New answers tagged

0

In this context, it's both. If you need to pick one, pick the bazaar since the phrase in the bazaar defines there in that sentence, or at least constrains its location. That is, he found various kinds of meat and fish in the bazaar, which was located in the nearest village. Assuming that villages are the larger unit, and that villages are not contained in ...


0

The given formulation implies an if-then relation, but goes beyond that in using a second-person pronoun and thus establishing an interpersonal context, whereby we move from the impersonal realm of logic to that of rhetoric. You are correct that we cannot surely infer from this utterance that the speaker believes or is asserting that x exists. We would need ...


0

In this sense, the "dynamic" is a synonym of impetus (a moving force; impulse; stimulus) and is related to positive trend/context that motivates the author. If the dynamic is altered (negatively changed), the uthor will draw a smaller benefit from restarting the pilgrimage.


0

From this definition, dynamic A characteristic or manner of an interaction; a behavior. wiktionary.com it could be read as the behaviors and interactions which characterized the situation being reflected upon.


2

circular dependency a relation between two or more modules which either directly or indirectly depend on each other to function properly. Such modules are also known as mutually recursive. http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_dependency


-1

Perhaps you are looking for "mutually inclusive". Mutually inclusive means "neither may exist without the other".


-2

Deadlock situation? Coming at it from a computer science perspective, here is the definition.


1

This is Indian English, in all its glory, and so cannot be properly discussed in an Anglo forum such as this. Indian English is to US/UK English as biryani is to meat and 2 veg - there's no comparing them!


6

As you noted, "infinite feedback loop" is not the right term (and not just because your situation has nothing to do with software). That sounds more like a runaway success story, which is quite the opposite of your situation. If you wanted to borrow technical jargon from programming, it would be deadlock: In concurrent programming, a deadlock is a ...


2

English prepositions tend to have a wide variety of meanings, and this is particularly true of old prepositions like by, which came to the language from Old English, giving the word over one thousand years to gather meanings. The OED finds 39 major categories of meaning for the preposition by, classified into seven classes of usage. The one that's relevant ...


22

Catch-22 To use it in a sentence, "It's a catch-22" or "It's a catch-22 situation" From Google's definition of Catch-22: a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions. "a catch-22 situation" (Paraphrased very slightly) from Wikipedia's Catch-22 (logic): A catch-22 is ...


-1

It's a paradox. An infinite looping event. As bib said, a chicken and egg situation.


13

This sounds like a chicken and egg situation. a situation in which it is impossible to say which of two things existed first and which caused the other It's a chicken and egg situation - I don't know whether I was bad at the sciences because I wasn't interested in them or not interested in them and therefore not good at them. Cambridge Idioms ...


1

all future generations Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/posterity


0

I can only guess, for the most part, since these phrases are not common in Canadian English, which is what I've been speaking for 60 years, nor is it common in American TV, which I've been watching most of my life. (I don't remember hearing any of them in British TV either, although I haven't seen as much of them.) I wonder if these might be English ...


0

It refers to that fact that the project was at the beginning a small one developed at home (backyard) and then became a multi-billion business. Many projects especially in the tech business were first developed at home, often in the garage( Apple, Microsoft etc.) and than became huge international companies.


1

Some can mean some quantity of or some particular example of or some kind of. So "That's some cheese" can mean either "That's a quantity of cheese", or "that's a type of cheese" or "that's a special cheese". Context will tell you which. What's that in the fridge? That's some cheese. What's that smell? That's some cheese! Or Knocking on the door? Some ...


2

Yes you can, but only when speaking because it requires that you emphasize the word "some". If you fail to emphasize the word "some" the additional meaning of "some very good" may be lost. The principle is the use of an understatement, a form of irony where the words themselves deliberately do not convey the intensity of your meaning. This is SOME good ...


0

In addition to the other answers, if you use it in the (informal) expression "...and then some", it can be used as an intensifier similar to "very", meaning "and plenty more than that". This is good stuff, and then some! ≈ This is very good stuff! This is good work, and then some! ≈ This is very good work! This is good news, and then some! ≈ This is very ...


3

You can, but I would definitely avoid it in written language. In spoken language, depending on the inflection I use I could say: "That is some good work" - to mean: You've learned some new task well and I think you're ready to move on to learning the next thing. Although some of what you did is good, most of it is unacceptable. Wow, I'm really ...


14

Not really. Some, as defined by the American Heritage dictionary 5th edition means "remarkable." In the cases you've given, "some" means an unspecified amount. In your sentence "This is some good stuff." it could be argued that "some" means remarkable (hard to know in print) but "some" cannot be exchanged with very because very would be intensifying or ...


24

If 'some' is the only modifier attached to a singular noun, it probably will be understood as an adjective meaning 'extraordinary' or 'remarkable', with an implied a/an. To me, this seems like the most obvious reading of the example in Cathy Gartaganis's answer, 'That's some woman!' The exclamation mark confirms it further, because the other possibility is ...


7

Yes, it can be said in informal English. It can replace 'a very nice': That's some woman! A statement with 'some' might have clarification. In the case of a woman, you'd list her attributes. If you say, That's some fish! , you might be referring to the size or the taste, depending on the circumstances. 'some' can also have a negative connotation. Some ...


-1

Also can mean in the slang that is cool or that is awesone Like as in man that car is off the top or that song is off the top


-2

(Mostly) fictitious insult-humor faux-news skit, based on comic premise of a candidate being more tolerant of a minority than most of his supporters are -- therefore, said candidate comically compensates, by emphasizing the wide traditional prejudices he and his supporters still share. As comedy goes, it's a bit smarmy, as it indirectly flatters the New ...


21

This is satire. The writer is making fun of Trump after Trump came out with a statement supporting transgender rights. Trump is widely viewed as a sexist pig who instinctually objectifies women--he is someone who is said to hate women, because he sees them as for his own sexual gratification and nothing else. This appeals to his right-wing supporters. So, ...


1

The essence of the influence lies in the fact that the Arts and Crafts movement encouraged a return to hand-crafting furniture, houses, books, etc., in reaction against modern mass-produced goods. Modern bookbinders who devote themselves to this handicraft have a very similar ideology, and I think the meaning of the sentence is more that their ideas and ...


4

Here debt means a feeling of gratitude for a service or favour. instead of the usual meaning "a sum of money that is owed or due." So, "..much of modern hand book binding owes a great debt to the 19th century Arts and Crafts movement." means that the 19th century Arts and Crafts movement was very influential in the development of modern hand ...


2

Yes, "quarter" in a business context means a three-month period. Businesses often refer to quarterly earnings, quarterly sales, etc. It is not grammatical as it stands. It must be missing a word--"at least once a quarter," "twice a quarter," etc., or "at least every quarter" or "every other quarter," or some such. It almost certainly does not mean "at ...


0

Why not mean both? I mean, when you fall in love with someone and are on your first date(say), do you ever look at your watch? And how many times do you , when you are in a lecture hall? The difference is, in a lecture, no matter how much interesting it is, when it crosses say an hour and a half, (even if everything you are learning is new and beautiful) ...


1

Metaphor for a withered autumn leaf ... here's another one, in the description of the tattered sails of the Ancient Mariner's ship "The planks look warped! and see those sails, How thin they are and sere! I never saw aught like to them, Unless perchance it wereBrown skeletons of leaves that lag My forest-brook along"


3

Double back to go back in the opposite direction (esp in the phrase double back on one's tracks) So you are reluctantly replying to "I love you".


1

It is neither offensive nor rude in its own meaning. To me, I would be required to see how you said it to understand why they shut the door, maybe they were just trying to help and did not expect your comment. Add a please next time and specify why you don't want them to do it next time to avoid any misunderstandings if you feel like it is worth it.


-1

The term "bunt ball" is also used in cricket, but the meaning is different and Ogilvie's quote makes less sense with the cricketing meaning. It means the batsman hits the ball at the ground rather than into the air, and therefore he can't be out "caught". The force of the hit is irrelevant. The term is usually used when the ball is hit hard into the ground ...


13

A bunt in baseball is a gentle tap of the ball that causes the opposing team to scramble from their usual positions (catcher and pitcher in particular). Its goal is to get the hitter to a single base or move other runners to the next base. It is in stark contrast to a big swing, an effort to hit the ball out of the park (home run). By analogy, a bunt in ...


0

The Beats were into Buddhism and it seems that I remember Burroughs, Kerouac, and Ginsberg writing about people who were "real gone cats" and people with "Buddha eyes" meaning the same thing. I always associated this with the concept of the Tathagata in Buddhism, a term the Buddha often used to identify himself. It refers to an enlightened one and the ...


1

In the article, we are told that the guy talking is named 'Frank Miller'. As such, 'tell'em Frank sent you' means that when you go to the shop, you should tell the people there that Frank sent you, as in Frank Miller told you to go there. You may receive a discount or something similar for doing so, or it's to let the store know if their radio adverts are ...


3

I think what you mentioned is short for interest-free credit a credit or loan where no interest is paid by the borrower "The company gives its staff interest-free loans" In your case, it appears the goods are sold on credit without interest. Also, the comments explain it well.


0

No, it means something closer to "third hand". Imagine you are watching a videotape of a cheetah chasing a gazelle, taken through a telephoto lens. Then you might say, "There is something deeply moving about such an encounter with nature, even if it is at second remove." Seeing the event through the telephoto lens is "one remove", that is one step ...


1

Happiness ahead...You will be rich - you will be able to afford pudding for supper [ashore] with your share of the cargo. Now row. There is also a reference to copulation [another enticing reward!] at have hot pudding for supper I have not read enough Melville to know the extent of sexual imagery in his writing. Several paragraph earlier there is a ...


-6

One meaning could be that sailors would take pudding for supper at any time, but as explained later But what the devil are you hurrying about? [...] Only pull, and keep pulling; nothing more. it is not something that could be achieved due to their mere condition.


1

The second meaning is the correct one in this case. Your phrase could be translated along the lines of: Something else is obscured because the light reveals itself.


2

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpty_Dumpty at Origins "...According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term "humpty dumpty" referred to a drink of brandy boiled with ale in the seventeenth century.[8] The riddle probably exploited, for misdirection, the fact that "humpty dumpty" was also eighteenth-century reduplicative slang for a ...


1

One can gift the poor people with a belief that education gives a real power.


1

The way to improve the quality of life of the poor is to make them understand that education is their way out of poverty, and the way to take control of their lives.


1

1) Improper by situation alone. A teacher must teach, not insult. Such remarks are like a waiter who, after filling a teacup past overflowing, then lays his fault on the cup's size. 2) If not -- so no Q 2. Note: "Waste breath" is never used, "waste" and "breath" are always separated by some word, usually "my", "of", or "your": Don't waste your breath. ...


0

The French phrase à propos made an unusually awkward landing in English, as the following four entries in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) indicate: 1apropos adv {F à propos, lit.,to the purpose} (1668) 1 : at an opportune time : SEASONABLY 2 : by way of interjection or further comment : with regard to the present topic ...


1

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/waste+breath Don't waste your breath talking to her. She won't listen. You can't persuade me. You're just wasting your breath. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/waste+of+breath Don't bother trying to change my mind about this, it's a waste of breath! It looks like my whole pitch to the board of directors ended up ...


0

Tillerman as in Charon (The Ferryman). "Tea" would have been used as payment instead of Coins to "pay" the Ferryman to cross the River Styx, Tea for the Tillerman. Coinage was not available when Greek Mythology first spoke of "Paying the Boatman, Ferryman or Tillerman as a Tiller would be used to propel the ferry across the river



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