New answers tagged

0

What about ebullient, i.e. overflowing with fervor, enthusiasm, or excitement; showing liveness and vivacity; cheerful and full of energy.


0

Here you go: it's a performative and involves giving or handing something to someone or finding something for someone. It indicates something is being pointed to physically or mentally. It accompanies the gesture of giving something to someone: Here [hand moves toward the other person] you go [is the thing]. You might kick a ball to child and say: Here you ...


5

There is type-A personality, restless, ADHD, or just hyper.


0

A crutch makes things easier in the short term. If you use it as little as possible, you'll eventually be able to do the thing without the crutch better than you could with it, but if you overrely on it, you'll never improve and will always need it. A GPS is a good example of a crutch. When I'm in a strange city and don't know my way around, I'll use my GPS ...


0

I think that in the mentiones context , "reading coarse-hand" could mean reading with difficulties and mistakes.


2

The term arose from the military where the victorious side publicly proclaimed that it will not provide quarter (prison) for captured enemy. Which meant that no mercy will be shown and all prisoners will end up being slaughtered. Wikipedia has a more elaborate description of the etymology: The term may originate from an order by the commander of a ...


2

In computing, Legacy implies a different meaning Denoting or relating to software or hardware that has been superseded but is difficult to replace because of its wide use. [ODO] Therefore, the author of the linked blogpost had decided to include even brands that have been replaced by newer brands but still continue to be used widely. I read the ...


2

It means 'made' in this context. Most programs are tedious to write in the bare language, whereas just about any task can be made simple by the use of good libraries. ‌ render verb to cause to be or become; make: to render someone helpless. to do; perform: to render a service. to furnish; provide: to render aid. to exhibit or ...


1

Outlier A peripheral person often with unique ideas as described by Malcolm Gladwell in his book 'The Outlier' The outlier is not an introvert though he could also be one, stays on the fringes of society, has contrary and often remarkable views, and is able to relate to society if he so chooses.


0

it means before a particular period of time has passed, during a particular period of time. I think 'within the next year' is the time during the end of the year 2017.


1

Leaving the validity of these claims aside, greater than 90% accuracy would mean if they made 100 such predictions you should expect more than 90 of them will turn out to be true. Breached within the next year is a time limit on when the predicted breach will occur. It is not referring to gaining this predictive power within the year. If that was true the ...


2

I would interpret this to mean that they're predicting that a company will be breached at some time over the next 12 months (beginning at the point at which this prediction was made), and they're saying that there is a greater than 90% chance that their prediction will come true.


0

Urban Dictionary’s top definition of “mingler” seems close enough to offer as a suggestion: A member of a social atmosphere without a particular group. A mingler simply wanders from group to group. He or she may be friends with jocks as well as nerds, goths as well as preps. The enmity between the groups which he or she befriends themselves do not ...


0

Self-taught ? : Taught by oneself without the aid of formal instruction. Or following Nietzsche : Aristocrat


2

One of a kind - to be very ​unusual and ​special http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/be-one-of-a-kind


1

Freethinker.  a person who forms his or her own opinions about important subjects (such as religion and politics) instead of accepting what other people say. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/freethinker


1

Perhaps a lone wolf, a person who prefers to live, act, or work alone or independent of others.


3

“Eccentric.” There are no introverted connotations, and the person is typically extroverted and social and popular. However, you expect them to have unique tastes, for example in fashion and music.


5

There are some common words mentioned in the comments but there is a word derived from staff which is staffer. It is AmE but might not be that common. [The frequency is band 4 in OED] OED defines as: orig. and chiefly U.S. A member of a staff. a. Of a newspaper or journal: a staff writer. b. More widely, of a business or other organization. ...


3

The word staff used in this sense is already singular. It derives from the idea of support provided by a stick, a staff or stave. It was originally a military term - for a staff of officers: Mil. a. A body of officers appointed to assist a general, or other commanding officer, in the control of an army, brigade, regiment, etc., or in performing ...


3

In this sense, "scale" is part of the phrasal verb, scale down or scale up. To say that something doesn't scale means that it either breaks under the weight of the full-scale organization, or its functionality is reduced to the point that it is no longer reliable or productive. scale up - increase proportionally; "scale up the model" scale down - ...


1

You might want to use the phrase Stir Crazy. This generally refers to someone who's going a bit nutty due to prolonged loneliness or incarceration.


0

Garbage collection is like the process of recycling plastic for example. Once the bottle of pop has been consumed, the plastic bottle it came in is (temporarily) redundant. The garbage collector comes along, picks the bottle up, cleans it and makes a brand new plastic bottle from it. HTH:)


4

Etiquette is following rules that govern behavior- it might be the reason that causes you to behave a certain way. Courtesy is behaving in a way that benefits others- it means thinking of the effect of your behavior. Your manner is how you behave, regardless of the cause or the effect. Definitions from Collins Online Dictionary: Etiquette: the customs ...


0

You wanted it simplified? Between passes of the garbage collector, fragments of free space accumulate. On the next pass of the garbage collector, it consolidates these fragments. Only then does the free space become usable.


0

Memory allocated to program objects which are now out of scope does not become available until that space is reclaimed by periodic garbage collection. The total free memory area is fragmented by these sections of memory which are candidates for garbage collection, but not yet returned to the free area. build up = accumulate, grow in number fragmentation ...


0

"Researched into the design of a Formula 1 car simulator including both the aesthetics and hardware, focusing on improving upon the main competitor’s designs." I am amused. The Japanese missed your designs! Please see the following from Oxford dictionary. The word DESIGNS has dishonest connotations as you shall see from what is given below. Say ......" ...


1

No: in your first two examples, the that– clauses (or more correctly 'content clauses') are complements of the verbs "knew" and "heard", and in your third example, it’s the subject of the sentence. Content clauses serve to expand, or complete, the meaning of the item they complement. So in you first example, the clause explains what it was that you knew was ...


-2

Those answers are all great, but there is another definition promoted by a book called "The Circle." Notice the Google logo is 3/4 or a circle. Per the book, closing the circle means Google obtaining all the personal information about everyone on earth and monitoring everyone too. It reality, they aren't too far from it.


0

"Every time a friend succeeds, I die a little." - Gore Vidal I think the above quote embodies the feeling the original poster was trying to capture. To say you don't think somebody deserves it isn't quite capturing the malcontent behind the feeling. It is almost based in insecurity and self-loathing. I almost think the only word we have for it is 'hater.' ...


1

The word feedback comes from the act of feeding data of some kind into something that can process it and getting data back in return. The return data is called feedback. The data can be of almost any kind. Behavioral data, which is most likely the original use for the word, is a type of data that can be feedback for example. Learner Feedback or Learner's ...


5

It is advice not to sit around in one locality and speculate (with your unfettered imagination) about the nature of the world, but rather to travel, thus gaining direct knowledge and experiences that establish realistic experiential boundaries on your thinking, i.e. "regulating" or constraining your world view.


0

a. gut-wrenching = distressing; out of your quotes from the review, this is the only figurative adjective that seems wholly appropriate; b. wilderness = set in the wilderness (this is not figurative); c. concerto grosso = literally, 'big concert'; not particularly apt with reference to the concentration on a single character in the Revenant, because it ...


1

It really depends on context. The same sentence could be used to mean both "suggestions that the panel should adopt" or "suggestions the panel has made for adoption by someone else". It does read awkwardly for the second one which would look better as "Several suggestions have been made by the panel for adoption." Was there a particular context you ...


3

The phrase is ambiguous in English. Consider re-wording: "The panel has offered several suggestions for adoption." "Several suggestions have been offered for the panel to adopt."


4

Short answer: yes. Long answer: a public venue would indeed be open to anyone, though it may have hours of operation which restrict when people can go. A private venue could have anything from a guest list you need to be on to armed guards who will shoot you if you don't present an ID card and sign form 18-B in triplicate. The terms of entry to a private ...


0

Perhaps the word 'amenities'? "The neighborhood includes amenities such as a playground and walking trails. a·men·i·ty əˈmenədē/ noun plural noun: amenities a desirable or useful feature or facility of a building or place. "heating is regarded as a basic amenity"


0

You can easily use this list on Wiktionary.org. It requires attribution according to these terms.


3

If you haven't found www.urbandictionary.com yet, that site has very much useful information and it is certainly uncensored. Be aware though that the explanations with the highest ranks are not necessarily the most "correct" ones, people tend to vote for funny/smart definitions.


0

I just googled What is wtf in Internet slang and found internetslang.com, which has an answer as to wtf (What the fuck...?). http://www.internetslang.com/WTF-meaning-definition.asp


0

Think of it this way: Scenario 1: a health care worker in a low-income community may be present to provide care for her catchment population, but the health post in which she is located is difficult to get to because of its rural location (i.e. care is available but not accessible). Scenario 2: The health post is built and visible in the village. However, ...


4

In a word, yes. Long is an adjective used to describe the length of something (duh). In both those examples, it references (in weird ways) the length of time, specifically the length of time that something is true. You can think of it as a logic argument. As long as you live, they will never leave you alone. The condition: said person being alone. If ...


0

The quote says that many people are liars and hypocrites, but mostly they don't know what they're talking about.


0

These categories are specific to the context, but include both individuals and businesses: Taxpayer - not all, but most, fall into this category (tongue-in-cheek). Account (or account-holder)- in the context of another business.


0

According to Austen Saunders in a blog at http://spectator.uk.co, the quotation is from a collection called Timber: or Discoveries; Made Vpon Men and Matter: As they have flow’d out of his daily Readings; or had their refluxe to his peculiar Notion of the Times. The quotation is a peal of cynicism, a blistering condemnation of hypocrisy. Many people ...


1

Many men believe not themselves what they would persuade others Many people try to make other people believe things that they, personally, do not believe. This is called hypocrisy. For example, a politician who says drugs are immoral, while secretly indulging in cocaine. and less do the things which they would impose on others, Even fewer people ...


2

This, I believe comes from "Discoveries". It means: Many people don't really believe the things they tell other people are true; don't do the things they tell others to do, and don't really know the things they boast about knowing.


0

Modern usage: overused plot device leading to cliched/predictable story lines. Some people will differentiate a bad trope from a good (ie a well used archetype), while others times calling a plot device a 'trope' automatically carries a negative connotation. My feeling based on general conversations with friends, is this use for trope has grown particularly ...


4

Being "envious" is not considered positive by English speakers. It means to feel envy and as you know envy is not considered a positive emotion. It has a strong sense of resentment at another's good fortune.


2

Envy has different connotations, ranging from bad to good. At one extreme, one can be "consumed with envy." At the other extreme, envy can be roughly synonymous with admiration or respect: "Her intelligence and radiant personality made her the envy of her classmates." Incidentally, I would take that Seven Deadly Sins site with a grain of salt. For example, ...



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