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Because of their insect origin, the Myrmidons were blindly loyal to Achilles, so loyal that they would die without resisting if ordered to. Duely devoted to Achillis and his word the insectoid Myrmidons would die directly following their duty.


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Any Reason create to Purpose because every purpose have reason.And purpose can not create to reasons. Reason may be further back of purpose. For Example:- After completion My MBA, i will work in a Big company. I will go aboard for work as i did not get any job in my country.


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The Myrmidons, being hexapods, would lay down their lives for Achilles.


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Because of their buggy beginnings the Myrmidions were bound to be bound to Achilles, so beholden they would beg to be brought to oblivion if he but besought them.


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Because of their insect origin, the Myrmidons were blindly loyal to Achilles, so loyal that they would die without resisting if ordered to Due to their pismiric origin, Myrmidons were steadfast to Achilles, so much so, their abnegated deaths were without obluctation.


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'Herbert', or 'Erbert' was a name called to me all my childhood by my mother and father, it was not meant in a nasty way, but affectionately described my mates and me, it meant a mischievous, street kid. we were always up to no good, but in the mildest form, having bonfires up the woods, ghost knocking, stuff like that. if you did higher level or antisocial ...


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There, shepherds play their pipes Pan pipes, an early flute. (Example) and sigh with longing for flirtatious nymphs and goat-footed nature gods Pan was a nature god. He had goat's feet. play in the fields and woods.


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First, turnout Turnout noun a clearing out and cleaning Second, there is an elided "that". So, to rephrase - Mrs. Sutton: If you ask me, it was cleaning the dining-room (that) did it. I would describe it as highly colloquial writing.


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StoneyB over at ELL answered your question rather well: The phrase at hand, keep you in shoe leather, means, literally, to provide you enough revenue to pay for maintaining your shoes—more generally, to cover the costs of keeping your business open and maintaining the value of your capital investment. More interesting information about the phrase can ...


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I would like you to buy such fruit as apples and watermelon for me. You want someone to buy you fruit. The fruit has to be either apples and/or watermelons. Can you buy me some fruit such as apples or watermelon? You want someone to buy you fruit. Some examples of fruits are apples and watermelons. The first one, the sentence focuses on the specific ...


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Pinks is a slang term for ownership documents to a vehicle. The term is still used by most street racers in the US. Pink slips are also used for terminating employment, back in the 1950s when this movie was staged, the registration papers were in fact pink. But he does have a rather sarcastic response in the movie when asked the question "pinks?" He was ...


-3

Even with colloquial speech, I think there is a word missing from the sentence. 'Done' is equivalent to 'did' and 'what' is equivalent to 'that', so you could say 'X done it' = 'X did it' or 'It was X what done it' = 'It was X that done it' = 'It was X that did it', but 'it was X done it' does not ring true, just as 'it was X did it' sounds wrong.


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I would understand it in the following way: What was the cause of her being unwell? It was (her) turning out the dining room, (that was what has) done it (read: her not being well for "it"). Or: (that has) done it. I would not use the term incorrect English. Sayers renders the way simple uneducated people speak and that is interesting and attractive. If ...


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You should use impel to mean to drive or to urge, and compel to mean to force or to make something happen. Compel is definitely stronger (implying more force) than impel, and if you mean "coerce against one's will," then you should use compel. Look at the words in the definitions for impel: to urge or drive forward or on by or as if by the exertion ...


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Mrs. Mummery is tired. Why is she tired, Mr. Mummery might wonder. "Mrs. Mummery is tired because she works too hard. I warned her, but she insisted on turning out the dining room today" says the help, Mrs. Sutton. "That's what did it. That's why she's resting." (As I am an American, I have never turned out a dining room, but I have cleaned it and ...


6

There's quite a few idioms in there, very suggestive of Mrs Sutton being uneducated / lower class. "Turning out the dining room" - cleaning / tidying the dining room "It was X done it" - incorrect conjugation of "It was X that did it". So Mrs Sutton is (with some incorrect English) saying that the act of cleaning the dining room was what caused something ...


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It means that tidying the dining room, and perhaps discarding some of its contents, was the cause of the lady’s condition. The speech is in a non-standard dialect in which the past tense of ‘do’ is not ‘did’ but ‘done’.


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This is about as silly an argument as I have ever encountered in Shakespearean scholarship — even sillier than the celebrated Impediment of Adipose. Jonson's compliment is a fairly pretty one: “Despite your lack of a Classical Education (like Mine), your work commands the admiration of the Classical Masters.” But the reading Ingleby urges makes no sense at ...


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And though thou hadst means "although you have", and is read the same way today as two centuries ago. I am no scholar, but I don't think it the subjunctive, but merely the indicative. As you know, the subjunctive expresses a wish, a suggestion, a command, or a condition that is contrary to fact (today... and then?) Would I were sleep and peace, so ...


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Does "And though thou hadst" here mean "And even if you had" or "And although you had"—or is it impossible to tell? I think it's impossible to tell: because although "hadst" is the subjective, it's also the indicative. If it is impossible to tell, were listeners and readers in Shakespearean/Jonsonian times accustomed to having to draw their own ...


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My first recollection of the term employing 'Erbert was from my father, a Cockney. However, the most common recollection comes from "The Goon Show" when Bluebottle was often called a "...spotted little 'erbert." David J. C.


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The moon shone on his face as he spoke, and the girl was pleased to watch it, it seemed to breathe such an innocent and old-world kindness of disposition, yet with something high too, as of a well-founded self-content. This is a complicated sentence but we can remove a few of the clauses in order to get at "as of" more directly: The moon shone on ...


5

"Where's Waldo" is a game where you have to scan a sketch of a crowd, looking for a particular person. By using where's-waldo as a verb, I think the writer means the student is not going to read the passage, but just scan over it, looking for a few words that resemble the question.


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A version of this proverb I've seen more often is: "The candle burns brightest just before it goes out." For example: But, as the old cliche says, perhaps a candle burns brightest just before it goes out. (Lawrence J. McCaffrey, Textures of Irish America, 1998) Quite often, a candle will get a burst of radiant light just before it flickers out, and ...


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Only when a candle is burning does it shed light. A burning candle will get smaller as it does so, which is what waning means. (The opposite of waning is waxing; the moon waxes and wanes as it goes through its monthly cycle of visibility.) A candle which is not burning is static. It doesn't get smaller, but nor does it shed light. It is not making any ...


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While it is obvious Turpin wore a mask to avoid being recognised, the buyer is suggesting a seller has a 'bare faced' cheek to ask a hefty price and is guilty of such blatant 'highway robbery' that Dick himself would be embarrassed to attempt it in person. It doesn't really work well in the written form.


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The expression used to be "prey on one's mind", but this has now been transformed by footballerspeak to "play on one's mind." You're welcome.


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The confusion may be based on the definition of cross wires: Not accordant with what is wished or expected; interrupting; adverse; contrary; thwarting; perverse. "A cross fortune." --Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster]


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No, it means they misunderstood each other. It probably comes from a telephone switchboard analogy. Once, operators had to manually connect two parties with wires. If they put the wires into the wrong plugs, people would think they were talking one party (person) but actually be talking to another. This would cause misunderstandings, as they would be ...


2

Not necessarily came to blows, but rather they couldn't agree on what they were discussing. English definition of “get your wires crossed” get your wires crossed When people get their wires crossed, they have a different understanding of the same situation: e.g. Somehow we got our wires crossed because I'd got the 23rd written down in my diary ...


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I think of the phrase's use being spoken to a comrade, usually with nervous bravado. Particularly when fixing to go into a tense or hazardous situation like diving in pursuit of an enemy aircraft; or chasing something that could turn on you quickly with dire results.


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I don't know the grammatical difference here, but do find that "selected" is often used for a subset that itself would be processed while "select" is often used when the subset would only form the basis/means for some processing. Personally, I would use "select" when the selection process is underway (or yet to start), the criteria are vague or I want to be ...


11

A phoenix is a mythological bird that dies as it reaches old age (literally by burning up, or, if you want, spontaneously combusting) and is reborn (young and beautiful once again) of its own ashes. It is a creature associated with a whole slew of related concepts: long life, rebirth, resurrection, regeneration... In the context of the sentence you quoted, ...


4

A phoenix is a mythological creature: a bird which is reborn after dying. It's usually associated with fire and the sun and its death often involves burning down to ashes. The usage is a metaphor suggesting that Japan was burned down to nothing, and then reborn as strong as ever in the same way as a phoenix. The sun association was probably not invoked ...


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Phoenix is a bird in Greek mythology, a bird that burns and is reborn again. Read Wikipedia's article on Phoenix (mythology). Wikipedia: Phoenix


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The use of Phoenix suggests the idea that Japan was able to reconstruct itself after the war.. Like the Phoenix which was able to rise from its ashes.


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As others have mentioned, the use of so-called phrasal verbs can be subject to highly idiomatic and essentially unpredictable or unsystematic usage. In the particular cases you mention, it is fairly common for the phrasal version to emphasise the notion of completion. So if you "bandage up" a wound, as opposed to simply "bandaging" it, this emphasises the ...


1

You are right, it seems to mean 'just going', as the AHD notes. mush 2 (mŭsh) v. mushed, mush·ing, mush·es v.intr. To travel, especially over snow with a dogsled.


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Mush is the traditional cry for encouraging sled dogs—“Mush, you huskies!” Etymonline conjectures first recorded 1862, as mouche, perhaps altered from French marchons! "advance!" (imperative of marcher "to march)"


2

Travel validation, in this case is basically referring to that very sheet of paper, which will validate your travel. This form is being used to validate whether or not the person in question (you?) is able to travel as an exchange student. The "good standing" portion is going to be subjective and up to the educational institution to decide what that ...


0

You're right. It's a restatement for emphasis (which is one of do's roles - compare 'I do like spinach' with 'I like spinach'). Your example (which needs a comma) is in a pretty informal, almost rustic or childish, register. Edwin Ashworth


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These are examples of what are called Phrasal Verbs. A phrasal verb consists of two parts: a verb, practically any verb, like beat, set, run, burn, or take. and a particle, generally the same shape as a preposition, but without an object, like up, out, off, over, and down. There are about 17 particles in English. Phrasal verbs usually mean something ...


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You can beat someone. You can beat up someone. You can beat up on someone. Who can explain it? Just try to keep pace with changing fashion.


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These are examples of idiomatic language. There is no rule guiding idiomatic use; people use it because they've heard it in their region, their home, their peer group. How it starts, I can only guess. Somewhere along the line, someone thought the extra word helped the verb to express more clearly what they wanted to express. Use of idiomatic language can ...


1

Because English gets around. The simple verb on it's own is normal in English but when the language was exported to other countries some speakers adopted grammar from their own language into English. So in parts of the US where the inhabitants had spoken Spanish or French they kept their own grammar when speaking English. There are some cases where formal ...


0

There is also a "tit bull," (East Texas), referring to a calf that was never weaned or steered and is still living off mama as an adult.


-3

Obtuse can refer to an expansive mind.


1

Give-back (coined in 1975–80) refers to a negotiation tactic of labor unions; basically the union/employees would give back some of their gains (usually wages) in return for something more valuable, such as increased benefits, etc., or in recognition of economic hard times for the employer. For example, Boeing recently won a huge give-back when they ...


1

Speaking from an American-culture perspective, instead of a purely grammatical perspective, when someone asks you where you work, they are trying to get to know you. It's an invitation to open up and tell them about yourself. If you say something short like "I work at a hospital" and leave it at that, you are telling them that you don't really want to talk ...


0

Using at or in depends on the place in which work. If you are part of a government, you can say I work in a government service. If it is a small shop, I would prefer, I work at a shop.



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