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14

The phrase "you belong to me" is an expression in English (at least American English) most often used in an address to a romantic partner. The phrase belong to, in this case, clearly conveys possessiveness (belong to) Be the property of: the vehicle did not belong to him Oxford Dictionaries Online There is a bit of a chattel tone to the overall ...


12

"Old sport" is just a friendly term of endearment used between equals, like buddy or the decidedly more modern dude. Using it today would likely be considered amusingly stuffy or upper-crust.


8

The difference is huge. "Belong to" means you treat the person as your property. (This may not go down well with your significant other.) "Belong with" means you find it proper that you should walk together.


7

There is no double negative per se. The sentence has a series of nested modifying phrases that build on each other in a way that is difficult to track. In addition, the interaction of the words disagree and debunk seems to create a semantic reversal: Starting with the simple unmodified subject and and the simple unmodified verb we track the meaning one ...


7

There's no way this was composed by a non-native English speaker; it displays impressive mastery of no fewer than three aspects of formal English: Headlinese: zero copula, omitted article: "All [...] Visitors [are requested] to park in [the] Starbucks car park only." Note also that "[are] to" is a short form relative to the alternatives "should", or indeed ...


6

Eidetic means marked by or involving extraordinarily accurate and vivid recall especially of visual images; an eidetic memory Merriam-Webster


6

The adjective describes the cow-lick which is a feature of photographs of Hitler. (Cow-lick describes a lock of hair which rises from the forehead and then flops forward) Nabokov uses an insulting comparison to show what H thinks about the neighbour.


5

The preposition from does a lot of work in the English language, and so its usage usually leaves plenty of wiggle room for interpretation: preposition 1.0 Indicating the point in space at which a journey, motion, or action starts: she began to walk away from him I leapt from my bed figurative he was turning the Chamberlain government away from ...


5

The situation dictates the usage. The question "Where are you from?" in the early stages of getting to know someone usually refers to where they were born and/or raised, or where they consider their hometown. However, when traveling, the same question might simply mean, "Where do you live right now?" Either way, your answer will relate a place you have a ...


5

The term dysphemism is appropriate: noun A derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one. The opposite of euphemism. ODO, emphasis mine Brands are designed to generate pleasant feelings in the marketplace, but these monikers are proffered to defame the brand with a sense of contempt, as the specific meanings of the ...


5

I think there's an extra "well". A single well there, set off by commas, is an interjection, a rhetorical strategy of a speaker who is here acknowledging or conceding that the predicate may sound tautological: Your body size doesn't make you, well, you! The sentence means that it would be reductive to think the size of your body is your "essence". Body ...


5

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=sport&allowed_in_frame=0 sport (n.) Original sense preserved in phrases such as in sport "in jest" (mid-15c.). Meaning "game involving physical exercise" first recorded 1520s. Sense of "stylish man" is from 1861, American English, probably because they lived by gambling and betting on races. Meaning "good ...


4

She was found in a HoJo's in a rest area on a turnpike...rest area restaurants being those that could be reached without exiting and re-entering the turnpike at an exit, but just off the side of the turnpike. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_Johnson%27s: When the Pennsylvania Turnpike, Ohio Turnpike, and New Jersey Turnpike were built, Johnson bid ...


3

Though speaking about the etymology of a phrase is a clear and unambiguous way to refer to how the phrase formed and its past and current usage, the term origin appears to be the one commonly used to specifically refer to a phrase. Ngram shows no usage for etymology of a phrase or expression. The well known The Phrase Finder for instance says: 1,800 ...


3

From is typically reserved for where you grew up. For instance, I was born in New York, but my parents moved to Columbus when I was an infant, and I grew up there, so I'm "from" Columbus. It has connotations of the place that formed you, and I'd personally consider it wrong if used otherwise. It's possible for someone to have moved so often during ...


3

Based on the context of the paragraph, I would say without a doubt that "yams" is slang for "legs," although it is not a term I have heard used in that way in my part of the United States. One does occasionally still hear the very similar term "gams" to refer to legs, but almost exclusively in reference to a woman's legs, not a man's, and mostly in a ...


3

The definitions of credit and accredit clearly overlap at acknowledging the role of another. The semantic overlap: credit verb (credits, crediting, credited) [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Publicly acknowledge a contributor’s role in the production of (something published or broadcast): the screenplay is credited to one American and two Japanese ...


3

Credit generally refers to the definition you gave. The definition you found for accredit is a secondary one, though. Accredit is generally used in a different context, to mean: "to give official authorization to or approval of". See Merriam's definitions for accredit: 1. to give official authorization to or approval of 2. to give recognition to (someone or ...


3

Once we know the correct spelling, we can look up facet in the dictionary: noun 1 One side of something many-sided, especially of a cut gem: a blue and green jewel that shines from a million facets 2 A particular aspect or feature of something: a philosophy that extends to all facets of the business 3 Zoology Any of the individual ...


3

To understand this expression you have to realise that the author is not being strictly literal in the sense of just the physical existence of a living human body. I believe that they are using the term "human being" as shorthand for "everything that goes to make up a person, their physical body, their personality, their outlook on life and the way they ...


3

It means that family is the most important thing for someone growing up. Although without context, I take "forming a human being" to mean them growing as a fetus; this context makes it so it talks about the child growing up. It's not so much the physical growth as the mental/emotional one that is stressed here.


2

Funny he should mention Mumbai. Saying one is from Mumbai contains (can contain) a political element. As pointed out by the Tata programmers at Target, the "common" man in India still insists on Bombay. Just an interesting aside. Asides allowed?


2

Milk delivered...on your doorstep: also at your doorstep very near to you Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2003. Movies delivered on your IPad is slightly more popular than movies delivered to your IPad. It seems an IPad is sometimes viewed like a television or radio with the preposition on, ...


2

'Ever so' has the connotation of being spoken by an upper class English or American person from an old fashioned (black and white!) film. A similar word but with stronger connotations might be 'frightful' as an adjective or 'frightfully' as an adverb e.g. 'he was a frightful brute.' With these old fashioned and upper class connotations which are almost ...


2

It certainly can be used ironically, and maybe today it is more than in the past, but when you ask if it's always used that way, the answer has to be no.


2

A hard copy (of a magazine, for instance) is a paper version, versus a digital version.


2

From wiktionary : riddle (third-person singular simple present riddles, present participle riddling, simple past and past participle riddled) To speak ambiguously or enigmatically. (transitive) To solve, answer, or explicate a riddle or question And : puzzle (third-person singular simple present puzzles, present participle puzzling, ...


2

I would say it is mainly the Latin suffix -ia for names of countries as in Italia, Hispania (Spain), Graecia (Greece), Germania. -(i)a is the femine ending for adjectives. The full name of countries was "terra Italia", word for word "earth/country Italian". As terra is a feminine noun the adjectives also have the feminine ending. -ia may have a connection ...


2

X years on simply means that we are talking about something that happens five year after an earlier mentioned time. X years in means that we are X years into something that takes a certain (usually long) time to finish. On is probably more commonly used, but in the case of projects, programs and other such undertakings, in is used: The game started all ...


2

To me, the sentences are similar enough in meaning that they could be interchangeable. The meaning I glean from them is that "since then, I have" practiced almost exclusively in "this work." That being said, the second sentence may be slightly ambiguous. It could mean "I have been developing my specialty in this work since then." In other words, the ...



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