New answers tagged

0

Since the turn "belongs" to the English edition, so to speak, I would use indicate the possessive with an apostrophe-s added to "edition." Also, since the second clause of the sentence is independent (it has a subject, it, and a verb, is), you need a comma after "Arabic." So you have: I read this novel four times in Arabic, and now it's the English ...


0

You're assumption is correct. It does mean either or both. However, it is normally written with a slash instead of a comma: and/or


1

Video sniffing is the process of reading a video feed from outside of the equipment actually carrying the feed. For example, with special equipment you could stand with a laptop under a public CCTV camera, and watch (and record) what the camera is recording, on your laptop: you are "sniffing" that video signal. If you did this you would be "tapping into a ...


1

Read: "go after" as prosecute. Go after phrasal verb of go pursue or hunt down (someone). google: go after Read: "Imagine if" as hypothetical. Snowden is inviting us to envision a world where prosecuting corruption was considered as important as prosecuting filesharing.


1

'Zero tolerance ' is a term used to mean something is not tolerated at all. The term is common enough to have it's own Wikipedia entry. It's normally used for something negative. A city with 'zero tolerance for speeding' means every case of speeding will be punished, no matter how small. This phrase is a clumsy way of stating that, presumably to avoid the ...


0

From Macmillan online dictionary: Realize [3]: FORMAL to achieve something that you have planned or hoped for comes close to the technical meaning of realize I am familiar with: to be or provide the mechanism by which something happens. By contrast I would understand "enable" in this context to have the broader meaning of "to facilitate something ...


1

In the context of a person speaking, chime means to either interrupt a conversation with an unwanted opinion, or to participate harmoniously in a conversation. Given that the two meanings are polar opposites, it is well to understand it in the general context of the text!


1

There is nothing wrong with the sentence. "Zero tolerance", in engineering and statistics, means "allowing no deviations from the standard". It does not imply that the standard is enforcing a positive or negative attribute. The term has been "hijacked" in several contexts to have more specific meanings, but the above use in not in one of those contexts. ...


17

I believe that "longstop" is referring to the cricket position, and that makes sense in context: the job of the longstop is to act as backup for the wicket keeper. If everything goes according to plan, they will never have to do anything - the wicket keeper will stop the ball. But, sometimes, due to a mistake by the wicket keeper, or an unexpected ...


1

Shakespeare was almost godlike in his capacity to put into English, sentiments that crystallize some recognizable human experience in a novel way. There are two entities who have influenced English more than anything else: One is The King James Bible; the other is William Shakespeare. These two have given us some of our most colorful, and fun, idioms. ...


2

Crazy literally means "mentally deranged," but in the slang sense it implies some combination of intensity, chaos, confusion and unbelievability --a level of sensory overload that could drive one crazy, or make you feel as if you were already mentally deranged. Used as a modifier, it adds its own connotations to the adjective modified. Crazy busy means ...


0

If we provide a convenience, like superstores (Walmart etc) or an online bookseller, but that causes the usual channels to fail, we end up with a world where only the one possibility is available, and the others cannot re-arise. It makes for a narrower, less interesting world. Eventually, even places like Paris might wind up with lots of closed storefronts ...


0

As others have eluded, the expression describes the difference between winning (eat lunch - enjoy the spoils of success) or losing (be lunch - suffer the consequences of loss) metaphorically.


0

Wikipedia has an excellent explanation of the ephemeral quality in respect of actors/ performers. Ephemerality Typically the term ephemeral is used to describe objects found in nature, although it can describe a wide range of things, including human artifacts intentionally made to last for only a temporary period, in order to increase their perceived ...


0

The ephemeral quality is about being a star. To me, the writer conveys that being a star only lasts for so long, until someone else takes your place, thus being an ephemeral quality, something that can only describe you for a short period of time.


0

"Ephemeral star" means some star quickly increasing its brightness for a short time (days-months on the star time scale) - nova, supernova and, then fading away forever. Used as well for movie and other stars etc.


0

Not a bad guess. One's take on a subject means how one views that subject. But in this case, you've got the phrasal verb take on, meaning to engage in a dispute. The title means that the artists are fighting with the architects about the nature of buildings. The clue is that it's not OK to remove the apostrophe.


3

I've consulted several different dictionaries, and all say pretty much that both words mean the same thing. At first, I thought that "eternal" may indicate no start or end, while "everlasting" only specifies no end. But that is NOT the case. My Random House Websters College Dictionary (2001) lists "eternal" as a synonym for everlasting. The American ...


0

"we've as much, if not more wildlife than they do" -> we have as much wildlife as they do, maybe even more than they do. With a sentence such a this one, you have to look for the noun that the comparison refers to. To get the meaning, skip the "if not more" which is not immediately relevant to get the meaning of the sentence.


2

It really depends on when this is being said. "Don't work yourself so hard" would mean that whoever says it is observing this person working really hard and is admonishing them to relax a little. "Don't work yourself too hard" would mean that the person saying this either does not know how much work has been done or is being done and is warning them not ...


2

They're not packing anything. They're the ones packed into that space. The speaker is complaining that they might not be able to do their work because they'll be packed into that little space. They need space to do the job but they won't have enough space, because they will be packed into that little space. ODO definition of "pack": 2.1 (often as ...


1

The original (back in 2012 or earlier) gibe at Elizabeth Warren involved referring to her as "Fauxcahontas"—that is, "Fake [Po]cahontas," the implication being that she didn't really have any Native American ancestry but was exploiting special minority preferences in school admissions and elsewhere to gain an unfair advantage over both "real" Native ...


0

If you google "up and down meaning," "to and fro" is the second definition of the phrase. And, if you google "to and fro" almost all the definitions say that it means back and forth. So, he means "It's happening to and fro this hemisphere" or idiomatically speaking, all throughout the hemisphere, from one end of it to another.


3

It appears that the words play and rage were often paired in Middle English, the one word complementing the other. Middle English Dictionary By Hans Kurath CT abbreviation for Canterbury Tales pleien (V) 2. (a) to play amorously; make love, engage in sexual intercourse (al393) Gower CA 1.1764: Thei were wedded in the nyht.. And sche began ...


0

Some countries have allowed or currently allow a select group of officials to frank mail, indicating that postage has been paid, by signature, as outlined in Merriam-Webster's online definition of frank: a: to mark (a piece of mail) with an official signature or sign indicating the right of the sender to free mailing m-w.com Wikipedia has an article ...


1

I used the above answers some and googled some, but my takeaway is: Youth speaks to himself and says: With women I have sex with sometimes lightly and sometimes carnally Angel: To your soul it is great damage Devil: If you be holy in your young age Your offspring will increase an your character will be molded swage = the shaping of metal (the gripping tool ...


2

Is it not me lyste (that is, my lust) that both play and rage. With sense of rage as in a fire burning. An adolescent response to the sight of the attractive woman that the angel is urging to be controlled.


7

I'm not sure, but I think the relevant sense is probably this noun sense (from the Middle English Dictionary): 6. Amorous longing or desire, lovesickness; also, a fit of carnal lust or sexual desire; a feeling of passion or love; ~ of love, an ardent passion; loves ~, the fervor of love. [link] So I think the verse means something like, "I like both ...


12

Online Etymology has some interesting background for rage; until the mid-13c., it meant "to play, romp," from rage (n.) [After that a new meaning was acquired:] Meanings "be furious; speak passionately; go mad" first recorded c. 1300. So, it may be a repetition of play (as in "romp and play"), or it may be fight/go mad/whatever. I'm not sure the ...


3

Google's definition includes: continue with great force or intensity. "the argument raged for days" synonyms: be violent, be at its height, be turbulent, be tempestuous, be uncontrollable, thunder, rampage "a tropical storm was raging" (of an illness or fire) spread very rapidly or uncontrollably. "the great cholera epidemic which raged ...


0

I think aside is to be taken as a noun: a comment spoken by a character in a play that is heard by the audience but is supposedly not heard by other characters on stage a comment that is spoken quietly to someone so that it cannot be heard by other people who are present a comment or discussion that does not relate directly to the main subject ...


0

Time (and I would consider an age to represent time) seems to call for "when". But it doesn't necessarily do so. People use when and where somewhat interchangeably in the situation you've presented. "Where" can be a place in time. We're living in a time where, more than ever, everyone has a voice. - NYT This kind of ‘‘perfect storm’’ is seductive ...


2

[Arthur Dent] was about thirty as well, dark haired and never quite at ease with himself. The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his ...


3

The likely quote is a bit different: The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his friends worked in advertising. - The Hitchhiker'...


6

It's a modifier to express surprise or strength of meaning. To put this in context, the "how" works much in the same way that you, as a Spanish speaker, might exclaim "qué fuerte!" instead of just "fuerte!".


23

Adding to @HotLick's great answer, the adverb how (See No. 3 definition) can be used as a modifier to indicate surprise, delight, or other strong feelings. [Wiktionary] It has two usages as follows: It modifies other adjectives or adverbs as in How very interesting! How wonderful it was to receive your invitation.‎ How seldom I ...


5

Two ways of considering it. One view would be that "how" is used as a simple intensifier -- "I wonder greatly what you are". (This would be the most common understanding, as "how" is often used for such effect.) The other view would be that "how" implies a sort of "meta wonder" -- "Wondering about your nature is thought provoking". Of course, since ...


0

Accordingly does make the sentence more polite and friendly but it is an old fashioned word and I feel a little out of context here. It would have made more sense if you were given something and you had to work with respect to that (according to that) If you want to have the politeness and not sound strange, how about these alternatives: I'll arrange ...


-1

"New creative for an email ad" is awkward. I would guess the author wanted to say "new creative ideas for an email ad". The meaning is now clear hopefully. "Tested against a control" means that it should be tested on a group of users first to validate its effectiveness. This is from the commonly used term control group in research.


2

Unless you are trying to make a point of being informal, there is no reason (other than it would be a shorter sentence) to drop the word. If anything you will end up sounding more professional and possibly more intelligent. Basically: it's a perfectly everyday word, use it if you want to.


1

I think you hit the nail on the head! It makes sense that "a moon" would refer to (more or less) one month, which is about how long the lunar cycle takes. The usage of moon as a period of time is supported by Wilde's description of how the main character felt "wearied" when the moon was waning, or return back to its new moon phase at the end of the cycle—...


2

This turned out to be a bit more complicated to explain than I had anticipated, so I can understand the reason to post your question on ELU! The combination of "if not", "invoking" (which lends a sense of something not present) and "presenting" (i.e. being present) takes some unravelling… if not - ODO: Perhaps even (used to introduce a more extreme term ...


0

If not, in gerneral terms represents a more extreme term than the former (in this case 'invoking'). Organ chants were based on the chants they replaced, thus invoking perhaps even presenting the appropriate words. In this case, 'presenting' is more extreme than 'invoking' the appropriate words. For example: Let's meet up tonight if not sooner (link).


5

The most common use of the phrase is "to turn oneself in (to authorities)" meaning to voluntarily surrender. For instance, "A man wanted by the state on a parole violation escaped arrest by U.S. marshals in Cambridge on Tuesday, but turned himself in on Thursday." http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/crime-and-courts/wanted-man-turns-himself-in-dane-county-...


2

It means to "rat them out" and inform on their [nefarious ?] doings. With Trump you can never be quite sure. The Collins Dictionary thesaurus provides several terms for turn someone in hand someone over, denounce, inform on, blow the whistle on (informal), shop (British, informal), finger (US, informal), betray, sell out, split on (informal), grass ...


1

A tall man (with deep-featured face), who (to my knowledge) has never told a joke, is patting my head. is basically the same as the following sentence if you get rid of the prepositional phrases and relative clause. A tall man is patting my head To my knowledge means "as far as I know".


14

trapezium (n.) 1.1 North American A quadrilateral with no sides parallel. 1.2 British A quadrilateral with one pair of sides parallel. Source: Oxford Dictionaries There doesn't seem to be a non-mathematical definition for this word. For that reason (and since the definition pertains to geometry), I'm certain trapezium is simply describing the ...



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