New answers tagged

1

After translating Homer for 10 years, I've come to believe that winged words connote words of unusual truth, urgency, or import. They usually occur before an action or change of setting, and thus convey the forward motion of the story.


4

The word is being used hyperbolically here. Meaning: "How can I make amends?" ref: 'make amends' You can clearly see a relationship between the word penance and the phrase "making amends" if you consider the transitive verb: - Expiate v.tr. To make amends or reparation for; atone for: expiate one's sins by acts of penance. ref: Expiate


2

Yes the meaning is ambiguous. It could also refer to Company X itself, although I would consider this less likely. (The use of plural/singular to refer to companies is a British/US distinction.)


0

One of the slave-concubines permitted my father "One of the slave-concubines" is the subject of the sentence whose verb is "could…" while "permitted my father" is a participial phrase modifying "one of the slave-concubines". The "my father" is a retained object from a ditransitive sentence which would look similar to: (Someone) permitted my father ...


1

It's saying that if one of the slave-concubines bore a child from a member of the royal family then that child would not be considered an heir to the royal family. They can bear a child, but the child would not be a "Royal Successor", ie could not succeed to the throne. The child would be a "bastard", to use the old terminology, who were not considered as ...


2

original sentence: "In your initial application provided we stated with fixed price. The proposal seems to be going well passed that." This is very badly written and ungrammatical. "passed" is clearly meant to be "past", but otherwise it's not 100% clear to me what meaning is intended, but here's a guess: "In your initial application provided we stated ...


0

The usage of "friend" friend and friend is quite simple. When the question is posed as such, a friend is "just a friend" (a platonic relationship). When someone is a "friend" friend (commonly said with extra emphasis on the first word and often with quotation fingers), the implication is that there is something more going on. While it can sometimes be ...


6

My guess would be that this is about bees fanning their wings at the hive entrance to cool parts of the hive. The place where the bees come in and out of the hive is exactly where they do this.


2

OED fanner, n gives definition 1.a. obs. One who winnows [separates wheat from chaff using air] grain with a fan. This seems more relevant than the other definition "one who fans". Winnowing does not seem particularly relevant to the poem as a whole, but the agrarian context does fit a poem about bees.


0

If Crowdsource is the appeal to a collective to share and consolidate expenses for a want or need to be satisfied by me, on consignment (delayed gratification), the reverse of this would be for me to wholly assume the expense to hire or contract an individual to satisfy me.


1

There's no contradiction between "auditing algorithms" and "algorithmic auditing", because it's the auditing algorithms that are doing the algorithmic auditing. There is some ambiguity (as is common English) where "auditing algorithms" could either mean: Algorithms that are used for auditing. The process of auditing the algorithms (i.e. ensuring that the ...


0

I disagree with deadrat. Nothing about the title allows us to infer that the exhibition centers on 'artists against architects'- especially about the 'nature of buildings'. "Take on" here can mean different things, but in this context it is most similar to "focus on", "tackles" or "engage with". This is a common phrase. See a popular tv series that uses it ...


5

The TBT Acronym or hashtag used in a social media app such as Instagram or Vine, or on a website like Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Tumblr, Reddit, etc It means ThrowBack Thursday, basically where you remember things from your past on Thursday, or any day of the week. Here it refers to a confrontation between the two leaders. From the Washington ...


1

You can say whatever you want, but nobody is going to understand “You are the shape of my thoughts.”  Maybe if you say it (and explain it) a few thousand times, it’ll catch on as a new idiom.  But I wouldn’t hold my breath. “You are much on my mind” (or “You have been much on my mind”) are standard ways of saying that you think of a person often.


1

The reader was mistaken and you were correct. The commas delineate an aside (there is a more proper term for this, but you will get my meaning if I call that part of the sentence between your two commas an "aside"). Removing the second comma obviously changes the meaning of the sentence, and considering your intent aligns with the first construction of the ...


0

Oxford dictionaries bear : noun : 1.3 : A large, heavy, cumbersome man: a lumbering bear of a man In your sentence the bear wasn't referring to his mental constitution but his physical: he was a large man who walked slowly/lumbered like a bear. Speaking of Animals: A Dictionary of Animal Metaphors Extension and its Limits As to your ...


0

No, it's not ironical. It refers to a close friend of the opposite sex who has been friend zoned. To "friend zone" somebody (typically of the opposite sex), is to discourage their sexual interest, and "cap" the relationship at "friends only." The urban dictionary defines a "friend friend" as "Sort of a boyfriend/girlfriend who is not receiving benefits" (...


3

I believe, ""friend,friend"", is used here to describe a non-exclusive lover, or, "friend-with-benefits". Each item is listed and is different from the others. Knowing the intonation and/or stressing would help quite a bit.


2

I believe the writer is referring to the 1938 Munich Agreement, in which France, the UK and Italy signed a treaty with Germany basically saying "OK, you can keep the places you've annexed (eg portions of Czechoslovakia) so far, as long as you don't do anything else bad". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munich_Agreement It's historically seen as a colossal ...


0

It is used when you are sending something like picture through emails to someone, then someone may say i will send the pictures across to you.


0

From the sentence: In ethics, Aristotelians have implicated reflection in virtue The meaing of "implicated reflection" can be broken down to implicated and reflection, where Meriam Webster defines implicated as: to involve as a consequence And Meriam Webster defines reflection as: a thought, idea, or opinion formed or a remark made as a ...


3

The usual term is throw down the gauntlet, referring to the practice of challenging someone to a duel by throwing your gauntlet (glove) down in front of the person you're challenging. Laid down the gauntlet is not the usual idiom, but apparently is used, with the same meaning.


0

Without more detail, any one of the other posters could be right, but the general sense of the statement is, "Guys who are better off than me, annoy me." These could be guys who are "in love," or "with it," or "excited about their work," or any other form of "switched on," because your colleague "is not." Someone in his early 40s is more likely to feel any ...


4

It's a bit awkward, but perfectly grammatical, and if spoken correctly is perfectly understandable. "Not having friends in your childhood" is the subject of the sentence, inverted with the verb "Was" to make it a question.


1

Lay, yes, as in narrative tune or ballad as sung by a minstrel, but in the more specific context of how such songs represent the culture of each tribe (i.e. "the lay of the land"). The poem discusses specifically the singers, etchers, artists of different tribes (that are killed for non compliance or competing songs), but is ultimately a thinly veiled ...


1

As a programmer I'm assuming that .CLS file is a source program in VB6 which is mostly jargon here. So I assume that you are sending a document which describes the .CLS file. In that case, you have to say: Please find the attached technical detail document for the file test.cls. (or) Attached is the technical detail document for test.cls. Or ...


3

Jar, as a verb, means to have an unpleasant, annoying, or disturbing effect. "Jarred to life" means the same thing as "sprang to life" (Silenus's comment has a good example.) In this case, jar is a synonym of jolt, shake, startle, disturb and provoke.


3

A trade off is a balance between two desirable but incompatible things. That is, you'd like to have both, but life doesn't make them available together. An economic example is the risk of and the return on an investment. You'd like to have both low risk and high return, but that rarely happens. If you accept a lower risk, the return is generally lower, and ...


1

To "develop attitudes" (in the social sense of the word) is to develop bad attitudes. Everyone has attitudes, but it is (usually) the bad ones that get noticed. He has an "attitude" is a pejorative. And "autistic" people don't "develop attitudes" is in the context of they don't have other bad qualities like laziness and "politicking."


2

One term that is often used in programming is stub. That is "filler" for a portion of the program that is not yet written.


1

The terms ancillary, auxiliary, or supplementary should work better. Ancillary: providing something additional to a main part or function Auxiliary: available to provide extra help, power, etc., when it is needed supplementary: Completing or enhancing something You can also simply say nonessential: not completely necessary : not ...


1

I'm a fan of "inert." It's definition isn't 100 percent literal: From Dictionary.com: Inert having no inherent power of action, motion, or resistance (opposed to active)


0

A [German] Ignorant is actively being [English] ignorant. It rather translates to "an ignoring person" than "an ignorant person".


2

Activists trying to "raise awareness of" something are trying to reduce the number of "ignorant" people, and often use this language. It definitely has connotations of being part of the problem not part of the solution. (Where "the problem" depends on who is using the word, but this language is most commonly heard from advocates for more acceptance of ...


0

Among the comments I've received, there was exact answer to my question. I was reading Mick Herron's "Slow Horses" series. So, "the Park" means MI5's headquarters.


4

Well I am taking the bonus part here. The tricky thing about the English ignorant is that there are two words in German that are written the same ignorant and Ignorant, adjective and noun. On the surface the definition is about the same as in English - with the second one refering to a person of such characteristics. Both have the dictionary addition ...


10

The meaning that I get from someone being called 'ignorant' is that they're not only unaware, but they also refuse to want to try to become aware. In this sense, ignorant is also connotative of stubbornness and being too stuck in one's own backward biases.* In the old Webster's dictionary of 1913 this use of ignorant is shown to have Biblical origins, and ...


3

Orwell was referring directly to the metaphor rift within the lute, a tiny flaw which will inevitably destroy the whole. Your copy of Orwell is corrupted. The correct list reads: Ring the changes on, take up the cudgels for, toe the line, ride roughshod over, stand shoulder to shoulder with, play into the hands of, no axe to grind, grist to the mill, ...


23

Saying "Alice is ignorant of the fine details of etiquette" is not too derogatory by itself; the specification of a detailed context focuses the connotation on simply being unaware/uninformed (note the latter two are even safer). Saying "Alice is ignorant" is derogatory. Without any constraint you are implying that Alice is unaware/uninformed of things ...


0

It is slightly old-fashioned syntax. It just means: AngularJS is what HTML would have been, if it had been designed for building web applications.


4

The author is trying to say, HTML wasn't designed to be used for building web applications. If it had been designed to be used for building web applications it would be more like AngularJS.


12

Though one answer analyses this as an example of the single-word verb 'will', and this probably explains the development of the construction, Wikipedia considers 'will on' a transitive multi-word verb (it uses the term 'phrasal verb'). Wiktionary has a definition for the term: will on Verb [Categories: English lemmas ... English verbs ... English ...


4

To will something is to [try to] cause or change by an act of will or volition. Merriam-Webster (third usage) will - transitive verb - decree, ordain This is something you can do, whether or not you have to authority or power to follow through: I can will my bowling ball to turn back toward the center of the lane, even as it tips into the gutter. It ...


4

But I will be willing you on. This means "I will be wishing for you to progress/advance." "Willing something/someone on" is like when your team has the ball and is advancing and you try to "wish" them forward to a goal. Sometimes it implies physically cheering them onward, sometimes the "cheering" is unspoken and the most an observer of you might see is ...


19

In this context, to will means something like [WITH OBJECT AND INFINITIVE] Make or try to make (someone) do something or (something) happen by the exercise of mental powers: 'reluctantly he willed himself to turn and go back' 'she stared into the fog, willing it to clear' Your example doesn't include the infinitive, but rather the small ...


4

Starting during Victorian times in Britain it became very popular for people to go to the seaside for holidays. Many seaside resorts built piers on which tourists could walk to take the sea air, which was said to be good for the health. Certainly better than the smoky city air of the time. Small theatres were typically built at the ends of piers to ...


1

A pitch is a specific kind of presentation, typically: The pitch presentation is a 20-minute (or so) slide presentation, usually done live but with either PowerPoint or Keynote slides in the background, that tells investors about a new business. Sales pitch in the modern commercial advertising sense is from 1943, American English, perhaps from ...


2

It's referring to the path of a journey, eg "So, where did your adventure take you Bilbo?" "There and back again" I wouldn't say that it's an idiom, although it depends on what you use it for I suppose. An idiom's meaning isn't obvious, so if you used to to refer to something that only you understood the meaning of then you would be using it as a sort of ...


2

In the context of (probably most) U.S. universities this would mean a transcript from a Masters program; i.e., a list of courses taken and grades received with a calculated grade point average.



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