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Can you provide not just general contex, but like a transcript of the actual discussion, or a link to a listening assignment? Although one interpretation may be prone to being "more correct" if not "the correct", in spoken language, people often change what they want to say in mid-utterance and end up with a potpourri of grammar whose meaning can't really be ...


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Speaking personally, and without more context, I'd argue you're both right. The critic might have been actively seeking the ambiguity, too: it was both the freshest in years and for years.


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I have to somewhat disagree with sojourner about the connotations of "insider hiring". There are two schools of thought about insider hiring. The first is that, by hiring (effectively promoting) from within an organization, the position is filled by a known quantity, who is familiar with the values and standards of the organization. In this context, insider ...


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I believe the article answer it: it's to fill open positions from inside the civil service itself than hiring outside people (not already working for the government sector).And it does not have any negative connotations--- it's not like insider trading. " One reason is that the government prefers to fill open positions from inside. The collective bargaining ...


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An oath works untill death a vow is a solemn promise


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They are two different terms with different, though related, etymology. Flammable is the more recent and also the more common of the two: (Etymonline) inflammable early 15c., in medicine, "liable to inflammation," from Middle French inflammable and directly from Medieval Latin inflammabilis, from Latin inflammare (see inflame). As "able to be set ...


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"New media art" New media art is a genre that encompasses artworks created with new media technologies, including digital art, computer graphics, computer animation, virtual art, Internet art, interactive art, video games, computer robotics, 3d printing, and art as biotechnology. The term differentiates itself by its resulting cultural objects and social ...


1

Evolution in a term used to refer to the developments of art though centuries: The evolution of visual art: Art is created and enjoyed by many people for many reasons. However, one of the things that art does is extend and expand our shared common visual language. When new visual ideas are first introduced by the artist, they are often seen as ...


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When used in the sense "I freaked her out", I can only see it having the "distressed" meaning only. But "She freaked out on me" does have a sense of being angry. It still carries the "upset" meaning in the definition, but the line between upset and angry here feels thinner. It doesn't mean "acted in an unusual way" although that is true. I think there's ...


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you really freaked me out when you abused your father, 'freak out ' here means : you really stunned me


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I will be comfortable using responsive; (adjective): 1. reacting quickly and positively. "a flexible service that is responsive to changing social and economic patterns." Synonyms: quick to react to, reactive to, receptive to, open to suggestions about, amenable to, flexible to, sensitive to, sympathetic to. Aware of, "several consumers said the ...


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The words evolution and innovation can also describe artistic development and breakthroughs.Thus proper phrases in this case are artistic breakthrough or artistic development. The proper word may be just the word development; a developed or advanced state or form: " drama reached its highest development in the plays of Shakespeare."


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A simple google search of “stoked about” yields about four times more hits than either “stoked on” or “stoked to.” This matches my expectation, because I don’t recall ever hearing someone use “stoked on” or “stoked to.”


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Reference-book definitions of 'conversely' Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines the noun converse and the adjective converse as follows: converse n (1570): something reversed in order, relation, or action: as a : a theorem formed by interchanging the hypothesis and conclusion b : a proposition obtained by interchanging of the ...


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The sentence is correctly punctuated. To expand, since "romance of English society" makes little sense, the intent of the author is reasonably clear. The sentence could be rewritten so it is easier to read, but not such that it would be clearer to a native speaker.


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You probably won't find it in many if any dictionaries, but I'd have thought the meaning is pretty obvious (to levelise/levelize = to make level). Also note this from the full OED... levelization, noun. ‘The act of levelling or reducing to equality’. First recorded 1860 Gentleman's Magazine. cited in Worcester. In context it's actually a ...


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According to the Wikipedia article on Cost of Electricity by Source, Levelized Energy Cost is the price at which electricity must be generated from a specific source to break even over the lifetime of the project. It is an economic assessment of the cost of the energy-generating system including all the costs over its lifetime: initial investment, ...


2

The difference between "whatever path you are on" and "whatever path you happen to be on" is that the second implies a certain degree of chance or randomness -- ie, it's acknowledging that the "path" you're on might be the wrong one. "Whatever path you are on" of course doesn't deny that you could be on the wrong path, but it doesn't call it into question ...


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Take Whatever path you are on, and replace are by happen to be. Does that help?


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A letter can be notarized, a procedure in which an authorized person certifies the authenticity of a document. The definition at Vocabulary.com explains it well: You usually have someone notarize your contract when you lease a car. In other words, she'll put a special, official stamp next to your signature and her own — certifying that you are in fact ...


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"The Conscience of the Court" is a short story originally published in The Saturday Evening Post on March 18, 1950. It is set in Jacksonville, Florida, at the trial of fictional character named Laura Lee Kimble, an uneducated black woman from Savannah, Georgia, now living with her (temporarily absent) employer in Jacksonville. Here is the relevant excerpt: ...


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""account for" can mean "take into account", which is a synonym for "consider". So yes the sentence id correct. However, it might be more accurate to say "allow for" rather than "account for".


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Non-repudiable exists, in generic/ broader legal usage corresponding to non-repudiation. non-repudiation (Wikipedia) Non-repudiation refers to a state of affairs where the purported maker of a statement will not be able to successfully challenge the validity of the statement or contract. See also: non-repudiable (ContentCreationWiki) ...


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Another possibility is schemer. That is one who schemes, used in the general descriptive sense.


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Trickster In, When Br'er Rabbit Meets Coyote, the argument is posited that the Br'er Rabbit stories were derived from a mixture of African and Native American mythology, thus attributing part of the credit for the formation of the tales and wiles of Br'er Rabbit to "Indian captivity narratives" and the rabbit trickster found in Cherokee mythology. ...


0

I believe this is either a typo or a case of incorrect usage. Perhaps the person who wrote this wanted to say "We do not believe in overstraining the team beyond its capacity."


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The definition of it is someone who will use anything to get attention. These people are usually on the internet, as you will never see someone doing lots of stupid things for attention in real life and only do it on social media for likes/follows. They usually act like someone they aren't, simply because they want people to like them over the internet.


4

Best is a valid verb. It's usage in the given sentence is also valid. From the google definition verb, informal outwit or get the better of (someone).


-1

May be it is a typo? Since a and s are side by side in keyboard layout.


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The term "gray" is sometimes used to refer to old people. From Wiktionary: Relating to older people. This is because some people's hair goes from being black to gray as they get older. One example of this is grey nomads being used to describe retired people travelling from place to place in Australia. The term "tsunami" is used metaphorically. ...


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Same: "Justin wore the same shirt that Alice did" implies that Justin wore the exact thing that ALice wore, not just a shirt that looked like the one Alice had worn. There is just one shirt under consideration here. Typical: characteristic (adj.) "Justin wore a shirt that typically Alice wears" implies that Justin wore a shirt that was the kind of shirt ...


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The main meaning is "[past tense of verb] up". So you take "chef", turn it into a verb, make it past tense (cheffed), and add "up" and you get "cheffed up". That means that someone has done chef-style stuff to the ramen. However, and this is pure speculation, there could be a pun involved. Eff is a euphemistic way of using the word "fuck", based on the ...


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From Wiktionary: (business, politics, transitive) To phase out. It does mean to put something to an end, but not immediately. Just like how a sunset, the end of a day, isn't sudden. And the noun being used here means "the act of sunsetting". These usages are somewhat law-speak or business-speak, which could explain why it's not in the dictionary you ...


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It is a legal term, and it is used to refer to the expiration (an end) to a legal act ( law, provisions etc): Sunset : (Law) The automatic expiration of a statutory provision on a previously established date, in the absence of reauthorization: The law's sunset was July 1. To sunset ( v.int.): To provide for the expiration of (a ...


4

It means "to [plan to] bring something to an end"; I've only noticed it being used in discussions about political acts / laws. "In public policy, a sunset provision or clause is a measure within a statute, regulation or other law that provides that the law shall cease to have effect after a specific date, unless further legislative action is taken to ...


1

Nothing but is an idiomatic phrase that means "only" in the sense of "solitary": Only: Nothing but the best will do. The three words expressed in that phrase: No thing but yield the meaning Only: ADJECTIVE [ATTRIBUTIVE] 1 Alone of its or their kind; single or solitary: Only boys sing in the boys choir. If you substituted only ...


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As another respondent has pointed out, your example does not really work. Nothing but is usually used in the sense of: 'The person in the dock is nothing but a rogue and a scoundrel'.


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The awkwardness of "nothing but" preceding an adjective has already been addressed in other answers. If you are trying to reinforce the following adjective, you might try wholly, completely, or entirely. I'm entirely certain we will win.


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No, this type of phrasing is not in use. You may be thinking of "all but certain". For example, "I'm all but certain we will win" is a fine phrase. It's hard to prove this because of phrases like "Nothing but certain reactions...", but this n-gram comparison provides evidence.


7

Mincing has the connotation of being cut with an instrument with a slicing edge, whereas grinding utilizes friction between two or more points. More about the physical action and tools involved rather than materials; although because of the difference in technique, they have varying effectivness with materials of varying consistency. Both turns of phrase ...


1

All furniture is made by someone - even if it's produced in a factory (possibly in China) by mass production methods. The only furniture NOT produced by someone would be an objet trouve; some suitably shaped piece of rock or timber lugged in to be used as a chair, table or some other article of domestic furniture. Dan Bron is absolutely right: ...


1

The first Google result (other than this question, now) for the string “intergeneric writing” is a Facebook blog post which states the following: What is intergeneric writing? Intergeneric writing is when you combine genres in your narrative. You can incorporate seemingly unrelated genres together to tell the story. The type of genres you choose ...


2

"Intergeneric writing" is a malappropriation of the phrase "inter-genre writing." The latter involves writing in a manner that mixes aspects of multiple genres.


0

"I don't agree with him totally," and "I don't totally agree with him," mean the same thing: "my agreement with him is not total." The speaker agrees, but has doubts. In this case, "I agree with him totally" is the sentiment negated by "don't". "I totally don't agree with him" means "my disagreement with him is total." It is a declaration of complete ...


2

A malapropism is the use of a similar-sounding, but incorrect, word in place of the correct one; the correct word will usually be apparent to a literal person. The common use of the word "literally" for emphasis does not involve such a similar-sounding, but incorrect, doppelganger; hence such usage does not constitute a malapropism.


0

something along the lines of She says, like liberally, music is the air she breathes would be a better example of a malapropism, I agree.


0

Spoon has a connotation which may be undesirable in a business context. spoon verb ​2. [no object] informal , dated (Of two people) behave in an amorous way; kiss and cuddle: I saw them spooning on the beach 2.1 (Of two people) lie close together sideways and front to back, so as to fit together like spoons. [ODO]


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As both Hot Licks and choster say (in comments above), a "hype job" is simply a production, promotion, or other undertaking characterized by hype. The emphasis is on hype, and it is an unusual word. Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) presents five separate entries for hype, and is noncommittal about the word's origin in all but one of ...


0

There is no negative connotation, in general. But you might get better feedback if you can privide more information. For example, nova has no negative connotation in Spanish. But Chevrolet made a mistake marketing a car with that name in Spanish-speaking markets, because no va means no go.


0

The sentence is almost certainly just a typo. It makes very little sense. It's worth noting that in English, there is a real trend to try to write and talk in a "overly complicated" manner. This results in idiocy. The writer, in their confused mind, probably just meant: "We do not believe in overloading the team beyond its capacity." That's a common sort ...



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