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0

I would take this as a slightly mixed metaphor: "dredging deep" meaning drawing on my last reserves, and "steel" meaning backbone or resolution. If I recall correctly, the hero has had a bad time recently (including being the ex-jockey criticised in a thinly veiled manner), and he does not expect the Cathcart article to be pleasant reading.


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The context is not sufficient to yield a comprehensive answer. But it occurs to me that it means something that is hard to get or achieve. "Steel" is an alloy and is not available naturally. Dredging is an excavation activity which is generally carried out underwater either to get something valuable or to increase the depth of a water body. But we cannot ...


0

Consider resonate. For example: Alice didn't enjoy the poem, but it resonated with me, as I understood the inside-jokes and background.


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Solipsistic seems to be a match for the phenomenon you're describing, but I think it is hardly common use in conversational English. The term has several aspects, a philosophical one pertaining to "an extreme form of subjective idealism that denies that the human mind has any valid ground for believing in the existence of anything but itself" (Encylopedia ...


1

Maybe the word you're trying to remember is intuitive. For example, My proposal makes intuitive sense to me, and to other people in my field that I've shown it to, but I'm having trouble explaining it in a way the stupid reviewers will understand.


1

One way to understand the word nailed in this context is as a short form of the idiom "nailed [one's] hide to the wall." Here's the entry for that idiom from The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997): nail (someone's) hide {or (vulgar) ass} to the wall {or barn door} to punish or otherwise put a finish to (someone). [First ...


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What a good question- I would like to know as well! ("Would" is used in expressing the optative mood.)


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I would think that "they" refers to the "divine electuary" mentioned earlier.


-1

No, I've never heard of this or anything remotely close to this in the United States. I also can't conceive of a professional woman (an attorney, physician, business analyst) thinking of calling a carpenter or truck driver a girl. It just wouldn't make any sense.


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One application is the "past habitual." *She would sing in the shower.* See, e.g., The Evolution of Grammar: Tense, Aspect, and Modality in the Languages of ... By Joan Bybee, Revere Perkins, William Pagliuca or: English Grammar: A function-based introduction, Volume 1 By T. Givón Another application is dreaming/imagining in a past time: Dusting Off ...


2

I would understand it to mean "overcome with anger". - Furious


0

Like in a market, she displays her sexual "offering," revealing parts of her body.


0

That's a strange/inappropriate expression, as "apoplexy," with both its meanings a dated : stroke b : gross hemorrhage into a cavity or into the substance of an organ is quite a short process, while "besieged" shows a prolonged condition. No surprisingly, there are no hits on it at Google Books. "besieged by apoplexy" About 0 results Instead, ...


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It's usually a derogatory comment meaning her clothing is too revealing - skirt too short, neckline too low, everything is too tight or sheer, etc.


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I think the second sentence of your quotation establishes the context in which your colleague properly regards “vulnerable” and “capable of being hurt” as active capacities rather than passive susceptibilities. The only way to avoid the pain of vulnerability is by shutting out all emotion and becoming cold, uncaring, heartless and selfish. The ...


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Yes, "capable of being hurt" can have the meaning of "predisposed to/susceptible to being hurt": ca·pa·ble adjective 5 : marked by or possessed of a predisposition to : having characteristics or personality traits conducive to or admitting of — used postpositively with of all who are capable of absorption in an inward passion — ...


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Try "use of alcohol" for the latter instance. And don't forget the apostrophe in peers'.


6

In the United States, there is a long association between putting your hand over your heart and affirming something sincerely. Most notably, when people in the United States say the pledge of allegiance or sing the national anthem, they are encouraged to salute the flag either by putting their right hand over their heart or (if they are in military uniform) ...


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wikipedia just leads to Kylie - Hand on your heart For idioms, Wikipedia isn't necessarily the best place to look in. If you assume you're dealing with an idiomatic expression, go to Google Books and search for this whole search expression: "hand on your heart" idiom This will find many idiom dictionaries describing the idiom that are stored at ...


-1

It's an idiom. put your hand on your heart (TFD) if you can put your hand on your heart and say something, you can say it knowing that it is the truth I couldn't put my hand on my heart and say I'd never looked at another man. And a standard gesture during the Pledge of Allegiance (US) I give my heart and my hand to my country, one country, ...


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This is only an assumption, but after doing a bit of research I have come up with the following notations and now believe the "Tommy" in TommyKnockers is a carry over of these references of a "Tommy" being a British person (soldier) in as much as the legend of them correlates in the U.S. mining communities about the same time frame and the high possibility ...


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Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1942) suggests that what distinguishes various adjectives of largeness isn't strictly an ordered position in a hierarchy from largest to smallest, but aspects of largeness that are emphasized more in one word than in another. Thus, it argues, "Enormous suggests an exceeding of all bounds and therefore abnormality of not ...


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"If you want a stronger version of 'good', what sense is there in having a whole string of vague useless words like 'excellent' and 'splendid' and all the rest of them? 'Plusgood' covers the meaning, or 'doubleplusgood' if you want something stronger still." -- the linguist Syme in Orwell's 1984 Very few sets of related adjectives can be formally ...


7

"Red Indian" is an old-fashioned, politically incorrect term for a Native American. One stereotype of Native Americans is that they're very stoic, possibly due to Edward Curtis's series of photographs of Native Americans with stern, serious expressions. (Of course, it's thought now that Curtis posed them in stereotypical ways to achieve the effect he ...


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#RaceTogether was proposed by the CEO of Starbucks. He said that, in light of the racial issues affecting the United States, Starbucks baristas who normally write customers' names on cups could instead use the hashtag to make for healthy, thought-provoking dialogue on racism. In terms of the phrasing of "Race Together", it appears that this is a thought ...


1

In my observation, the negative meaning is likely the older version as evidenced by usage in older movies and TV shows and regionally dependent. In the British sitcom "last of the summer wine", set in the yorkshire area, the character Compo complains how his wife left him for another man by exclaiming "she ran off with a chuffing Pole". By contrast, ...


2

As other commentators have suggested faking cheer just means pretending to be cheerful. Cheer can mean a general demeanour as well as a literal cheer, (a cheerful person) and faking means having the outward appearance of something which does not reflect reality. It does not necessarily mean that someone is not sociable. Among people they actually want to ...


0

I believe these cases actually refer to the fact that one is lowering their eyes to ground-level, as if digging a hole that, if one were to stand in, would put one's nose at level with the hole's lip, thereby lowering one's eyes to just above the ground. A change in perspective is indicated. As stated by others, the Obama example does not relate to this ...


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Sounds akin to profiling (class, category, grouping, clustering) - We group a set of experiences or traits into a profile. Synthetic holds some appeal in that we would be creating unnaturally something that occurs naturally. There is Projection of ones own bias into the situation. Empathy is still a strong word. Will make up my own word and go with ...


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"Attitude towards drinking" maybe? So something along the lines of: In other words, a member's drinking behavior is influenced by observing his peers' attitude towards drinking.


-2

it means to sort of avoid the gunfire


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This is not clinical, but I suggest get inside their head This implies that you are carefully analyzing/constructing what might be going on in the person's thoughts or emotions, without identifying with or empathizing with the person.


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It is essentially just asking the reason or reasons for the fact previously stated. The 'might' gives an idea of potential or unknown reasons, to allow slightly more breadth to the answer.


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You seem confused; why might that be? Well, you might be confused because you are not sure what "that" refers to. In the above case, "that" refers to the whole first clause: "You seem confused". In the example you gave, "that" refers to the whole first clause: If American universities are indeed poor value for [the] money" On the other hand, you might be ...


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I tend to think of ineffective as an assessment or statement of the 'result'; whereas ineffectual is a statement of an ongoing status. In other words, ineffectual is the state of actually being ineffective. Something can only be ineffectual if it is being used; whereas many things that are not in use - objects and processes included - are know to be ...


0

TommyKnockers are an American Urban Legend about the ghosts of miners knocking on the walls of a mine right before a cave in to warn the living miners to get out of the mine. Some say that if you are the first person to hear a TommyKnocker you will be cursed or will die very soon. Which leads to hearing one at your door as a very bad omen indeed. In short ...


0

I would suggest "service organization".


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Best resource, bar none, for finding and separating synonyms, IMO: Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms: A Dictionary of Discriminated ... See "charitable" and related synonyms on pp. 140-141


2

Any work marked by humanistic values and devotion to human welfare, regardless of its size and impact, could be termed "humanitarian". A humanitarian is a person concerned with the welfare of mankind. As an adjective, humanitarian is used to describe something or someone who displays the characteristics of someone concerned with human welfare. ...


0

On both sides of the pond, school as a noun can refer to an institution for educating children (e.g. primary school), a unit or faculty of a university (University of Cambridge School of Technology), or a specialized training institution (e.g. dance school). On top of this, in North American English, any formal education can be referred to as school. While ...


1

If the page is expanding on the description or one part of a product then you would use the second sentence. If the page is expanding on multiple bits of a product's information or giving details for a variety of products then you would use the first sentence.


1

We don't really say "What a make!" for something we admire. Instead (in North America) we say "What a beaut!" if we are lucky enough to see a beautiful something or person. It is better to express your admiration by naming the article. After seeing great resolution in a photograph you may say to the owner of the camera, "What a great camera!" etc. These ...


0

Painting a picture black is a form of erasing it, or making it into nothing. I saw that episode, and I understand the phrase in that context to be "eliminate them", like a painter would eliminate a painting by splashing black paint over the entire canvas.


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The phrase "What a X!" is usually used to express that X is really great, or that X epitomizes the definition of X (e.g. "What a nice car!", to express appreciation of a well-made vehicle, or "What a dick!", to express frustration with a person not currently present). "Make" here refers to the make of camera (the most frequent use of this sense of the word ...


1

I like the colloquial term gobsmacked. From That's Not English: Britishisms, Americanisms, and What Our English Says About Us, by Erin Moore: Every so often, a word comes along that means just what it sounds like. It may not be onomatopoetic, but even if you've never heard it before, you instantly get the idea. Gobsmacked is such a word. It ...


1

The definition of "earn" on Google is "obtain (money) in return for labor or services." In other words, to earn something is to work for it. I might say that I was given a gift by a friend, but I would not typically say that I "earned that gift". When I receive money for my work, then I say that I earned the money. By this definition, the saying implies ...


0

More natural in terms of quite confident expectation is the use of "should": Star Trek Generations: A Novel - Page 16 Jeanne M. Dillard, ‎Rick Berman, ‎Ronald D. Moore - 1994 - ‎Snippet view - ‎More editions But Chekov never got the chance to explain things to Scott; a sonic boom, followed almost instantly by another, distracted him. "That ...


1

Have a look at this very good dictionary definition: school a : an organized source of education or training: such as (1) : an institution for the teaching of children : an elementary or secondary school (2) : an institution for specialized higher education usually within a university the school of medicine at the state ...


2

It may rain. This means that rain is a possibility; it may happen or it may not. It may well rain. This means that rain is a possibility, and that the speaker thinks that there is good reason for it to occur. For example: You'd better bring an umbrella; it may well rain today. Dictionary references: Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary: ...


1

Perhaps deflated to reduce in size, importance, or effectiveness deflate his ego with cutting remarks Merriam-Webster Or crushed to defeat or humiliate utterly, as in argument or by a cruel remark Collins [but I still like @Little Eva's crestfallen]



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