Cole Porter)


2

Positive do to: "Hot diggity, dog ziggity, boom What you do to me, When you're holding me tight." -Hot Diggity (Dog Ziggity Boom) [1956]


1

You got it right in your title. A word that is not spelled phonetically (that is, a word that's pronounced differently than it's spelled) is commonly called a non-phonetic word. I couldn't find any authorities which use this term, but it's found all over the web. For example, this site defines non-phonetic words as "words that aren't pronounced like we'd ...


6

Inspissated thickened or dried by evaporation Example of usage The poison is obtained by boiling the root in water, until it attains the consistency of an inspissated juice. Narrative Of Capt James Cook Voyages Around the World Inspissated gloom This text was taken from Eurekas and Euphorias: The Oxford book of Scientific Anecdotes, and gives ...


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Inspissated is not only literary, it's actually a medical term as a dictionary tells you MW. Medical Definition of inspissated : thick or thickened in consistency "blocked with inspissated bile" "the inspissated juices of an aloe" However, connected with gloom it seems to be very rare and as you already discovered mainly in description of literary ...


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It is not a common word in any register. In Goodbye to All That Robert Graves tells a story about T.E.Lawrence which illustrates this point: Professor Edgeworth, of All Souls’, avoided conversational English, persistently using words and phrases that one expects to meet only in books. One evening, Lawrence returned from a visit to London, and Edgeworth ...


6

It means to purposefully play slower. This would be a disadvantage to a team that plays quickly, as it interrupts their natural flow and frustrates them. If a game has a high pace, then it's likely that both teams are looking to attack and/or counter-attack quickly, as opposed to patiently gaining ground and concentrating on keeping the ball.


0

Speaking as an native Englishman who lives just outside of London, the use of the term "jam it down their throat" is perfectly fine; "ram it down their throat" or "stuff it down their throat" is used interchangeably. "Cram it down their throat" is perhaps regional; I have certainly never used it in my life or heard it in conversation locally. "Cram it into ...



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