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32

Date as a synonym of "anus" is Australian slang. The definitions I've found are a bit vague in terms of what specific anatomical feature it refers to (some say "anus," some say "buttocks"), but other people responding to this post have provided evidence that this vagueness may just be due to some dictionary-writers misunderstanding the meaning. (For example, ...


12

The Australian National Dictionary has an entry for "date" meaning anus and vagina. http://australiannationaldictionary.com.au/index.php The link does not work well. You have to fill in "date" in the search field. 1919 W.H. Downing Digger Dialects 18 Date, a word signifying contempt.] 1961 M. Calthorpe Dyehouse 214 “In your bloody date! What do ...


7

I think mawkish may convey the meaning you are referring to: sad or romantic in a foolish or exaggerated way excessively and objectionably sentimental. (M-W)


7

How about saccharine? It means overly sweet or sentimental, both literally and figuratively. Saccharine ingratiatingly or affectedly agreeable or friendly overly sentimental : mawkish a saccharine love story the movie was funny, but it had a saccharine ending in which everyone lives happily ever after Source: Mirriam-Webster (click ...


5

The word triggeronomy is the father's impression of the word trigonometry. He has fused the first half of the word with an ending that's commonly heard in other scientific contexts, probably from the word astronomy. The father is showing off here about his daughter, but the speaker is mainly noticing the fact that, ironically, the father doesn't know what ...


5

Maybe these convey the meaning Lovey-dovey expressing much love or sentimentality Schmaltzy music, art, etc., that is very sad or romantic in usually a foolish or exaggerated way Soppy ​showing or ​feeling too much of ​emotions such as ​love or ​sympathy, ​rather than being ​reasonable or ​practical: More: syrupy, sickly


5

An article that might interest you: http://www.timeanddate.com/time/united-kingdom-bst.html According to them BST is a time zone. So it would be correct to say "my current time zone is BST" during the summer and "my current time zone is GMT " in the winter. Apparently a time zone does not have to apply all year long to a region to be considered as ...


4

Ah, this stems from teachers telling students that nouns represent things, verbs represent actions and so on and so forth. Unfortunately, none of this is true. It's a seemingly handy generalisation for helping students intuitively identify nouns before you actually get down to discussing nouns with them properly. Otherwise it's pretty misleading. Nouns ...


4

Another related word is maudlin showing or expressing too much emotion especially in a foolish or annoying way drunk enough to be emotionally silly weakly and effusively sentimental (M-W)


3

In "An Introduction" of the third edition (2006) of the referenced work by Landow (see pp. 2-3), this explanation of his use of the term is given: Thus Landow is using 'lexia' to signify "blocks of text", after Barthes' term, and is defining 'hypertext' using that term plus "the electronic links that join them". Wiktionary claims that 'lexia' in this ...


3

To plug can be defined as: 9 a recommendation or other favourable mention of a product, show, etc, as on television, on radio, or in newspapers (Collins Dictionary Online) So this means that Branum encourages self promotion by recommending one's own projects. Show-plugging, film-plugging, book-plugging, church-plugging, recipe-plugging, and many more ...


3

Actually, this was fairly easy to research. From Wikipedia: "Cataract" is derived from the Latin cataracta, meaning "waterfall", and from the Ancient Greek καταρράκτης (katarrhaktēs), "down-rushing",[52] from καταράσσω (katarassō) meaning "to dash down"[53] (from kata-, "down"; arassein, "to strike, dash").[54] As rapidly running water turns ...


3

contradictory (Wiktionary) 3. That is diametrically opposed to something. A common idiom that describes the scenario described by the OP would be: practise what you preach e.g. That TV cook's advice is contradictory, he doesn't practise what he preaches


3

While "afford" is usually used with regards to having enough money or other resources to spend on a certain thing, it can also be used to indicate that an object embodies a certain possible use. Typically the word used is "affordance", but the verb afford is sometimes used as well. See the Wikipedia article on affordance for some examples: For example, a ...


2

Instead of conceptual extension or expansion, let's first talk about physical extension or expansion, starting with the example in Ricky's answer. Saying that a forest extends beyond the lakes is a description of how far you can go and still be in the existing forest - you can go beyond the lakes and still be in the forest even if the forest never increases ...


2

I happened to find this thread while doing a little research for my MIT dept (the descendent of the old MIT Writing Program), and the most authoritative/detailed answer I can find comes from the 1998 "Reports to the President", wherein every department writes up their activities from the prior 12 months. On page 121 (PDF) it reads: Two completely new and ...


2

According to a number of historians whose books appear in Google Books searches for Saracen + pejorative, the term Saracen was indeed a pejorative term back in the (medieval) days when English Christians widely used it. Hunt Janin & Ursula Carlson, Mercenaries in Medieval and Renaissance Europe (2013) offers this brief discussion: "Saracen" is a ...


2

From my own experience, growing up in the US mountain west: "draw" is pretty common, at least as much so as "ravine." I'd define it as a drainage smaller than a canyon. "Coulee" is very common in the Northwest US, particularly Washington state (cf. the Grand Coulee, as someone mentioned), and in fact, having lived in Washington for a number of years, I ...


2

"You lot" is a mainly British colloquialism for "You people", but perhaps with a slightly greater sense of defining the people addressed as subordinate to the speaker. It's not necessarily derogatory, although the example above seems to suggest discrimination, but it usually indicates the speaker is asserting some sort of authority. A policeman might say to ...


2

In this context, the person is saying they are satisfied with the care they received, so it is considered "their" care. Telling Baymax "I am satisfied with your care" although it could be used to mean "I am satisfied with the care you have provided" is a less common way of saying it and would probably confuse the listener.


2

To have a lot of heart means to be particularly empathic, compassionate or loving. Although I can't say I've seen a cast-iron origin for this specific idiom, it likely stems from the heart traditionally being used as a symbol of love and caring. See examples such as "[The Grinch's small] heart grew three sizes that day" in The Grinch.


2

Treacle (n) or Treacly (adj) From dictionary.com: contrived or unrestrained sentimentality and from merrian-webster: something that is annoying because it is too sentimental An example from the latter source of it being used in a sentence: "The book is ruined by all the treacle about his childhood"


2

Throwing caution to the wind, and speaking to a British exam question in an American voice, I'll suggest that perhaps sense, which I agree would have been a more felicitous choice, invites the reader to a connotative understanding, whereas meaning calls up a more objective decoding of the word. As you say, it's the sort of fine distiction that ...


2

Oversentimental is defined as "excessively emotional or nostalgic, especially in a superficial or self-indulgent way" (here).


2

Nouns can be derived from verbs by adding a suffix such as '-tion' or '-ment', but many verbs can also be used as nouns without any suffix, such as 'the kick' or 'the quote'. Both forms are ambiguous in that the noun may mean the object that the verb acts on, or it may mean the entire event. You are fine to use 'quote' as a noun. 'Quotation' is just ...


2

"Your point being?" is an informal contraction of the odd-sounding, and possibly out-dated*, "Your point being what?", typically interjected in lieu of, "What is your point?", with the intent of aggravating the other party. *See this earlier question for a more thorough analysis, "What does 'my point being' mean?" It is also the title of a book by Graham ...


2

Probably the following saying suggests what you are referring to, but generally I'd say that "still" just suggest being immobile: Still as death: (Cliché) immobile; completely still. (The reference to death gives this expression ominous connotations. *Also: as ~.) George sat as still as death all afternoon. When the storm was over, ...


2

Yes, certainly. The roots are archaic, going back to the distinction of animate vs. inanimate or the quick vs. the dead. "Still" denotes motionless, but has, at the very least, poetic ties to death. I would not go so far as to say it has connotations of death without some sort of context indication like a reference to breath or body, or the addition of ...


2

Stripping away inessentials, and reversing the claim (use 'non-geographical' or 'metaphorical' if this is a concern): We were too distant (in the geographical meaning). is infelicitous and unidiomatic. 'Meaning' refers almost inescapably to the word 'distant' here, and 'with' rather than 'in' is required. We were too distant (in the geographical ...



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