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18

It's a quaint/inventive conflation of... have a bug up one's ass be very irascible and touchy (Source: dictionary.reference.com) and have a bee in one's bonnet be preoccupied or obsessed with something (Source: oxforddictionaries.com)


13

Generally speaking it means someone who works (or would prefer to work) traditional working hours (9 AM to 5 PM, Monday to Friday), probably in an office environment. From this we can often infer several things: That they would prefer not to work evenings, early mornings or weekends, at least not on a regular basis. That they work for one organisation for ...


11

This isn’t exactly an established idiom, but it is easily comprehensible to a native speaker. There is an established idiom, to have a bee in your bonnet (‘bonnet’ being an old-fashioned type of headwear), which means “be preoccupied or obsessed with something” (ODO definition). Imagine having a bee buzzing around inside your hat all the time—that would ...


10

The phrase should be "pick someone's brain," and suggests interrogating them about a particular topic in order to learn more about said topic. I think it is used often enough that practically all native speakers are familiar with it.


9

Nine -to-five: a job with normal daytime hours. I wouldn't want a nine-to-five job. I like the freedom I have as my own boss. I used to work nights, but now I have a nine-to-five job. often used to mean: reflecting, or exhibiting a lack of willingness to work beyond the required amount of time or with more than minimal effort: With your ...


7

To surprise someone can also mean to catch them by surprise, usually in some surreptitious (and often improper) act. The professor quips that his wife has surprised him and the housemaid in illicit canoodling. ADDED: Yes, the sense of catch in the course of a (usually) improper act is still current. Here are some recent uses from Google: Police Calls: ...


7

Often, a person will draw someone aside, ask "Can I pick your brain?", describe a situation, and then say "so what do you think?" If you are picking nutmeats out of a walnut, you jab and dig at the shell to get at what's hard to get at. Likewise, picking someone's brain is intended to get insights that are hidden, although without the trauma a nutpick might ...


7

Consider abroad: in or to a foreign country Example: I'm going abroad over the weekend. Source: Merriam-Webster


6

"Why" in this case is not being used as a question word, but as an interjection, such as: "Oh! It tastes just like chicken!" "Why, it tastes just like chicken!" It's a old usage, dating back centuries, and it is not obsolete. It usually indicates a degree of mild surprise in the speaker in response to a remark or a question. I recall a scene in an ...


5

To be clear and precise, use if A then B for an implication, that is, when every case where A is true B is also true, but not necessarily the converse. The following are more or less standard interpretations of everyday English as logic statements, but do not depend on people understanding them this way: A if B -- means if B then A, that is, whenever B is ...


4

Iff the writing is super technical and focused on formal logic then you should use 'iff'. However, if the writing is casual or if it is not concerned about logical nuance then you should simply stick to regular 'if' to mean both. In those few cases where the ambiguity between iff and if are of concern (e.g. 'If you want to fly a plane, you should get a ...


4

I have to say that, in British English, I cannot recall ever having seen 'promptitude' used in any context. In the example situation quoted it would be normal to say 'thank you for your promptness in replying' or, more likely, 'thank you for your prompt reply.'


4

To divide X from Y means to effect some sort of separation between them. An executioner may divide a man's head from his neck (or shoulders) with an axe, and a confidence man or pickpocket may divide a man from his money. Figuratively, Sunday (in Shakespeare's day - the weekend in ours) is ordinarily 'divided from' the week as a day of rest; but the 'sore ...


4

If you want to coin a word, you just do it. For instance, I've just coined the word litgenitor, and I'm defining it as someone who wants to coin a new word. I intended it for you, but it looks like it's me as well. I stated with lit as in literal, adding gen as in genesis, and tor as in actor. But I fully expect the word to go pffft in no time flat. You ...


3

It suggests there is a path that he wants / should follow, and he isn't. It is like not following the best way - he has lost the way. It is different to meaning they aren't connected to the internet (although not being connected may make some people's lives off line).


2

In military circles, anyway, there is a term "weaponize" past tense "weaponized" (British spelling "weaponise" past tense "weaponised") which means "be turned into a weapon". I've specifically heard it used with respect to Anthrax spores, and an internet search shows it is also used with attempts to use animals for destructive military purposes.


2

OK, I wasn't going to post as an answer, but it seems that the other answers miss the mark. Summary: A "9-to-5 kind of person" is someone who prefers to live a structured life. By comparison, someone who does not like "the 9-to-5" prefers a varying schedule and a more unexpected life. What we have here is two concepts, both with connotations. 9-to-5 ...


2

lay means non-professional, as in the word layman. So lay governance of higher education refers to governance by people who aren't professional educators.


2

Is there any rules and regulations for naming a new word? There are no rules about how to create a new word, just as there are no rules about how to create a new idea. That's how human imagination works! Whether your new word will be successful or not outside of your own usage, of course, is a different story. Just like any other new invention or idea, ...


2

"To him who" is not a phrase, and therefore hasn't a definition. "Who is concerned" is a relative clause, modifying "him". Having said that, I can't imagine a native English speaker saying or writing this: it is quite unnatural. It sounds to me like somebody half-remembering the formulaic salutation (at the top of a letter or notice): To whom it may ...


2

In formal writing, even about mathematical logic, it is better to spell out "if and only if" rather than writing "iff". In informal mathematical writing, on the other hand, "iff" is quite common. In mathematics, "if" would ordinarily be understood as meaning a one-way implication (without asserting or denying the converse). To assert the implications in ...


2

It's the symbol for the Euro Currency.


2

Neither is a common phrase, but we can make a good guess from context. By implication, cracking his thumb (I'm guessing in the same sense as "cracking your fingers") is an insulting gesture in the speaker's culture. "Black be its fall" is an idiomatic version of "may its fall be black", and again by implication is intended as a wish that the House of Shaws ...


1

According to the Free Dictonary: to talk with someone to find out information about something. And gives the following example: I spent the afternoon with Donna, picking her brain for ideas to use in our celebration. Do you mind if I pick your brains? I need some fresh ideas. But if the context is a zombie party the meaning can be different. :-)


1

"I don't like neither of you" indicates the speaker is addressing two individuals, and that he/she dislikes both of them.


1

Take a look at this segment of Oxforddictionary.com's entry for divide, which explains and illustrates the verb construction divide from: VERB 1.3 [WITH OBJECT] Form a boundary between (two people or things): EXAMPLE SENTENCES the artificial barrier that has divided an academic education from a vocational one But they are a bit ...


1

To add to what others have said here (the messages being (a) there is no English Academy deciding what words are legitimate and (b) anyone can make up any word anytime), it might help to realize that English-language dictionaries are typically (almost universally, I think) based on actual usage. IOW, if a word is in the dictionary then it is used or ...


1

"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded." - Yogi Berra That's one way to address your concern, but a better way might be to consider rounding error. To an engineer, 1000000 means "between 950000 and 10500000"m because there is one significant digit If he wants to express "between 99999905 and 1000000.5",he writes 1000000.0; numbers to the left of a ...


1

About 500 years ago, Shakespeare wrote in Hamlet (3:1): “For in that sleep of death what dreams may come ... Must give us pause.” And although it seems like there must be more to it, it just means that surprise or doubt caused a hesitation before one reacts. Most commonly, it is used in a self-referential manner. After all, you know when something takes ...


1

An obvious truth is one which is instantly recognized, but one which may not hold up on careful examination. A patent truth is incontrovertible, but it may not be instantly recognized. In many cases. of course, something will be both obvious and patent. In that case, a political candidate would use patent when trying to emphasize the validity of his own ...



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