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0

One can lose consciousness for several reasons, not only because a traumatic skull injury but also because of any cerebrovascular disease, heart arrhythmias, licit or illicit drug overdose (alcohol included), very low blood pressure, etc. It's a technical term and it may be a serious condition or not. Fainting, on the other hand, is the everyday term and ...


3

Venom, poison, and to a lesser extent toxin are informally used interchangeably, referring to all substances that are harmful to living things. Below I will list what is my understanding of their technical differences; but as English is a living and very lax language, and as the words are used in multiple separate scientific fields, I'm sure there is some ...


3

The two terms ceremonial and cerimonious have the same root "cerinomy" but meaning and usage are different even though they are often incorrectly used as synonyms: “Ceremonial” and “ceremonious” are often considered synonyms, and can indeed be used interchangeably in many contexts. But there are some cases in which one is better than the other. If ...


2

A little bird tells me the word you might be looking for is verbose adjective using or expressed in more words than are needed. "much academic language is obscure and verbose" (Google) It seems to me to fit the requirements. Edit: The birdy has reminded me to mention Tautology (grammar), is an unnecessary repetition of meaning, using multiple ...


0

"art and science, science and art" is a device to avoid giving more importance to one of the two disciplines. There is also a sense in which 'to reconcile' is directional. I might be able to reconcile my science with my art but not vice versa. Example: reconcile •make or show to be compatible. "the agreement had to be reconciled with the city's new ...


1

It is sloppy English. In your context the phrase would be: Do you want to have a hand in this?


3

Possibly you are referring to a neologism. noun a newly coined word or expression. (Google)


0

It has two possible meanings (at least according to Google): a person's inherent qualities of mind and character. "a sweet-natured girl of a placid disposition" "the book is not recommended to readers of a nervous disposition" synonyms: temperament, nature, character, constitution, make-up, grain, humour, temper, mentality, turn of mind; the ...


0

I was finally able to access the Oxford English Dictionary, and Def. #2 is as follows: Wearisome in general; annoying, irksome, troublesome, disagreeable, painful. Obs. exc. dial. This does confirm that this is a known meaning then, but is limited to dialects.


1

I would try to convey the difference like this: If one knows the method for solving a problem, one can apply it to that and equivalent problems, and can communicate that singular method to another. If one understands a method for a problem, one can apply it to similar or perhaps even unrelated problems, further being able to teach the method using multiple ...


-1

"Do you want a hand in this" is not a valid phrase as far as I can tell. "Do you want to lend a hand" or "Could you give me a hand" are commonly in use.


1

This idiom is general in that we can 'take action' or 'take an action'. Most courts, however, have read the specific intent requirement to be satisfied in police excessive force cases if the defendant purposefully took an action which he or she knew or should have known violated the victim's constitutional rights. Police Violence: Understanding and ...


0

In my view key is from French clé/clef and Latin clavis from the verb claudere to close. Clavis was primarily a key to a door. French clé was also used for the parts of a piano that you touch to produce a sound. In analogy used for similar parts of a typewriter. Here "key" is a kind of metaphor for a part that works like a key to a door (for opening and ...


2

The term mumpsimus is used for persistent misuse, including that due to ingrainedness: noun adherence to or persistence in an erroneous use of language, memorization, practice, belief, etc., out of habit or obstinacy ... {ODO}


0

In idiomatic U.S. English, a person who says, while leaving one location, "Maybe I can get a run in" is suggesting the possibility that he or she can find time for a brief run for exercise (what used to be called a jog) before the next item on the person's schedule must be attended to. As that description suggests, the phrase often come up under unplanned ...


2

I have certainly come across this before. When people in town had to go to the pump to get their water, they'd stop and chat. So the "Town Pump" became a centre for the exchange of gossip, rumour and ideas. Rather like the forum in a Roman city. So one might imagine Patrick Wethered to be a key local source of chat, advice, gossip and friendly communication ...


0

"Clientilism" is a social or political system based on patronage. You may check here.


2

Clientelism is a practice which originated in Ancient Rome. "Clientela" was the network of people connected to the persons in power: is the exchange of goods and services for political support, often involving an implicit or explicit quid-pro-quo. It is a political system at the heart of which is an asymmetric relationship between groups of political ...


4

Key meaning (computing) one of several small, usually square buttons on a typewriter or computer keyboard, mostly corresponding to text characters, derives from the keys (mechanisms) of musical instruments according to Etymonline: keyboard: 1819, from key in sense of "mechanism of a musical instrument" + board. Originally of pianos, organs, ...


0

The phrase used where I grew up in Wales, to describe someone having an extraordinary and possibly undeserved piece of luck, was "You jammy Arab!" which might tie in to the answer given by Stateleyhome.


0

"Is this a British variation on the definition that is known in the United Kingdom but that hasn't entered dictionaries yet?" - No. As a native speaker of British English my interpretation of the example given is stating that the lack of open museums is rather dull and implying the available alternatives may not be as interesting. Whether or not that is ...


0

laissez–faire : a philosophy or practice characterized by a usually deliberate abstention from direction or interference especially with individual freedom of choice and action Merriam-Webster


0

Uninhibited: not limited or restricted http://www.macmillandictionary.com/us/dictionary/american/uninhibited The guests at the party were uninhibited and soon naked.


0

The world is filled with possibilities. From Dr. Seuss : "Oh the places you can go!" The sky is the limit.


3

Well, here's Merriam Webster on it: Full Definition of SOVEREIGN [adj] 1 a : superlative in quality b : of the most exalted kind : supreme; sovereign virtue c : having generalized curative powers (a sovereign remedy) d : of an unqualified nature : unmitigated (sovereign contempt) e : having undisputed ascendancy : ...


0

The "one side of the ledger" is the wonderful character of the allegedly designed universe; the other is the flaws we find. Tally the workings of the human body on the first side, and the its inevitable failings (as Jefferson noted) on the other. Citing Jefferson's metaphor, by the way, is a swipe at Palye's watchmaker fallacy. The problem is with the ...


0

In America, this would be understood as: If London adopts it, then I will too. That is to say, if it becomes commonly accepted in London, then I, too, will start doing it. EDIT: Apologies. Admit to, not adopt.


0

I have read also other page.Some of the signs of not having a good day: Feeling Sick,Early Morning Dispute,Bad Mood, Negative Talk,Lack of Politeness, Refraining From Talking. You can find more about it in this article:http://inspower.co/30-signs-that-youre-not-having-a-good-day/


2

Pilot was at first the word for the helmsman of a boat and then transferred to the pilot of an aeroplane. See etymonline.


2

The verb to cop has quite a few meanings, the most basic of which is ‘seize, grab’. The sense relevant here is definition 1.1 (of the verb) as given in the Oxford Dictionaries Online article: Incur (something unwelcome) If you cop something, it is forced on to you, you get it without wanting it. You can cop the blame for something; you can cop a bad ...


2

In British English 'cop it' can mean a few things but one of two of those things is certainly being referred to. From http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/cop: 1.2 (cop it) British Get into trouble: will you cop it from your dad if you get back late? 1.3 (cop it) British Be killed: he almost copped it in a horrific accident London ...


1

It's actually a prepositional verb, formed with the Old English-derived proclitic "a" as in a-hunting we will go. See definition 5.


1

According to http://www.pronunciationtips.com/syllables2.htm, steps and glides describe the nature of pitch changes in a sentence, for example, the falling tone at the end of a declaration. The rule, which I evaluate as a native speaker and it seems entirely plausible, is that at the end of a sentence, the pitch glides downward if the last word is a single ...


-1

Just a guess, but it sounds like your teacher is trying to describe some aspect of how English "flows". "He is quiet and shy" has short step-like syllables while "She is friendly and outgoing" seems to run more smoothly together to my ears (gliding) - but I have no idea how this would be useful except for poetry. I do not recognize the terms ...


1

From an etymological standpoint, verbal means 'pertaining to words' and oral means 'pertaining to the mouth'. The two can have different meanings in some cases (e.g. the other connotations of oral) but overlap in their common usage to mean spoken word. In this meaning, the two are synonymous and used interchangeably, as reflected by Oxford's definition of ...


3

Oral and Verbal: ( grammar.about.com) The adjective oral means pertaining to speech or to the mouth. The adjective verbal means pertaining to words, whether written or spoken (though verbal is sometimes treated as a synonym for oral). Usage notes: Oral communication is speech, conversation. Verbal ability is one's skill with words, ...


0

'Mistake' as a verb can be both transitve and intransitive; or to say it other way round, it is the context that makes the verb either. The problem lies elsewhere. 'If' introduces a condition as a subordinate clause which will be fulfilled in the principal clause ; and the sentence-If I don't mistake......-fails to find that consummation in the principal ...


1

Your answer is different types of medicine. "I hate this medicine." <- The quantity of specific medicine is unknown, but is typically implied to be one medicine with an unknown amount of doses with only this much context. "These medicines can all lead to heart failure." <- Unknown quantity per type, but multiple types. edit: American English ...


2

I can see your problem, Soudabeh, I've spent some time tracking down the meaning I think "constituent" has in this context. I don't know why it took so long. My take is that the constituent customer profiles here are profiles of the customers who are likely to visit the "retail locations" mentioned earlier. In this sense, "constituent" means serving ...


1

You might call that a backhanded compliment: A backhanded compliment, also known as a left-handed compliment or asteism, is an insult that is disguised as a compliment. Sometimes, a backhanded compliment may be inadvertent. However, the term usually connotes an intent to belittle or condescend.


31

It's called litotes In rhetoric, litotes is a figure of speech wherein understatement is used to emphasize a point by stating a negative to further affirm a positive, often incorporating double negatives for effect For example, "She's not bad looking" could be used to express that someone is gorgeous. Or it could convey that she's not particularly ...


3

I would call it a "euphemism", a figure of speech where you substitute a milder word or phrase for one considered to be too harsh or offensive. ("you know, he isn't the smartest person in the world" instead of "he is dumb". A euphemism is a generally innocuous word or expression used in place of one that may be found offensive or suggest something ...


0

Neoplasia and infiltration are definitely not synonyms. Consider the VINDICATES mnemonic for differential diagnosis: Vascular, Infectious, Neoplastic, Degenerative, Idiopathic, Congenital, Autoimmune, Traumatic, Endocrine, PSychiatric Neoplasia refers specifically to tumors. From Merriam-Webster: neo·pla·sia \ˌnē-ə-ˈplā-zh(ē-)ə\ noun 1 :the formation ...


0

A simple and polite way say that in British English is "as I mentioned" or "as I mentioned before".


0

To me, it sounds like an incomplete sentence. If one is thanking someone for something, why not be specific ie. "thanks for having me on your show" or "thanks for having me over for lunch" etc.


0

"to buy" is the normal word, "to purchase" is an elevated variant. I don't think that it is often used in normal everyday language. You don't purchase a Coke or a hamburger. "To purchase" is from Norman-French.


1

It is correct that “If I do not mistake, she would be his fiancée” is ungrammatical. Mistake as a verb is always transitive in normal use in current English; that is, you cannot just mistake—you have you mistake something. In fact, in the vast majority of cases where you use the verb in regular speech, you are talking about mistaking something/someone for ...


0

There really isn't very much difference, and they are almost universally interchangeable.


2

...a study, which so strongly suggests our near kinship with the rest of humanity and points a steady finger toward the great brotherhood of mankind, and by which one is so forcibly impressed with the possible earnestness of life as seen through the teepee door!" Our kinship with the rest of humanity is strongly suggested by the study of Indian ...


2

If you're willing to use an eponym, consider referring to the person as "a Sisyphus." Here is the entry for Sisyphus in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): Sisyphus (14c) : a legendary king of Corinth condemned eternally to repeat the cycle of rolling a heavy rock up a hill in Hades only to have it roll down again as it nears the top ...



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