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27

Anthropomorphism is not limited to physical appearance, and does not imply specifically a spiritual or soul element. The attribution of human characteristics or behavior to a god, animal, or object (Oxford Dictionaries) So I believe it is the right term.


19

An alternative to "anthropomorphism" is the word personification. It is almost identical in meaning to anthropomorphism, although perhaps a bit less technical. According to Literary Devices, personification is: Personification is a figure of speech in which a thing, an idea or an animal is given human attributes. The non-human objects are portrayed in ...


18

"Murder to " do something means that it is very very hard. For example "That mountain is murder to climb", or "That course is murder to get an A in". In this case the tag is playing on the literal sense of murder also.


8

Aside from two matches to a Tumblr page with the name "The Cat's Evening Wear," a Google search returns the following six readable matches for the phrase. From a September 8, 2004, post at RoadbikeReview.com: My SO is the cat's evening wear, but useless when it comes to bike related anything. From a September 21, 2006, comment posted at Threadless.com: ...


7

There is no antonym for attend, because there are so many possible ways, and reasons, not to attend. It is not usually wise to assume that any word has a one-word antonym, for just this reasson. Your edited question, though, is more reasonable: missing (a class) without justification could be shortened to skipping. I would, however, call this slightly too ...


7

You ask a lot in this question and the two answers at the time of writing address different things and I agree with them both (anthropomorphism would be an apt term for it). Neither addresses your final question: But when it comes to functions and articles assuming things or drawing conclusions, is it ever "OK", even in an informal sense? Yes it is. ...


7

If the author's eyesight was improving, he could only be writing about his past damaged sight. In this case, the tense of "what I saw" is incorrect - it should be "what I had seen". So that scenario should be ruled out.


6

If google-style translation can be trusted, the closes expression in English would be someone who is "slow to warm to" or "slow to warm up to" people. From The Comprehensive Preschool Curriculum by Albrecht and Miller: Fearful children avoid new situations and are slow to warm to new people and experiences. while The Essentials of Pediatric Nursing ...


5

My impression of the excerpted language is that the author is reflecting on the fact that children often behave in ways that adults do not, and yet children's behavior is somehow easier to respond to and manage than adults' behavior because children's behavior has an element of guilelessness or a simplicity of motive and action that makes it easier to calm ...


4

Art is about the individual; Science is about people working together. There is always hope, unless we are truly in hell. But (the writer sees something limiting or unsatisfactory in hope) only in heaven could we be beyond (or above) hope. Summer makes everybody special, or "royal". (Difficult to interpret without context, but I suggest:) I can always ...


4

From dictionary.com... sate to satisfy (any appetite or desire) fully. to fill to excess; surfeit; glut. satiate to supply with anything to excess, so as to disgust or weary; surfeit. to satisfy to the full; sate. This would seem to imply that they are mostly synonyms. The word origin dates seem to imply that sate is a newer ...


4

OK, since what Peter Shor and I were telling you in the comments hasn't done the whole job, let's walk through this step by step: I'm goin'-a take that right hand road "goin'-a" is an unusual way to write "gonna", which is a contraction of "going to" and yields I'm going to take that right hand road "right hand" (or "right-hand") ...


4

Wow! They are expecting a lot in this quiz. It is more like a cryptic crossword clue. emphatic is an adjective, denial is a noun (thus they can't be antonyms) vehement is a near synonym for emphatic - they are not opposites conclusive describes the correctness of a statement, emphatic describes how it was made That only leaves (4). The explanation that ...


4

Animism would apply to situations where an inanimate object is believed to possess will, choice, and motive. But that's hardly the right word for the linguistic practice you cited, where that which is authored by a human being (a paper, a function, a work of plastic art, music) is made the subject. We treat the created work as a proxy for the author, as ...


4

A fairly common requirement, when letters of recommendation are handled by the person who is recommended, is that the recommender puts the letter in an envelope, seals the envelope, and signs his name across the place where the envelope is sealed. The idea is that the person who is recommended cannot then open the envelope and read the letter before sending ...


3

The expression originated as 'deus ex machina' from a Latin translation as shown below and its modern meaning refer to a literary/artistic device used to solve apparently irresolvable situations ( as if by divine intervention). 'Ex machina' as such just refers to its original expression. In the movie, the scientist Nathan appears to be the 'Deus ex ...


3

Beleaguered Dictionary.com: to surround or beset, as with troubles Cambridge: having so many difficulties that you feel as if you are being attacked from every direction Merriam-Webster: to cause constant or repeated trouble for (a person, business, etc.) The already beleaguered family once again receives a visit from misfortune as...


3

Perhaps the word you are looking for is discourage, although it is similar to demotivate. Definition of discourage by Google: "cause (someone) to lose confidence or enthusiasm." Usage examples: "I don't want to discourage you, but I don't think it's such a good idea," "she was discouraged by his hostile tone." So your statement would read: "Now I was ...


3

It depends what you mean by correct. If you mean grammatically correct then yes, they both are. If you mean that your version is a correct (i.e. 100% accurate) paraphrase of the original then no it isn't. Explanation My clothes disintegrated, victims of the sea. A possible paraphrase is: My clothes disintegrated [through being] victims of the sea. ...


3

"Killer in the Rain" is a 1935 Raymond Chandler short story that the author incorporated into his novel The Big Sleep. In both works the narrator is the private detective Philip Marlowe, who returns to the La Verne Terrace house of Harold Steiner. (In the novel, Steiner, renamed Geiger, is a pornographer and blackmailer.) Previously Marlowe had found his ...


3

The key to answering this question is "through damaged eyes". If it had been "through recovering eyes" or some such,then C and E would have been correct. The negative connotation associated with "through damaged eyes" makes A and D the right choice.


3

The meaning of those phrases is their literal meaning. If you do not understand any of the words, you can look them up in a dictionary. The passage is saying that children will, when faced with a substitute teacher, misbehave. Examples of such behavior include lifting one's skirt above one's head (if one is wearing a skirt, presumably) and removing one's ...


2

Informally, camels walk and run just like other four footed creatures. This is 'walk' and 'run' are the verbs to use for slow and fast travel. But if you're talking technically about gait (link gives some biological explanation too), the patterns of leg movement at various speeds, the labels for these gaits are similar to that for horses. Like horses, ...


2

A camel walks or gallops. This website has plenty of information and facts on camels, like Speed: Walking speed is 3 miles per hour (m.p.h.). A camel caravan would normally travel 25 miles a day. A racing camel can reach 12 m.p.h. at a gallop for short distances. This speed was used by Arab warriors in attacking an enemy. A female camel is a cow.


2

One of the definitions of naked is Exposed to harm; unprotected or vulnerable: John looked naked and defenseless without his glasses Oxford Dictionaries Online The whole phrase would suggest that the person is in a hostile environment, an unfriendly world. The term is also used to suggest an emotional vulnerability, or transparency, especially one ...


2

My father has used that expression all his life. He was born in 1920, which is in agreement with the idea that the expression was somewhat common through the 1920s-1940's. From context I always understood it to mean, as others have stated, of poor quality, a last resort. Interestingly, he is from New Hampshire with no Yiddish connections. Perhaps if the ...


2

I'd suggest wounded or battered in this case. Since your second half of the sentence sets up the image of being visited (and hurt) by misfortune, it would make sense to keep the image in mind in the first half.


2

These terms are often used in computer hardware, software and testing. source would mean to produce and sink to consume something, in this case a configurable constant current of electricity.


2

Praise Merriam-Webster: say or write good things about (someone or something): A good teacher praises students when they do well. Macmillan: express strong approval or admiration for someone or something, especially in public: Mayor Dixon praised the efforts of those involved in the rescue.


2

I think it means that he established, through his policies, a constituency of support that he would in future be able to rely upon to provide a national majority. One way this can be done is by appealing to voters who hitherto have never voted - the poor etc. Another way is to capture the centre ground, so that people who had previously voted for your ...



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