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38

This is an instance of the Halo effect: Halo effect is a cognitive bias in which an observer's overall impression of a person, company, brand, or product influences the observer's feelings and thoughts about that entity's character The businessman is respected in his profession, so everyone thinks his character, including his conduct towards children, ...


31

It's called litotes In rhetoric, litotes is a figure of speech wherein understatement is used to emphasize a point by stating a negative to further affirm a positive, often incorporating double negatives for effect For example, "She's not bad looking" could be used to express that someone is gorgeous. Or it could convey that she's not particularly ...


28

The attributive noun Teflon (semi-genericised) is often used: Teflon Trademark. a fluorocarbon polymer with slippery, nonsticking properties: used in the manufacture of electrical insulation, cookware coatings, etc. ... characterized by imperviousness to blame or criticism: a Teflon politician. {RHK Webster's} It would make of ...


28

Such a person can do no wrong used for saying that someone is considered by other people to be perfect, although you may not agree with this opinion His parents think he can do no wrong. He might also be called above the law in a position where one can avoid being bound by the laws that govern ordinary people. "the army was above the law and ...


7

The two terms ceremonial and cerimonious have the same root "cerinomy" but meaning and usage are different even though they are often incorrectly used as synonyms: “Ceremonial” and “ceremonious” are often considered synonyms, and can indeed be used interchangeably in many contexts. But there are some cases in which one is better than the other. If ...


7

Perhaps this is an example of an "abuse of trust." Abuse of Trust References in periodicals archive IPCC Commissioner for Wales Tom Davies said: "This was an appalling abuse of trust by a police officer dealing with three vulnerable women who expected the police to protect them. Two officers are suspended over sex cop claims; Policemen face ... by ...


7

I think that the key point is not that this person will not only not be prosecuted or punished (as expressed by being above the law), but not even be suspected or criticized as expressed by: unimpeachable: not able to be doubted, questioned, or criticized; entirely trustworthy beyond reproach / irreproachable: such that no criticism can be made; perfect.


7

Hustle might work as an alternative to the violent implications of shoved, : verb 1 [WITH OBJECT] Push roughly; jostle: they were hissed and hustled as they went in 1.1 [WITH OBJECT AND ADVERBIAL OF DIRECTION] Force (someone) to move hurriedly or unceremoniously: I was hustled away to a cold cell 1.2 [NO OBJECT, WITH ADVERBIAL OF ...


6

A little bird tells me the word you might be looking for is verbose adjective using or expressed in more words than are needed. "much academic language is obscure and verbose" (Google) It seems to me to fit the requirements. Edit: The birdy has reminded me to mention Tautology (grammar), is an unnecessary repetition of meaning, using multiple ...


5

In that passage, the speaker was referring to a class distinction in the usage of the words. He was saying, in essence, that an upper-class (hence upper-deck) Englishman would never use the crass word "toilet", he would always say lavatory (that's pronounced LAV-a-tree in British, LAV-a-Tor-ee in American). To use "toilet", in his view, marks one as being ...


5

Such a person is usually called a sacred cow. Definition: Free Dictionary One that is immune from criticism, often unreasonably so Example: Peer review is often thought of as ancient and unchanging, but it is neither – and it shouldn’t be treated as a sacred cow (Times)


5

nudge : to touch or push (someone or something) gently : to encourage (someone) to do something http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nudge


5

Yes, it is a woman who does household chores for remuneration. She does not live as a member of the household.


5

The literal definition of rally welcomes application to any metaphorical battle: verb (rallies, rallying, rallied) [NO OBJECT] 1.0 (Of troops) come together again in order to continue fighting after a defeat or dispersion: De Montfort’s troops rallied and drove back the king’s infantry 1.1 [WITH OBJECT] Bring together (forces) again in ...


4

How about "underachiever"? underachieve verb, intrans to be less successful than expected, especially academically; to fail to fulfil one's potential. underachievement noun. underachiever noun. [Chambers 21st Century Dictionary] If you're referring to someone who never attains their desires or goals then you might describe them as "a ...


4

Key meaning (computing) one of several small, usually square buttons on a typewriter or computer keyboard, mostly corresponding to text characters, derives from the keys (mechanisms) of musical instruments according to Etymonline: keyboard: 1819, from key in sense of "mechanism of a musical instrument" + board. Originally of pianos, organs, ...


4

Venom, poison, and to a lesser extent toxin are informally used interchangeably, referring to all substances that are harmful to living things. Below I will list what is my understanding of their technical differences; but as English is a living and very lax language, and as the words are used in multiple separate scientific fields, I'm sure there is some ...


4

If he goes off on a tangent , presenting facts unrelated to his point, he is circumlocutory or, in casual English: beating {around/about} the bush If he simply goes on and on, using more words than necessary, he is: prolix (adj) or verbose (adj) or using **verbiage (n) windy (or, more old-fashioned, a windbag) long-winded (adj.—this especially ...


4

Lost consciousness is a relatively technical phrase, and isn't that frequently used in informal conversation. It is an umbrella term that covers fainting among other reasons for losing consciousness. Fainting is when someone loses consciousness with no obvious physical cause. It can be a medical issue (as Centaurus mentioned), because they stood up too ...


4

It’s on the far side of the first–class lounge. It is indeed a matter of social class. For the historical background to the passage in your question, you might like to read about "U" and "Non U" language in this Wikipedia article which also includes the particular example from your passage. "U and non-U" was an entirely artificial construction of ...


4

The OED's entry for do, under Phrasal Verbs, has an entry to do for —, whose definition 1b is: colloq. To attend to; esp. to perform household tasks for, esp. as an employee. They give (among others) a 1997 citation from the Daily Telegraph: Mrs Simmons has ‘done for’ Mrs Lynton-Smith for 24 years. In context, it usually refers to light ...


4

When a group of people rally behind someone, it means they are uniting and cooperating to provide support to and solidarity with that person. If people rally behind one another, it means they are uniting for a common purpose.


3

Oral and Verbal: ( grammar.about.com) The adjective oral means pertaining to speech or to the mouth. The adjective verbal means pertaining to words, whether written or spoken (though verbal is sometimes treated as a synonym for oral). Usage notes: Oral communication is speech, conversation. Verbal ability is one's skill with words, ...


3

I have certainly come across this before. When people in town had to go to the pump to get their water, they'd stop and chat. So the "Town Pump" became a centre for the exchange of gossip, rumour and ideas. Rather like the forum in a Roman city. So one might imagine Patrick Wethered to be a key local source of chat, advice, gossip and friendly communication ...


3

Well, here's Merriam Webster on it: Full Definition of SOVEREIGN [adj] 1 a : superlative in quality b : of the most exalted kind : supreme; sovereign virtue c : having generalized curative powers (a sovereign remedy) d : of an unqualified nature : unmitigated (sovereign contempt) e : having undisputed ascendancy : ...


3

I would call it a "euphemism", a figure of speech where you substitute a milder word or phrase for one considered to be too harsh or offensive. ("you know, he isn't the smartest person in the world" instead of "he is dumb". A euphemism is a generally innocuous word or expression used in place of one that may be found offensive or suggest something ...


3

Possibly you are referring to a neologism. noun a newly coined word or expression. (Google)


3

One can lose consciousness for several reasons, not only because a traumatic skull injury but also because of any cerebrovascular disease, heart arrhythmias, licit or illicit drug overdose (alcohol included), very low blood pressure, etc. It's a technical term and it may be a serious condition or not. Fainting, on the other hand, is the everyday term and ...


3

Toilet (Online Etymology Dictionary): 1530s, earliest in English in an obsolete sense "cover or bag for clothes," from Middle French toilette "a cloth; a bag for clothes," diminutive of toile "cloth, net" (see toil (n.2)). Toilet acquired an association with upper class dressing by 18c., through the specific sense "a fine cloth cover on the ...


3

A "media splash" is noticeable coverage in news media -- newspapers, TV, radio, online outlets, etc. Here's a headline from The New York Times: Beyond Publish or Perish, Academic Papers Look to Make a Splash. It's about academic economists who want their papers reported on for a general readership instead of having them restricted to an audience of fellow ...



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