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18

I would argue that Cassandra does work here: the name is often used metaphorically, in a variety of fields. For example, achieving a clear, shared vision in an organization is often difficult due to a lack of commitment to the new vision by some individuals in the organization, because it does not match reality as they see it. Those who support the new ...


12

"Within an inch of his/her/its life" is an idiom which means "almost to the point of death" or, more generally, "to an excessive degree". It is commonly used after the verb "beat", as in "The dog was beaten within an inch of its life." The writer seems to mean that Kelly promoted the show to an excessive degree.


9

It is not a set phrase. In your example, the sentence is being used as hyperbole (or exaggeration). The writer is trying to convey that Kelley would have done anything in order to make the interview, even something as extreme as crawling over coals. Although your example does not use a set phrase, there are several other coal-themed idioms in English. These ...


4

I can only propose an answer. I have no vetted grammar sources to lend weight to these ideas. Parties are portrayed as countable. In other words they are conceived of as punctive events which have beginnings and ends. Each bout of activity is portrayed as an event with a start and end point. In contrast, partying is seen as an uncountable activity. ...


4

Just by way of confirming the consensus among commenters above that the "walkie" refers to the many legs a caterpillar is supposed to have, I note that a common version of this joke involves crossing a parrot with a centipede (for example, here, here, and here). Since the name centipede derives from the equivalent of "hundred foot," it probably makes a ...


4

Lacuna — OED noun (plural lacunae /ləˈkjuːniː/ or lacunas) 1 An unfilled space; a gap: 'the journal has filled a lacuna in Middle Eastern studies' 'Thus, divergent growth apparently prompted offsetting, in order for the coral to maintain the lacuna and occupy the space around it.' 'Fill the lacunae in your inspiration by ...


4

Double-take for right doesn't mean anything because you've spliced together two pieces of two different constituents and asked what the result means. It doesn't. To better understand this sentence, you need to read for as meaning because, and you should probably put a comma before it. That sentence would or should probably cause a double-take, because ...


4

Trail: (when: intr, often foll by behind) to lag or linger behind (a person or thing). (Collins) The sentence suggests that markets expectations in the past have followed and are still following what the FED is doing, or is expected to do, in terms of monetary policy.


4

'Would crawl over a heap of hot coals' isn't a set phrase, but it is a variation of Would walk over hot coals, which is. Would walk over hot coals for/would sooner walk over hot coals than... conveys great dedication to the person or circumstance that you would walk over coals for/in preference to, such that you would be prepared to risk your own personal ...


4

Lick can mean, among many other things, "a quick pace; speed" (sense 7, here). Thus to keep up one's lick means to keep up one's speed. Twain is saying that the watch does not keep correct time when out at sea. As for the use of "her" when referring to the watch, feminine pronouns are often used when referring to inanimate objects, especially artifacts ...


3

Having searched for that phrase and read the article (and I learned something I never knew I needed to...), I think it's used in the sense of the key components of urine were present in the fluid, at the levels you'd expect in normal urine. The key components hadn't been diluted in the fluid, and thus you could conclude that the fluid was urine and not urine ...


3

The verb tease, as used in this instance, is related to the word teaser, meaning (according to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary) an advertising or promotional device intended to arouse interest or curiosity esp. in something to follow So the story is saying that Kelly was using various media interactions to drum up interest in the TV ...


3

You might call this type of person an X's X. "Jane Smith isn't very well-known, but she's a mathematician's mathematician." "Some people might not get his humor, but John Smith is a comedian's comedian." This means that this person is not well-known by the public, but is popular among people in that particular field.


3

"Fairweather fan" does the trick in the case of a sports team. A person who is supportive of and enthusiastic about a sports team only when that team is performing well. "I've been rooting for the home team in their playoff run, but I'll admit I'm just a fair-weather fan." TFD


3

The OP said: To me, the best proof in support would be an example of the broader use by a first-rate writer Here is an example of fluke being used, first as an unlucky accident, and second, as a lucky accident. The quotation is perhaps too long, but it illustrates that the first speaker used fluke as unlucky, and the second as lucky. From E. ...


3

It's the tobacco pipe mentioned here. — TFD noun a tube with a small bowl at one end; used for smoking tobacco Twist, refers to tobacco. — M-W 1.d. tobacco leaves twisted into a thick roll


2

'Bucking' as opposing The phrases "buck traffic" and "buck a trend" are examples of the verb buck used in the sense 1(b) below (from Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary): buck vt (1750) 1 a archaic : BUTT [meaning "to to strike or shove with the head or horns"] b : OPPOSE, RESIST {bucking the system} 2 : to throw (as a rider) by bucking 3 : ...


2

I haven't found a distinction between the noun prosthesis and the noun prosthetic, or their plural forms prostheses and prosthetics, when used to mean "artificial body parts." They are synonyms, like dyslexic and dyslectic. Prosthetics(s) is listed in the Oxford English Dictionary with this meaning, with several citations from medical or surgical sources, so ...


2

Also, 'Pearls before Swine', which means to show valuable things to people who disregard them. It's pretty negative, but it's usually used in a light hearted way. In a pub quiz, you might suggest an answer and have it dismissed. You would say 'Pearls before Swine', implying that you words are pearls, and the people you are playing with are too obtuse to see ...


2

"To compete for the control of a corporation" This reads well when it's a person within the company competing in a legal context. Where the competition is about having legal standing to lead the company. "To compete for the control over a corporation" This reads well when it's corporations competing to control another corporation. This would ...


2

It is hard to guess what do you mean by "weakness". If you mean performance, then the "weakest" part of your program is called [the] bottleneck: A point of congestion or blockage, in particular.


2

To be "in deep" can be understood as: inextricably involved in or committed to a situation. "He knew that he was in deep when his things began to proliferate in her apartment" Your sentence looks like a variation on it. Sometimes, a "strong" or negative word is omitted in spoken sentences, which in this situation could have been depression, as ...


2

Chambers gives a definition of nice as done with great care and exactness and I think the element of 'care' is relevant here. The person will be taking care to ensure that whatever it is is dried and ready for use. Nicely ( or the variant of nice and...) personalises what would otherwise be a bald statement of efficiency.


2

The sentence is complicated. I think maybe the best thing to do is re-word the sentence in a way that might be easier to understand. Jonas and Gabriel saw deer; and once, beside the road, looking at them curious and unafraid, a small reddish-brown creature with a thick tail, whose name Jonas did not know. Jonas and Gabriel saw deer. Another ...


2

As far as I know, none of the authors of the following examples are considered to be "first-rate" by anyone (which helps make whatever "evidence" that's contained below fall well short of the "best proof" that you seek), but I’m most familiar with hearing and seeing “fluke” used negatively when the subject is disappointing performances, grades, or test ...


1

You may be looking for alienation a withdrawing or separation of a person or a person's affections from an object or position of former attachment from M-W.com/alienation or estrangement: to arouse especially mutual enmity or indifference in where there had formerly been love, affection, or friendliness from M-W.com/estrange These options ...


1

Disloyal Adopted children often fear being disloyal to their adoptive parents if they try to learn who their birth parents are, even if only for medical purposes. Disloyal, Collins not loyal or faithful; deserting one's allegiance or duty Because disloyal is not loyal, let's define loyal: Merriam-Webster: having or showing complete and ...


1

Consider candidate A person or thing regarded as suitable for or likely to receive a particular fate, treatment, or position Oxford Dictionary Online (The downside is possible association with politicos we may not like during this election season)


1

"Running numbers" refers to working for an illegal lottery scheme, generally as a low-level member. See the Numbers Game article in Wikipedia, particularly the "In Popular Culture" section.


1

Although it doesn't describe the person, the phrase "casting pearls before swine" might apply to the situation. It's originally from the Bible (Matthew 7:6: "Do not give dogs what is holy; do not throw your pearls before swine. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and then turn and tear you to pieces."). From the Cambridge dictionary: cast ...



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