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Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) includes this shepherd-free definition of pastoral: pleasingly peaceful and innocent: IDYLLIC And this one: of or relating to the countryside : not urban And here's the Eleventh Collegiate's relevant definition of idyllic: pleasing or picturesque in natural simplicity Another ...


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Haptics refers to the branch of engineering dealing with tactile human-machine interfaces. Force feedback is a term that originates from control theory where force is used as input for the control system, rather than for instance position. Haptic interfaces are often suitable for force feedback based control systems (because of compliance), which is why ...


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I agree with your concern about "prompted with a dialog". So if you want to do a very nice job with this manual, I would suggest something like A dialog box will come up prompting you for xxx However, people will understand what you put in your draft, and much worse things have appeared in countless user manuals, even those written by native speakers. ...


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Pastoral is also a literary tradition of sentimentally idealizing a rustic, rural existence. (Its origins stretch all the way back to classical antiquity, the Idylls of Theocritus and the Eclogues of Virgil, but bits of it are found in As You Like It, Don Quixote, Milton’s “Lycidas,” and even—mockingly—in the Savoy Operas of ...


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All of the words have different definitions and uses, and contrary to popular opinion, one does not need a degree in accoustical engineering to understand them. A consultation with the oracle, "dictionary" helped me. Based on your context, the words mean: Resonated--to evoke a feeling of shared belief or emotion. Echo--to have a sympathetic response ...


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Aye aye means "I understand and will obey." So it has a different meaning than a simple yes. It conveys more inform


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As someone who has studied the 1848 revolutions in the last ten years I can well understand why the author choose reverberate. There were three principal centres of revolution - Berlin, Vienna and Paris- with a lot of other places becoming involved. Each fed off the other and the revolutionaries in each place gave encouragement to one another. So ...


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Spread I am sure you know, it is like a disease, it grows through infection. The others are all related to sound. First you utter a sound. The sound reaches the innards of something else and are met with recognition. This is resonance. Resonance causes vibrate in the same frequency. This is what it is reverberate. The vibration causes a sound identical to ...


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It's simply a combination of "screaming" (an approximate synonym of "howling") - implying the sound made by a very strong wind, and "darkness" - what you get when the lights go out. The two have been combined into one phrase for literary effect. This provides a contrast to the stillness and/or quiet that is more commonly encountered when it is dark.


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Unfortunately I cannot yet comment, but I can provide a theory related to physics. In physics, some of these words have a completely different meaning, even though all related to "passing on" a signal. The meaning of the words may be smoothed in linguistics, but this is how you could distinguish between some of them: Echo relates to a rebound. It is often ...


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To equate means to cause (two or more things) to be the same in quantity or value. Whereas, to identify means to find or to spot example: We cannot equate two words with different meaning Now we have identified the difference between these two words


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To me it means Not having wild fun but rather like in Kanye's refrain "hold me back I'm about to spaz." Both of their phraseology e's mean the same thing.


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It seems straightforward enough. Part of their function is to keep a register of individuals 'Barred' from specific professions or roles (for example sex offenders, via court rulings). They also offer the 'Disclosure' of that sensitive information to those who have good reason to see it, for example potential employers.


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"Keen" in this usage means sharp. So figuratively, your sense of awareness is a particularly discerning instrument, as a sharp knife is particularly good cutting instrument. This is a compliment to your mental abilities.


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A word can be considered a real word even if it's not in an established dictionary. Many words that have yet to appear in dictionaries are widely understood, and could be added over time - if their usage continues. Others fall away over time, but during their peak, they would have been just as real as standard dictionary words. Merriam-Webster's Help ...


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In the 1990s the preferred umbrella term used by and about people who weren't in alignment with their birth gender was "transgendered." (OP) Observe that your first claim is not supported by available textual evidence from a source you later cite yourself: Google books Ngram Viewer. The ngram comparing the frequency of occurrence of 'transgender' and ...


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It's difficult to understand what you're trying to say. The best way to write your sentence is this: The man's face was in the shade when his big, kind hands lifted me up and held me. The arrangement of adjectives is correct, however you missed a few things: A shade doesn't make sense because shade by itself doesn't refer to a specific part of shade, ...


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About the etymology, according to Etymonline: missive (n.) mid-15c., "commandment," noun use of adjective (mid-15c.) meaning "sent by superior authority," from Medieval Latin missivus "for sending, sent," especially in littera missiva "letters sent," from Latin missus, past participle of mittere "to send" (see mission). If we take a look ...


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Bernie is referencing the music industry execs. The entire album is a concept album regarding the struggles he and Elton endured during their early years.


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"When going to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants." "When I went to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants." Speaking as a native British speaker, I instinctively see the difference as follows. When going to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants. ---> When travelling to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants. ...


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A computer prompt is a signal that the running program requires user input. Probably from a combination of the meanings "to cause to act": Runaway inflation prompted the government to impose price controls and "supply a cue to continue" "Or not to be" he prompted the forgetful actor. The google finds numerous uses of "prompted with," "prompted ...


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The etymological meaning of ‘but’ is ‘outside’; whence ‘except’. The instances you cite are elliptic for ‘not but’, or ‘naught but’, that is, ‘only’. O.E.D.: a. By the omission of the negative accompanying the preceding verb (see C. 4a), but passes into the adverbial sense of: Nought but, no more than, only, merely. (Thus the earlier ‘he nis but a ...


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In the US, a "watchdog agency" is an official arm of the government that protects citizens from the overreach by other parts of the government or by private organizations regulated by the government. An example of the former is the General Accountability Office (GAO), which audits executive agencies to make sure that appropriated monies are spent properly. ...


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In Britain it is quite normal and everyday to refer to a local or central- government supervisory body, informally, as a watchdog. In this BBC report you will see that the Independent Police Complaints Commission is referred to as The Police Watchdog.


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I think it is an appropriate definition, according to Collins Dictionary a watchdog is: a person or group of persons that acts as a protector or guardian against inefficiency, illegal practices, etc. (as modifier): a watchdog committee. The Cambridge Dictionary provides the following definitions: Government watchdog: UK a ...


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Being jealous and being envious are two quite different things, yet in common parlance, many people use jealous to mean envious. It's too bad. I hope the English language does not lose this valuable distinction just because of this frequently heard sloppy usage. For jealous, Merriam-Webster gives: "1.a intolerant of rivalry or unfaithfulness; 1.b disposed ...


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Number of people. If it's a taxi service, you could say Number of passengers. If it's a restaurant, you could say Number of diners. Etc.


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I would structure the sentence, "Committee members are entitled to receive adequate attendance wage which will be paid by the Ministry of Commerce and Industry" to instead say (as noted), "Committee members are entitled to receive a commensurate honorarium which will be paid by the Ministry of Commerce and Industry."


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Remuneration It can refer to a regular wage or salary as well as (irregular) ad-hoc payments, but I've often seen it used in the context of attendance fees.


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I think files are generally corrupted. You could probably say corrupt, and everyone will get what you mean, but I'm pretty sure corrupted is correct.


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I would suggest honorarium: a payment in recognition of acts or professional services for which custom or propriety forbids a price to be set. (from dictionary.com) It is paid as as a favour, making it distinct from a wage or fee for service of a more commercial arrangement.


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I agree with you that the phrase seems redundant but technically, it is grammatically correct. A large group of crowds A large group of [plural-noun] A large group of marbles A large group of buildings A large group of trees A large group of sheep As you can see, any plural noun is acceptable instead of crowds. Since crowds is ...


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StoneyB is right about the origin of the phrase "on the curve." It comes from assigning letter grades ABCDF based on the (assumed) normal distribution of students' numerical scores instead of on a linear scale of A=90-100, B=80-90, C=70-80, etc. It has come to mean adjusting the grading to boost lower scores that would have been failing under a linear ...


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There are more complex answers here that are correct, but to simplify the answer, one may note that a "bet," is a prediction. When something is off, idiomatically, it is -not- "unpowered," which is literal, but it is no longer valid. The idiom is actually two idioms put together, "to bet," and "its off." e.g. "I bet it will rain," and "the wedding is off." ...


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One - Ogden Nash, master of letters as he was, was being clever & deliberately rhyming insouciance with nuisance (nouciance). Two - I've personally battled with split differentials re insouciance and nonchalance myself in a couple of my books (this name is one of my many pseudonyms) and I found that using nonchalance best described ambivalence in ...


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You'd better to use such style : Booked : __ times.


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Semi-related as well is the use of "boss" as way to indicate mastery. As a low-hanging fruit, consider show "Cake Boss". It has nothing to do with literally being a manager of cakes (although I suppose the people in the show do that too after a fashion), but instead it means the 'stars' of Cake Boss have mastered the ins and outs of baking cakes.


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I could see it as a pun. The boss being a way might imply that the boss, rather than saying no to goofing off at work, is easy to convince and thus becomes a way of legitimizing, shall we say, a work slow down. That said, this is just a guess and my first intuition is that it's incorrect usage or a typo.


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Kinesthesia (the sense of body movement) and proprioception (the sense of body position) are senses that give us the recognition of where we are and where we are going. This involves balance, recognition of muscle tension, the estimates of the magnitude and direction of forces on the body, etc. It turns out that these so-called senses rely on feedback from ...


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The U.S. Army Field Manual FM 7-21.13 Section 4.18 states: 4-18. A soldier addressing a higher ranking officer uses the word sir or ma’am in the same manner as a polite civilian speaking with a person to whom he wishes to show respect. In the military service, the matter of who says sir or ma’am to whom is clearly defined; in civilian life it is ...


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Dictionary discussions of 'assumption' and 'presumption' I found several treatments of these two words in different reference works. Although some of the discussions are clearer than others, they all generally agree that a presumption is more grounded in observed probability than an assumption is. The most concise discussion appears in Bryan Garner, ...


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I believe the intent is (1) and (3). If (1) and (2) were intended, the more normal way to express it would be with or, not and. Do not declare this callback function with a void return type or cast the function pointer to LPTHREAD_START_ROUTINE when creating the thread. I don't know if there's a logical reason for it, but not usually distributes over ...


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The whole sentence is a comparison statement. Maskull traveled a long way, and the mountains he saw appeared to not move at all as he approached them. In this sentence, the word as is used to compare two things: what the mountains looked like at the beginning of his voyage and what they looked like at the end. If you were to extend the sentence for easier ...


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the root of the words is 'sume' which is to take or use. The pre and as are the prefix to that root. per means 'before and as is ad which it 'towards' Thus the two word are time dependent. One has history and one has future. presumption is guess based on knowledge whereas assumption is to pull it out of you hindquarters.


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The key issue here involves the word them, which appears in the highlighted sentence in multiple editions of A Voyage to Arcturus. I think this word is a typo—and at least one edition of the book agrees with me. From David Lindsay, A Voyage to Arcturus (1963): Maskull gazed at the fantastically piled rock all around them. "I saw these rocks from ...


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I see the difference as: You wouldn't be spending it for fun : process, activity ("You will be doing the thing.") You wouldn't spend it for fun : result, fact ("Eventually you will do it." / "You will have done it.") However, both I guess could be used interchangeably, and the real difference is only the tone, in which the first sentence sounds a ...


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I'm assuming you're asking about these two separate scenarios: The wife tells the husband: "You wouldn't be spending it for fun." The Wife tells the husband: "You wouldn't spend it for fun." In both cases, assuming that they're both supposed to be statements, not questions, the only real difference is the tone in which the wife is speaking to ...


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You wouldn't spend that for fun: It's not your habit to spend that for fun. It does not indicate that you are currently spending something. You wouldn't be spending that for fun: You are currently spending it, and I say that it is okay, I know that you wouldn't be spending that for fun. In general: Something that does not end in -ing generally describes ...


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Women, it has been said, are notorious for being chatterboxes, social gossipy creatures. Many claim, usually it's men, that women spend far too much time talking to friends or family on the phone or at parties and social gatherings. In contrast, men tend to be more quiet at home, and traditionally, men only speak when something important has to be said. ...



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