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43

harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


14

A hot meal is one that is prepared and cooked, as distinct from a sandwich, say, or some cheese with a piece of fruit. In some countries, it has been the custom to set aside a couple of hours in the middle of the day for the mid-day meal, which allows the mid-day meal to be a full meal rather than something quickly prepared, requiring no cooking, that could ...


5

I have heard plenty of grousing from a) mental health professionals, b) sufferers from clinical depression and c) the nearest and dearest of the latter, about the "cheapening" of this word to mean, as you say, "sad". Having the blues, the megrims, being melancholy, down in the mouth or whatever is part of the human condition: clinical depression is a ...


4

In an 1855 edition of "The Church Porch," edited by the Reverend Robert Willmott (incumbent of Bear Wood), the editor reports that the line And the sad man is cock of all his jests. actually means The serious man wins the victory. To reach that conclusion, one must first recognize that the stanza is comparing the virtues of a solemn or sober ...


3

The phrase "proverbial worm" means "the worm in the proverb". In this case the proverb in question is "even a worm will turn", a quote from Shakespeare's Henry VI part 3, which implies that the most docile and weak of creates will fight back if sufficiently provoked. This is a well-known enough phrase that a native English speaker of the right age (probably ...


3

"Aggregated" is the past tense construction of the verb "to aggregate". In contrast, "aggregate" is an adjective ("aggregated is not an adjective). The company aggregated sales figures to check expectations. (verb) The aggregate sales of the company exceeded expectations. (adjective) For your phrase: The aggregate consumption of oil consumed ...


3

I would use swagger. However, I also think stride is a good one, as FumbleFingers say. Strut may also work. You can also say walking with aplomb


3

Saunter does not indicate confidence but does indicate lack of anger/frustration/hurry. (M-W)


3

There are quite a few uses for the word "lead" in the wide world of knots that I can think of. However, I believe your question refers to the orientation of the rope as it comes out of the knot. Take a piece of rope: Trailing end => ----------- <= Leading end Tie a knot at one end: Knot => @------- <= Leading end For a knot to have "good" lead the ...


3

In the term "hot meal", the part "hot" does not refer to temperature per se, but to the fact that the meal is prepared immediately prior to being served (usually involving cooking, but many other preparation techniques can be involved). If you left your packed lunch in a car parked in the sun, it might be hot by the time you get to eat it, but it still ...


3

It is often a long time from wiktionary : In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future. I used to suffer from depression, but now I'm mostly content with my life. In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts ...


3

In an appropriate (though sometimes necessarily extremely contrived) context, most nouns can replace most other nouns. There are a number of natural contexts in which number can replace hotel room without causing any confusion, and some speakers will actually do this: As far as I know, the president will be staying in number 1. - No, he won't. Since ...


3

According to ODO the adjectival agreed is sufficient: adjective [ATTRIBUTIVE] 1.0 Discussed or negotiated and then accepted by all parties: the agreed date 1.1 (Of two or more parties) holding the same view or opinion on something: all the republics are agreed on the necessity of a common defence policy The Learner's Dictionary concurs ...


2

DTO is Discretionary Time Off. A similar expression is PTO or Paid Time Off. This article at jimromensko.com describes DTO as implemented Tribune Publishing to be a performance based policy of giving time off at the discretion of management in a flexible way, and apparently without specified duration limits other than that the time off does not interfere ...


2

"Clean out" means to empty the contents. clean out 2.) To empty of contents or occupants. 4.) Slang To deprive completely of money or material wealth: The robbery cleaned us out. So, in this context, it means the person ate all the food, though that's likely a exaggeration. Best inference of the meaning: the person ate a bunch of food.


2

Although an old question I feel I might have something to add to the above answers and possibly help other confused visitors. I don't know if 'salty' is used in the same sense in other languages, but at least here in Finland, we might use it like your friend did: "This apartment is way too small for the rent to be that salty", meaning that the rent of the ...


2

It's based on: cock (noun): 3 a : one occupying a position of success and control : victor; often : one dominating some field or leading some circle usually through determined aggressive individual effort Merriam Webster Unabridged Dictionary A joke that is better than most, that dominates the others.


2

Well, first of all, there is: The English Dialect Dictionary - Page 4 Joseph Wright Tacket: A small, broad-headed nail, esp. used for boots and shoes; a tin-tack. One must have humor to keep one's dignity when sitting on a nail (a quite uncomfortable, if not dangerous for one's bottoms, situation:-))


2

Follow from is the standard way to use follow in this sense. From oxford: (sense 2.2) [NO OBJECT] Be a logical consequence of something it thus follows from this equation that the value must be negative If you want to say that X results from lemma (1), you could say: X follows from lemma(1) or From lemma(1), X follows. You shouldn't ...


2

In "discrepancy" the stress is, IMO, on showing a "discordant" difference. Related to DISCREPANT Synonyms: clashing, conflicting, disagreeing, discordant, inconsistent, incompatible, incongruous, inconsonant, inharmonious, mutually exclusive, repugnant Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary


2

Perhaps you can say that he is in awe of, intimidated by, cowed by or daunted by his superior.


2

You may consider: ghat noun \ˈgȯt, ˈgät\ also ghaut \ˈgȯt, ˈgät\ plural -s 1 India a : mountain range b : a mountain pass 2 India a : a landing place or platform on the bank of a river b : a passage or flight of steps leading from a landing place or platform to the water's edge (as for the convenience of bathers) — ...


2

Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Grumble: definitely not. That consists of complaining words, it is not a sound. Grunt: close, but that isn't it. Grunt doesn't include throat-clearing, and it is an inhalation. Is there a more appropriate ...


2

We need a nominal (a word that can take on noun functions) to act as the complement of the copula is. Both the infinitive ("to verb") and the gerund ("verbing") serve this purpose, and provide the same grammatical meaning in this particular context. To my native ear, the gerund sounds smoother, but the infinitive sounds more formal.


2

To me, to walk "purposefully" connotes a vision of someone looking straight ahead, in control and with a purpose.


2

'For' is implied by 'seeking' and therefore redundant. In 'searching an answer,' 'for' is not implied and should be added. One of those English mysteries, I guess.


2

It's not too welcome, IMO. At Google Books, one can test the waters injecting relevant extra words in the search, say "dissertation," which limits the search environment to publications containing "dissertation": "provide the best guess" "dissertation" About 0 results "provide the best estimate" "dissertation" About 9 results


2

Sixty-five years ago, drone had, among its seven definitions as a noun in Webster's New [Sixth] Collegiate Dictionary (1949), this one: A pilotless airplane, vessel, or other craft remote-controlled by radio, as for target purposes or ammunition-laden for blasting enemy defenses. No previous Webster's Collegiate Dictionary had any such definition, so ...


2

In programming, as well as in writing (to some extent): revise: finding bugs/errors and fixing them reformulate: put in another form/shape, recreate parts of the program/manuscript The second is generally deeper, more concerned with the style. The first is more concerned with the grammar, but not necessarily. However, the demarcation is tricky, as the ...


2

According to The Wordsworth Dictionary of Proverbs (1993), a proverb involving the turning of a worm dates back to at least the middle of the sixteenth century—considerably earlier than the publication date of Shakespeare's Henry VI, Part 3, which Wikipedia dates to 1591. Here is the Wordsworth Dictionary's entry: Tread on a worm and it will turn. 1546: ...



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