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47

As you understand, Lucifer means the same thing as Satan, considered in Christianity to be the leader of evil spirits. The word flesh sometimes has a sexual connotation, but not in this case. Here, it's part of an expression in the flesh, which the Cambridge English Dictionary defines as meaning "physically in ​front of you," with the example sentence "I’ve ...


23

This may be somewhat opinion based, but I don't think that wobble is negative-sounding in and of itself. I think it is fun and silly, in a good way - and it seems to strike the right tone for a web tool, as these often do have silly names (such as 'Pyjamas' or 'Mustache'). Positive meanings of wobble are found in the wobbling of a jelly, or a musical wobble ...


14

"The former" refers to "his limitations", "the latter" to "his gifts". The writer is saying that a poet's good qualities, well applied, may enable him to produce delightful work in spite of his limitations.


10

It means he's as evil as The Devil in human form.


10

To answer your second question first, one method for tackling difficult sentences is to deconstruct and, if necessary, then reconstruct them in shorter, bite-sized sentences so that the meaning can be teased out. The text you've provided is challenging even for a native English speaker. Part of the difficulty lies with former and latter, expressions that ...


6

The they in that sentence is the apostles, who are mentioned previously. The referent for a personal pronoun will almost always be the nearest prior mention which matches for number and gender. In this case, that produces a consistent reading of the text. For I am the least of the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted ...


5

I think you should go with something more neutral. It is clear from the other responses that "Wobble" can be seen as positive or negative. So I think you should try moving towards something like: Squiggle noun noun: squiggle; plural noun: squiggles 1. a short line that curls and loops in an irregular way. "some prescriptions are a series of ...


4

The stratosphere is the layer above the troposphere but below the mesosphere and the thermosphere. So while the stratosphere is only the 3rd highest atmospheric level for our planet, it is used in the word Stratospheric to describe something extremely high. So something that is a stratospheric success is an amazing success. Tropospheric, Mesospheric and ...


4

It was the tradition in England to "roll" the sod in a lawn at regular intervals. "Rolling" consisted of pushing a weighted roller (a drum filled with water, with a handle to facilitate pushing) over the lawn, to press the sod down to be nice and smooth and tight. I understand that this is still done to some degree on "estate" lawns in the UK.


4

Depending on the type of product Wobble can have a meaning of either funny or unsturdy/off balance. If you have a table or a chair that wobbles, people see that negatively. If you have a ball or other toy that wobbles, it makes it more fun. Since you are making a tool, wobble might not be appropriate to use as a product name in this case. Two good words ...


4

To be more specific, (and I think Boehner meant it in this sense): Cruz's reputation, fair or unfair, is for pride— acting as if he was 'above' others that he was working with. In the Bible, Lucifer (which is a later Latin name applied to that entity) was expelled from heaven because he placed himself 'above' God.


4

Likely not. Here's a rundown of the commonly accepted account of each word: Illicit 'Illicit', like 'elicit' has Latin origins. The original Latin derivative is 'illicitus' meaning il- (not) -licitus (allowed) or simply 'not allowed' (and its a second declension adjective if you'd like to know). We might with more accuracy, considering connotations and ...


4

I found the answer. The phrase is actually called an antimetabole, defined by Wikipedia as: the repetition of words in successive clauses, but in transposed order (e.g., "I know what I like, and I like what I know").


3

It means that the evaluation protocol has been described to some extent and the authors are now going to describe it some more. Further adverb 2.2 Beyond or in addition to what has already been done: this theme will be developed further in Chapter 6 - ODO


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


3

Consider leech: a person who clings to another for personal gain, especially without giving anything in return, and usually with the implication or effect of exhausting the other's resources; parasite. Or(e) colloquially, gold-digger: a woman who associates with or marries a man chiefly for material gain. [Merriam-Webster]


3

In this context takes means viewpoints about / on the city. The author's (author of Seven Walks) opinion / point of view / perspective is the meaning of takes in this context. One meaning of take is (as defined in google): a particular version of or approach to something - "his own whimsical take on life". Synonyms include: view of, version of, ...


3

No, it does not. In this context, "brownie" is clearly intended as a racial slur referring to skin color, but the word can also be used in a number of perfectly innocent ways: A chocolate dessert A small mythological creature in English folklore A young Girl Scout None of these usages are treated as tainted by association - one need not use ...


3

To me 'wobble' does have a bit of a negative connotation, as a wobble is typically something to be avoided, although in some cases, it could also be somewhat endearing. It's a bit like 'toddle' in that respect. On a side note, given the actual name of the ~ character, I'm going to go the less literal and slightly punnier route, and suggest the actual name ...


2

I'd suggest, "the first of a pair of talks," would be much less cumbersome, and easily readable. Series does have the implication that there are a few, i.e. 3 or more.


2

Nuance, meaning a subtle difference in shade of meaning, expression or sound exists as both a noun and a verb. An example of its use as a noun would be: He was familiar with the nuances of the local dialect And as a verb: The effect of the music is nuanced by the social situation of listeners. Meaning and examples taken from Oxford Dictionaries Online.


2

WS2's answer provides the definition and offers appropriate examples, but perhaps some further explanation might give some insight into how "nuance" is used. Two singers might sing exactly the same words to exactly the same tune using exactly the same tempo. But if one singer adds some extra depth - perhaps by a slight hesitation before a critical word, or ...


2

As an English sentence, it absolutely makes sense. As a legal disclaimer, it is absolutely worthless. There is no such thing as a "fair-use" policy legally. What you are doing is to take copyrighted materials without permission, and you seem to have a policy of claiming that there is some "fair-use" rule that allows you to do this. There is a "fair-use" ...


2

An opinion is still subjective if everyone has always, currently, and will always have it. Consider the definitions of subjective: existing in the mind; belonging to the thinking subject rather than to the object of thought pertaining to or characteristic of an individual; personal; individual (here) Now consider whether or not everyone having ...


2

I think the closest sense of but I can find in the OED is 5b: Whilst 5a applies to: a. Negative and interrogative sentences containing a comparative (esp. more) were formerly followed by but; they now usually take than, or else the comparative is omitted and but retained; modern idiom preferring sometimes one, sometimes the other. 1713 ...


2

To help provide a modern contextual background in support of the name Wobble, I want to highlight that the word wobble has actually received a significant positive connotation in certain cultural subsets. Most famously in the past decade (and underground for a decade and change before that) a genre of music has been evolving that actually centers around ...


2

No, there's no special title for such a situation. Someone with a double doctorate still just has the title "Doctor," in prefix form generally abbreviated to "Dr.": "Dr. So-and-So." (By the way, having two PhDs is not a standard stage in most academic careers, and it's not necessarily more prestigious than having a single PhD. See the answers to this ...


2

Further is for metaphorical or figurative distance and is used in your example to state that now some more details or explanation will be provided regarding the evaluation protocol.


2

Contrarian is a possibility, although it doesn't imply the aspect of having little evidence for beliefs. Contrarian definitely has a more positive spin.


2

Consider, Indian taking Indian taker Informal. Offensive A person who steals your property but returns the stolen property to you at a later date. The car thief stole my car but was nice enough to return it the next day. What an Indian taker piece of shit. Urban Dictionary Indian giver One who takes or demands back one's gift to ...



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