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thrift c.1300, fact or condition of thriving, also prosperity, savings, from Middle English thriven "to thrive" (see thrive), influenced by (or from) Old Norse þrift, variant of þrif "prosperity," from þrifask "to thrive." The sense of thriving or prosperity preceded the idea that prosperity was obtained by thriftiness, which was first recorded in the sense ...


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In my opinion, if you come across a figurative reference to wet flannel the primary "meaning" you can derive from it is that the speaker is atypical, and doesn't know the standard expression... such a wet blanket 11,700 hits in Google Books such a wet flannel one result Note that even that one result is "dubious". A single book title is listed, but ...


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Wet blankets used to put out fires were often made of flannel: blanket (n.) c.1300, "bed-clothing; white woolen stuff," from Old French blanchet "light wool or flannel cloth; an article made of this material," diminutive of blanc "white" (see blank (adj.), which had a secondary sense of "a white cloth." Wet blanket (1830) is from the notion of a ...


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To fully understand the meaning of wet flannel when applied to a person I think you need to be 'of a certain age' and possibly from the UK. That age being before the introduction of modern materials and tumble dryers. A flannel can either mean a soft material, usually quite expensive for clothing, or it can mean a simple washcloth made of cheap harsh ...


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I am British and for me thrifty means to save money, or not to spend money. Spendthrift therefore means to spend your savings. They are opposites, not synonyms.


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Wet flannel can mean a person who spoils other people's fun by failing to join in with or by disapproving of their activities.


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Something I noticed reading in Wikipedia that I have not seen mentioned in your posts is that an aphorism is a an "original" statement. That alone seems to help easily distinguish it among the others. Example: Carpe diem... which is original in that we know the author of the statement was Horace from the poem Odes 23 BC. But it is short, concise, memorable, ...


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When a politician walks back a statement they have made, it typically means that they add some additional remarks that are ostensibly intended to clarify (and often make more palatable) some ill-considered words. In this case, it was a State Department official who took on the job of cleaning up (walking back) Kerry's messed-up message. The term creates a ...


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The usefulness of the 'toast' comparison draws on the fact that toasted bread easily morphs from being desirable (when it is properly heated) to being very undesirable (if it gets overheated and chars). At that point it becomes good for nothing. Dowd's piece subtly suggests that Christie (and by implication, his career) now stinks like burned toast when she ...


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Nowadays, youth from preschool to university are more commonly referred to as "students" than "pupils," especially in the US. The term "pupil" generally applies to a student under the direct supervision of a tutor (sense 1) or private instructor. And so, the correct expression should be "He is an MBA student."


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I think that you are referring to Symbolism: The practice of representing things by means of symbols or of attributing symbolic meanings or significance to objects, events, or relationships. The solitary house becomes symbolic of (represents) his loneliness. The cat chasing a mouse can be used as a Metaphor: A figure of speech in which a word or ...


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Robot means to work anything you have done by the operator (human). Machine means to create a motion and force of the system.


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Here, by saying "you'll still be covered", google says that your account is protected. It will not ask for a password or code again if your computer is used to sign in but if you or someone else try to log in the account from another computer, it will ask you a code. Hence, your account is automatically logged in through your computer but from any other ...


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Allegory 1. a poem, play, picture, etc, in which the apparent meaning of the characters and events is used to symbolize a deeper moral or spiritual meaning 2. the technique or genre that this represents 3. use of such symbolism to illustrate truth or a moral 4. anything used as a symbol or emblem The literary device is known as a 'Symbolism in ...


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I'll toss in my answer. I did not recognize twee as primarily British, and use it myself. I know plonk from Rumpole and some other British fiction, see it as British, don't use it. I thought whinge was Aussie in origin, it's not (yet) common in the States, but it's a great almost-onomatopoetic word, so I use it often. I knew boffin from a biography of ...


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Both "pupil" and "student" refer to a person who is studying, usually in a school. A pupil is under the close supervision of a teacher, either because of youth or of specialization in some branch of study (a kindergarten pupil; the pupil of a famous musician). A student is a person attending an educational institution or someone who has devoted much ...


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American here. I recognized everything except Twee, plonk, chunter and pukka. I'm not sure what that says about me as most people seemed to have heard 'twee' before. I actually use 'whinge' more than 'wine' now. I had always heard gormless to mean someone who was hopelessly naive or gullible rather than stupid. I also took prat to be more like 'jerk' than ...


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Check out and check in are two specific terms used in source control systems. They are jargon. The first use I encountered was in RCS, in 1982. The term check out derives from a hotel or supermarket checkout. To check out is to obtain your program from the source control system. To check in is to put your program into the source control system.


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Anyone implies the singularity of one individual whilst everyone implies the sum of all individuals.


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When she said: "Because if you could be my everything, i would not let him come close to me, in the first place". She meant: I had strong emotions for you, but you did something that didn't agree with me and I let this other individual get close to me (closer than a friend). So yes, when she said: ... doesn't she mean that I failed being ...


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John Lawler is on the right track. The difference between could and would draws on the difference between their present formations (can and will, respectively). Can simply implies physical (or other existential) ability to complete some task. Will implies that the task will actually be completed (whether or not by choice). Similarly, Could only implies ...


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Anyone means a particular person. Everyone means all.


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There is, intentionally or not, a slightly comical element discernible in the notion of "finding something gone," in much the same way as when Alice tells the King of Hearts that she sees nobody on the road, and he responds (fretfully), "I only wish I had such eyes. To be able to see Nobody! And at that distance, too! Why it's as much as I can do to see ...


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"Identity" here does not carry its common conversational English meaning of "selfhood." Instead, it means "sameness"; think of it as the noun form of the adjective "identical," as in "identical twins." This is a less common meaning in everyday speech but is reasonably common in technical or academic writing. In other words: the sentence could be rephrased ...


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If you change 'you find' to what it actually means in this context - 'you discover that' then it should be clear which one is more correct, but the second one still conveys the meaning perfectly in speech and is possibly more dramatic if you can slip in a pause between 'kidney' and 'gone'. But John's comment explains why in much more detail than I could.


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A slightly more explanatory option: This is the name we'll use in future communication with you.


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I grew up in rural Yorkshire after the second world war and the expression fill your boots referred to an involuntary bowel movement caused by great fear, for example, being chased by a bull, or some equally terrifying event. Fill your boots was a polite way of saying one had "S… oneself". When you consider people wore wellington boots with their trousers ...


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Say we are trying to understand the psychological and linguistic foundations for lying. What gives people the ability to lie? One model might be that a person first conceives the truth. They then mentally prepare a list of responses. They then deliberately select a wrong response. This activity requires a mental one—to-many map. If a person’s ...


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You might find the answer here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthroponym Antroponyms are names for Persons. You could theoretically say we'll anthroponymize you as follows: Or Josh61 answer is good too. We'll be adressing or reffering to you by the following name:


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You can also use the passive, and say: You will be referred to by this name. You will be addressed by this name.


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You can also say: We will address you as Mr....


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How I understand it, relatives are those individuals to whom one is tied to by blood or marriage. For example, one's parents, siblings, husbands, wives and so on would qualify for "relatives". "Relations" on the other hand, those individuals to whom we may have a sort of relationship, be it close or not, are not members of our families through blood or ...


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The origin of the word can help to understand the meaning: republic (n.) c.1600, "state in which supreme power rests in the people via elected representatives," from Middle French république (15c.), from Latin respublica (ablative republica) "the common weal, a commonwealth, state, republic,literally res publica "public interest, the state," from res ...


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The fact is that the term relations is ambiguous in American English. Relations can mean people in your family, it can mean people that you have had relationships with, and it could mean people that you have had sex with. It is often used as an innuendo for sex. Usage: "So what's up with Liz and you? Have you guys had relations?" So that is issue ...


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The definitions are very poor, all of them. They talk about html, the world wide web, and hypertext files. Both the consumer and techie in me knows that this is no better than a 3rd grade definition. A browser is a software interface that allows you to search, find, consume, and interact in various formats with almost any computer that you are ...


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Sometimes words grow different in English as in other languages as well. Rise of internet and being world-wide may be changed the meaning or the use habits of the word. It does not change the exact meaning or make the word poor, but it is how people approach it. One other word which is rising these days is "google it" which means search about it.


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The word browse means to scan through something. So it's not restricted to the World Wide Web only. You can use it in many contexts. When it comes to the WWW, the word browser is more like a short form of the word web-browser. It has become so ubiquitous that it can be called a synonym of web browser. The same is true about google. Most people now a days, ...


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"It is telling" means that a thing is significant. "It is telling to note" means that I am making note of, or pointing out, something that is significant.


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It isn't necessarily mocking the subject of the deference although this is a typical use of mock deference. Mock deference is fake deference, usually obviously fake deference for effect. This is often intended to make fun of the subject of the deference but can be used in other ways. For instance it might be used to mock a third person, or just for ...


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No. Mock deference means you are pretending to be a social inferior when in fact you are not.


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It means regret. I regret not having time to do this.


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It means *I would if I could, but I can't, so I won't." "If only..." is the beginning of any number of plaintive excuses that signal a kind of hopeless resignation to circumstances beyond one's putative control.


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The trick with mock deference is that in text, the mocking component doesn't always come through. In your example however, I would switch it around, and say that mock deference would be an employee telling the boss, "You are our boss so of course anything you think needs doing is what's best. " ... note how depending on your tone when reading that it could ...


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It means simulated deference ,


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It is not mocking someone by speaking with deference so much as speaking with a deference which is "mock" as in not real deference. It would be pretending to speak with deference when you are not. Usually "mock deference" is also obviously fake. mock, adj: preceding a noun, designates a thing that imitates, or deceptively resembles that which the noun ...


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Adjectives ending in -ic form the adverb with -ally: poetic poetically, systematic systematically, automatic automatically. There is one exception to this rule, public has publicly. And its only natural that speakers in the course of time extend the general rule to public and form publically. I would see this as a natural "pruning" and rectification of the ...


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Since, in this case, means the time period in between the first period of time mentioned and the present day. Essentially, this means that the territory was divided in the past, and that territory is no longer contiguous.


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The territory had been divided since the moment the Albanians started to trade.


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I have never seen friends and relatives written on invitations. The most commonly used phrase is Friends and Family.



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