New answers tagged

0

If an effort is "at best minimally successful," it is very slightly successful if viewed as optimistically as possible. It could be not successful at all or just a little successful.


1

Video sniffing is the process of reading a video feed from outside of the equipment actually carrying the feed. For example, with special equipment you could stand with a laptop under a public CCTV camera, and watch (and record) what the camera is recording, on your laptop: you are "sniffing" that video signal. If you did this you would be "tapping into a ...


-1

"Overrun" and "infested" are essentially synonyms in this case, meaning that they are interchangeable in your example. You can say both Our kitchen is overrun by cockroaches. and Our kitchen is infested with cockroaches. Remember, however, that overrun is usually followed by "by" and not "with" when used passively. I would say though that in ...


0

Going into the project (meaning near the start of it) people had some solutions. They had allegiance to those solutions ( meaning they believed and were attached to them). Mind mapping reduced that level of allegiance.( Presumably this made it easier for agreement to be reached on a single solution).


0

The other inappropriate answer is clearly #2. You put the service person in an uncomfortable situation, since it was a pleasantry, not an inquiry.


3

No, that makes it sound like the concert travelled into the future like in a science-fiction story. You would say "the concert was rescheduled to a later date" (or time if it was moved within the same day) or "the concert was moved to a later date". You don't use "moved ahead in time" in any context other than the science-fiction story.


0

You are of course fully aware that the 'question' is no more than a greeting, not an enquiry to your health. The only appropriate response is something to the effect of "I'm fine thanks". So anything else is inappropriate; for example, "quarter past two" or "go shaft yourself." Hope that helps.


3

The question 'How are you doing?' is a Pleasantry, rather than a genuine request for information, in this instance (ie the question is from a service employee rather than a friend or anyone who has a personal reason for being interested in your well-being). pleasantry : something (such as a greeting) that people say in order to be polite Source: ...


1

In the context of a person speaking, chime means to either interrupt a conversation with an unwanted opinion, or to participate harmoniously in a conversation. Given that the two meanings are polar opposites, it is well to understand it in the general context of the text!


0

In this connection, a failure to maintain absolute integrity would indicate that the employee had failed to obtain prior authorisation for their absence, and in doing so had displayed a lack of honesty or trustworthiness.


5

Officially it is a noun. The word comes from the combination of two Japanese words: “Bon” is a dish or thin bowl (“a modified vessel which has been divided or cut down from a deeper form”). “Sai” is a tree or other growing plant which is planted – “planted,” as would be a halberd or spear or pike stuck into the ground. “Bonsai” thus means or ...


7

Yes, it can be used as a verb and CNN used it that way. Verbification in English is common and the linked Wikipedia article explains there are thousands of them: Examples of verbification in the English language number in the thousands, including some of the most common words such as mail and e-mail, strike, talk, salt, pepper, switch, bed, sleep, ...


8

I'm not familiar with the term. I think it might just be badly written - perhaps they mean "large block capital letters"? I could see how "block" could get mistranslated to "box", since "block" is another word for "rectangle", which in turn could be called a "box". "Block capitals" is a style of writing which just uses clearly written capital letters, ...


2

Just in case if anyone is wondering which one is more popular: (Queuing!)


0

The connotation probably derives from its Latin origin, which referred to showing that something was good, credibile: Prove (v.): late 12c., pruven, proven "to try, test; evaluate; demonstrate," from Old French prover, pruver "show; convince; put to the test" (11c., Modern French prouver), from Latin probare "to make good; esteem, represent as good; ...


2

Children and/or animals who "perform" for attention are often described as "a (little) ham." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ham


0

The author is saying, in effect, that "every day is a new day, with new opportunities." He is speaking of figurative bounds, not literal ones, and wakes up each morning feeling as if he knows no boundaries. In particular, the writer's "domain" includes the animals of the forest, who are most apparent (and seemingly subservient) in the early morning. After ...


1

Context is important, but it's pretty easy to get the gist of it, if not the exact meaning. Fishbowls - for goldfish, anyway - were traditionally round, like a globe, with an opening on the top and a flattened bottom. A circle, if you will. A circle has no beginning or endpoint - it is endless. The goldfish has no place to go; it can be still, but mostly ...


1

I've heard the phrase 'burn the (or a) candle to the quick', but that was long ago and I'm also searching for a reference to it. It means to use something completely up, and I believe the 'quick' is the base part of the candle where the wick is either anchored or begins.


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Michael Quinion, Ologies and Isms: Word Beginnings and Endings (2002) suggests that words taking the suffix -phile can be sorted into a number of subgroups within the philos-related family: -phile Also -phil, -philia, -phily, -philic, and -philous. Lover of or enthusiast for, having an affinity with a given thing. {Greek philos, loving.} Several ...


-1

Whether 'To me' is an adjectival complement is not important. It could be an adverbial usage of a 'prepositional phrase' which indicates the subject who feels excited. You are overthinking the prepositional phrase. You can't judge how other people would feel about an event. In other words, even if you feel excited, others might not feel the same way. The ...


0

Since you would be the one doing the describing, wouldn't it be you who is excited? Another way if of saying it is: "This event excites me."


1

Shakespeare was almost godlike in his capacity to put into English, sentiments that crystallize some recognizable human experience in a novel way. There are two entities who have influenced English more than anything else: One is The King James Bible; the other is William Shakespeare. These two have given us some of our most colorful, and fun, idioms. ...


3

Taking this purely as a language question and not a philosophical one, I would say the answer is no, you can certainly have religious nationalism. "Are Hindu nationalists a danger to other Indians?" Zionism (Hebrew: צִיּוֹנוּת Tsiyyonut IPA: [t͡sijo̞ˈnut] after Zion) is a nationalist and political movement of Jews and Jewish culture that supports ...


2

Crazy literally means "mentally deranged," but in the slang sense it implies some combination of intensity, chaos, confusion and unbelievability --a level of sensory overload that could drive one crazy, or make you feel as if you were already mentally deranged. Used as a modifier, it adds its own connotations to the adjective modified. Crazy busy means ...


0

Dynamic SQL can be downright painful to deal with. Dynamic SQL can be painful is the core sentence: [[SUBJECT Dynamic SQL] [PREDICATE [VERB can be] [COMPLEMENT painful]] The other pieces are adjuncts: In what respect is Dynamic SQL painful? —to deal with: that is, not considered abstractly with respect to its adequacy and power and grammar, ...


1

Focusing on what one is left with after the initial disappointment, your description is almost the exact definition of regret: Regret (n): a feeling of sadness, repentance, or disappointment over something that has happened or been done (especially a loss or missed opportunity). Although, this may not meet your needs, since regret is often used in ...


0

In UNIX everything is considered to be a file. This idea is called paradigm. Abstraction is the way they actully implement this idea. Everything is file is a metaphor, they are not actually all files. For example, a printer is not a file. CREDIT: All credits goes to Baard Kopperud


0

In casual language, facts are often conflated with an implicit argument for an unspoken conclusion. (e.g. "the facts speak for themselves") Calling an individual fact biased is not a description of the fact itself, but is instead referring to the unspoken claim. A collection of facts can be biased. As a simple example, a list of 10 good things about ...


0

Facts are neither intelligent actors nor do they represent any subjective statement or judgment call. Therefore they cannot be biased. A fact is a fact - if you say X is Y - either it's true and anyone should be able to verify (biased or not) to see for themselves that X is indeed Y, or it is not a fact at all in the first place and "unbiased" opponents will ...


3

Can a fact be 'biased'? No. If it's authentically a fact then it is an instance of a truthful event and describing it as biased would be technically incorrect. Can sets of facts be manipulated to represent a biased intention? Absolutely yes. And this is usually the area of expertise of politicians who handle multiple facts, expose the ones that are more ...


0

As others have eluded, the expression describes the difference between winning (eat lunch - enjoy the spoils of success) or losing (be lunch - suffer the consequences of loss) metaphorically.


1

I would suggest that the person claiming that the facts were biased is technically the one who is wrong. A fact cannot be biased. An argument can be biased but that would mean either the facts are misleading, misrepresentative or simply false, never biased. People often call their opinions facts, and in those cases the opinion is almost unilaterally biased ...


3

Let me point out very specifically why you're wrong. A "car" could reasonably be defined as a means of transportation that meets certain other requirements. A "toy car" is not a means of transportation. But there is nothing wrong with talking about a "toy car". The definition of a noun points to the cluster of concepts that noun embodies. Modifying a ...


3

'Biased' facts usually are biased because they have been selected to support one opion. They still are facts and yet the collection can constitute a falsehood as it leaves out many other facts which would support a different opinion; I call this 'lying by omission'. So not so much the individual facts but the collection and filtering process is biased. ...


0

Sleeping with one eye open may be an expression meaning to sleep lightly, aware of what is going on around, but apparently it actually happens: it is a condition known as lagophthalmos. Apparently, some people do sleep with both eyes open.


35

Speaking from a statistical perspective, it is definitely possible to create factual statements that have a bias. It's important to keep in mind the definition here: noun         prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair. I ...


12

I would think the word "biased" should apply to a person, and only one who has some obligation to be neutral. However, a selection of facts can be biased. If you cherry-pick only the best or only the worst aspects of any entity, even if each fact is true in isolation, the impression can be misleading. For example, supporters of Obama like to say, "He ...


0

'Biased facts' is indeed oxymoronic. But many interpretations are biased. It is a fact that "the EU are considering visa-free travel for 1.5 million Turks." But just reporting the bare fact can itself show bias. The implication in the heated EU immigration debate is that they will all exercise that right to migrate. To present the fact with balance, you ...


11

There are facts and there are "facts" - with the latter, the quotes around it can be called 'scare quotes' ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scare_quotes ) - they are a way of saying "so called", ie implying that they are not facts at all. Presenting misinformation or outright lies as "facts" is such a common practise for people (or newspapers etc) trying to ...


3

This is often referred to as a permanent loan A form of loan agreement in which an individual, trust, or company loans artwork or other objects to a museum for an extended period of time. The loan agreement may stipulate that the museum must display the loaned artwork in a specific area of the museum, that the artwork is to be displayed as part ...


0

Not a bad guess. One's take on a subject means how one views that subject. But in this case, you've got the phrasal verb take on, meaning to engage in a dispute. The title means that the artists are fighting with the architects about the nature of buildings. The clue is that it's not OK to remove the apostrophe.


3

I've consulted several different dictionaries, and all say pretty much that both words mean the same thing. At first, I thought that "eternal" may indicate no start or end, while "everlasting" only specifies no end. But that is NOT the case. My Random House Websters College Dictionary (2001) lists "eternal" as a synonym for everlasting. The American ...


4

You could say the punchline was tepid, or one of its many synonymns: (especially of a liquid) only slightly warm; lukewarm. synonyms: lukewarm, warmish, slightly warm; at room temperature "tepid water" showing little enthusiasm. "the applause was tepid" synonyms: unenthusiastic, apathetic, muted, halfhearted, so-so, 'comme ci, ...


0

"we've as much, if not more wildlife than they do" -> we have as much wildlife as they do, maybe even more than they do. With a sentence such a this one, you have to look for the noun that the comparison refers to. To get the meaning, skip the "if not more" which is not immediately relevant to get the meaning of the sentence.


0

There's a couple of problems with "in a home". "in" means "inside" in this context, whereas "at" means "at the location of" - it's a bit more general. The delivery will be to the door of the house, it won't be inside the house, but it will be at the same location. So, "at" is better than "in". The next problem is "at a home". "A home" is too vague - ...


3

No. Although it may adhere to the dictionary definition, so do many other activities such as petting your cat and having a nice relaxing bath and these are not hobbies either. I would argue it isn't a hobby for these reasons: It (reproduction) is one of the 8 life functions and therefore would be biologically considered akin to breathing and eating (...


6

Dictionary.com an activity or interest pursued for pleasure or relaxation and not as a main occupation: Merriam-Webster a small Old World falcon (Falco subbuteo) that is dark blue above and white below with dark streaking on the breast a pursuit outside one's regular occupation engaged in especially for relaxation Cambridge ...


1

Looking into the history of this anecdote, I found that it is recorded (in somewhat different form) in Asa Bartlett, History of the Twelfth Regiment, New Hampshire Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion (1897). Bartlett's source is a letter to the Boston Globe newspaper, dated April 26, 1885, by Thomas Thatcher Graves, who 30 years earlier was aide-de-camp ...


1

You might want to think about comparable words. Does "tally it up" or "hold in place" work better? In your example, both could technically work if you're using "chock" as a replacement for "immovable idea/dogmatic belief" but "chalk" works better because you're outlining the steps of logic you took and tallying - or "chalking" - them up in order to arrive ...



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