Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

From Hard Facts: nuances in meaning and usage exist, but there are good reasons to use both terms: What is the clear difference between a fact and a truth? Well, if you look into most dictionaries, you will be amazed to find that the two words are actually very close in terms of their definitions. This is because the two terms are very much related. ...


1

I think that you are reading too much into the last two definitions listed. The fifth one is apparently a legal term of art and as we all know lawyers have little use for the actual truth. The fourth covers instances where facts are asserted without being verified. If I asked a group of toddlers for a list of facts about where babies come from, that's still ...


1

A fact does, in fact, have to be the truth at the time you're using the word. A few years ago, it was not a fact that the solar system had eight planets. It is now. (Just an example, don't attack the example.) When a jury convicts a man, it's a fact that he's guilty. If he's later acquitted, it's a fact that he is innocent. (As far as the public is ...


0

As with most questions of colloquial language, the answer is highly subjective. I've heard Americans and Finns (speaking/writing in English) use "thanks, my lovelies!" (and "bye, my lovelies" etc.), but I've never heard Irish people use it, for example. Personally, I think it's charming and warm, but it really depends on your audience, and if it's not in ...


1

If all the people are social contemporaries, you can say what you wish. If your relationship to some of the people is subordinate in some way, the best phrase would be, "Thanks to all.." (for the lovely whatever)


0

"bleed inside out" can't quite make sense because "inside out" means "completely" as in "I know him inside out", which is presumably very different from what you actually want. As suggested by StoneyB, the phrase generally used is "bleeding on the inside", denoting great emotional pain.


2

Here the writer is not comparing men and women. He (or somebody whom he is quoting) is using "men" to mean "men and women", and he is clarifying that thought. This answer has two parts : a general response, followed by a specific response. This is what he wanted to say: "... what our students get out of the arts and humanities ... But since ...


4

The quotation in the OP's question comes from the transcript of a WCAX radio interview with Jim Yong Kim, then president of Dartmouth College, on December 24, 2010. Kim became president of the World Bank in March 2012. The excerpted paragraph appears in the midst of a longer response to a question about the involvement of the Dartmouth Center for Health Care ...


2

An example of a Victorian ladies' guard chain, worn around the neck. These were long chains, with a clasp for attaching pocket watches, lockets, spectacles and muffs.


0

sober serious, sensible, and solemn. not affected by alcohol; not drunk. muted in color.


0

District is perhaps more likely to be used to name an administrative, official, division than quarter, which can be an informal but distinct neighbourhood. So we might imagine that the dwarves administer their particular district, but that the "foreign quarter" is just where most foreigners live and hang out. But in general I think, as Cipherbot says, ...


4

If you read on to the next paragraph, you will see that "guard" is used again: "I duly detached and re-attached it, then coiled compactly the completed guard". It seems to be some form of jewelry the narrator is crafting. It is in the form of a chain, made with silk and beads, and she completes it by attaching the clasp from her own necklace.


2

Mischievousness can also be used if a "bad" action is undertaken while doing it for a "well intended" reason. Father eating chocolate. Son approaches, clearly after chocolate. Father: "Do not touch my dessert!" Son literally touches the chocolates, to jokingly defy his father. Never actually takes anything from the plate. He just smiles because he ...


0

No. It appears officially (in GB) at least in 1887, Hansard's Parliementary debates with the same sense and political connotations of the CIA usage. Interestingly, it was a phrase used by the Unions accusing the Judges of paranoïa agaisnt their supposed motives.


1

Yes, all of the above. It's often added to "invented" names to make them seem higher-class. Sometimes the extra "e" is just an accident of history -- when the spelling was "hardened" vs what the style was at that moment, sometimes the extra "e" is due to it being "borrowed" from French or some other language. (Net: Aside from its possible effect on ...


-1

I postulate that the true etymology of the term "dukes", as used in this fashion, is actually a mis-transliteration of the name of Polydeukes, one of the Dioskouri [Dioscuri] - also known as the twins of Gemini - while I have no proof of this theory (and the former explanations seem eminently plausible), it is well-established that the twin boys (Castor ...


2

Mischievous is not a negative attribute. Provocatively mischievous implies that his mischief is provoking others (maybe to think more rigorously). Obv. the line surely... itself was a response to his mischief :)


4

From what I know of Feynman (I've read that book and others) it sounds like an apt description. Mischievous has a secondary sense of impishly playful, which I believe the quote intends. One source has: roguishly or slyly teasing, as a glance ...while another has: prankish; teasing; full of tricks


-1

CIA Document 1035-960 Concerning Criticism of the Warren Report http://www.jfklancer.com/CIA.html There is no doubt of C.I.A involvement the spreading of what is now recognized as the most successful all purpose ad homenim logical fallacies technique to foil any dissent to official state narrative through what i can imagine were,are operation mockingbird ...


0

I think you mean the difference between district and canton. As the source you referenced says: 'The Foreign Quarter is the northernmost canton of the city of Vivec.' Canton: A small territorial district, especially one of the states of the Swiss confederation. District: a division of territory, as of a country, state, or county, marked off for ...


2

In the example you provided it means that she really looked her age. It's a stylistic way of saying that she absolutely did not look any younger than what she was. For example: She was 55 and looked every day of it. The woman could look 55 or older, but certainly not younger.


4

It could be a "cliché", or perhaps the word you're after is "trope"... Tropes are devices and conventions that a writer can reasonably rely on as being present in the audience members' minds and expectations. TV Tropes.com has a large index of common tropes used in TV, film, literature and other areas...


1

To rest satisfied with the present is a sign of an abject spirit. Washington Irving, Journals, 1817


1

I guess that the problem is with the word ‘drive’. It has multiple meanings and in this particular case this one applies: 2.4 [with object] Force (a stake or nail) into place by hitting or pushing it: ‘nails are driven through the boards’


0

The heart is usually symbolized as a thing of love. Usually whenever something is said to be piercing the heart such as this it means that it hurts you emotionally. I am assuming that this text means it is hurting this person emotionally.


2

Driving a stake through the heart was the traditional way to kill a vampire (and/or werewolf and/or zombie -- a folkloric creature that wouldn't die normally, but needed to be destroyed and kept that way). Note (from the comment below) that this was a way of "killing" someone who was already dead; a corpse which was believed to be a vampire or thereabouts ...


1

'Busted in' is not a hairstyle but referring to that his head is cracked. There are some pictures in Google if you type in Busted in head. I am not adding the pictures for the reason that it is not for the squeamish.


0

Whenever you have "the {adjective}-est {noun}" followed by a relative clause, any property or behavior referred to in the relative clause can be understood to apply to a set of {noun} where each item in the set possesses the property or evinces the behavior to some degree. The fastest creature on two feet= the fastest creature in the set of creatures with ...


0

It just means battered and broken, like beaten up badly. It's not talking about their hairstyle; it's talking about their actual head.


1

(2) means: Take all the people in the class. Then remove everyone who can't play the piano. Vin and some other people remain in the group. Vin is the smartest one in that group. Perhaps there is a non-piano player in the class who is smarter than Vin, but she doesn't play the piano, so she doesn't count. (3) has a similar meaning: Take all the people in ...


7

The appropriate word or a phrase might depend on the context, that is the sort of piece you are writing. For someone who gives names: nomenclaturist which redirects to M-W 3rd definition of nomenclator: 3: one who gives names to or invents names for things Nomenclator is also a book that contains names or lists of words (and most examples of usage ...


3

An example might help. Here is a scene from the popular comedy Family Guy where Brian, the family dog, fears he is longer wanted as a pet. He with talking to his owner Peter, as Stewie (Peter's infant son and Brian's best friend) comments acerbically: PETER Hey, Brian, I thought maybe we could spend an afternoon together? BRIAN ...


4

"A preoccupation with words or names" is onomatomania, so the word for such a person would be onomatophile or even onomatomaniac. (This whole discussion might onomatomaniacally autological.) EDIT: Martha suggests onomast, which is a "real" word in the sense that people other than me use it (if you want to resort to that definition) but does not, I don't ...


0

It means exactly what it looks like it means. It is said to someone who arrives at a faulty inference from an argument, because they don't realize the full implications. For instance, if someone says: "Nobody will be poor if we just print more money", you can say "Follow the argument through to its conclusion. If they print more money and the number of ...


0

The other definition of "on the nose" is when something smells fishy, pungent or otherwise off, either metaphorically or literally. Someone describing art as "too on the nose" would make me think they were likening it to a cheap perfume too liberally applied.


1

so what I would say this is the canonical phrase. Also: And...? (the ellipses indicating a pause before the question mark)


0

The phrase can mean something else that hasn't been covered in other answers. It can mean that the speaker doesn't believe that the data in question is a spontaneous utterance, or believes that the "question" was written around the answer. What is the human population of Earth? 7.2 billion That is a bit too on the nose for it not to have come from Google. ...


2

I believe you're thinking of the word "peccadillo". From Google: pec·ca·dil·lo ˌpekəˈdilō noun a small, relatively unimportant offense or sin. Synonyms: misdemeanor, petty offense, indiscretion, lapse, misdeed I'm sure we can overlook a few peccadilloes.


5

In the acting/script/play/film world, "too on the nose" is a pretty common phrase which means lacking in sub-text, too obvious, having neither subtlety nor sophistication. In life, people can't usually say what they mean for one reason or another; when they do in film or theater it comes across as unrealistic.


1

Although one can legitimately rationalize the OP expression, the disparity between on the nose and too creates significant semantic confusion. Examples of how on the nose would normally be applied: Not too high; not too low; just the right height--on the nose. Not too far left; not too far right; in just the right location--on the nose. Not too ...


1

"there's something to it/them/NP" means that there is some substance in 'it', whatever 'it' refers to. It is usually in reference to something someone says and implies that you shouldn't dismiss them so easily. The phrase looks very vague and empty and is not precise speech because of its dependence on the nuances of the preposition 'to'. In speech the ...


8

There's another reasonably common usage which relates as much to the audience as the work itself. A work which is "too on the nose" is one which gives an accurate view of the world that people won't like hearing, reading or talking about, and so will be unpopular. An author who was beheaded for writing a political play which criticized the King of ...


6

Assume "on the nose" means perfect - a positive connotation, as you've stated. Too "on the nose" means too perfect. Which, as you've noted, connotes a negative. Take a subjective matter such as painting. If you're going for freedom, expression of movement, light, etc., rendering something in too much detail can ruin the effect, in essence, the rendering is ...


0

To make someone's acquaintance is to meet them where you each introduce yourself. Someone is your acquaintance when you know each other by name (not just you know them), will recognise each other and say hello when you meet, but you are not close enough to call your relationship a friendship.


0

Your last example is a good general definition of theories, explanations, concepts that 'have something to them.' ideas that have something to them, (but) ...You can’t quite put your finger on it yet. It isn’t even a fully developed concept yet, but you know you’re going to think of it from time to time. It’s not time to start putting pen to paper ...


1

"You're going to have to be more specific" Question: "... what is the function of be going to in this case?" It's the construction to be + going + infinitive This usage refers to the near future as opposed to a Future Indefinite tense. In other words, your sentence, "You're going to have to be more specific" can be rewritten as "You will have to be more ...


0

He means that the "incantations" had some content, some meaning, some "substance", because they seem to have had some effect. That is, the events lend credence to the belief that these "incantations" (or in the case of Hendrick Hertzberg, "theories") were not empty and meaningless. Oh-- and as for your question title, "them" does not refer to anyone; ...


2

Let's start with a stranger, Mr. X. If you go up to him and engage in conversational interaction, or he approaches you, and the interaction is sufficiently satisfying for you to exchange names (and if Japanese, meishi), then you have made an acquaintance. Your acquaintances are those to whom you can put a name or about whom you can state something, even if ...


0

He means that the "incantations" had some content, some meaning, some "substance", because they seem to have had some effect. That is, the events (seemingly) lend credence to the belief that these "incantations" (or in the case of Hendrick Hertzberg, "theories") were not empty and meaningless.


1

OP has misparsed the usages. You can have something on someone (you know something "secret" about them, giving you power to "blackmail" them). But you can't have something to [a person]. The cited usages are versions of the idiomatic there's something to it, meaning it's not a completely daft idea - there's at least a grain of truth in it. Or perhaps there ...



Top 50 recent answers are included