New answers tagged

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It's the middle of the day. This is when the sun is straight above (not entirely straight unless you're on the equator but let's not nitpick) the tree, so the shadow is directly underneath the tree


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Yes, languid can be used in a positive sense, but not in the world of work, striving to get ahead and multi-tasking. Nor is languid positive if you want six-pack abs or to climb Everest. However, a skier so expert as to seem to expend no effort might be described as having an "almost languid grace". Languid is for long summer days; languid can also be used ...


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In this case, as in surprisingly few others involving the word "f*ck," the phrase refers to sexual intercourse. You can say "My boss totally f*cked me!" to mean, "My boss arranged things in such a way that my situation is now untenable." If you said, "My boss totally f*cked my brains out!" however, I would suggest that you either go to a lawyer and file ...


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My guess, which fits in terms of economics and political science as well as linguistics, is that it was intended to say something like: China has been simmering for several years, in the knowledge that there was going to be a big problem of adjustment, (as it was) no longer able to sustain a high-investment economy.


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It's about having spent months looking back on your life, as far as you can go and seeing yourself as you really are.....selfish, arrogant, narcissistic, prideful, hurtful, liar, thief, a tittltetailer and all the bad truths.....and then falling down in absolute grief sobbing all day and begging for forgiveness. And then it's about praying for all those ...


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You can read a PDF of the entire interaction with Krugman here. From some of the other formulations attributed to Krugman, it appears that someone took notes of his English-language speech in Japanese and then attempted to back-translate it into English. It is certainly difficult to explain otherwise how the PDF ends up attributing statements like these to ...


1

Given that Homo Sapien essentially translates to "Wise like us" I think that a new sentience would be labeled as Sapien Superius and as such the ideal term for the unreasonable fear there of would be Sapiophobia, a fear of the wise. That is what I think it ought to be. As it so happens there is Prosophobia, an irrational fear of progress.


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As a general term technophobia: abnormal fear of or anxiety about the effects of advanced technology. more specifically, Automatonophobia : the fear anything that falsely represents a sentient being which could mean robots or object using artificial intelligence.


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Technophobia — M-W noun fear or dislike of advanced technology or complex devices and especially computers Robotophobia — Robots and Androids Robophobia is an anxiety disorder in which the sufferer has an irrational fear of robots, drones, robot-like mechanics or artificial intelligence. It frequently results in a panic attack and ...


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Languid, to me, has always meant relaxed or unhurried. Apparently this meaning is more common in British English compared to American English. Languid — Cambridge Dictionary British English (adjective) moving or speaking slowly with little energy, often in an attractive way "a languid manner/voice"


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At dawn shadows are long and are spread at great length from the trees but as the sun gets higher the shadows shorten and gather under the trees that are their sources. (She's a wonderful writer. I wish you much pleasure.)


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The 'y' is 'of' in Welsh; and what follows describes the location or features of the cottage. Pent -y-groes, Pent-y-cwm, Pent-y-siliogogogoch. There are so many cottages, old summer farm-houses with names like this that it became a nick-name for the white cottages in the Welsh mountains. Pen Pent doesn't actually mean cottage . I means 'head,' or 'top;' the ...


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The sentence means that they stayed talking in the garden from when it was dark until the sun rose. At night, there are shadows everywhere. As the sun rises, the shadows disappear slowly. If you have moved slowly enough, you have crept. The shadows do not disappear completely in full daylight. Each shadow now is under one tree, which can be considered ...


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I'm completely uncomfortable with the conversation. A forty-five day escrow is "like" three months. Given that the definition of "like" in this context would be "similar to" or "approximately". Yes, a 45 day escrow is akin to 3 months. No tolerance is given for how similar something has to be in order to qualify as "like". Therefore, 45 days is like 40 ...


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Examples of irony Situational Irony where actions or events have the opposite result from what is expected or what is intended Verbal Irony where someone says the opposite of what they really mean or intend; sarcasm is a particularly biting form of verbal irony Dramatic Irony occurs when the audience or reader of a text knows ...


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The author seems to be using the concept of legal boundaries, enforced by the record books maintained by the County Clerk, to create contrast between real limitations and government enforced or superficial limitations. He is reflecting that as he walks over the ground in the morning, before the government official is awake, it is as though the government's ...


1

I will try one more time, and propose this time deficiency. This is not a fancy word, or idiom, but since the OP clarified in this comment, a sentence of interest is the following: The deficiency of the system is lack of support for NoSQL databases. From MW, deficiency means a lack of something that is needed : the state of not having enough of ...


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The flip side means — TFD (Music, other) another term for B-side Now B-side means — TFD n (Music, other) the less important side of a gramophone record. Also called: flip side. It is the less important side because it has the relatively bad songs. That's the main idea. However, "the flip side" can also simply mean "on the other ...


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The expression is may very well. (The be is part of the progressive infinitive verb be learning.) May here refers to possibility. The young man or the coed may be learning..., but they may not be. It has a higher possibility than might. Using very well with may (be learning) can mean several things. It really depends on the speaker's attitude toward ...


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It's the tobacco pipe mentioned here. — TFD noun a tube with a small bowl at one end; used for smoking tobacco Twist, refers to tobacco. — M-W 1.d. tobacco leaves twisted into a thick roll


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The Compression Service schedules compression of incoming images, so there will be some delay between receipt of an image and the storage of the compressed version of that image. An alternative to means another way of doing things. In this case, the other way is immediately compressing each image as it arrives.


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Bounded means delimited by boundaries or constraints. So you may see in a deed the lot bounded on the west by Main Street, on the south by Little Creek, .... The author is saying that every dawn as he walks over the land, he disregards the legal boundaries, making the land open (unbounded), and he figuratively transfers that lack of limitation to ...


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As far as I know, none of the authors of the following examples are considered to be "first-rate" by anyone (which helps make whatever "evidence" that's contained below fall well short of the "best proof" that you seek), but I’m most familiar with hearing and seeing “fluke” used negatively when the subject is disappointing performances, grades, or test ...


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The OP said: To me, the best proof in support would be an example of the broader use by a first-rate writer Here is an example of fluke being used, first as an unlucky accident, and second, as a lucky accident. The quotation is perhaps too long, but it illustrates that the first speaker used fluke as unlucky, and the second as lucky. From E. ...


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Nationalism is just a form of statism - the belief in state - and is as much a religion as Christianity, Islam, or Judaism. They all have their holy texts (Constitution, Bible, Koran, Torah), their prophets (president/king, Jesus, Mohammed, Abraham), their rituals (voting, communion, Hegira, Sabbath), and many other common concepts. In that context, I ...


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Lick can mean, among many other things, "a quick pace; speed" (sense 7, here). Thus to keep up one's lick means to keep up one's speed. Twain is saying that the watch does not keep correct time when out at sea. As for the use of "her" when referring to the watch, feminine pronouns are often used when referring to inanimate objects, especially artifacts ...


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Communicating Doors refer to two doors that are back to back, usually with a shared door frame. These are predominantly found in adjoining hotel rooms that can be occupied by two separate guests or guests that rent both and want to be able to go between rooms without going out into the public hall - a room with parents and the adjoining room with their ...


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"Fairweather fan" does the trick in the case of a sports team. A person who is supportive of and enthusiastic about a sports team only when that team is performing well. "I've been rooting for the home team in their playoff run, but I'll admit I'm just a fair-weather fan." TFD


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You could call it a [help] vampire. From Urban Dictionary: A term used most frequently by chat room programmers for blood suckers who aren't interested in the functions or inner workings of a solution but rather the end result. They normally mask themselves in chat rooms pretending to ask for "help." See also: The help vampire problem and slash7.


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The word highly is important here. The sentence is discussing what highly influences global warming. Do many scientists believe human activities highly influence global warming? Yes. Do those many scientists believe natural fluctuations highly influence global warming? No. The word 'highly' leaves open the possibility that those scientists believe ...


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Generally speaking, a bum rap is a false accusation of criminal behavior. "Rap" is an accusation (consider "rap sheet" still used on cop shows in the US) and "bum", in this sense, means "bad" or "false". But in the OP's example the term is used as a play on words -- if your car is rear-ended you have been "rapped" on the "bum" (where "bum" in this sense ...


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I have never heard of just a "trigger reaction" being used like this. I think you could be speaking of one of two things: Hair-trigger reaction 1: immediately responsive to the slightest stimulus (a hair–trigger temper) Source: Mirriam-Webster To trigger (a reaction) to cause someone to do or say something (The report has triggered a fierce ...


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It refers to a prompt and often strong reaction to something said or done: to trigger a reaction: to cause someone to do or say something: trigger a response/reaction: The report has triggered a fierce response from the governor. (MacMillan Dictionary)


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My answer is inspired by thinking from an AI or chess engine perspective. A chess engine or AI appears only as smart as its programming and is in that sense limited by its programming or design or perhaps even the hardware it is running on. It may then appear smart enough to play good chess overall, but still fail to recognize certain patterns, because ...


1

It means that the person has faith in God, and considers themselves blessed by God, and so doesn't let life's stresses get to them too much.


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Estimable means (among other things) 'Capable of being estimated, valued, or appraised' (OED). So no need for 'estimatable', which is probably used because people assume estimable only means 'worthy of esteem or regard'. (I would say 1880 hits in Google Scholar counts as a 'real word' but I prefer 'estimable' as it was already there, fits the need, is ...


2

The sentence is complicated. I think maybe the best thing to do is re-word the sentence in a way that might be easier to understand. Jonas and Gabriel saw deer; and once, beside the road, looking at them curious and unafraid, a small reddish-brown creature with a thick tail, whose name Jonas did not know. Jonas and Gabriel saw deer. Another ...


0

Heresy: opinion profoundly at odds with what is generally accepted. Heretic: a person holding an opinion at odds with what is generally accepted.


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'Putting returns': probably means hitting the return key. In other words, start new paragraphs on new lines. 'forensic examination:' literally 'forensic' is to do with scientific examination of evidence of crime, figuratively it can mean something like 'in thorough detail', which in this instance would mean (I assume here that you are discussing cricket) ...


0

Could be an awkward translation of The king is dead, long live the king! The original phrase was translated from the French Le roi est mort, vive le roi !, which was first declared upon the accession to the French throne of Charles VII after the death of his father Charles VI in 1422. In France, the declaration was traditionally made by the duc d'Uzès, ...


1

Live on To persist; endure: Although The Beatles broke up decades ago, their music lives on. thefreedictionary.com They are saying that although the person may be dead, his legacy is still persisting.


2

Chambers gives a definition of nice as done with great care and exactness and I think the element of 'care' is relevant here. The person will be taking care to ensure that whatever it is is dried and ready for use. Nicely ( or the variant of nice and...) personalises what would otherwise be a bald statement of efficiency.


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Campaign means "an organized course of action to achieve a goal" and towards "in the direction of". Hence "to campaign towards" would simply mean an organized course of action to achieve a goal in a direction of (something). For example, It is important for us to campaign towards the goals that are necessary to sustain a stable, comfortable ...


0

When used as a verb, "to campaign" means to participate in a campaign for a person or cause or even against a person or cause. But "to campaign towards" does not fit into that mold. A person using such a construction perhaps intends to indicate movement towards a goal. It's the sort of mixed usage one might hear in spoken English but not read in ...


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It may not be you but some other person or the nature (wind, sun) that dries the thing. You could have it dried by your mother, for example.


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Answer: reticent Solution: "Although" sets up a contrast between what has occurred – success on some issues – and what can be expected to occur – success for the whole talks. Hence, the parties are reluctant to express optimism. The common word "reluctant" is not offered as an answer-choice, but a synonym – reticent – is.


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Given the programming context, perhaps edge case would be relevant? It doesn't capture the entire sense of blind spot, but could be given some extra context, e.g. "untested edge case". See this Wikipedia article.


1

There seems to be some debate as to whether 'I could crush a grape' was used to mean 'I'm genuinely excited' or 'I'm supposed to be excited about this but I'm underwhelmed'. As it was used in a children's show watched also by adults, I would suggest that the children would assume the former but the real meaning for the adults was the latter. For the ...


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I am just interpreting this in the way I understand. Let us take the example of a teacher marking an essay. Many a time the teacher finds that the students instead of moving from one point in an essay to another, for want of matter may try to camouflage his lack of knowledge of the subject by wording the same thing differently. The teacher however sees ...


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It's actually very simple: "As he said before, my car's making a funny noise". -And- "As he mentioned before, his car is making a funny noise". (In this context they're nearly the same) However, given a bit of context, these uses multiply a bit. ie: If your context were to include something along the lines of "the boss mentioned were're all going to have ...



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