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1

My impression of the excerpted language is that the author is reflecting on the fact that children often behave in ways that adults do not, and yet children's behavior is somehow easier to respond to and manage than adults' behavior because children's behavior has an element of guilelessness or a simplicity of motive and action that makes it easier to calm ...


2

The meaning of those phrases is their literal meaning. If you do not understand any of the words, you can look them up in a dictionary. The passage is saying that children will, when faced with a substitute teacher, misbehave. Examples of such behavior include lifting one's skirt above one's head (if one is wearing a skirt, presumably) and removing one's ...


0

goof–off: "a person who avoids work or responsibility.." http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/goof-off It is more common to use goof off as a verb "Jim goofs off and we have to do his work." The source cited above says that the first recorded usage was in 1953.


0

I refer to this as internal narration. I happen to have such a narrator in my head. He provides an unending stream of occasionally strange but consistently colorful commentary, in Rod Serling's voice, upon both my thoughts and the moment-to-moment events of my life. My Inner Narrator is Obnoxious The Narrator in My Head Does your Life have a ...


0

If you aren't actually speaking out (verbally to yourself like we catch ourselves doing it at times, albeit involuntarily), then it's a "dialogue with your self". (Note: not "yourself"!). This may be just introspection (observation or examination of one's own mental and emotional state, mental processes, etc.; the act of looking within oneself).


1

Austin Powers used the term "inner monologue". "Subvocalization" could also be used, but it usually refers to when reading or reciting something silently.


0

Internal monologue, also known as inner voice, internal speech, or verbal stream of consciousness is thinking in words. It also refers to the semi-constant internal monologue one has with oneself at a conscious or semi-conscious level https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=ssl#q=inner+voice


0

self-talk. noun. the act or practice of talking to oneself, either aloud or silently and mentally: positive self-talk. Contemporary definitions for self-talk. https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=ssl#q=self-talk+definition


1

Stream of consciousness/thought: A literary technique that presents the thoughts and feelings of a character as they occur. Psychology The conscious experience of an individual regarded as a continuous, flowing series of images and ideas running through the mind. The Free Dictionary


-1

How about reverie, meaning lost in one’s thoughts?


1

"Slacker" has the sense of someone who doesn't do work until compelled to (e.g. By the boss's presence). Where a "shirker" would like to avoid the work entirely, a slacker is perfectly capable of doing something but chooses not to at the moment. Here's one of the definitions from Urban Dictionary: "someone who is very lazy, doesn't do their work until the ...


0

The behaviour you are describing would be considered typical of a disloyal employee according to the following definition: Most employers share a concern that employees may be disloyal. Disloyalty of course spans a wide spectrum, from merely intentionally failing to perform tasks, accepting benefits personally that rightfully belongs to the ...


1

In this sentence 'different' clearly states that 3 species are a lot different. 'nearly as different' means that the 3 should not be even close to this much of differences and should have fewer differences (or should have more similarities, than they don't possess actually). So you are assuming absolutely right!


1

I believe the quotes you list are not merely anthropomorphism (aka personification/prosopopoeia). There's something else there, additional kinds of figure of speech: I think that in the language of rhetoric, these are transpositional rhetorical operations. Synecdoche is using a part of a thing to refer to the whole; such as referring to a singer by speaking ...


1

The phrase "on the other hand" implies a contrast with an omitted "on the one hand" in the first clause. In this example the only choice offered which contrasts with any term in the first clause is "unexpected", which contrasts with "no surprise".


2

In the first part, there is It comes as no surprise. In the second part, they use on the other hand which imho means that they are looking for a word with an opposite meaning - something like "surprising". Therefore, I would choose B - unexpected.


1

Yes, your assumption is correct. In they should not look nearly as different as they do, the nearly emphasises the difference, implying that the difference should be way smaller.


0

I always took it to mean that he "practiced what he preached."


1

"Artfully" is more about skill and adeptness than "art". So, an "artfully plated" dish would look appetizing and attractive, while an "artistically plated" dish of spaghetti might resemble a painting by Jackson Pollock.


0

the answer is simply anthropomorphism as Channel, and in a comment Sundar, have explained perfectly. Your misconception that anthropomorphism does not mean, what it means - is very simply a misconception. You have exactly the correct word, for the absolutely precise detailed sense you discuss. "It's that simple."


2

Over-formal seems to mean "overly formal" or "too formal", from the context you provided. Meaning that being too formal is best avoided as well, formality needs to be adjusted to the situation. I'm not sure if over-formal is correct English, I can't seem to find any occurrences of this. If you're interested in synonyms that can be used, this question ...


-1

You could play around the word counsellor or adviser, and their etymology.


4

A fairly common requirement, when letters of recommendation are handled by the person who is recommended, is that the recommender puts the letter in an envelope, seals the envelope, and signs his name across the place where the envelope is sealed. The idea is that the person who is recommended cannot then open the envelope and read the letter before sending ...


2

I haven't heard the expression "cross signature," but I know that some school admissions require the recommender to sign across the back flap of the envelope, so that it's clear it hasn't been opened by you to read the letter inside.


1

Premises plural came to refer to a location because its legal sense of preamble or prologue refers to the introductory paragraphs, or premises, of a deed in which the property deeded (or transferred) by the document is defined and described by its boundaries, landmarks, survey points, etc.


1

The computer industry is not the sole malefactor misusing these two words. I've heard it uttered maladroitly by electrical and building contractors; IT and IT technology installers; LEOs; security (alarm) firms; and the maintenance and operations staff at my school. Definition of premises in English: From ...


1

The use of "premise" as a nominal adjective (particularly in the computer-related instances you are citing) is based on the need to differentiate between computer and resource locations which are external. While the actual use of the word may not be accurate in the modern understanding of "premise" (or as it is more normally used, "premises", as in relating ...


2

I think you're right. If I'm understanding you, the uses you noticed were adjectival, for example, "the premise system started a major fire in the customer's clean room". In a cursory search (online and the OED), I did not find a precedent for adjectival use of "premises" in the singular, much less use in the singular as a noun to describe a "location or ...


1

Among other things it is quite common and normal to associate the verb "want" with inanimate objects. For instance, one might say "The car wants to pull to the left," or "I tried typing 'glibnix' but every time I do it the computer wants to replace it with 'glibness'." Some folks insist that such statements are invalid syntax/semantics because "car" and ...


17

An alternative to "anthropomorphism" is the word personification. It is almost identical in meaning to anthropomorphism, although perhaps a bit less technical. According to Literary Devices, personification is: Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, an idea or an animal is given human attributes. The non-human objects are portrayed in ...


0

"in-room" is used in phrases such as "in-room WiFi" or "in-room massages," but not under the circumstances you're asking about. "In the room" and "in room" are not interchangeable.


0

"I'm in the room" is the phrase you should be going with. If you're talking about the room for the first time with person X, use 'a', as in "In a room which is on so and so floor". The "in room" structure is generally only used when the room is named or numbered. Like "I am in room 2813 of Hotel Lakshminath."


3

The key to answering this question is "through damaged eyes". If it had been "through recovering eyes" or some such,then C and E would have been correct. The negative connotation associated with "through damaged eyes" makes A and D the right choice.


7

If the author's eyesight was improving, he could only be writing about his past damaged sight. In this case, the tense of "what I saw" is incorrect - it should be "what I had seen". So that scenario should be ruled out.


0

If the author's sight is deteriorating, that doesn't necessarily mean it's so bad as to make him/her incapable of writing already, just that his/her eyesight is worsening.


3

Animism would apply to situations where an inanimate object is believed to possess will, choice, and motive. But that's hardly the right word for the linguistic practice you cited, where that which is authored by a human being (a paper, a function, a work of plastic art, music) is made the subject. We treat the created work as a proxy for the author, as ...


6

You ask a lot in this question and the two answers at the time of writing address different things and I agree with them both (anthropomorphism would be an apt term for it). Neither addresses your final question: But when it comes to functions and articles assuming things or drawing conclusions, is it ever "OK", even in an informal sense? Yes it is. ...


1

In many societies the government's legislative branch makes the laws, and the executive branch creates the regulations implementing the law. For example, in California the State legislature (through a popular referendum) passed a law permitting the use of medicinal marijuana, but the regulations regarding how much marijuana patients could possess, what form ...


26

Anthropomorphism is not limited to physical appearance, and does not imply specifically a spiritual or soul element. The attribution of human characteristics or behavior to a god, animal, or object (Oxford Dictionaries) So I believe it is the right term.


1

I appreciate your differentiation between metaphorical language, which few would question, and non-metaphorical writing. Two things are going on here. A teacher might question "Ultimately, our article draws the conclusion that X and Y is Z," because indeed, the article is not drawing the conclusion, the authors are. In a course in which the teacher's at ...


0

I would say rules and regulations are general terms for things an authority says people should or shouldn't do. Laws are more specific rules and regulations legislated by a government - the breaking of which could be a criminal matter. rule noun 1. one of a set of explicit or understood regulations or principles governing conduct or procedure within a ...


0

It's just idiom and is a fair enough test for fluent speakers. An emphatic win is a win by a large margin. A win that emphasizes or highlights the difference between the winner and the other contestants, rubs it in, almost. Like a winning by an innings and 500 runs in cricket. It's the opposite of a narrow win. You are contrasting various types of wins, not ...


1

I think the usage here is that doing something piecemeal means to only do a bit at a time, usually what is immediately needed (or what you can afford to). So, the prop car only needs one working door and so that's what the prop-makers build - a car with one working door. If the director later decides that he needs its wheels to go round too, then those will ...


-1

Official meaning having googled the world: characterized by unsystematic partial measures taken over a period of time. "the village is slowly being killed off by piecemeal development". Sorry, but in future please attempt to use Google. It's there for a reason.


0

There're two factors that're being discussed here: Fear and survival and their relationship to each other. The fact remains that we're no different than animals in all ways, except for the endowment of a highly developed and complex brain. Fear warns and thereby saves us from a risk to our very existence, by forcing us to act. It is an instinct, built ...


0

It is hypothesized that we inherited from our anthropoid ancestors an innate fear of things like snakes and fire. The evolutionary model says that any animal so equipped to avoid dangerous things will live longer to reproduce.


4

Wow! They are expecting a lot in this quiz. It is more like a cryptic crossword clue. emphatic is an adjective, denial is a noun (thus they can't be antonyms) vehement is a near synonym for emphatic - they are not opposites conclusive describes the correctness of a statement, emphatic describes how it was made That only leaves (4). The explanation that ...


2

"Kudos" is the Greek word for praise, which English has swallowed whole. (Note that it ends in an "s," but it's no more plural than gyros.) From the pilot of Californication: HEATHER: You drifted off. And I thought to myself, “Self, what's the nicest possible way I could wake up Mr. Hank here?” HANK: Well, kudos to you, because you definitely ...


2

"Empirical" means amenable to testing or understanding through physical experience. It comes from the Greek Εμπειρίκος, meaning "experienced" or "practiced." You could also say, "in practice; not theory." If the entire stage is a projection screen for making Bunin's words visible and the a cappella choir makes them audible, then the audience can directly ...


0

"could use a X" is an American English idiom "could do with a X" is the the British version They both mean "would benefit from [having] an X". "I could use a friend" "I could do with a friend" "I would benefit from [having] a friend. The above are all equivalent.



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