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Deadrat has an excellent point. I don't know this author, but the passage has problems! Nevertheless, I will try to help you: Perfection would be boring. A slightly blemished but otherwise beautiful piece of art might remind us that human beings are complex, with doubts and fears on the one hand, but an unstoppable drive toward simple happiness as well.


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The writer is explaining about the contemporary model/explanations that scientists currently employ to describe how the human brain works. Like many other concepts including Rutherford model, the way we picture our brain cells and the transferring of signals etc are all merely a hypothesis, and in fifty years’ time, we will probably use a different ...


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It means: Artists think outside the box, and are a bit weird, but all told, you could do worse than to spend your time around artists. Living with artists, or being an artist, is a good place to be. It's nothing to be ashamed of, even if you have a few fleas and bedbugs in your loft.


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What is the thing that "is obviously recognisable in this 'Machiavellian behaviour'"? I thought the sentence "The notion that communities..." is this thing, and it was why I thought a "which" might have been dropped in this sentence. "This 'Machiavellian behaviour' refers to something implied in the preceding passage, a description of intrigue, ...


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Its meaning here is ambiguous. It can be taken to mean it's good to be an artist (and so, be counted among their company). It can also be taken to mean artists are good company to have (as in, it's good to hang out with them).


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It "goes to" art. As in: Art eases social interactions Art is a mark of status and of the conspicuous display of consumption that indicates superior health and wealth. These things are some of arts "biological purposes". If the sentence had read: Anyone could hazard suggestions for the biological purposes of art – they ease social ...


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It means that the Afghan could survive (and walk away from) an amount of bullets (lead) that would kill three Englishmen. By the time you'd manage to drop him with your gun, he would have already come close enough to kill you with his knife.


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A social scientist is a scientist who specializes in a social science such as psychology, economics, or political science. But a scientist is a person who studies the natural sciences (like physics, chemistry and biology).


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A "social scientist" is one who studies social phenomena, like psychology, economics, history, or politics. These things are generally difficult to study, since it's often very difficult to set up a perfectly repeatable experiment with proper control. This is in contrast to "natural sciences" or "hard sciences", which include chemistry, physics, biology, and ...


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So that this question receives an answer rather than just comments, I'll summarise what has been said so far. The notion that communities are always ruled by competing Alpha males and that females play a subordinate role does not feel acceptable in a post-Marxist, postfeminist society. That sentence is correct. See the following shortened version. ...


0

To use your own words from version two: Post-Freudians have reminded us how we are burdened by repressions resulting from our early family life... and Marxists and Foucauldians have reminded us how we are burdened by the power of the political hegemonies we labour under or subscribe to.


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This would be clearer if the comma after "family life" were a semicolon. You may conclude from the context of the named movements that the sentence contrasts theories of personal burdens. Freudians ascribe their weight to early family life. Marxists, on the other hand, ascribe that weight to the political power structures of society.


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Not sure why, but my googling yielded meaningful results. Apparently there are sewers that are home to crabs. There are also, apparently, people who fish for them. I will pull out a few additional sentences from the sewer crab section of the book, to provide more context for the old man's answer: I left by the coffeeshop door and walked down a hill to ...


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Apparently the author thinks that the some areas of the British press are "better art critics", from which "rigorous criticism [has emerged]". The author seems to share the view of these "better art critics", that this work represents "all that is flashy, childishly provocative and calculatingly commercial". However, they do not fail to mention that "from ...


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I think the album cover art is the answer here. Cat did the cover art himself. Clearly a farmer. Not a boatman or fireman.


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Let's break this down: Are some individual children genetically disposed to violence, or addiction, or laziness? We do not know, but some doctors seem to think so Extreme applications of such thinking are already happening in America, and increasingly in Britain Some doctors in the US and UK not only believes it is true, but they have decided to ...


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The term 'Sirrah' is used to show contempt, so it is appropriate to the context: A term of address implying inferiority and used in anger, contempt, reproach, or disrespectful familiarity, addressed to a man or boy, but sometimes to a woman. In sililoquies often preceded by ah. Not used in the plural. (www.finedictionary.com) For the usage ...


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Google Books has a link to (a lot of) the Raymond Chandler story you're asking about. It also has links to three other versions of the same story—but no other matches for "sewer crab" or "sewer crabs" at all. So I think maybe "sewer crabs" is just a little invention of Raymond Chandler's. The closest I could get to an entry for "sewer crab" in the slang ...


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If you’re indecisive, you have a hard time making decisions. When you finally do make a decision, you may not be confident about it, or you might change your mind. vocabulary.com Watch out when a situation becomes volatile — it is likely to change for the worse suddenly. You fight and then make up with your partner often if you two have a volatile ...


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The meaning of 'then' in this context follows Merriam-Websters definition 3: Without more from the original text its hard to tell if it would be more appropriately one of the sub definitions a-d but my best guess would probably be 3d. as a necessary consequence


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Here's another example: The diet of people living up near the Arctic Circle is not very varied. They eat mainly caribou, salmon, and moose with the odd root vegetable when they can find one. The with-phrase supplements the meaning in the main clause. "With" could be paraphrased there as "including" or "and". The word "odd" can have the sense "rare" or ...


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The idiom is "drumming something into one's head," under the dubious theory that a person's head and a drum head are similar enough that long-term, forceful, repetitive pounding aids learning.


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"Odd" here doesn't mean strange. It means occasional and not in accordance with the usual. This meaning survives in the idiom "odds and ends." Note that usual music was "hymns, folk songs, and military marching songs." Out of keeping with this list, was the occasional and contrasting piece of classical music.


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Think of odd in this sentence to mean "some" or "a few." From Dictionary.com: odd 6. being a small amount in addition to what is counted or specified: I have five gross and a few odd dozens. So the meaning of that sentence is something like: We learnt to sing and read music and had a wide repertoire of hymns, folk songs and military marching ...


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The eye dropper is used as part of an improvised mechanism to inject drugs, such as heroin, into the vein. The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English (2009 edn.) refers to the process of tearing the edge of a dollar bill and and wrapping it around the small edge of the dropper, so as to secure the needle to it. As the eye ...


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Wikipedia states on a disambiguation page that "the good doctor" is "a cliché referring to any physician." However, the earliest link on that page is to the Wikipedia article on Dr. Samuel Johnson (1709–1784)—while the earliest occurrence of "the good doctor" in a Google Books search is from almost a century before Johnson's birth. A biography of Thomas ...


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From what I can tell, Oishi-san, it just means he appears to be dyeing his hair (what's left of it) more and more blond. (Note the picture of Trump in the photo which shows an almost glowing golden mane.) The writer is poking fun at Trump's comb-over and his vanity.


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I think the meaning of "destroy" here is the first one in http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/destroy: "End the existence of (something) by damaging or attacking it." It refers to the animals that were killed by the fire itself. "Destroy" in that sense is an inclusive word for all the effects of the fire - not just the "damage" to the ...


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The adjective good before a name or title or form of address was quite ordinary in older English, conveying an extra degree of respect or affection: FENTON: Good Mistress Page, for that I love your daughter   In such a righteous fashion as I do,   Perforce, against all cheques, rebukes and manners,   I must advance ...


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It used to be a somewhat condescending honorific quite often used in the 19th century. You won't hear it these days or very rarely. Edit: I accept StoneyB's extra information about this Google ngram: my good man,my good fellow,my good Mr,my good Mrs Very often it was a way of softening an implied criticism.


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Like deadrat, I believe it means to waste time or engage in a pointless and ill-defined activity. Google ngram: count clouds The earliest reference I can find is Meanwhile, the child Dimey stitched away, and now the table-cloth was almost done. She thought, as soon as she finished it, she would begin to count clouds again—but, oh, what a sweet, ...


2

Soundness means stability, validity, rational, free from error, reliable and so on. Lets see it in different context first. "During the past few years we have questioned the soundness of many principles that had for a long time been taken for granted". Here soundness relates to the validity or rationality of these principles. Another example can be "The ...


4

Chandler's PI, Marlowe, has received a call from a woman whose voice he doesn't recognize. She tells him to see a lawyer named Rush Madder, and it's Madder whom Marlowe is talking to here. Marlowe is sure that Madder had the woman call, but when he asks Madder who she is, Madder asks, "Did somebody phone you?" Marlowe makes the "count clouds" comment and ...


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"In all of its moods" ^ It would mean the ocean is either calm, turbulent . . . etc.


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Perhaps we can tease out the meaning by examining the three contrasts of the first sentence: fortune1 (i.e., chance) vs reason dull2 vs serious3 (i.e., involving earnest thought) particular humour (i.e, emotion) vs general principles So, on the right-hand sides we have rationality, its methods, and its results. On the left-hand side, we have ...


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"When I use a word . . . it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less." --- Humpty Dumpty What does the phrase "paramour in waiting" mean? As I am confident the reader already knows, a paramour is an illicit lover. But the meaning of the phrase "paramour in waiting" depends very much on who is using it . . . [note: 'paramour' is gender ...


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I have asked, and answered a similar question on the Information Security SE. I think my own answer probably applies here. Registration is the process of establishing your identity with an institution. For instance accepting your offer of a place. Enrolment is when you provide your details and select your courses. Sometimes this can take place at the same ...


0

Here are some of the preceding lyrics: This is my stop Got to get off ... Excuse me Excuse me I've got to be direct(la, la, la) If I'm wrong please correct(la, la, la) You're standing on my neck. In other words, this is where I want to go, and I'd get there if you weren't preventing me. Everything about the lyrics drips irony from ...


0

It means that somebody is preventing you from doing what You need to. It has a similar meaning to "holding someone back". Hope it helps:)


0

"Routeless" makes sense in the above, when you consider it to mean "aimless" or "random", with no "map", no "guiding hand". This sense is mirroring the use of "randomized" at the start of the excerpt. (I see no intent to form a pun here.) The "grief" is a sadness because the "routelessness" implies that there is no overriding "scheme" or "plan". Many ...


1

In mathematics, a relation between the elements in a starting set (the domain, the set of input items) and those in a target set (the codomain) is said to be injective (one-to-one) if every element of the codomain is mapped to by at most one element of the domain. If every element of the codomain is mapped to by exactly one element of the domain, the ...


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I always interpreted Lenina's line in a more explicitly sexual way, given the context. My first thought was pneumatic tube systems and the suction involved in making them work. "Pneumatic" refers to pressurized gas systems. I did just look it up just now though and found another usage I was unaware of, "of or relating to the spirit". Maybe that's what she ...


3

Beyond following common naming principles, the other thing that identifies it as the name of an establishment - probably a pub or inn - is that it is capitalized as a proper name. A purely descriptive sentence referencing a young deer of odd colouration would refer to a 'purple fawn', not the 'Purple Fawn'. The capitalization identifies it as a proper name, ...


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It is more likely to be the name of an inn, which are frequently named after animals. Shops were generally not so named. (In an age when few people were literate, English inns and public houses would often bear a sign with a distinctive image, often of an easily recognisable animal or object.) A fawn is a young deer. Note well: There is a clear and ...


1

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, according to[1] is the usage of the words according and to as a compound preposition. The definition of the adjective according is: 1. With to. Corresponding to something; agreeing, matching. Obs.* 5. As a compound preposition. according to: as stated or formulated by. The word according itself means: ...


0

The difference is one of trustworthiness. Based on... Based upon... is an appeal to available evidence. Even if the appeal is to a named source, Merriam-Webster, or Berthon and Onions, it is the work that is referred to. According to... is an appeal to an authority. You can even say "According to Freud XYZ, but according Jung ABC," and then disagree ...


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It means: "Since you can never really tell what you're getting when you go to the polls, why NOT vote for a bad-mannered, bad-tempered, boorish person who throws personal insults at everyone who disagrees with him?" The author is arguing that many people see casting a ballot as essentially a blind choice - like "buying a pig in a poke" - so the fact that ...


2

The phrase "buying (or selling) a pig in a poke" refers to buying something you can't inspect and trusting that it really is as described. "You can't open the bag here, since the piglet might escape, but I promise that it's a healthy little one, definitely worth the price I'm asking for it." Obviously, the seller may have been lying -- the thing in the bag ...


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R: There are some things in my research log which might be relevant to your case. Now that you have stopped blustering, I'll read you some things before my patient returns. B: You just happened to have it on you. B is being sarcastic, and making fun of R. It isn't typical to carry around one's research log. B is thinking, "Isn't it weird that ...



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