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In formal writing, even about mathematical logic, it is better to spell out "if and only if" rather than writing "iff". In informal mathematical writing, on the other hand, "iff" is quite common. In mathematics, "if" would ordinarily be understood as meaning a one-way implication (without asserting or denying the converse). To assert the implications in ...


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To be clear and precise, use if A then B for an implication, that is, when every case where A is true B is also true, but not necessarily the converse. The following are more or less standard interpretations of everyday English as logic statements, but do not depend on people understanding them this way: A if B -- means if B then A, that is, whenever B is ...


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Iff the writing is super technical and focused on formal logic then you should use 'iff'. However, if the writing is casual or if it is not concerned about logical nuance then you should simply stick to regular 'if' to mean both. In those few cases where the ambiguity between iff and if are of concern (e.g. 'If you want to fly a plane, you should get a ...


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According to the Free Dictonary: to talk with someone to find out information about something. And gives the following example: I spent the afternoon with Donna, picking her brain for ideas to use in our celebration. Do you mind if I pick your brains? I need some fresh ideas. But if the context is a zombie party the meaning can be different. :-)


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Neither is a common phrase, but we can make a good guess from context. By implication, cracking his thumb (I'm guessing in the same sense as "cracking your fingers") is an insulting gesture in the speaker's culture. "Black be its fall" is an idiomatic version of "may its fall be black", and again by implication is intended as a wish that the House of Shaws ...


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Often, a person will draw someone aside, ask "Can I pick your brain?", describe a situation, and then say "so what do you think?" If you are picking nutmeats out of a walnut, you jab and dig at the shell to get at what's hard to get at. Likewise, picking someone's brain is intended to get insights that are hidden, although without the trauma a nutpick might ...


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The phrase should be "pick someone's brain," and suggests interrogating them about a particular topic in order to learn more about said topic. I think it is used often enough that practically all native speakers are familiar with it.


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"I don't like neither of you" indicates the speaker is addressing two individuals, and that he/she dislikes both of them.


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Oxford Learners Dictionaries makes some distinction: See Usage Note under astonish: surprise to give somebody the feeling that you get when something happens that you do not expect or do not understand, or something that you do expect does not happen; to make somebody feel surprised: The outcome didn't surprise me at all. … astonish to ...


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Not one grammar cop in a hundred could discern a difference in the two constructions.


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To surprise someone can also mean to catch them by surprise, usually in some surreptitious (and often improper) act. The professor quips that his wife has surprised him and the housemaid in illicit canoodling.


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In the first instance you have a verb "to express". It is the wish which has been expressed... etc In the second instance you have an adjective, which the Oxford dictionary defines as Stated explicitly, not merely implied There you go, I hope that was helpful.


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It's the symbol for the Euro Currency.


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It is not a complete sentence, it's just a prepositional phrase. As such, it is grammatically correct. You could add an object, like We are a company with an ability to deliver ...etc. or, With an ability to deliver (...) designates, we feel our firm is best suited to...


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"would" is used to express something that doesn't actually happen. There's always the hanging question "why isn't it happening" when you use "would" and that's why you need another phrase to qualify it, whether in the same sentence or from context established from a previous sentence. I would go, but I'm feeling sick. I'm not going, the reason why - I'm ...


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Consumption of porridge and tobacco is same as how much his confidence is..


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It means you should not be charitable and draw even with a sucker (a dumb person) just not to hurt his or her feelings. The sucker cannot and will not understand your graceful gesture and will take advantage of it claiming that he is at least on a par with you.


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He was not selfishly keeping his confidences for him, he was offering them to others, the same way he was offering porridge and tobacco. As though confidences were small treats we can graciously offer (to guests maybe) like porridge and tobacco. Edit As oerkelens pointed out (and with simpler words -as requested by RegDwigнt-) this could also convey the ...


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Take a look at this segment of Oxforddictionary.com's entry for divide, which explains and illustrates the verb construction divide from: VERB 1.3 [WITH OBJECT] Form a boundary between (two people or things): EXAMPLE SENTENCES the artificial barrier that has divided an academic education from a vocational one But they are a bit ...


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To divide X from Y means to effect some sort of separation between them. An executioner may divide a man's head from his neck (or shoulders) with an axe, and a confidence man or pickpocket may divide a man from his money. Figuratively, Sunday (in Shakespeare's day - the weekend in ours) is ordinarily 'divided from' the week as a day of rest; but the 'sore ...


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We normally divide the week into "weekdays" and "weekend". In Shakespeare's time, it was divided into six workdays and and a one day weekend. Shipbuilders didn't treat Sunday as anything special; they worked seven days a week, instead of dividing the week into work and rest.


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"To him who" is not a phrase, and therefore hasn't a definition. "Who is concerned" is a relative clause, modifying "him". Having said that, I can't imagine a native English speaker saying or writing this: it is quite unnatural. It sounds to me like somebody half-remembering the formulaic salutation (at the top of a letter or notice): To whom it may ...


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"Why" in this case is not being used as a question word, but as an interjection, such as: "Oh! It tastes just like chicken!" "Why, it tastes just like chicken!" It's a old usage, dating back centuries, and it is not obsolete. It usually indicates a degree of mild surprise in the speaker in response to a remark or a question. I recall a scene in an ...


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I have to say that, in British English, I cannot recall ever having seen 'promptitude' used in any context. In the example situation quoted it would be normal to say 'thank you for your promptness in replying' or, more likely, 'thank you for your prompt reply.'


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To add to what others have said here (the messages being (a) there is no English Academy deciding what words are legitimate and (b) anyone can make up any word anytime), it might help to realize that English-language dictionaries are typically (almost universally, I think) based on actual usage. IOW, if a word is in the dictionary then it is used or ...


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As has been said, there is no Institute of Words and Meanings (maybe there should be!). A word or phrase that is invented is said to be "coined", and if it gains popularity, people will often reference the coining of the word or phrase along with it's coiner, the person who invented it. Frequently the coining is galvanized in history through its use in a ...


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Perhaps "I didn't marry you because you were rich." was intended to mean " I married you not because you were rich but for another reason." However, it could also be interpreted as meaning "I declined to marry you, because I didn't want a rich wife."


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If you want to coin a word, you just do it. For instance, I've just coined the word litgenitor, and I'm defining it as someone who wants to coin a new word. I intended it for you, but it looks like it's me as well. I stated with lit as in literal, adding gen as in genesis, and tor as in actor. But I fully expect the word to go pffft in no time flat. You ...


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They both express the same idea -- that a reason other than wealth is why the speaker married the subject. The first sentence is more likely to be ambiguous, as Peter Shor noted: is the speaker married to the subject, for a reason other than wealth? is the speaker not married to the subject, because they're rich? In either case, a native speaker would ...


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Is there any rules and regulations for naming a new word? There are no rules about how to create a new word, just as there are no rules about how to create a new idea. That's how human imagination works! Whether your new word will be successful or not outside of your own usage, of course, is a different story. Just like any other new invention or idea, ...


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"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded." - Yogi Berra That's one way to address your concern, but a better way might be to consider rounding error. To an engineer, 1000000 means "between 950000 and 10500000"m because there is one significant digit If he wants to express "between 99999905 and 1000000.5",he writes 1000000.0; numbers to the left of a ...


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The facts of the matter are .. 1) literal used to mean, "literal" (exactly, truly, 100%) but 2) since perhaps the 1950s (?) it has simply been used as a general strengthener - a meaningless slang emphasiser. (Not unlike a swear word - a completely pointless addition to a sentence which, literally (joke), does not in the slightest, in fact, change the ...


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About 500 years ago, Shakespeare wrote in Hamlet (3:1): “For in that sleep of death what dreams may come ... Must give us pause.” And although it seems like there must be more to it, it just means that surprise or doubt caused a hesitation before one reacts. Most commonly, it is used in a self-referential manner. After all, you know when something takes ...


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Concepts There are some different but similar concepts at play here and they have some overlap, so here's a comparison and contrast: (United States) The 9-5 job is typically more metaphorical than literal, referring to employment that meets the needs of the household. Despite the number of companies, each with their own policies and management, the ...


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As a general rule, these sentences do not mean the same thing, although they can mean the same thing depending on the context in which they are used. First Sentence: Sentence: You are not great because you know many things. Usual meaning: Knowing many things does not make you great. Meaning if someone is already great: You are great for another reason ...


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Well, there is an issue with each of your modified sentences that makes your question hard to answer directly: your modified sentences are not complete sentences. If you say/write, "You are great not because you know many things," the end of the sentence is missing. The wording indicates that you are going to explain why the person is great. For example: ...


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I'm certainly not the smartest person on this board from what I've read so far, but 'Curiouser' sounds like it would fall quite nicely under the definition of NEOLOGISM, (i.e., a term, word, or phrase that may be in the process of entering common use but that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language...and is often directly attributable to a ...


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An obvious truth is one which is instantly recognized, but one which may not hold up on careful examination. A patent truth is incontrovertible, but it may not be instantly recognized. In many cases. of course, something will be both obvious and patent. In that case, a political candidate would use patent when trying to emphasize the validity of his own ...


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Until x means that the change occurs on/at x: I am here until Friday. | From Friday I will not be here. or I am playing football until 7pm. | At 7pm I finish playing football. or The store is closed until March. | In March the store opens. In your example: I am out of the office until Thursday. | From Thursday I am back in the ...


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It's not the best translation, but in this context, it means despicable: (Informal) despicable, mean, low, base, vulgar, sordid, contemptible, scurvy, scungy (Austral. & N.Z.) That was a cheap trick to play on anyone. The Free Dictionary They may have been trying to say that My Savior is someone who uses "cheap tricks". A "cheap trick" is ...


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OK, I wasn't going to post as an answer, but it seems that the other answers miss the mark. Summary: A "9-to-5 kind of person" is someone who prefers to live a structured life. By comparison, someone who does not like "the 9-to-5" prefers a varying schedule and a more unexpected life. What we have here is two concepts, both with connotations. 9-to-5 ...


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lay means non-professional, as in the word layman. So lay governance of higher education refers to governance by people who aren't professional educators.


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Registry is a place of registration or a book or list in which registration is made. Registration is the act of registration, so a registration number is a number under which something such as a company or a person is registered. A registry number, however, is the number given to a place of registration or a book or list of registration, since too many of ...


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I agree with Kevin's answer but if you want single words I'd use purchases and recurring.


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equivocate means to describe something in an ambiguous way such that it may lead one into confusing one for the other. This may be on purpose or by accident. We don't know which Joe was doing, because the phrase itself is ambiguous as to his intent.


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It suggests there is a path that he wants / should follow, and he isn't. It is like not following the best way - he has lost the way. It is different to meaning they aren't connected to the internet (although not being connected may make some people's lives off line).


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To me, explicate has more of a connotation of develop or elaborate, that is, to explain in detail. You can give a summary explanation of something, but an explication gets into the nitty gritty and is typically precise.


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Personally, I see no negative connotation in the term 9-to-5 at all, especially in this context. The writer is stating how much he loves his job and that his "work" actually involves doing something that everyone else has to pay for. He's just stating that his hours are not normal day-job hours. If anything, I'd say that "9-to-5" is usually used as a term ...


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Well people, with words like these - explain vs explicate - you have to go "OG" and pull out the old Oxford English Dictionary for the LATIN and/or OLD ENGLISH origin. With EXPLAIN you have the Latin origin 'planus', or 'plain'. Now we need to infer; to explain means to make something complicated plain or understandable. We are literally 'taking out' ...


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I use the word "legacy" as the inherent traits of my late mother, Grace, who weathered many a storm but kept a positive attitude, saw the good in the worst of mankind, shared goodwill, treated others with respect and kindness and never waivered in her faith that her soul was her most treasured possession. Thru her living her life in that manner we have now ...



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