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10

"Season after season" is a phrase meaning "over many seasons" or "repeatedly". If you substitute "repeatedly" for "season after season" in the sentence it should be easily understandable. Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short repeatedly with their current crop ...


9

Because disciplinary simply means concerned with discipline, and discipline can mean not chastisement but field of knowledge, disciplinary expertise means expertise in a particular area. That is, it is the same thing as domain expertise. Compare with interdisciplinary meaning related to more than one branch of knowledge. Without the inter- part, it simply ...


6

In the United States, Canada and Australia, primary and secondary education together are sometimes referred to as K-12 education, and in New Zealand Year 1–13 is used. The purpose of secondary education can be to give common knowledge, to prepare for higher education, or to train directly in a profession. -Wikipedia Education As @ab2 kindly affirmed K-12 ...


5

Could the word discipline be used rather than disciplinary? MW dictionary for discipline: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/discipline #3 definition is "a field of study". The author is using a root word (discipline) with common usage with a common suffix. Not all prefixes and suffixes of all words are in the dictionary; These are not normally ...


5

Origin of the proverb 'There is honour among thieves' According to G.L. Apperson, The Wordworth Dictionary of Proverbs (1993), the notion that thieves share a bond of honorable conduct goes back at least as far as Cicero: There is honour among thieves. {Cum igitur tanta vis iustitiae sit, ut ea etiam latronum opes firmet atque augeat.—Ciciero, Off[ices],...


5

"Bilingual" describes someone who is versatile in two languages. If you want to describe someone who has mastered multiple languages, you could call them a "polyglot", although this is properly "someone who speaks 5 or more languages." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyglot_(disambiguation)) Also relevant is the word "biliterate," simply meaning "able to ...


5

Automatic transmission reference, meaning leave it in gear, don't stop, don't park, just keep going.... "and leave it all behind". "Put it in Drive" is an incredibly common phrase in north American English to mean "put it into gear and go". "Leave it in drive" is less common compared to a phrase such as "keep going", but for song construction you often look ...


5

London town is a colloquial expression to refer to modern London in a way that evokes traditional sentiments, to a time where it wasn't as populated. Nicknames of Places: Origins and Meanings of the Alternate and Secondary Names, Sobriquets, Titles, Epithets and Slogans for 4600 Places Worldwide "London Town London, England. A form of the British ...


5

The TBT Acronym or hashtag used in a social media app such as Instagram or Vine, or on a website like Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Tumblr, Reddit, etc It means ThrowBack Thursday, basically where you remember things from your past on Thursday, or any day of the week. Here it refers to a confrontation between the two leaders. From the Washington ...


4

All of the current answers explain that "season after season" can be replaced by "after many [consecutive] seasons", but I wanted to add the origin of this construction. "[time word] after [time word]" is a very common English idiom, and it takes many forms: "Time after time" "Day after day" "Week after week" "Month after month" "Year after year" (as you ...


4

I think the "'way" could be replaced by "deep": "turtles deep down in the pond were afraid" or you could compare "far", it can be used similar. the "far" east...in principle you could say simply "east" but that does not say anything about the extend to which it is east from where you are. So you add "far" meaning it is "a long way from your position, in ...


4

A bust is a statue of the upper part of someone's body. Often head and shoulders. Nowadays, where a bust of Churchill sits (probably in a public space), if you (probably 'the authorities') try to move it (for example to a different plinth) this will cause controversy. Churchill has gained a saintly reputation which the author believes is undeserved.


4

Adding to @Josh61's answer, #TBT is used only on Thursday and its primary purpose is to let others know how you looked in the past by posting a picture of your earlier time. TBT, TT, FBF: These terms are for types of flashbacks, to show friends and family a glimpse of the past. TBT stands for “throwback Thursday” and is one of the most popular ...


4

"I dislike his being blunt" means I dislike it when he speaks in a blunt manner. "I dislike him being blunt" means I dislike this person-- when he is being blunt. Actually, the first is more grammatically correct--and this is probably what the speaker means to say--- but people very often use the second way.


3

I think that's correct, although perhaps a bit unusual. I agree that a catalogue can be any kind of systematic, carefully constructed list, not just a list of items sold at a store or a list of books in a library. Merriam-Webster includes this definition: "a complete enumeration of items arranged systematically with descriptive details." And the New Oxford ...


3

It is indeed straight from the definition of perennial: enduring, persistent, and timeless would be proper synonyms. "All-time favorite" really would not. When used by movie reviewers, perennial favorite is a sort of industry term for a film with long-lasting appeal to audiences; it is still beloved even after much time has elapsed. Examples of perennial ...


3

[the] reveal the moment in which previously withheld information about characters or plot is unveiled.


3

This is called learning by rote. A kind of learning style that isn't really learning but repeating exactly as you were told. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rote_learning.


3

The noun for this is "polyglot". "Polyglotism or polyglottism is the ability to master, or the state of having mastered, multiple languages." "Multilinguist" is a synonym for this.


3

Season after season means the same as after many seasons. "after falling short season after season" The second "after" means that Arsenal was falling short after the season, after many seasons. "...they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short after many seasons..."


3

Those are generally referred to as traffic signs or road signs: signs erected at the side of or above roads to give instructions or provide information to road users. The earliest signs were simple wooden or stone milestones. Later, signs with directional arms were introduced, for example, the fingerposts in the United Kingdom and their wooden ...


3

Jar, as a verb, means to have an unpleasant, annoying, or disturbing effect. "Jarred to life" means the same thing as "sprang to life" (Silenus's comment has a good example.) In this case, jar is a synonym of jolt, shake, startle, disturb and provoke.


3

The usual term is throw down the gauntlet, referring to the practice of challenging someone to a duel by throwing your gauntlet (glove) down in front of the person you're challenging. Laid down the gauntlet is not the usual idiom, but apparently is used, with the same meaning.


3

It is spelled cashed. From McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions, via TFD: cashed 1. mod. expired; depleted; burnt out. (From cashed in.) My pen is cashed. Where can I get a new one?   2. mod. tired. Man, I’m cashed. Can we rest here for a while? Wiktionary backs up this sense of cashed (again, ...


3

Historically, in British English, a bootblack. But Chambers (iPhone edition), which I quote below, also has shoeblack, which I have never encountered myself. boot'black noun 1. A person whose job is to clean and polish shoes 2. A shoeblack The 1993 paper edition of Chambers does not include shoeshiner (the iPhone edition lists it without definition)...


3

Sterile (adj.) not able to produce children or young I believe "scientifically sterile generations" means that those generations are not able to produce science. That is not exactly the same as those generations having nothing to contribute to science. You can contribute to science, without producing science. Older generations can produce science, and the ...


3

To flounder might be a suitable word. From Google: Flounder struggle or stagger clumsily in mud or water. "he was floundering about in the shallow offshore waters". (To do it successfully would probably be treading water).


2

Note that traffic sign is a general-purpose term that includes hazard warnings, speed limits, etc. A sign telling you which road to take to get somewhere (or telling you where you'll end up if you continue on your present course) is more specifically called a... signpost - sign giving information such as the direction and distance to a nearby town, ...


2

The phrase may make more sense if "parsed" as follows: "Arsenal are interested in Inter Milan striker Mauro Icardi as they attempt to fill a much-needed spot up front after falling short (season after season) with their current crop of attackers." "Season after season" means "for many seasons." But it is basically a "parenthetical" to the main sentence. ...


2

Consider classic. Classic adjective 2 Very typical of its kind: Hamlet is the classic example of a tragedy - ODO



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