New answers tagged

0

I agree with NDubonix, but just as a humorous aside, there's a quote by Moses Hadas that I've always held on to, and it illuminates the ambiguity of this phrase. When someone would send Mr. Hadas a transcript of their book, he'd reply with: “Thank you for sending me a copy of your book. I'll waste no time reading it.” ― Moses Hadas Now what did he ...


2

At no time were we friends[.] This one is pretty literal: "there was no point in time when we were friends", or "we were never friends". The "at no time" usage is a bit more emphatic than "never". We were friends in no time[.] The expression "in no time", as used here, is synonymous with "immediately" (Collins). The sentence can thus be ...


1

"At no time were we friends" is a simpler way of saying that at no point in time were we ever friends. Essentially: We were never friends. "We were friends in no time" means that we became friends immediately. It might be easier to understand if it said "We became friends in no time", meaning that it took no time for us to become friends. Hope that helps.


0

A phrasal verb is a fronted object complement. 'Wake up the boy' = 'Wake the boy up' = 'Wake the boy [[to] be] up'. 'Fire off a shot' = 'Fire a shot off' (presumably to make the shot be off {of the deck of the gunship}). Phrasal verbs come in two varieties: literal and idiomatic. In the idiomatic variety, the position is not literal -- it has either been ...


1

"Over six figures" should not be taken to mean "seven figures". It means that she passed the line between 5 and 6 figures, and is now "over" the 6 figures line. "Jane ran over ten miles yesterday." You would take this to mean that Jane ran at least 10 miles yesterday. But likely not 15 or 20 miles, as in that case the speaker would have used 15 or 20 ...


0

Many are fond of the notion that everything human is in a political context. Such chauvinistic generalities aside, 'bipartisan', strictly speaking, refers to two parties, whether the parties are political or not: biˌpartiˈsan, adj. Of, representing, or composed of members of, two (political or other) parties. ["biˌpartiˈsan, adj.". OED Online. March ...


0

"Over six figures" is ambiguous. From that statement alone, you cannot possibly know how much she makes (even assuming that the person who told you actually knows her salary). You can safely assume that she makes more than $100,000, but you have to guess what the person meant: Either they meant six figures = $100,000, so it's over $100,000, or they meant ...


2

I would pay attention to the way they say it. There was a Seinfeld episode--Episode 94 "The Mom and Pop Store"--where Jerry was trying to figure out whether he was invited to a party. ELAINE: Well, I talked to Tim Whatley... JERRY: Yeah... ELAINE: And I asked him, "Should Jerry bring anything?" JERRY: So...? ELAINE: Mmmm...and he ...


58

It's a word I made up! It's for someone who habitually electrically stimulates the brain's pleasure centres via an implanted electrode. (Like 'wirehead' in some stories by Larry Niven.)


11

It seems this is all about parsing. The given phrase over six figures can be parsed in two obvious ways: over (six figures) which would be "more than 100,000", or (over six) figures which would "more than 1,000,000". Neither parsing can be said to be "wrong", but it seems that the most commonly intended parsing is the first one.


1

The sentence is: Jordan took her elbow and ostentatiously steered her past a trodie who'd collapsed in the doorway of a Help the Waged charity shop. From the context, my only guess is a word built on the past form (trod) of tread, a person who walked along waiting for charity and just fell here. Side note: at first I though a letter was missing. ...


16

It isn't a word in normal use; clearly invented to add some 'local colour' to the book. If I had to guess, I would say that the unconscious down-and-outs in this (Scottish?) street have overdosed not on Special Brew but on electric current passed through their electrodes.


3

Dictionaries document real uses of words. Because a dictionary is (usually) a finite size, the line on what is included and what is not has to be drawn somewhere. Generally, this line is decided on commonness of a particular usage. I did the easy thing and searched Google for "tower of giraffes" to see how common that phrase was. Most results were simply ...


0

Commemorate is the best available term. Note the prefix Co-, this makes it a group memorial. As in: our group must never forget this extraordinary thing, terrible, or marvelous, as it was. Group Memory (or commemoration) precedes factions, and factions precede neutrality, (preceding the need for it). Just as a single comma is not a sonnet, nor good or ...


1

Deliberate implies alertness, time limits, some definite decision to be made, perhaps using rules or formula, and a situation that calls for it, as with juries. Ponder lacks those things, and is unscheduled, not routine, perhaps even involuntary (though seldom unwanted), a mind facing nature or the consequences of some natural event, appreciating the ...


5

six figures could be anywhere from 100,000 until 1,000,000. This is a rather wide range. Thus, it's often qualified. For example, low six-figures, mid six-figures, high six-figures. Without qualification, it often seems reasonable to presume low six-figures. With this understanding, it's rather clear that over six-figures is at least 1,000,000, with the ...


0

Sure, but offering up a remembrance might be more fitting: re·mem·brance rəˈmembrəns (noun) the action of remembering the dead, especially in a ceremony https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remembrance_Day http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2016/05/04/holocaust-remembrance-day-israels-needy-survivors-still-suffer/83913468/


1

Does an event to be remembered get any worse than this? Go here. The main commemoration of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz will be held in front of the Death Gate of KL Auschwitz II–Birkenau. On this day – which, for ten years now has been commemorated as International Holocaust Remembrance Day – various anniversary events ...


1

Commemorate by definition is not "value-neutral". Commemorate Recall and show respect for (someone or something) in a ceremony. "A wreath-laying ceremony to commemorate the war dead." Serve as a memorial to. "A stone commemorating a boy who died at sea" Celebrate (an event, a person, or a situation) by doing or building something. ...


2

In a Biblical context, the word ponder was used to describe the process of clearing a path of obstacles such as large rocks so that a royal procession could proceed without breakdown. Verses that refer to this process are in Proverbs 4:26 "Ponder the path of your feet, then all your ways will be sure". Also in Isaiah 40:3 describes the process: "In the ...


1

Don't forget this document was originally written in German. From your quoted translation, I suspect that it wasn't written in Hoch Deutsch. I'd take the answers above and not worry about the garbled translation you cite.


52

I'd actually be inclined to say Jane makes at least $100,000/year. In this case, I interpret over to mean greater than or equal to, even though I would normally assume it to mean greater than in numeric contexts. It just seems unlikely that Jane makes $1,000,000/year or more. This usage also seems to be somewhat common when describing minimum age ...


30

"Jane makes six figures": at least $100 000, at most $999 999. I've never heard or seen "over six figures", and I would definitely avoid it because of the ambiguity you note, but I would expect most people to mean "well over $100 000", because 1) not very many people earn seven-figure salaries and 2) for those who do, you can say "seven figures" or "a ...


0

Six-figure: worth 100,000 units of a currency to just below 1,000,000 units. I'm looking for jobs with a six-figure salary. (Onlineslangdictionariy) All articles available online use the expression "six figures" with the meaning suggested above: Make six figures. Over six figures refers to amounts like 150.000 or 200.000 for ...


5

There are several editions of the Manifesto, and several translations. An easier reading of this sentence is often given as No sooner has the labourer received his wages in cash, for the moment escaping exploitation by the manufacturer, than he is set upon by the other portions of the bourgeoisie- the landlord, the shopkeeper, the pawnbroker, etc. ...


0

. . . by the manufacturer at that point at an end in that the labourer receives his wages in cash, than . . . so far = temporarily at an end that = in that = indem


0

It is needed here, indeed, and it is the very basics of punctuation. When the dependent clause - a clause that wouldn't make sense on its own, usually (but not necessarily) starting with a conjunction, such as 'when' or 'if' - is placed before the independent clause - the main idea of the sentence and a clause that would make sense on its own - or when two ...


1

The general rule for "only" is to snuggle it up as closely as possible to the word or phrase you intend it to modify. "He only speaks English" can be interpreted as "He does nothing other than speak English," whereas "He speaks only English" should reliably be interpreted as one of "He does not speak anything other than English" or "He is not speaking ...


0

Perhaps he believed in freedom of thought without intrusion from others, especially representatives of organizations wishing you to join, such as religious groups.


3

The word 'soothsayer', though commonly used to mean 'future teller', originally meant 'truth-teller'. This is the sense in which the article means it - that there are many people 'telling the truth' (or at least saying that they are telling the truth, because they contradict each other). Becket's work was often about the nature of truth, and often featured ...


1

I know this is an old question, but... Some scenarios in which "the" works, but "a" doesn't: He's the best potato eater! He eats all the potatoes all the time. The greatest thing about him is the smile on his face once he sees the potatoes on the dining room table. However, scenarios in which "a" works would work with "the," too. Just replace it in your ...


1

'At' wouldn't be correct in this context; you'll want to use 'to.' 'Sticked', unless I am mistaken, isn't an actual word - the correct past participle would be 'stuck.' Both 'stuck' and 'glued' would work in your case.


0

Here's what you could do for each one: He is currently choosing to speak only in English. He only speaks English. He is the only one who only speaks English.


2

"Top out" means to reach a maximum of some value. "One twenty" means "one hundred and twenty". "That thing" refers back to the last subject, in this case "Vito's truck". So the sentence expresses surprise that Vito's truck reaches a maximum of one hundred and twenty of some value - by implication speed: since it is in the US, it would be speed in miles ...


1

There is nothing in the expression "fire off" to suggest the intent, or the lack of intent, to hit a target. However, that suggestion is carried elsewhere in the sentences you cite. A "warning shot," for example, is just that: a shot fired off to warn an adversary or threatening other against persisting in some action. Warning shots are aimed away from ...


3

No. A semicolon should be used in one of the following situations: To separate two linked sentences (note: as they are sentences, they must contain a verb) To separate list items that contain commas In your original sentence, the second part is not a sentence (it contains no verb) and it means nothing standing alone. It does not work to use a semicolon ...


1

Quite a lot of family is rather a colloquial expression, without hearing the tone of voice it's hard to be sure what was intended. I would read it as implying an extended multi-generation family, but I think there is more implied than just size. A more conventional: I come from a large family would be sufficient if only size were under consideration. ...


2

Escalate is an appropriate word in current business-speak for this situation. For example, "I will escalate the issue to my team leader". Here is a page from the Project Management Institute that has a number of examples of how it is used, but with no definition.


-1

It means a dilemma in which you have two choices to proceed, neither of them being favorable in the circumstances given. To give you an Image:


1

I have no evidence for this, but I think the point is that a rock is a hard place. So it's like six of one and half a dozen of the other, but in a negative sense.


-1

Just imagine that you have a huge rock on one side and a brick wall on the other. WHichever direction you go in you'll hit something which causes you pain. That's the best literal transalation I can give. Hope it helps :)


1

You can simply say that you need to "consult" your senior to check if you can take the task up or not.


-1

This is just a simple poem showing the industry and hard work of a honey bee as it pollinates. It could be reminiscent of the reward of manual labor and the beauty in the simplicity of nature (the type of romantic view common to 19th century England), however that is open to interpretation and the author probably meant nothing more than what they said.


1

Technically, the word is hireling, but that word is almost always used pejoratively, hinting either the work is menial or the worker is only fit for menial work. The -ee ending usually refers to someone who is currently having something done to him (or occasionally, currently doing something fairly passive, like an attendee). A hiring is the act of ...


3

Case noun 1 An instance of a particular situation; an example of something occurring - ODO In your sample sentence, case refers to the current situation. In particular, it refers to the number of (potential) problems that exist (now). The comparative more ... than compares the following: the number of (potential) problems that the policy may ...


1

As framed in your question and link, an animal refers literally to the whole animal (or at least its edible portions). Eating a horse means consuming the whole horse, not just a small bite of it, hence the force of the idiom I'm so hungry I could eat a horse. However, the puzzle posed in your link doesn't require the whole animal (or more generally, the ...


1

'With the purpose' implies that the thing you are doing is contributing to your goal. 'With the intention' only implies that you had another goal in mind. The action doesn't have to contribute to it. So you can say I went for a walk with the intention of finishing my studies later. The walk doesn't contribute to the studies, so you could not ...


1

'An animal' almost always means a whole animal. There may be a few circumstances where it would be OK to use 'an animal' where you mean 'part of an animal', ( for example 'I saw an animal' if you only saw its head) but this isn't one.


0

As proclaim is a slightly archaic word, self-proclaimed tends to be more mocking in tone, indicating the person doing it is full of themselves.


2

seeker from bing: NOUN 1.a person who is attempting to find or obtain something: "a tenacious seeker of the truth" ·



Top 50 recent answers are included