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2

I believe when he said "be careful I Chap easily" he meant, as @Kris said above, I can be rough easily (without much provocation). verb: (of the skin) become cracked, rough, or sore, typically through exposure to cold weather. synonyms: become raw, become sore, become inflamed, chafe, crack "my skin chapped in the wind"; (of the wind or cold) cause ...


0

Well, Etymology Online says "romance" comes from: c.1300, "a story, written or recited, of the adventures of a knight, hero, etc.," often one designed principally for entertainment," from Old French romanz "verse narrative" (Modern French roman), originally an adverb, "in the vernacular language," from Vulgar Latin *romanice scribere "to write in ...


4

Romantic in literary studies refers to Romanticism, a term applied retrospectively to a movement which in a wide variety of forms dominated European literature and arts from the late 18th to the late 19th century. The term had been around since at least the early seventeenth century to refer to mediaeval romance and the quality of fancy unrestrained by ...


0

It says that he was a Romantic poet, the capital R is a first hint that it's not just the word romantic. The reason why Romantic is linked to a page about the Romantic era is because that's exactly what they are referring to. Ie, by Romantic poet they are referring to a poet of the Romantic era (writing in the style associated with that time period).


3

The humor in the line is like the joke my brother, who died of AIDS, told me. Q: "What is the most difficult part of having AIDS?" A: Trying to convince your mother that you're Haitian. At that time AIDS was strongly associated with Haiti, and somewhat less so with homesexuality. The gist of the joke was that the mother did not know the AIDS sufferer was ...


-3

This is related a knee-slapper; one would slap their knee in response to something funny or in rare cases, frustration. In the example you gave it would be the latter.


0

slap yourself five definitely has no meaning whatsoever. A skilled English user would be able to tell that this is a mistranslation of "give yourself five", which is obscure, but means to smack your palms together above your head.


20

To "give someone five" is to slap hands together in a congratulatory gesture. Most often it is heard in the context of "gimme five" or "high five" (the act of slapping the palms together over the heads of the two participants). In this case, to "slap yourself five" would mean to congratulate yourself. Cf. "give yourself a pat on the back."


0

The difference is similar to that of can and may. Saying to someone "Sorry, I could not get to that" is like saying "I can't get to it because I am physically or mentally unable to." If you "Did not get to that" it means you most likely can, just were busy in the mean time with no time to do said task. "I'm sorry, I did not get to that. I'll do it right ...


-1

Comments by Josh61 notwithstanding, to get to X normally implies to reach a target [location, situation, condition]. This implication is even stronger in negated constructions, where to not get to X strongly implies there was a failed attempt to reach X. Consider... 1: I did not get to the party last night 2: I did not make it to the party last night ...


0

I've learned in my classes, come of the earliest forms of wine and alcohol were a type of fermented milk (they let the milk sit with some grains/wheat or something of the sort mixed into a kinda of soup that would normally be drunk/eaten like a soup but if you left is out the yeasts would cause the creation of alcohol that evolved into what we drink today ...


0

Greasy dangers can also imply jokingly that your fingers and lips will get greasy, thus the danger.


2

In the context of the story the protagonist Steve Threefall is talking with Roy Kamp in order to get information about the town. "What do you do then?" The thin man shrugged his sharp shoulders. "That depends, he said, on who you are. If you're Dave Brackett" --he wiggled a finger at the red bank across the street-- "you gloat over your ...


3

Hammett is probably alluding to the uncertain quality of the food, not necessarily the questionable nutrition in greasy food. Likewise, small restaurants of dubious quality are called 'greasy spoons' because the dish-washing is not up to par, thus the quality of the victuals as well.


1

J.S. Farmer & W.E. Henley, in Slang and Its Analogues (1890–1904), cover most of the slang terms used by Jo in the line "I'm fly," says Jo. "But fen larks, you know. Stow hooking it!" Bleak House was published in 1852, and Farmer & Henley use the novel as a reference for several slang terms, so the authors were certainly interested in the ...


3

The Barnes & Noble Classics Edition, with notes by Tatiana Holway contains the following footnote in clarification of the first line spoken by Jo in this passage: I understand. ... But no tricks, you know! Don't try running off! For the second, it has the footnote: Don't try running away.


1

This citation is listed under an entry for checkmate in OED which reads: transf. To arrest or defeat utterly, discomfit. In mod. use, often: to defeat or frustrate the ‘game’ or scheme of (any one) by a counter-movement. This at least tells us which meaning of checkmate this is supposed to be relevant to (but not a direct example of, based on the ...


1

"Good for you" does not contain "I" or "me", while "I feel happy for you" does. That's a simple reason why the latter implies participation, while the former may easily sound like "That's good for you; for me, I don't care".


1

I think this is one of those expressions that is in the midst of a transition in usage, from having an earnest meaning to being used primarily with sarcasm. If said to a child, it is still earnest, but not so much if said to an adult.


0

Perhaps this extract will help Sub-text ... means that there is an essential plot point in the scene that is not directly expressed or referenced in the dialogue. Audience members must infer this plot point by interpreting the non-verbal behaviors of the actors, even at times when their words explicitly contradict the underlying point. — “Just say the ...


0

The definition of tip would tend to imply a relatively small portion at the extremity of the finger: NOUN 1 The pointed or rounded end or extremity of something slender or tapering: 1.1 A small piece or part fitted to the end of an object: Folks could argue incessantly about exactly where the tip of the finger ends. Someone could insist ...


1

I parse the sentence: There are some video ad campaigns that BrandLab consider (believe, feel) to have been effective (worked). Jeff quickly shows (rapi-fire) people from a client VW) these video ad campaigns, or possibly shows extracts from them, giving the VW folks a rapid overview of the campaigns. The overall sense here is one of enthusiasm and ...


0

A champion is a powerful, successful person. In this regard, there is probably no greater "champion" in the world than the President of the United States. Obama is referring to himself. He is telling the people, "the biggest corporations don't need another person like me [on their side]... You do.


0

The referent here of which is the proper means of obtaining and preserving the gift under discussion. It’s saying that because Luther laid aside the means of preserving his gift, it’s no great surprise that he should have lost it.


2

I'd scan it so: particularly prayer and mortification, which, because Luther laid aside (, by quitting his canonical hours of prayer and other religious exercises [, to which he had been accustomed in his convent]), no wonder if he had lost the gift of continency (, which he owns he enjoyed whilst he was a popish friar). So dropping the clauses: ...


0

My guess is that the referent of "which" is "prayer and mortification", and that "which" is the logical object of "laid aside". So prayer and mortification, which, ♦ because Luther laid aside, means: prayer and mortification. Because Luther laid aside prayer and mortification, ...


6

Joseph Lancaster's Improvements has this to say on the matter http://www.constitution.org/lanc/practical.htm On a repeated or frequent offence, after admonition has failed, the lad to whom he presents the card has liberty to put a wooden log round his neck, which serves him as a pillory, and with this he is sent to his seat. This machine may weigh from ...


1

The phrase get a feel for is an idiomatic usage that means Familiarize oneself with: you can explore to get a feel of the place Oxford Dictionaries Online The word feel has numerous meanings as both a verb and noun, many of them unrelated. This is just one of them. As you become more proficient in English, you will get a better feel for these ...


1

The fact that wrong is written in quotation marks is the clue to interpretation. The "wrong" part of Britain is Ireland. What is now the Republic of Ireland has never been part of the Empire but was considered part of the Kingdom for many years. Ireland was often referred to as part of Britain - which of course it is not. The author is harking back to ...


1

Some would say, half seriously, that everything translates to, "let's have sex" in the US. But they would be half wrong! In the dating context you describe ""Let's meet so we can get a better feel for each other" is most likely innocent of that charge and is a very common expression where the word "feel" means: to sense or perceive. So the import of the ...


2

"Agnostic" in this context means pretty much the same as "neutral". You'd get a nice idea of how it's used if you were to go to StackOverflow and do a search. Here, I've done it for you: Search "agnostic" on StackOverflow


1

Since the article is on a career site, the likelihood is that the author means a college major that leads to a degree in an 'in demand' field, with which the graduate expects to obtain a quick job or a high salary but not always to have had a great education.


0

I would say "Feeding the server with data from the bus riders by the bus riders themselves"


3

When studying at universities (at least in the Us and Canada), your major is the subject you take the most courses in (and your minor is the subject you take the second highest number of courses in. I, for example, majored in civil engineering with no minor. Picking the "perfect major" means finding the perfect topic to specialise in for a bachelor degree ...


1

Perhaps: All of the buses that serve that route have the same number.


1

Phrases of the form "this good of a Y" or "that good of a Y" are fairly new to published writing in the United States—to judge from the results of a Google books search for "this good of a," "that good of a," "this big of a," and "that big of a" for the period 1700–2008. The first matches that the search turns up for "this/that good of a" are from 1990, both ...


0

The variation of the expression I have heard is, "useless as tits on a board".


0

In defense of 5arx's initial association of the interjection "not!" with the Bill & Ted comedy franchise, I note this chronological listing in J.E. Lighter, Random House Dictionary of Historical American Slang (1997): 1991 Bill & Ted's Adventures (CBS-TV): Smooth move, dude! Not! 1992 M. Myers et al. Wayne's World (film): Wayne'll understand that ...


1

"Propertied interest" is a legal term and is not interchangeable with "owning" real estate. It is possible to have an interest in property without actually "owning" the real property. For example, it used to be quite common for a man to leave property to his surviving wife but on her death the land would be owned by the man's son. If the man dies and the ...


0

Here is the entry for the transitive verb clinch in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2014): clinch vb [prob.alter. of clench] vt (1542) 1 : CLENCH 3 ["to set or close tightly"] 2 a : to turn over or flatten the protruding pointed end of (a driven nail); also : to treat (as a a screw, bolt, or rivet) in a similar way b : to fasten in this ...


1

In law, this question has been heavily litigated in both countries over many centuries and many situations. In Anglo-American law, the answer is "by the close of business on the date stated" unless the writing clearly means something else. If, for example, the contract read, "Payment must be delivered before June 15th," then the deadline is June 14th. ...


3

cat•e•go•rize - to arrange in categories or classes; classify. to describe by labeling or giving a name to; characterize. There are the eight groups by which words may be categorized, according to their roles in sentences:nouns adjectives ....


2

Divided is the correct choice. Subdivided is used where something has already been divided. More particularly in the case of land parcels.


2

Used in this way the propertied interest means the interests of the people who own property. For this purpose it would mean landed property, i.e. ownership of land and buildings. Propertied interest is a well-understood, and everyday idiom, particularly among historians, social and political scientists etc. Some, especially those subscribing to a Marxist ...


2

It appears that "interest" is being used in sense of political power block (though not necessarily one directed at government); a "special interest." MW Accordingly, your sense that it means the "interests of the proprietors" is quite correct.


3

You're a victim of 'verbing'. cURL is just the name of a program that the author was using to test something: cURL (/kə:(r)l/.[3]) is a computer software project providing a library and command-line tool for transferring data using various protocols. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CURL


2

Definition of Tender (on a bid) (via Investopedia): To invite bids for a project, or to accept a formal offer such as a takeover bid. Tender usually refers to the process whereby governments and financial institutions invite bids for large projects that must be submitted within a finite deadline. The term also refers to the process whereby shareholders ...


0

As this forum points out, "so good a [something]" (of which "so good of a [something]" is likely a more conversational variant) has been around long enough to be idiomatic in American English. Expressions such as "this good a wave," "so good a surfer," and "so great a love" are all of a kind. The same forum notes that Samuel Johnson used a similar ...


0

Basically it's saying "Here is all you thought you would ever want to know about it." Because if you look at it closely, you'll see two negatives: In this case "never" and "not". When there is an even number of negatives, remove them. When there is an odd number of negatives, it's still a negative. (The negative of -1 is 1 while the negative of the ...


1

It is more general than personality type but it fits somewhat: Kindred souls.



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