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1

Heinrich Berger was the leader of the Royal Hawaiian Band in the 1870s, when Hawaii was an independent kingdom. A measure (or bar) is a measure of musical time, each with a number of beats (i.e., notes) specific to the piece being performed. The conductor's downward stroke indicates to the musicians when to play the first beat in each measure. The ...


0

To wrangle: To manage or herd (horses or cattle).(AHD) Meaning "take charge of horses" is by 1897, American English.(Etymonline) to wrangle up: to drive/move the cattle together (into an enclosure, for instance).


0

Behind the sweet little image conjured up by reference to Bo-Peep, the child's nursery character, lies a brutal parallel in the real world that the sheep will perish. It is a threat.


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"Bo Peep" is a character in the film: Bo Peep is a porcelain figurine attached to Molly's bedside lamp inspired by the heroine of the famed nursery rhyme; a beautiful, sweet-natured shepherdess accompanied by a single figure merged to resemble three sheep, who serves as Woody's romantic interest of the films. In spite of her status as one of Molly's ...


0

Little Bo Peep is a shepherdess in a nursery rhyme: Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep, and doesn't know where to find them; leave them alone, And they'll come home, wagging their tails behind them. One of the animated characters is threatening the others, including LBP.


2

Your interpretation is correct. I find the quoted material very effective. It uses the term "noted lights" in the conventional metaphorial sense of those on the stage who are illuminated by the lights (and are therefore the objects of note and attention) but then re-illuminates them metaphorically with the light of the Inferno.


0

Back in the 60's we used it as a slang to describe anything from a party to a single performance attended by others, i.e., Hey man it's your gig.


-2

Look at the cover drawing for the answer. It looks to be a farmer.


0

It means 'as well as they are able to treat me'. 'As well as they can treat me' or simply 'as well as they can' would also have had the same meaning.


0

The term "constraint" here is inapt. A constraint is a restriction, and it's a term of art in the mathematics of optimization. Wikipedia can give you an introduction if you're interested. In any case, a constraint is not a prohibition, which is the condition in which you find yourself. You could use the equations if you had the coefficients, but you ...


0

It refers to a real written Code: Ladies' Law from the criminal Code of Alabama: a prohibiting the use of "abusive, insulting, or obscene language," especially around girls or women; punishable by up to $200 in fines, imprisonment in the county jail, or up to six months hard labor. (www.cliffsnotes.com)


0

This use of neither is at best marginally grammatical. It is certainly extremely rare: all the examples of Neither do/does that I looked at in GlowBE (the Corpus of Global Web English) are "afterthought" - following a negative statement He doesn't want to. Neither do I. rather than "forethought" ? Neither does he want to nor do I. (It's not even ...


0

I suppose the sentence is grammatical but I find it very hard to read. A possible paraphrase would be: Moreover, it was probably neither true that the snake was linked to Cleopatra because of the erotic association, nor that the cat was assigned to her because she was a voluptuous witch.


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Assuming that you're ultimately attempting to avoid sounding "a bit rude" to somebody you're "meant to know well," maybe I can suggest an alternative to memorizing all of the: other uses of "meet" that mean first time , besides "nice to meet you" Perhaps, just make a simple alteration to your mental dictionary of idioms. Rather than use the phrase ...


13

My impression of the excerpted language is that the author is reflecting on the fact that children often behave in ways that adults do not, and yet children's behavior is somehow easier to respond to and manage than adults' behavior because children's behavior has an element of guilelessness or a simplicity of motive and action that makes it easier to calm ...


5

The meaning of those phrases is their literal meaning. If you do not understand any of the words, you can look them up in a dictionary. The passage is saying that children will, when faced with a substitute teacher, misbehave. Examples of such behavior include lifting one's skirt above one's head (if one is wearing a skirt, presumably) and removing one's ...


0

meet has several meanings, and here it looks like you are using the one: being introduced to some one. This can only happen once. You can meet that person again, but then it is more appropriate to say nice to see you again. You would still say something like let's meet here tomorrow.


1

The phrase "on the other hand" implies a contrast with an omitted "on the one hand" in the first clause. In this example the only choice offered which contrasts with any term in the first clause is "unexpected", which contrasts with "no surprise".


2

In the first part, there is It comes as no surprise. In the second part, they use on the other hand which imho means that they are looking for a word with an opposite meaning - something like "surprising". Therefore, I would choose B - unexpected.


0

He had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish. If i was the writer of that sentence, I think I would use something like: He didn't take a fish during eighty-four days. Well, Michael, that's why he's Hemingway and you're not :) During and for express different ideas with respect to time. "During" refers to time as a bounded ...


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I always took it to mean that he "practiced what he preached."


1

It is correct. I read it as "(at the past instant that we are imagining) he had gone eighty-four days now (emphasing that we are to imagine that particular instant)" without taking a fish. The effect of the sentence is to place the reader firmly with the man at that moment in the past. Your alternative is a correct construction but gives no such feeling, ...


0

"He had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish." I see your "problem", as you call it. This sentence uses an expression, "to go without", which means "to be denied or deprived of (something, esp food)". Further, when we refer to the quantity of time that has gone by, we use the word, "now", which means, "it's been eighty-four days until now". ...


3

The key to answering this question is "through damaged eyes". If it had been "through recovering eyes" or some such,then C and E would have been correct. The negative connotation associated with "through damaged eyes" makes A and D the right choice.


7

If the author's eyesight was improving, he could only be writing about his past damaged sight. In this case, the tense of "what I saw" is incorrect - it should be "what I had seen". So that scenario should be ruled out.


0

If the author's sight is deteriorating, that doesn't necessarily mean it's so bad as to make him/her incapable of writing already, just that his/her eyesight is worsening.


1

I think the usage here is that doing something piecemeal means to only do a bit at a time, usually what is immediately needed (or what you can afford to). So, the prop car only needs one working door and so that's what the prop-makers build - a car with one working door. If the director later decides that he needs its wheels to go round too, then those will ...


-1

Official meaning having googled the world: characterized by unsystematic partial measures taken over a period of time. "the village is slowly being killed off by piecemeal development". Sorry, but in future please attempt to use Google. It's there for a reason.


0

No, it doesn't mean to change a blue to a red. "Adjust a red to a blue" means carefully mixing red paint so the color looks right to the artist compared to the blue he has already dribbled on his canvas. Guston was an action painter, a form of abstract painting that involves dribbling paint on canvas. Getting the colors just right was important. In the ...


0

No, it means that the journalists shudder. Equivalent VIII by Carl Andre was bought by Tate in 1972 and featured in special displays in 1974 and 1975 without attracting much publicity. But on 15 February 1976 an article appeared in The Sunday Times about recent additions to the Tate's Collection, illustrated with a picture of Equivalent VIII. ...


0

No, you haven't quite got it. The sentence means that some people within the British press have a negative reaction to Carl André's artwork. They shudder when they think about it, because they can't believe somebody would try to pass off a pile of bricks as artwork. Click here for an example of a person within the British press who has such a reaction.


0

"could use a X" is an American English idiom "could do with a X" is the the British version They both mean "would benefit from [having] an X". "I could use a friend" "I could do with a friend" "I would benefit from [having] a friend. The above are all equivalent.


8

Aside from two matches to a Tumblr page with the name "The Cat's Evening Wear," a Google search returns the following six readable matches for the phrase. From a September 8, 2004, post at RoadbikeReview.com: My SO is the cat's evening wear, but useless when it comes to bike related anything. From a September 21, 2006, comment posted at Threadless.com: ...


-1

a world-view in dislocated shards is an idea or phrase someone exposed to the esoteric thought of Qabalah would tend to use. Qabalah was instituted by ancient rabbis to study and derationalize the book of Ezekiel and to align its ideas with the rest of the Bible. It is said that the book of Ezekiel would have been rejected from the canon of the Bible - ...


1

Far more immediate to the constituencies of both art and science was the First World War and, if any imagery predominates for me, it is that of the jagged lines, the upheaval of mud and the dismembered bodies of the trenches, visual evidence of a world-view in dislocated shards. It is clear that these obfuscatory and polysyllabic maunderings, ...


1

From the context, I would suggest that whoever or whatever the 'blue glare' is, it is demanding an account, explanation or justification of our lives. Demand may be sort of short-hand for 'demand to know'. As FumbleFingers says, 'which is no more' refers to our life having ended.


1

jagged lines I presume 'jagged lines' refers to the appearance of the trenches. > > visual evidence of a world-view in dislocated shards This is a most peculiar phrase. It tries to say that the visual impact of the trenches is evocative of the fragmented world-view of the time. Does that help? If not I'll explain more fully.


3

"Killer in the Rain" is a 1935 Raymond Chandler short story that the author incorporated into his novel The Big Sleep. In both works the narrator is the private detective Philip Marlowe, who returns to the La Verne Terrace house of Harold Steiner. (In the novel, Steiner, renamed Geiger, is a pornographer and blackmailer.) Previously Marlowe had found his ...


1

Your interpretation is on the right lines but stops short of Ede's intention. I believe Ede means that the hope of life may seem beautiful but only in an acutely painful way (as in a stabbing, referring to the etymology of poignant). Perhaps like the beauty of a wonderful dawn on the day you were to be executed. Ede wants you to imagine sharp pain, not ...


1

Company in this case just means that the people in the house had visitors.


1

If it makes more sense to you, there is an implied that after the word impressive. So it’s all the more impressive that she comes across as sweet, polite, open and thoughtful — the kind of politician you could share a sandwich with. By all the more impressive, the writer is saying that there is a negative connotation about a type of person that that ...


2

The second sentence, though long, is syntactically transparent: This vision of the Sublime can be discerned   in 1 many of Turner’s paintings and   in 2 the astonishing vistas of wild American territory             in the Hudson River School paintings                of Thomas Cole and Frederic Edwin Church, although there is an element to ...


-1

That whole sentence is very badly constructed or, if not, the punctuation is wrong. Was this book ever independently proof-read? conscience noun [C or U] uk /ˈkɒn.ʃəns/ us /ˈkɑːn-/ C2 the part of you that judges how moral your own actions are and makes you feel guilty about bad things that you have done or things you feel responsible ...


0

Note: The text is from Art and Science By Sîan Ede latter The author is at fault here. The natural reading is to make Church the latter of Cole and Church. This is because the two names are in close proximity and Kant is way back in the text. However the author forces us to make both Cole and Church "the latter." Her subsequent words are, "...which ...


0

somewhere: in this hyperbole (exaggeration) "said" is actually used with overtones of "written" or "recorded" and "somewhere" would primarily refer to newspapers, magazines, and in particular biographies, but more generally may also refer to formals dinners, informal cocktail parties, "anywhere" that people talk politics. The fact that "somewhere" is picked ...


0

moved to terror does mean frightened. But since he's talking about people watching a play, it will be the artificial fright that's similar to what you feel when you're watching a horror movie -- you're not really in fear for yourself, you're just feeling it in empathy for the characters. at the gods' indifference means that the cause of the feeling of ...


0

As Kris points out in a comment above, The Free Dictionary identifies "have teeth" as an idiom: have teeth if a law or organization has teeth, it has the power to make people obey it [Example:] The committee can make recommendations but it has no real teeth. In U.S. legal settings, a law or regulation that is promulgated without including a meaningful ...


0

Yes I will describe you that how come temptation is used here, As you have seen in the paragraph that how author pushes everybody either friends or enemies in the bath, this is the temptation of author 'a desire to do something, especially something wrong or unwise'. So Author Gives a way to desire to do something unwise. If you go for meaning of temptation ...


1

In this context I understand it to mean that both things are occurring concurrently. We marvel at the world around us while simultaneously attempting to influence or control it.


4

This is a literary device that is called hyperbole. When somebody is described as "the most beautiful woman on earth", the speaker probably has not seen all 3,5 billion women on earth. However, the speaker thinks that the woman is so beautiful, it must be (almost) impossible that any woman is more beautiful. Likewise, Johnson did not know all languages, ...



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