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2

As FumbleFingers mentioned in his comment the bait suffix is predatory in nature. The only other terms, which are very offensive, are jail bait or rape bait. They are offensive because they are indicating the sexual offender was "baited" by the victim some how. This stark contrast in trivializing the others is where click bait comes from. A headline is ...


0

There are lots ways I can think of to say "I'm not going to go into all the details", but not many of them also include altering the accuracy. These are more for starting to explain something to someone, rather than describing what happened to you. (But why would you need a phrase to say "this isn't 100% accurate" then; stories aren't expected to be 100% ...


2

I think it's a widely recognized term on the English-speaking Internet, but that's my culture so my perception may be biased. I agree with the comment that it suggests predation by whomever has laid the bait. Because the Internet is funded by advertising, click bait typically suggests a monetary incentive for getting "hits" (page views.)


0

No, it's actually rich, and the author was maybe bragging about his knowledge of latin as the right of say is simply the literal for jurisdiction (see also this): Middle English: from Old French jurediction, from Latin jurisdictio(n-), from jus, jur- 'law' + dictio 'saying' (from dicere 'say'). early 14c. "administration of justice" (attested ...


2

(Could be from the French "droit de parole," which could mean "[no] right/authority to speak [for/over] Area C." – Papa Poule 2 hours ago) Thinking more about this I went from "right/authority to speak for/over" to "power of attorney for/over," which brought me back to another French word, "mandat," which led me to "mandate:" "[no] mandate over Area C," ...


0

I would like to add to this discussion a side note: tl;dr Syndrome. I have encountered an appalling tendency for people to read only the portions that they want to read (cf. "hearing what they want to hear") and discard the rest, even though they avowedly want detailed responses to the questions they have asked. I use the phrase "tl;dr Syndrome" in ...


3

"To simplify." Or, if too much accuracy is lost by the simplification: "To oversimplify."


0

I like to use effectively since it denotes a causal relationship to the antecedent without addressing what else it may cause (i.e. unintended side effects). The Oxford English Dictionary defines it as: 3.3 = in effect (see effect n. 8): †a.3.a Actually, in fact (obs.). b.3.b Virtually, substantially.


1

That is exactly what it means and reinforced by the another part of the song: Only wish to breed I explode into a million seeds Ya’ll remember me Legendary live eternally


2

The two words are very different in who's involved how with what. Ashamed is an emotion; it refers to some individual's experience of personal shame. Shameful is a moral judgement, not an emotion; it refers to an individual's belief that someone else ought to experience personal shame. Consequently, when used adverbially, without human subjects ...


1

For scientific explanations, I like "oversimplify" (or, for people who would understand the joke, "as a spherical cow approximation").


0

In waiting for a further response to my question and reading none, I have decided to answer it myself having compiled information these past couple of days. First, I will pose an additional question to promote the idea that an observer can discern another's thinking in certain circumstances, namely: What is an outward appearance or reaction to an inward ...


0

Elaborate: The adjective elaborate is used to describe when something is planned with a lot of attention to detail or when something is intricate or detailed itself. vs Grandiose: The adjective grandiose is used to describe unnecessary largeness or grandeur; and it's that excessiveness that pushes something grand (large, with an air of ...


1

I've always called this a gloss on the situation, as in the below example: Let me save us all some time by putting a gloss on this for you. In doing some research, I've found several reasonably similar definitions, but none identical to how I would personally define the term: A superficial summary of a complex situation, which sacrifices accuracy for ...


2

I usually preface a situation like this with "Long story short..." Implying that I am leaving out a lot of detail but you get the basic idea of what happened.


0

Daft twit, would be about as good a translation. Not so much derogatory, but often used affectionately.


2

While they both get the point across reasonably well, the second option "Shamefully" flows off the tongue a little easier. Since it is a play on "proudly presents," adding just one syllable to change the phrase to "Shamefully Presents" makes the connection easier to make.


0

I've seen this word used in Breaking Bad when Walter described that their chemical work is not going to stop: We're not ramping down. We're just getting started. Video clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OyabiLNfjQw


1

Shamefully. Usage of the word this way as an adverb to mean "with shame" is listed as rare in my dictionary (OED), although I have certainly heard it before. Ashamedly is noted as much rarer still-- with only one example from 1600. If there's a comedic element, using Ashamedly might play that up. But from your second paragraph I don't get the sense that ...


2

I tend to go with 'to paraphrase', which was already mentioned by Octopus, but another fun one is, "Here's the Reader's Digest version:".


5

These are a few alternatives that come to mind: "basically", "to paraphrase", "in a nutshell" All of these more or less say the same thing: that you are going to cut out a lot of the details in order to be succinct.


10

"More or less" could be used, i.e. This is more or less the plan, you go here, you go there, etc...


6

Sketch. You could use the verb form: Let me sketch (out) the plan or the noun That is a quick sketch of the scenario I prefer the former. A sketch is a summary or outline and carries the clear implication that it lacks much detail (so satisfies your lessened accuracy requirement).


8

Here, the meaning is, "The [vulture of the law] removed the barber from [the vulture's] plate." This is a formulation of the idiom off one's plate: No longer a matter of one's responsibility and concern (Compare with the related too much on one's plate.) In this idiomatic context, one's "plate" is the set of concerns one is trying to resolve. The ...


18

I think you might be helped by roughly: without completeness or exactness : approximately (Merriam-Webster.com) This implies that you are giving a simplified version of the facts, one which is not to be held to a requirement of full accuracy or completeness, but which is presented to give a reasonably understandable quick overview. Note: As ...


-1

It seems particularly difficult to establish 'rules' here as the examples above show. We could probably say, however (correct me if I am wrong) that if prerequisite is intended as an adjective, then the adjectival form is most commonly followed by 'to': e.g., The satisfactory completion of French I is prerequisite to enrolment in French II.


0

Because you are very slow, it surprises me that, at any time, you can get anywhere. "ever" (adv) Merriam-Webster at any time - "I love you more than ever before." in any way - "How can I ever thank you for that?" Look at these similar examples: I wonder whether this kind of question has ever been asked before. Did it ever occur to you ...


2

In the case of the library book, it's typically called "overdue": From Google Dictionary: not having arrived, happened, or been done by the expected time. Example: "the rent was nearly three months overdue" synonyms: late, behind schedule, behind time, delayed, unpunctual Overdue books are the bane of librarians and the title of this ...


2

What about "tardy"-adj. When you're tardy, you're late. : arriving or doing something late The word comes from the Latin tardus, meaning "slow." You may be tardy for an appointment because you got stuck in traffic, or maybe you just slept late and you don't have good time management skills. Whatever the excuse, being tardy almost always annoys ...


2

Considering that it's a musical involving human meat pies, I think it's a metaphor insinuating that, to the "vulture of the law", people were just food on a platter. By removing Sweeney from his "plate," the girl was then left alone and desperate.


0

delinquent adjective failing in or neglectful of a duty or obligation; guilty of a misdeed or offense. (of an account, tax, debt, etc.) past due; overdue. of or pertaining to delinquents or delinquency : delinquent attitudes. noun a person who is delinquent. From Des Moines Public Library policies FVII. Delinquent Borrowers Borrowers who owe debts ...


1

It does mean finance, it does not mean cash. The pair are talking about a case where they were adversaries. Neal's forgeries had already been caught, so whenever they were used the FBI would notice, specifially Peter. In order for Peter to "get a visual on" Neal he needed to allow the forgeries to be accepted as real bonds, so the FBI put up the money that ...


0

I think it is used with the meaning you are are suggesting, implying that the financing and setting up the whole operations of forging bonds had attracted the attention of the police even before he could cash them. Bankroll: verb (used with object) Informal. to finance; provide funds for: to bankroll a new play. ( from ...


0

The Urban Dictionary (not necessarily a valid source, but in this case maybe still so) gives this possible meaning for bankrolling something: an acquisition of a large sum of money from various means As the use in a TV show is basically spoken language and might well include slang words, this could be a very possible option.


1

Background on nonidiomatic ‘untrack’ and 'untracked' Although Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary series takes no notice of untrack prior to the 2003 Eleventh Collegiate, untracked as an adjective appears in Noah Webster, A Compendious Dictionary of the English Language (1806): Untracked, a. not tracked or marked out, untrod The larger American ...


0

First occurrences of ‘egoism/egoist’ and ‘egotism/egotist’ Leaving aside any consideration of their intended meaning, it seems clear from the following Ngram chart that egotist (yellow line) and egotism (red line) are older terms than egoist (green line) and egoism (blue line): Merriam-Webster’s Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) lists a ...


1

The distinction between "take" and "bring" appears to be regional. In the SE US, "bring" is never used when you talking about an immediate action. It means something you will do in the future and the destination is somewhere the person being transported will be returning to. There is an implied "back" after the "you". Example usages are "If you drop your ...


0

That phrase doesn't seem to make sense, but I have a couple of guesses. As Mari-Lou A said, booting can mean being thrown-out of a place or event, but that is usually in the form of "booted him out of", not "booting him up to". In can also mean being fired, usually in the form of "booted him". It can also mean a promotion, usually in the form of "booted ...


-2

The last is correct. It's about the geography. I'll take you there. Neither of us are there at present. Bring her to me. I am already there.


2

To boot someone out of a location (e.g., a bar or saloon) is to expel them forcefully. The image is literally kicking them out, with the boot on the buttocks of the person forced to leave. Here, obviously, the use is metaphorical, but the implication is that version 3 should have been left behind long ago, just as the patron should have known he was ...


-1

How about 'reticent' or 'tight-lipped' or 'secretive'


5

I think there isn't a single word that exactly covers this meaning but blight comes close. It is actually a plant disease or the symptoms of that disease caused by pathogenic organisms (insects and fungus usually). But if you say blighted, you imply that crop is destroyed by blight. Blighted crops are crops blighted by pests, that is, crops damaged by ...


2

"At 30% off" would mean that all items are reduced by 30%. "Up to 30%" means that the price reduction may be 30%, or it may be a smaller reduction, such as 25%. Therefore up to is essential to preserve the intended meaning. At may be optional, depending on the context.


4

Modals do not occur in the imperative. They don't have infinitive forms, which the imperative uses. Real imperatives: Leave at once. Go out the back door. Be quiet. Ungrammatical imperatives: *May leave at once. *Can go out the back door. *Could be quiet. However, various phrases with modals have become common as indirect impositives. In the examples ...


1

You could use plague in this instance. Either way it may be most clear if you add of [bug type] to whichever word you choose.


6

In general, an implied imperative can only be there when there is such a semantic implication. The -able ending normally indicates just ability. Implying an imperative meaning can certainly, as I mentioned in my comments, be seen as improper in certain cases. Even when no cultural or otherwise touchy subjects are in play, in at least the vast majority of ...


1

From the article "Who You Callin Ratchet?" found on The Root: What arguably started as a Southern rap dance at the turn of the century and then expanded to describe a relatively positive expression of energy has now become a worthy rival to the word "ghetto." It is most typically used to describe outrageously uncivilized behaviors and music -- often with ...


3

Consider infestation. Oxford Online defines infest as (Of insects or animals) be present (in a place or site) in large numbers, typically so as to cause damage or disease: the house is infested with cockroaches


2

To answer your second question first, as Mari-Lou A has already explained, "may" (just as "must", "can", "should", etc) is a modal verb and, as such, must be followed by infinitive. As for your sentence "He may not have been far wrong", "far" is an adverb here. far (adv.) - to a great extent, much (Merriam-Webster) That car is far more ...


0

If the HP increases by 10% of the current ATT value whilst the ATT value remains the same: then the statement is incorrect. I understand it to mean, 10% of the current ATT value will be deducted and given as HP. If the former is what actually happens in game, then it should say; Restores HP by 10% of ATT value.



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