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Assuming there is a period at the end of that rule, then it is plainly the case that the conjunctions are not allowed. More specifically, the interpretation is as follows: the rules give you permission to play in a particular manner, however, this rule indicates that you do not have permission to use these conjunctions. You might be thinking of the common ...


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A prompt is a short statement or piece of writing to literally prompt the student to write something in response. It is not necessarily a question, but more something to set a discussion into action. For example, a question would be: What was the primary causes of the American Civil war? A prompt would be: Although the American civil war is ...


-1

A question directly asks the audience something and looks for a response: "What do you think of politicians today?" A prompt is not necessarily a question but still looks for a response, for example: "Explain what you think of politicians today".


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If you want to use Google to check frequencies for a word/phrase, I have one suggestion and one warning. First, the suggestion. I have found "Google Fight" an easy way of checking the frequencies of 2 words/phrases. You just enter the two words you want to compare and then click on "Fight" and it shows a bar graph of the frequencies. If you want to use ...


2

Often when someone finds a new word, they need to look up not only that word, but also others. Then you'll understand not just one word, but several. Abjection: a low or downcast state: each confession brought her into an attitude of abasement - H.L. Menchken. See: abasement, degradation, humiliation, decadence, decadency, degeneracy, degeneration, depth ...


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"To have a good command of English" is correct modern British usage, "to command English" is not. SOED has "command of language", meaning "skill in speech, articulacy" (SOED noun sense 3). Oxforddictionaries.com has "he had a brilliant command of English" (noun sense 2) as an example of "the ability to use or control something". That's using "command" as a ...


0

I have heard that idiom in two places recently. Here is one example: A world that sends you reeling from decimated dreams Your misery and hate will kill us all So paint it black and take it back Let's shout it loud and clear Defiant to the end we hear the call What does it mean?


1

You're probably familiar with the difference between and & or. conjunction: and 1. used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences that are to be taken jointly. "Taken jointly" applied to your situation means both are considered. conjunction: or 1. used to link alternatives. "Alternatives" mean only one or the ...


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First of all, no indefinite article with proper names - a Rashba ... there is very little difference between results obtained with and without Rashba coupling. Here and means that you have two types of results, one obtained with the coupling, the other - without it. if you say ... there is very little difference between results obtained with or ...


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I would lean toward specification. We create detailed design specifications or simply design specifications. These encompass the appearance and behavior, and provide guidance for implementation while not allowing deviation from the embodied concepts.


1

I have never heard them described at conceptions, but I often hear the term 'concepts' to describe documents produced during the early stages of a project, but I would usually expect to see design mock-ups rather than read about features. I think it could still work for your purpose, however. For me, Conceptual design is suggestive of a new, innovative ...


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The first step would be to create a top level layout. This displays the appearance and major features of the site. You can use this to show your customers how the site meets their goals. This is also used to drive the detailed design and implementation steps.


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Here, John Barlow is reporting, and hence it says Mark Jacobs dealt a damage with the knife. Thus 'he' refers to John Barlow, as he had a misunderstanding with the borrowing matter.


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This is a style question. However, comma would add a visual chaos. I am not sure of the best answer. I looked up the question in the CMoS but couldn’t find the answer. However, Investopedia, puts the quarter with its relevant year, as in Q1 2012 or Q1/12, which represents the first quarter of the year 2012.


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The difference you see in the preposition with is a difference of the verbs. The idea of opposition is exclusively expressed by the verbs.


2

These are auxiliary verbs. In some languages, it would be sufficient to say He walking. But in English, we have to say He is walking. In other structured languages, it would be acceptable to say (let me concoct the grammar) ensufficiented says-he ensufficienting him to-say However, English having gone through various stages of ...


0

'Do' is certainly a verb. But, it is a multi-purpose word. Do in these context does not represent any action hence is not a verb. Here, 'Do' is used as a support for forming a question. Like the words 'Which', 'Who', 'Where', the words like 'Is', 'Do', 'Are', are also used as question tags. Eg: 1) Is it getting dark? 2) Are you doing your work? 3) Do you ...


1

That sounds strange. I think people would get your meaning, but the idiomatic way to say this would be: A plan for tasting Mediterranean cuisine in Oia is a “must have". I think that is probably the idiom you were going for.


1

No, she is not correct. Wow is just an expression of excitement or surprise. Wiktionary.


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Black's Law Dictionary (1968) provides the following three definitions of information: INFORMATION. An accusation exhibited against a person for some criminal offense, without an indictment. [citation omitted] An accusation in the nature of an indictment, from which it differs only in being presented by a competent public officer on his oath of office, ...


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I don't see a pun. Like the previous answer, I understand what the guy likes about his new gf is that she "swallows" her pride. . . Since one cannot literally swallow pride, it is a "figure of speech," not a pun. And yes, it is a bad euphemism because of the adolescent innuendo. Questioner: Try swallowing your own pride dude and grow up!


3

The "pun" that the speaker references is actually not a pun at all, but is more of double entendre. He is playing on the use of the word "swallows" to include a more vulgar usage in connection with oral sex which, in stereotypical polite society, is not something in which a "lady" engages.


4

The only thing I can think of is that when your friend paused in his delivery, he was making an oblique reference to his girlfriend swallowing his semen during oral sex (though presumably that would represent the swallowing of his pride more than of hers :) Failing that, there seems to be no basis for asserting the existence of a pun, bad or otherwise. ...


1

As an adjective, Shakespearean could refer to a specialization or a style of writing. If you where were a scholar and specialized in the writing of Shakespeare, you would be a Shakespearean scholar. The fragment how Shakespearean, depending on additional context, would be used to describe the writing of a work that resembled Shakespeare's style. Within in ...


1

James Reeves wrote a lot of poems for children. I haven't had the time to search for the whole poem, but this looks like fun poetry for young children in the style of "The cow jumped over the moon". There are fantasy figures in this poem, first Longears, perhaps an animal with long ears such as a hare or a rabbit, then Tapperbill, one can only guess who or ...


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Those phrases are synechdoches for three different animals. synechdoche a figure of speech in which a term for a part of something refers to the whole of something, or vice versa. Wikipedia "Longears" most likely refers to a rabbit, "tapperbill" refers to a woodpecker, and "painted-wings" refers to a bird, possibly a mockingbird or other bird ...


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A brief diachronic analysis It descends from Proto-Germanic *withro (corresponding to Modern German wider 'against'), but took on additional meanings in Middle English when it replaced the now-obsolete mid, descended from Proto-Germanic *midi (corresponding to Modern German mit 'with'). Since it now appears both with and without oppositional meaning, in ...


2

I do show, employs a technique called metonymy, where one word is substituted for another in which it has a close relationship. It's the same kind of thing as "The Whitehouse announced spending cuts" or "Let's see what London have to say about that". The definition of Metonymy in general is very broad and rather vague, but it tends to fall into a number of ...


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This is the type of statement made by someone viewing online data. They are stating that they can visibly confirm that the account has been updated.


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Mutual has two meanings: Both parties understand (each party understands) The two parties share the (same) understanding This Agreement outlines the parameters of all IT services covered as they are mutually understood by the primary stakeholders This Agreement outlines the parameters of "all IT services covered as they are mutually understood by ...


2

All agreements to provide goods or services, or to establish a commercial relationship are legally considered contracts. Contract law requires that there is a meeting of the minds. That is, the contract (whether written or oral) must reflect what both parties understand and what is supposed to be done on each side, regarding all important areas of the ...


1

In various sources, it is mentioned as sensed presence or sensed presence effect. Have you ever had the sense that you were not alone, that another person, perhaps menacing, was in the room with you? And yet, when you look around, no one was there? This is a common experience, which researchers call a “sensed presence.” Neuroscientists hypothesize that ...


4

I think the word you are looking for is paranoid or paranoia paranoid : medical : of, relating to, or suffering from a mental illness that causes you to falsely believe that people are trying to harm you : having or showing an unreasonable feeling that people are trying to harm you, do not like you, etc. : feeling or showing paranoia Merriam ...


1

In U.S. football—a sport where the quarterback is a constant target of onrushing defensive lineman and sometimes also of blitzing linebackers and safeties—a quarterback may sometimes get rid of the ball before he needs to, because he senses an approaching defensive player who isn't actually there. This phenomenon is sometimes called "hearing footsteps" and ...


0

How to Win Friends etc is a classic that sold millions of copies. Your basic analysis is correct. But Dale Carnegie is making some other points: (1) if you are smarter than other people that is no credit to you; (2) people do like it when you tell them they are stupid It is a variant on the mote and the beam (Mt 7 v1-5.


5

You are referring to the use of la as an exclamation. According to M-W: interjection chiefly dialect —used for emphasis or expressing surprise Interjection la (from Wiktionary) (obsolete) Used to introduce a statement with emphatic or intensive effect. (archaic) Expressing surprise, anger. etc. 1811, Jane Austen, Sense ...


0

I first came across the expression "played a blinder" in the early 1960s. It was used by a then boyfriend and had to do with brilliant play on the football field.


1

A- "Do you think " is used for asking someone politely to do something. E.g.: Do you think you could pass me my bag? Do you think you can fax this paper for me?.... is not impolite or insulting. B- "Do you think " is used for asking someone's opinion E.g. Do you think we'll get this finished on time? And why not keep the request simple and pleasing to ...


3

I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations. That's enough for me. So I make no effort to ask why God didn't distribute intelligence evenly among men.


1

"The well running dry" idiom means that you have used up all of a limited resource. It carries an implication that the resource was squandered; not used carefully. In this case, the limited resource is the trust the public had in the Ferguson city officials. In terms of the "check", it is more a poetic structure than a structure of prose. The idea is to ...


5

I think that the well is dry refers to the idiom: You never miss the water till the well runs dry. ( fromTFD) Prov. People are not grateful for what they have until they lose it. Jill: I never realized what a good friend Jeanie was until she moved away. Jane: You never miss the water till the well runs dry. Here it refers to the value of ...


14

"The well ran dry" is a metaphor that means you have run out of something, originating from the idea that a well, where people bring up water from, can run out of water, i.e. run dry. Saying "the well was dry" in your excerpt is indicating that the well of public trust has run dry. So, the public no longer trusts the officials who run the city. "Check" is ...


0

Since well-muscled arms are sometimes called 'guns', and (in the United States) a permit is required to carry a gun, it is a joke of juxtaposition. Effectively, this is the same as saying "I should need a permit to carry these."


0

He's talking about a CCW permit. It is a legal document, similar to a driver's licence, for example, which you have to carry with you every time you carry a (concealed) gun. If he brought his guns, but not his permit, he probably shows off how courageous (or stupid) he is. I don't know more about the context, however, only what you've provided, so there's ...


2

"In an instant [Jonathan] had jumped upon the cart, and, with a strength which seemed incredible, raised the great box, and flung it over the wheel to the ground..." After the box (coffin) was opened, "I saw the Count lying within the box upon the earth, some of which the rude falling from the cart had scattered over him." So, yes, rude falling basically ...


0

Your colleague is right. We use skeleton in just that sense of an "unfinished framework". And we do not use carcass that way. Doesn't mean you can't do that. But if you did, it would be novel and for special (e.g. comic, possibly black-comic) effect.


3

I would consider making a play to involve any set of actions that have as goal to obtain the interest or favors of someone. Those actions need not involve any direct interaction with that person. They might involve preparation, contrivance of circumstances or events, and so on. Of course ultimately there would presumably involve some direct ...


2

According to Collins Dict. the two expressions are quite close in meaning, but make a play for someone actually may suggest a more romantic involvement than make a pass at someone. Make a pass at someone: make advances to, proposition, hit on (US & Canadian, slang), come on to (informal), make a play for (informal), make an approach to, make ...


1

I would consider "making a pass" to be a brief, one-time, event and "making a play" to be longer-term than a 1-5 minute encounter.


-1

Carcass implies remains, not something unfinished.



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