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I find it helpful to break down the sentences into their logical elements. In turn, articulating cultural practices of the subjects so constituted mark contingent collective ‘histories’ with variable new meanings. Statements: A = "Articulating cultural practices of the subjects" B = "Constituted mark contingent collective ‘histories’ with ...


2

Your sentence is immediately understandable and perfectly clear. The only place that makes the reader really stumble is “Even so commonly held, it seems a flawed assumption…”, which is clumsy and needs a verb in the leading apposition: “Despite being so commonly held, this seems a flawed assumption…”. With that said, keep abreast of does seem ‘off’ somehow. ...


2

Parsing as follows: Nevertheless, it is sufficiently [implausible to insist that there is no difference between “John fired a gun whose bullet entered Mary’s heart and caused her death” and “John ought to go to prison for murdering Mary”] that [allegedly sophisticated challenges to any of the distinctions in the text] need not detain us any further here. ...


1

I cannot make a grammatical argument for how the clauses are connected, but I can tell you how I naturally parsed it, and my consequent interpretation of the entire sentence. The author is saying that the statements "John killed Mary" (fact: "informative") and "John should be punished for killing Mary" (opinion: "normative") are so clearly different that we ...


0

A video game industry may not literally move but it can certainly advance technologically. Thus it's sensible to talk about one such industry keeping (or not keeping) abreast of another when comparing their technological development. I don't think it's the right metaphor for your argument though. Saying English can't keep abreast of the native language ...


2

I checked out page 228 of the book (thanks to your precise reference). In the said context, draw will mean attract or bring upon itself. This usage is akin to: This form of felony usually draws (attracts) a year of imprisonment. or: He drew the ire of his peers with his controversial remarks. Also, the word within in this context is not ...


3

This passage is indicating when "individuals are entitled to notice and hearing" of "facts that will produce adverse consequences to them". Two cases are contrasted: adverse adjudicative facts, and adverse legislative facts. The passage is saying individuals can expect be notified of the former (adjudicative) but not the latter (legislative) . The final ...


2

To insist that there is no difference between “John fired a gun whose bullet entered Mary’s heart and caused her death” and “John ought to go to prison for murdering Mary is the logical subject of the main verb is sufficiently implausible, though it is postposed (probably because it is such a heavy clause) and the formal subject it inserted. ...


1

To answer your question, I think it's best to cite from the definition of set as a verb which you've used in your question- Put, lay, or stand (something) in a specified place or position If you look at the examples given with this definition of set(as a verb)- Delaney set the mug of tea down and Catherine set a chair by the bed and then ...


0

Control: 1) noun - the power to direct, manage, oversee and/or restrict the affairs, business or assets of a person or entity. 2) verb- to exercise the power of control. Source:http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/control


0

I believe that "set" - in this context - has the following definition: to put (something or someone) in a particular place: to set a vase on a table. (source)


1

Squared away comes from old sailing ships. When they were docked in harbour for inspection, all the cross-members (from which the sails were hung) were placed exactly square with the line of the ship. This is a position in which the ship would never sail and is purely to make it look smart for inspection.


0

I do have a similar sentence using stock pole: The outer shell can be mounted to existing street furniture or stock poles, greatly reducing purchase and transportation cost. This sentence here would suggest metal poles used for fences for stock...


1

It's meaning 2, 'firm contact or grip', but in a metaphorical sense coloured by the original meaning of the verb 'seek to obtain'. Literal usage, as shown by the examples, typically conveys a sense that the contact is firm only through significant effort (that is, it is something that was 'sought to be obtained'). The author is implying that the optimal ...


1

Yes, it could be left out, but it could also be extended to or so. The meaning of the sentence changes ever so slightly: The analogy, the skeptics insist, did not determine the result. The skeptics insist that the analogy did no such thing. I, the author, am just reporting their insistence. The analogy, so the skeptics insist, did not determine the ...


3

What there is a reason to do... What there is a right to do... Can be parsed as The things [for which there exists a reason to do them]... The things [for which there exists a right to do them... What the author says is that what should be done is not the same collection of things for which there is a reason for them to be done. Let's say ...


17

Mark twain's comment relies on the sarcastic use of tautology: needless repetition of an idea, statement, or word. The author Dan Brown mistakenly makes a lot of tautological statements, parodied in this description: The critics said his writing was clumsy, ungrammatical, repetitive and repetitive. The last word is an unnecessary repetition of ...


51

The joke is that Twain considers idiot and member of Congress to be synonymous!


20

Given the date my money would be on its referring to a rubber of whist, though bridge, cribbage, even backgammon are mentioned in the usage examples for this sense in the OED. It means an odd-numbered series of games, of which the winner of the majority of individual games is the overall winner.


7

Unfortunately, the page you linked to is inaccessible to me. However, I believe I can still answer your question. Fl. is the abbreviation of flourished (or the Latin equivalent, floruit). The reference is to the active years of the person next to whose name the abbreviation appears. For example, if you open a history book, and next to the reproduction of a ...


3

One popular approach to interpreting creative works is that there is not necessarily a right or proper answer. When a piece of creative fiction is written, that piece becomes removed from the intent of its creator, and readers will do what they want with it. Poetry is a rather monstrous undertaking in this regard because the meaning of a well-written poem ...


5

To expand on Kiran's answer, the reason many people give that interpretation of the poem is these lines: Though as for that the passing there Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally lay In leaves no step had trodden black. That is, he picked the one which was 'least chosen', but the difference between them was ...


9

In leaves no step had trodden black. This line refers to leaves that have been stepped on to the point where they are black instead of the color they were when they fell off the tree. The word "tread" means (one of its meanings) "to step on." So you can tread on the leaves as you walk along. If you have stepped on the leaf, we can say you have ...


1

not a single word but written in stone (or carved in stone/engraved in stone) Fig. permanent or not subject to change. (Often in the negative.) Now, this isn't carved in stone yet, but this looks like the way it's going to be. Is this policy carved in stone, or can it still be modified? - The Free Dictionary like the definition says - it's usually ...


0

"At(or beyond) the point of no return"


3

"irreversible" - not able to be undone or altered. - not able to be reversed. source. or "irrevocable" not able to be revoked, changed, or undone. source.


2

Synonyms for "permanent" from NOAD 2011: lasting, enduring, indefinite, continuing, perpetual, everlasting, eternal, abiding, constant, irreparable, irreversible, lifelong, indissoluble, indelible, standing, perennial, unending, endless, never-ending, immutable, undying, imperishable, indestructible, ineradicable, ineliminable; literary sempiternal, ...


0

The definition of "as of right" in Your Dictionary is (law) by means of a legal entitlement, rather than through extenuating circumstances. The same source quotes Webster's New World Law Dictionary as defining the term this way: Description of a court action that a party may take without permission of the court, as opposed to requiring leave of ...


3

Cardinals are quite simply the primary, most ‘basic’ form of numerals. Different languages have different categories of numbers (English has cardinals, numerals, and a few repetitionals or multiplicatives [once, twice]; Latin has these as well as distributives; Irish has animatives; etc.), but if a given language has numerals at all, it will almost ...


3

The phrase "X is of the essence of Y" is an English idiom, connoting that X is in accordance with, or follows from the most crucial aspects of Y. (It may seem as if I have swapped X and Y here --- I have not. Think about this very carefully. The essence of Y is what X follows.) The use of "very" merely serves to strengthen this statement. What is being ...


0

The answer you are looking for might be in the text sample you provide: It is, to be sure, formalistic to take the literal meaning of the words “prior to December 31” in United States v. Locke as dictating a result (...) There are different methods of judicial Interpretation, one of which is to primarily consider the form of a provision, i.e. the ...


0

Try "downplayed" as the closest synonym.


2

Deflate: vb 1. to collapse or cause to collapse through the release of gas 2. (tr) to take away the self-esteem or conceit from source Then perhaps - in this context - deflationary describes accounts that take the piss out of legal reasoning.


3

It's a likening of the degree of immortality possessed by his memory to the degree of immortality conferred upon me by his arts: His memory is immortal in some degree. His arts have made me immortal in the same degree. His arts have made me as immortal as his memory ... mutatis mutandis, then His memory is as immortal as his arts have made me. ...


1

What Mr. Romney probably meant to say was that he had received "binders" (files) of women candidates to fill his cabinet posts. Which was a good thing to say. But when he referred to "binders full of women," it hearkened to acts in nightclubs, where women are sometimes brought in e.g. boxes, then "exposed" half-dressed for the prurient pleasure of men, a ...


1

In the introduction to the book, part of which amazon unfortunately removes in it's preview, it says the author references a Mother Goose nursery rhyme. It says that in the rhyme a man falls into a bramble bush and scratches out his eyes. But then he turns to the thorns again and scratches the eyes back into his head. Similarly in Law School, students ...


0

As oerkelens said, this is more about theology than English. But it is worth pointing out that: some theologians use saint to mean any believer, living or dead; some use it to mean any departed soul, on the assumption that any Christian is now in Heaven; and almost any would regard the idea that any human being, living or dead, is so perfect as to be beyond ...


1

OED [subscriber-only link] has law as a verb: 2.a. intr. To go to law, litigate. Also to law it. Also colloq. or dial. in indirect passive. ?a1550 Hye Way to Spyttel Ho. 799 in W. C. Hazlitt Remains Early Pop. Poetry Eng. IV. 59 They that lawe for a debt vntrew. 1866 ‘G. Eliot’ Felix Holt I. Introd. 13 People who inherited estates ...


2

( Based on the exerpt provided)I think what's meant here by "to edify saints"is "to instruct people who are on the path to sainthood", bring people to enlighment, make saints.


0

ZeroBugBounce found the link to the source of this text, which enables us to consider it in context: When it comes to the real war on woman – which includes sentencing those who opt to becomes Christians to death and shooting little girls in the head who want nothing more than to go school to become educated in math, science, languages and the humanities, ...


0

A question or issue “of a kind prescribed” refers to one that meets some previously stated criteria. To prescribe is, here, to specify a rule or guide (Wiktionary's sense 2). The quotation says that if a question or issue is raised that falls into a certain class, then there is a right to a jury trial.


1

get hold of To come into possession of; find: Where can I get hold of a copy? To communicate with, as by telephone: tried to get hold of you but the line was busy. To gain control of. Often used reflexively: You must get hold of yourself! The first one refers to the meaning of your sentence It simply means to communicate with someone as ElendilTheTall ...


2

It simply means you are trying to find the person in question, or trying to get in contact. It's idiomatic - you're not actually trying to physically get a hold of them.


0

'This has prompted soul-searching over Amazon’s 41 percent share of new book sales in America and its 65 percent share of new books sold online.' Amazon has 41 percent share. That is, as you say, an objective figure. But the soul-searching is over this fact. This implies that knowing that Amazon has 41 percent share (a lot) and having a dispute with a ...


2

He has given an example so as to distinguish between a crime and what you personally deem is wrong. In this case, violating a person's land possession rights. Here 'which of us' is used for either the person to whom the law gave the right to the land or the person who is detaining that land from him(the speaker in this case).


-1

A nonstandard usage of which: The relative pronoun which refers to inanimate things and to animals: The house, which we had seen only from a distance, impressed us even more as we approached. The horses which pulled the coach were bay geldings. Formerly, which referred to persons, but this use, while still heard (the friend which helped me move), is now ...


3

The OED definition you wrote for soul-searching is the applicable one: Deep and anxious consideration of one’s emotions and motives or of the correctness of a course of action. In this case, it is referring to the continued support of Amazon by the book-buying public, to the detriment of physical book stores and other online book-sellers. Amazon's ...


0

There are two different bookselling models between "Paris" (physical bookstores) and Amazon (online book sales). When Amazon stopped delivering books, it put the writer in the mood to count bookstores in Paris, and caused the writer to "search her soul" to see if the "Paris" model isn't better.


1

I was in a bookstore-counting mood, see: there were seven bookstores within a 10-minute walk of my apartment. You could use this if you wanted "I was in a xxx-counting mood," but you'd best explain it afterwards, e.g.: I was in a house counting mood, so I counted all the houses on Main Street. The author explains her "counting mood" by mentioning ...


0

A Greek chorus aka known as a "homogeneous non-individualized group of performers" is an "echo" to the main character. An American term might be "cheering section." In the context of a single individual, the term would be "yes man." An "echo," "cheering section," or "yes man" is specifically what a husband is not supposed to be. So Tolstoy is saying that ...



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