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77

It means "if you couldn't be bothered to read the preceding material because it looked too long (and possibly boring), here is a summary for you". The meaning is quite close to 'executive summary'. tl;dr is used to call out another user on the length of their post. However, in cases of more courteous exchanges and serious discussions, tl;dr can be ...


42

For some purposes, I like: indelible: making marks that cannot be removed It makes me thinks of spills, stains, bad tattoos, burns... things that you want to delete, but can't. Though I think @Sven-Yargs hit it on the head with haunting.


22

traumatic may fit, even though the word means basically "causing mental or emotional problems, usually for a long time". It was a traumatic experience for all of us. Not all unforgettable events are traumatic but most traumatic events will be unforgettable.


18

If you're looking for adjectives, as opposed to phrases, then I think there are three good candidates: inextirpable: incapable of being destroyed inexpungible: incapable of being obliterated inerasable: incapable of being erased Of course, the implication with these words is that we might, in fact, like to destroy, obliterate, or erase the things they ...


18

It is a reference to Edwin Abbott's classic satirical novella Flatland. Tufte is saying although we live an real, three-dimensional world, we get most of our information in artificial, two-dimensional representations: paper and on-screen.


18

You would be able to get away with seared into my memory or similar variations as a phrase to describe such an event. The train crash I saw that afternoon was seared into my memory. The report on teen drug use seared itself into my memory. I cannot think of any adjectives that would suit your purpose, however.


17

The "summary" meaning has already been explained, but in a different usage (perhaps the original), it is meant as an insult. User A: [long impassioned explanation of his views on a particular issue] User B: tl;dr Here User B is saying to User A: "Your post was too long and I didn't read it". At best, this is a suggestion that User A is being too ...


9

The phrase "There's less to the deal than meets the eye" is a reversal of the popular idiom "There's more (to something) than meets the eye." Basically, "There's less to the deal than meets the eye" is trying to say: The deal appears better at first glance of the readily available facts than it does if you actually read all the details. A different ...


8

"There's more than meets the eye" is a common phrase that means there is more going on than is immediately apparent. Less than meets the eye is a play on that phrase, meaning the opposite.


7

"What has been seen cannot be unseen". Slang. For citations see: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Citations:what_has_been_seen_cannot_be_unseen e.g. At Dachau he was witness to real rather than abstract suffering; what has been seen cannot be unseen, nor can it be rationalized. Brad Prager, "Suffering and Sympathy in Volker Schlöndorff's Der neunte Tag ...


6

I like an inescapable memory. The escape implies a concerted effort to relieve oneself of the memory. I find it's less passive. Requires the 'memory' after unfortunately. Edit: I realised this was very similar to Rusty Tuba's answer... but I've posted it now.


6

Baby here is, as Janus Bahs Jacquet says, a vocative naming the person addressed. Baby is ordinarily a term of endearment, but in this context it implies alliance or collegiality rather than affection. This slang use was hip in the 50s and 60s, but it is heard less now. The repeated verb on the outside is cast in the imperative. The whole is an eager or ...


4

As an adjective, there is never-to-be-forgotten which usually implies that the experience or memory was unpleasant, unlike unforgettable which usually implies a pleasant memory. Note: It is used as unhyphenated too. Examples: Stupid, sometimes tragic, decisions by commanders also impacted the mind with never-to-be-forgotten, nightmarish memories. ...


4

How about infamous? A la "a day that will live in infamy!"


4

Memory already implies that the thing is being remembered and not forgotten, so I would prefer a word to describe the type of memory being referenced, while also conveying that it is a memory that is constantly being revisited. So things like bedeviling memory tormenting memory the memory of it plagued me accursed memory fiendish memory vexing / vexatious ...


4

As others have noted, the quoted phrase plays on a reversal of the sense associated with a similar-sounding or similarly phrased cliché. There is a small industry of such reversals in English (as, probably, there are in other languages as well). Here are some other examples of this rhetorical tactic in operation (all of them adapted from Saul Gorn's ...


4

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) lists the term under safe-deposit box, and reports a first-occurrence date of 1874: safe-deposit box n (1874) : a box (as in the vault of a bank) for safe storage of valuables — called also safety-deposit box The Ngram chart for safe deposit box (blue line) versus safety deposit box (red line) ...


4

She is tall for her age This means that she is noticeably taller than the average height of girls her age.


4

The passive use leaves open the possibility that someone else has taken action to subscribe you. In the electronic age, where spam is not only an everyday hassle, but is becoming a legal issue as well, it can be annoying to the assumed subscriber, as well as factually wrong, to send you en email describing you have actively subscribed. The actual ...


4

I hesitate to call this an expression when it only gets 22 hits on Google. Apparently it was said on an episode of Big Brother Canada 2, but it’s by no means a set phrase in the vernacular. It’s an ad-hoc formation that combines two elements: “pissy pants” – a somewhat redundant though nicely alliterative extension of “pissy” (AmE slang) meaning “foul ...


4

I have assumed that it now means something like “If you found the above too long and complicated, here is, in a nutshell, what I meant to say.” Your interpretation as just quoted may be what some writers mean tl;dr to stand for, and is in accord with the explanation from knowyourmeme mentioned in a previous answer. But note that the knowyourmeme entry ...


4

A very brief answer: it would be highly inadvisible to use this construction in any variant of English I’m familiar with. It sounds to me as though it might be something that could appear in Indian English (reminiscent of “do the needful”, etc.), but since I am only very superficially familiar with Indian English, I cannot really say anything about that for ...


4

"Baby" here is generally not referring to any particular person. In fact, it's hard to say that it refers to a person at all. In the 60s culture "baby" was often used as more of an interjection, in some cases approximating "huh?" or "eh?" in meaning, in others perhaps used as you would "guy" or "pal" or "bloke", as in "Whadaya say, baby? Let's go get ...


3

More (to something) than meets the eye : (idiomatic expression) Fig. [there are] hidden values or facts regarding something. There is more to that problem than meets the eye. What makes you think that there is more than meets the eye? Usage notes: also used in the form less than meets the eye (not as interesting or complicated as it ...


3

Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1942) assigns the two words to different groups of related terms. Anguish falls in the sorrow category (along with woe, heartache, grief, dole, and regret), while distress is the lead term in a group that includes suffering, misery, agony, dolor, and passion. This dictionary has this to say about the special features of the ...


3

As an African myself i know that countries in Africa where English is the official language are usually refered to as Anglophone countries whilst native English speakers are people from Britain and the USA.


3

As an aside, I would start both sentences with It is so,. Something that is meant to be a certain way certainly indicates a purpose on the side of an agent that supposedly made it so. Something that is supposed to be a certain way indicates a certain expectation from the side of the observer. His artwork is meant to be shocking. The artist has the ...


3

"Nuts" is slang or colloquial for crazy, not stupid. "Literally" something does not mean "figuratively" something, so the answer is "no". However, many people have taken up the habit/custom of using "literally" to mean "very" or "figuratively". So in that sense the answer is "yes". Take your pick.


3

That's either a sarcastic comment, or a paradox or an absurdity. A form of wit that is marked by the use of sarcastic language and is intended to make its victim the butt of contempt or ridicule. An assertion that is essentially self-contradictory, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises. If you read it in reference to ...


3

"Go big" is a colloquialism in American English. It means to do something on a grand scale, or to do something with great ambition. The phrase developed (as in came about) as part of an advertising design for Porker Pipes, according to Rose Foster, who says she was part of the design team. So, when one "goes big," they do something in an elaborate, flashy, ...



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