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6

Consound it, concern it and consarn it are all minced oaths for confound it, which is itself a minced oath for damn it, in turn arguably a minced oath for God damn it.


4

"Consound it" means the same thing as "confound it". My guess is that the interjection "confound it" was thought to be too strong in Hannibal, Missouri, at the time of Mark Twain's childhood. So people changed the pronunciation slightly to avoid using "bad words". (I don't see anything objectionable in "confound it", but maybe it was perceived as a ...


2

I think it is just a general interjection ... used in place of a profanity that "polite society" would disapprove. My father used to say, "Confound it".


1

I have never encountered the word submit used with "money"; it is sometimes used with "payment" - but that would mean paying for something, which is different from what you usually do in a bank. COCA (the corpus of Contemporary American English) does not have a single instance of "submit money" (or of "submit the money" or "submit some money").


1

You can..... Comprehend is a verb that originates from the Latin word comprehendere, which means “catch or seize.” When an idea is clear to you and you understand it completely, you comprehend it. to take in or embrace; include; comprise. .....Education is to help students understand the how's and why's. All complicated subjects need you to ...


1

The word "charge" here refers to a piece of persuasive writing by Judge Alexander Adison (of the court of common please for Pennsylvania's fifth circuit) which he presented as grand jury instructions in September 1798. In this charge he defended the constitutionality of the alien and sedition act. In the Life of John Marshall, volume two, page 46: These ...


2

According to the dictionary, comprehend simply means understand, but to me the connotations are slightly different. Comprehend seems more "comprehensive" --I would describe it as a deeper and more complete level of understanding. I also see comprehend as dealing more with ability, the mental capacity to grasp something. For instance, I would say "I ...


0

I would say that they're more or less the same, however used in different contexts. I comprehended a lesson doesn't quite make sense for me; I would say that the differences are solely contextual. I understood the lesson Makes sense to me However, note that it depends on what you mean by lesson: if you're talking about a lesson as in school, ...


2

It means equally, indicating that each distribution or category has (roughly) the same number of users.


1

Let's say you did a survey asking 50 users to rate the usability of a website. If there were 40 men and 10 women who took your survey, then the respondents were not evenly distributed according to gender. If 35 people were under the age of 25, and only 5 were over the age of 50, then your sample was not evenly distributed by age. To get a more evenly ...


1

It is simply a mistake (typographical error or otherwise). It should be perspective instead of perceptive.


2

It's another way of saying "mothballed"


0

The reason "big-company" is hyphenated is that they are referring to the attribues of a "big company": The big company began to implement big-company procedures.


10

The word 'catch' is used figuratively. It implicitly compares the person to a (good) fish that one has caught. A related use: He | she is 'a keeper', that is, not a fish that one would toss back into the water. A fish worth keeping. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/keeper?show=0&t=1419169461 When words are used figuratively, over time the ...


9

She is just saying that, from your description, the girl sounds like a perfect find, for dating or marrying. catch - (noun) one worth catching especially as a spouse. Merriam-Webster


0

You have the answer in the cited text: "84% vs. 43%". That's what "twice as many means". As for "can turn customers off, it "can make customers lose interest". "There were five birds in one cage. In the other one, twice as many. (which is 10)


3

These verbs both mean to put someone or something in the place of another. To replace is to be or to furnish an equivalent or substitute, especially for one that has been lost, depleted, worn out, or discharged: To replace: to provide a substitute for (something broken or unsatisfactory, for example) - AHDEL To substitute: To put or use (a person ...


0

to convey, to impart or communicate by statement, suggestion, gesture, or appearance


0

It tells us what kind of growth upswings the writer is talking about. The writer is talking about growth upswings that happen at big companies. A related grammar topic is [compound modifiers].1


1

The cited text appears to be about the best way to handle a marketing campaign. 'Lead gen' must be an abbreviation for 'lead generation'. "Twice as many campaigns are for lead gen as customer retention" means that for every one campaign which is designed to keep hold of existing customers ('customer retention'), there are two campaigns which are intended ...


0

In English, the word "man" means both an adult male human being and all human beings regardless of age or sex. The distinction being purely contextual. The word bondman meaning a man bound to serve without wages, i.e. a slave, came into English in the 12th Century. It appears in the King James Version of the Bible (in the UK, the Authorized Version) in six ...


14

Camphor is used (among other applications) as a repellent against moths and other insect pests. So I take the mention of 'retirement in camphor' in the extract you cited as a somewhat laboured reference to the fact that for nine months of the year, the author's foster-motherhood was 'in mothball storage'. Her comment that during the three months of the ...


2

OP's citation is a mash-up of two well-established usages... 1a: "it worked a treat" (5230 hits in Google Books, primarily BrE) and 1b: "it worked like a charm" (86300 hits) For comparison, these are the "non-standard" versions... 2a: "it worked like a treat" (57 hits) and 2b: "it worked a charm" (145 hits) The meaning is given by ...


1

"I work it like a treat," is equivalent to, "I do it well"


0

It is the seventh meaning listed for freak in the OED (sense 4d). An alternative word is aficionado. There is no suggestion of it being negative.


1

You're thinking of it wrong. Your grouping: They were | laughing out | there when it should be They were | laughing | out there "out there" is a phrase meaning basically something outside or away.


3

He is referring to slavery; bondsman - a male slave President Lincoln’s Second inaugural Address , 1865: Just 701 words long, Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address took only six or seven minutes to deliver, yet contains many of the most memorable phrases in American political oratory. The speech contained neither gloating nor rejoicing. Rather, it ...


2

Once again it depends upon context. There is not much negative implications for the two examples you cite, but in other cases, such as "control freak", there might be. And it's a descriptor which is probably best used in less formal contexts.


4

In general, an injunction stops somebody from doing something, a mandate requires somebody to do something, and a verdict is the final decision handed down by the bench. In light of the edit: Black's definition of mandate. Note that a mandate is directed at the official responsible for enforcement, and it's a mandate to enforce the will of the court. An ...


1

Technically, the correct grammar would be "My daddy and I stay right here. The earth is for us" No starting a sentence with "But"; first person nominative singular following another noun for the compound subject of a sentence; plural subject matches plural verb; and no ending a sentence with a preposition, BUT all through the movie, Hushpuppy and many other ...


2

The usage is dialectic, and would be incorrect in standard Englishes. The Beasts of the Southern Wild is set in an impoverished and isolated area of southern Louisiana, and filmed in Terrebonne Parish— deep in Acadiana, where many people speak Cajun English, and some still speak Cajun French. While inconsistent number agreement itself isn't distinctively ...


2

Dan's answer is entirely correct, but I think it's worth adding that Le Fanu was alluding to a famous Latin quotation Post equitem sedet atra cura, usually translated "Behind the horseman sits black Care", though worry or foreboding would do as well. When this was written, a good knowledge of Latin and Greek were indispensable for an educated person (in the ...


3

It means worry or apprehension, in this case caused or inspired by the narrator's traveling companion (the governess Madame de la Rougierre, who later turns out to be a sinister character). In the first paragraph, the narrator refers to the sibyl sitting next to her; it is this self-same sibyl which she later names "black Care". Both terms are cases of ...


5

This hip means cool or trendy. Ramu wore a T-shirt with a logo of his newspaper and old pair of jeans. He looked unusually cool for someone in a crisis. The preceding sentence describes Ramu's clothes. That would rule out hip1 and hip2, since we're talking about neither a pelvic bone nor part of a rose; however hip3 is related to fashion, "especially ...


2

In this context, "make it" means "succeed". So, if you can't take criticism, you'll never succeed as a writer. Consider: We only have ten minutes to finish the climb. We'll never make it. So, yes, your understanding was correct.


0

make it as in this situation means become successful. ie: "...become successful as a writer" it is informal (see definition 1 under make it)


2

It seems to me to be merely a humorous and friendly twist on the conventional formula "Nice to meet you". It sounds quite harmless to me. However, I don't think you could use it in face-to-face conversation, because it depends on email communication for a context that gives it relevance.


0

"You too" sounds a little slovenly and maybe a touch insincere. "And to you" sounds slightly more sincere and thus more polite. To my British ears anyway.


0

I will add that he is creating a deliberately confusing sentence, breaking multiple rules of grammar, for humor's sake. English speakers (me too occasionally) do that sometimes, and such sentences are not even intended to be deciphered.


0

Emigrate is to leave a country for a long time, or permanently. Immigrate is to enter a country to live there for a long time, or permanently. Migrate is to move from one place to another, generally to live in the new place for a while. For example birds migrate south for the winter, or migrant workers travel around settling temporarily in different ...


1

Enough goes after adjectives and before nouns, so I am patient enough even to (or to even) listen ...


7

In The Transactions of the American Medical Association, Volume 9 from 1856, "mad cow" is used to refer to a cow with rabies (or hydrophobia). there were at least seven mad dogs, probably more, one mad cow, and two rabid human beings in that part of the country during that period, all of whom died The article is referring to the poverty and lack of ...


6

After reading the whole of Margaret Bertha Wright's article, I can confidently say that all the (now deleted) speculation here pertaining either to 'mad cow disease' (bovine spongiform encephalopathy / BSE), or to the dining facilities aboard Victorian-era English trains and what victuals might be served there, is misplaced. Margaret Wright's article makes ...


4

This is a use of an old way of phrasing things called a concessive subjunctive clause, as explained in this answer. You can tell because of the inversion of subject and verb and the switch from a present-tense verb form. These days you are most likely to see concessive subjunctive clauses in fossilized phrases like this: Come hell or high water, I’m still ...


1

As tchrist has mentioned in his answer, "be it" is an inversion of the present subjunctive of verb to be in a condition clause. This use is generally archaic, except for some instances where the meaning of the clause is "no matter whether ... or ..." such as posted in your question. Wikipédia Examples "Be he alive or be he dead..." "Be it a ...


1

"Boilerplate" means something generic that can be re-used with minimal adaption: like a standard email reply. (BTW, in software programming it means pretty much the same thing as what I have written above: the (perhaps over-)use of generic code that often clutters the programme where something bespoke would be much leaner and clearer: in other words, ...


1

I'm not sure but to me it seems most likely that the author simply used of instead of and by mistake. The house is on the right side of the street, between the yard of the prison vs. The house is on the right side of the street, between the yard and the prison.


0

While it is likely that you would use indiscreet to describe a marriage (and it is likely that this is the context in which it was meant in the above quote,) it is also entirely possible to describe a marriage as indiscrete, which would be the same as describing a marriage as indivisible.


1

The sentence actually doesn't make sense and was likely an accidental omission by the author. For example, either of the following sentences would be considered correct: "The house is on the right side of the street, between the yard of the prison and the jailhouse." Perhaps: "The house is on the right side of the street, between the yards of the ...


1

You're right. The writer of that sentence either accidentally missed out the other reference point, or they had some kind of brainstorm and used a different preposition than the one they meant to (e.g. 'between' instead of 'beyond').



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