Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

38

It's a common, longstanding American slang idiom intended to convey that no matter what you've seen, what you are about to see will far top it (whether for good or for bad!). It has associations with pop-music and black American culture and expression, but it's a little dated --it has a retro feel to it these days. Deliberately ungrammatical constructions ...


14

You are incorrect. Weird means odd: strikingly odd or unusual, especially in an unsettling way; strange. AHDEL Sometimes a word reflects to a person the biases of the person hearing/reading it. Here are some perfectly non-sexual and common used of the word weird. Weird News: California Man Fatally Stabbed By Rooster It was weird the way the ...


14

Wikipedia mentions the following: Diogenes Laërtius records the legend that he died by throwing himself into an active volcano (Mount Etna in Sicily), so that people would believe his body had vanished and he had turned into an immortal god; the volcano, however, threw back one of his bronze sandals, revealing the deceit. Although I cannot say I ever ...


14

What is described in the passage you provided is actually referred to as a "half-truth". A white lie is when you tell someone their outfit looks nice when there's no time for them to change it.


12

I was a bit puzzled with the expression, “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.” Isn’t this a double negative, which I learnt to be an affirmative statement in high school almost 70 years ago?. The meaning is akin to "you haven't yet seen the best, most interesting, or most exciting part". "You ain't seen nothing yet" is a common expression -- it shows up a lot ...


10

A native speaker wouldn't tell you to take the "right car", when he means "the car on the right". When in doubt, context is everything.


8

For slang use, Urban Dictionary can be rather enlightening. If a word has a slang sense which hasn't yet made it into mainstream publications, the online community maintaining the Urban Dictionary can often come up trumps. But even Urban Dictionary doesn't define weird as "paedophile", or even "sexually perverted". The closest that gets is 2.2: "horny; ...


8

The meaning of fall short is more like not quite reaching. For example, if you throw a ball and it falls short then it doesn't go as far as you intended to throw it, it does not reach its target. From this you can see that fall short might have a negative meaning if someone's behaviour falls short of what is expected of them. However, in your quotation the ...


7

It's more a constellation than a continuum, but here's what I would say: allegedly (we are distancing ourselves from responsibility for something) purportedly (someone else has responsibility for it) seemingly (I take some responsibility for the evidence given me by my senses) supposedly (other entities have indicated it might be true, which I may or may ...


7

That person could be called a "braggart" From the Google Dictionary: brag·gart /ˈbraɡərt/ noun: braggart; plural noun: braggarts a person who boasts about achievements or possessions.


7

The writer of that article (or the person they are quoting) has used 'spore' where they should have said spoor, which Oxforddictionaries.com defines thus: NOUN The track or scent of an animal: EXAMPLE SENTENCES they searched around the hut for a spoor the trail is marked by wolf spoor As it was vanishing on the hill-tops, a group ...


6

It seems odd, doesn't it? But really, it's a very similar meaning to alloy in the context of a mixture of metals. The missing piece is that alloy was often used metaphorically in a negative sense to mean that something pure was mixed with something base, a little like we might say "muddy". So to alloy is to stain or to taint. Her disposition tended to ...


6

You mentioned food products as an example. 'No artificial ingredients,' or 'all natural' come to mind. These terms are unregulated by the FDA in America (only 'organic' has real meaning on packaging in these terms). So in this sense, these words are meaningless when used in advertising or on packaging. I believe that answers part of your question. The ...


5

It pretty much depends on context. If someone talks about "making a right turn," you can pretty safely assume they mean right-left right, and if someone talks about "making the right decision," they clearly mean right-wrong right. If the context doesn't help, as in your example, you could rephrase it slightly, such as saying "the car on the right" to mean ...


4

Blowhard : someone who always brags or boasts about himself. He is also a braggart, bragger, line-shooter, vaunter, etc. Blowhard is an informal word describing someone who can't stop talking about themselves or their accomplishments, real or imagined. From ODO: blowhard: A person who blusters and boasts in an unpleasant way. My pick for an ...


4

The standard colloquial term for such behaviour is one-upmanship - the technique or practice of gaining an advantage or feeling of superiority over another person


4

The term "on fleek" first appears in Google Trends in July 2014. (It's difficult to find actual pages with it prior to 2014 due to content aggregation, e.g. 2008 posts on sites with twitter side bars come up in Google searches for "on fleek" limited by time, despite the phrase being part of a 2014 tweet, so I'm not able to truly say it began this year, but ...


4

It means that the person saying it is not listening so you may as well talk to their hand. It's often extended to something like "Talk to the hand, 'cause the face ain't listening". I believe an image will help here:


4

Yes it can be use a alone, but the exact meaning will depend on context and in some cases it may be ambiguous. For example in British (and I expect European Union) food labelling law, an ingredient is considered artificial if it includes a chemical compound that was created other than in a living thing or natural process.


4

The term closest to what is described in the story is "lie by omission". “”You told the truth up to a point, but a lie of omission is still a lie. Lying by omission, otherwise known as exclusionary detailing, is lying by either omitting certain facts or by failing to correct a misconception. Lying by omission - RationalWiki A white lie is different, ...


4

In general, an injunction stops somebody from doing something, a mandate requires somebody to do something, and a verdict is the final decision handed down by the bench. In light of the edit: Black's definition of mandate. Note that a mandate is directed at the official responsible for enforcement, and it's a mandate to enforce the will of the court. An ...


4

As far as I have seen, it is used as a sarcastic cheer. It is used as ‘excellent!’, ‘brilliant!’, ‘genius!’ sarcastically.


3

According to Urban Dictionary, a common slang word for such a person is a topper; they always have to "top" what someone else says.


3

Apparently, it refers to: "more humble, simpler food that is more accessible, but no less delicious that kaiseki, which is Japanese haute cuisine." I have also seen it called "Japan's comfort food." Japan's many fine restaurants have a world-class reputation for gourmet fare, but the national focus of late is on a different "class" of ...


3

I share your disagreement with your colleague. largely has two common meanings: Mostly (¨for the most part¨) On a large scale The first meaning is entirely inappropriate, because it is talking about the distribution of activity across the available options. Largely it contributed to the understanding of Y but it also, at times, turned up new ...


3

A slightly tongue-in-cheek sense of abet is reasonable here: abet v.t. to encourage, support, or countenance by aid or approval, usu. in wrongdoing. Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 At APLS we find such a tongue-in-cheek (encouraging in mischief rather than evil) usage: Kirkus Reviews Funke and Meyer ...


3

The author's argument seems to be that people (in the author's society) formerly told the truth but that now they don't tell the truth - or at minimum, that they now view truth-telling as an unusual and antiquated habit. The tone is that of curmudgeonly insistence that people acted better in the 'good old days'; as opposed to the morally degenerate society ...


3

The word "weird" has no specific relationship with sexuality, per se. The question seems to be one of cultural dynamics rather than the English language.


3

Although The Economist article clearly uses junkets in the sense of “gambling trip facilitators,” this isn’t the only meaning that the term has. One (relatively) longstanding and common use of the term junket is to describe a some-expenses-paid trip to a casino—a meaning that seems not to have originated in a specifically Asian context. From Darwin Ortiz, ...


3

It is called half-rhyme. ...is a type of rhyme formed by words with similar but not identical sounds. In most instances, either the vowel segments are different while the consonants are identical, or vice versa. [Wikipedia] It also has a bunch of other names: near-rhyme lazy rhyme approximate rhyme inexact rhyme imperfect rhyme (in contrast to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible