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2

As is so often the case, context is key. If you operate a gym, it is likely that people will interpret Fat Fighters as fighters against (being) fat. However, if you open a sumo wrestling school, it might be seen as a pejorative description of your athletes (and I doubt it would be very popular!). If you start a lobby organisation to increase the amount of ...


0

I would argue that there's no "correct" here. The statement is ambiguous. Presumably, if they're a gym, they mean it in the sense you suggest... though, you could certainly imagine a gym that taught some form of fighting - boxing, MMA, karate - and that all the people there were overweight. It makes for a fun mental image, at the very least. Not sure ...


1

The quote is explaining the core meaning, if you take out all the drama and emotions, of what people are saying.


1

In this case 'sound and fury' is meant to mean "angry polemics." (Polemics because he is implicitly complaining that the arguments are one-sided, and therefore merely noise.)


2

through here means "done". That is to say, the patient is done with the treatment process, except for any possible follow-up appointments, presumably so that the doctor can check up on how the patient is doing after the treatment.


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https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=confluent&submit.x=0&submit.y=0 con·flu·ent (kŏnfl-ənt) Share: adj. 1. Flowing together; blended into one. 2. Merging or running together so as to form a mass, as sores in a rash. n. 1. One of two or more confluent streams. 2. A tributary.


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Be aware that the term escrow has several uses. At its most basic level it refers to funds or other goods held by a trusted third party to insure compliance by the two main parties to a transaction. Investopedia explains. But in real estate the usage varies by state in the US, all based somewhat on the simple definition above. When you see a TV show or ...


2

"To throw in" means to "add something to the mix" usually rather carelessly, without giving it much thought or planning. The cookie batter looks tasty, but could you throw in some raisins? I was telling him all about our cross-country trip, and threw in how you got a speeding ticket in Kansas.


2

A hard copy (of a magazine, for instance) is a paper version, versus a digital version.


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'Reading faces' means being able to tell what someone is thinking by their expression. 'Taking a bull by the horns' means attacking a problem directly 'Head for figures' usually means that are comfortable solving mathematical or number related problems. - Hope this helps.


1

From http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/volatile. You fight and make up frequently if the two of you have a volatile relationship. An example would be the relationship of Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, who were married and divorced twice, and was by all accounts tempestuous: "You can't keep clapping a couple of sticks [of dynamite] together ...


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The site provides no context at all for the phrase other than general romantic relationships, so there can be no definite answer. But one presumes it's used as in sense 3—given to extremes of emotion. That could be good or bad, and may vary widely. The prototypical example of such a relationship would be Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. One minute they ...


3

The definitions of credit and accredit clearly overlap at acknowledging the role of another. The semantic overlap: credit verb (credits, crediting, credited) [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Publicly acknowledge a contributor’s role in the production of (something published or broadcast): the screenplay is credited to one American and two Japanese ...


1

"that we have before us" means nothing more than "have" or "see" It is this necessity that we see in the elevation. It is this necessity that you see here in the elevation. It is this necessity that we are discussing the elevation. It is this necessity in the elevation, which we now come to discuss. That's all it means. It's Just That ...


3

Credit generally refers to the definition you gave. The definition you found for accredit is a secondary one, though. Accredit is generally used in a different context, to mean: "to give official authorization to or approval of". See Merriam's definitions for accredit: 1. to give official authorization to or approval of 2. to give recognition to (someone or ...


2

What we have before us is what we are looking at. If you are in a restaurant, this may be a steak; if in a lecture hall, a page of notes. More generally, what we are considering, which will presumably be an argument. (It is a commonplace among metaphysicians that at a certain level of abstraction. 'explaining' a concept means replacing a carefully chosen ...


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Off point here but to a point: Antony's soliloquy says - there's gonna be trouble - big trouble; but the phrasing and imaginings are superb and pure poetry. It's a pleasure to serendipitously encounter such masterful language synthesis.


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They're entirely interchangeable. Both send across and send on over are common colloquialisms which don't change the meaning of send at all, but which are used to convey familiarity and/or friendliness. It's likely that the author is not even really aware of using one over the other, so I wouldn't read too much into the differences between them.


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Ms B. is suggesting that because Diana is such a dragon, an invitation to lunch with her might actually mean an invitation to be lunch rather than an invitation for lunch.


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It's simply a case of the writer being an idiot. The writer in question has seen intelligent people using the aside "pun intended!" or "intentional pun!" and the writer thought he would try to use that device, but unfortunately, it became only a situation for the stupidity and illiteracy of the writer in question to be displayed. There's a common humorous ...


0

I think the pun is on "plot" as a storyline vs a conspiracy. In one sentence, the speaker says both: Caesar may be a military guy, but he isn't exactly sophisticated. He wouldn't recognize a good play if it hit him over the head Caesar is so full of himself, he wouldn't recognize a conspiracy against him Edit: I don't think the speaker used the wrong ...


0

It means your circumstances present no problem for the teacher and you will not be penalized due to your situation.


3

the pun I would say is not on a double meaning of the word "plot" but on the second half of the common idiom "couldn't ------- to save his life" ie the pun is on the phrase "to save his life" This phrase is usually used in very banal circumstances to describe someones lack of ability but not one that would ever be a matter of life or death. Such as "He ...


2

I would suggest there might be three verbal ambiguities: to save his life: a metaphorical set phrase about lack of skill or a literal statement, as mentioned by others plot: the historical conspiracy against Caesar or the storyline of Shakespeare's play plot to save his life: there was no plot aimed at keeping him alive so the conspiracy killed him ...


1

the point being made is that humans use reason to discover truths that is why the phrase discover from itself ie itself is reason it goes further and says religion is more effective than human reason when it comes to discovering higher truths which are likely to be beyond the reach of mere reason


1

This is the proviso: that through religion humans could learn higher truths than reason is in a position to discover from itself The proviso assumes two preconditions .1. that there are such things as higher truths; and .2. that these truths are accessible through religion. If, and only if, that is accepted as true, then the point of interest is... ...


35

The pun is on 'couldn't (do something) to save his life'. Usually 'to save his own life' is used metaphorically, meaning that he couldn't do X very well. Except here the X, 'discovering a plot', is what he couldn't do and he literally could not save his own life because of it, the plot was to kill Caesar. As everyone else said, it's not a particularly ...


11

" He couldn't run to save his life;" "He couldn't swim to save his life;" morphed into such phrases as "He couldn't play bridge to save his life." "...fry eggs..." "...tie a reef knot..." Here R R finds himself using the phrase literally. I think that is the play on words that catches him by surprise, an informal phrase in a real context. ...


8

Another consideration: instead of referring to to word plot, maybe he's referring to the idiom "to save his life." It's used to colorfully describe one's inability/incompetence with regard to the described action: It's like saying "He's so bad at X, that even if his life depended on his doing X, he still wouldn't be able to it adequately." It's a common ...


1

In The Graduate. The man's advice to the new graduate Dustin Hoffman is clearly meant, like pretty much everything else in the film, to be satiric. The completely clueless kid watches and learns from all the soulless people in the society he is expected now to join.


3

Here is the metaphor that plastics represents in the movie The Graduate: In "The Graduate" a smug Los Angeles businessman takes aside the baby-faced Dustin Hoffman and declares, "I just want to say one word to you -- just one word -- 'plastics.'�" "The Graduate" didn't invent the use of the word plastic to signify everything phony and superficial ...


2

You may want to ask why is "as one another" even used. Consider: The orchids and roses were delivered on the same day. This would usually be correctly understood that they were both delivered on the same day, but one could also ask, same day as what? "Same" means two or more things that occurred concurrently, that may mean the orchids and roses, or ...


2

I can't let this pass by, the truth must be revealed. A wand is also the name of a lady's sex toy. Perhaps unbeknownst to the OP, but some women masturbate in the shower using a detachable showerhead, (aka handheld shower head), by aiming (“spritzing”) the jet of warm/hot water “on on their special place”. Apparently, bathroom manufacturers cottoned on ...


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B: spritzing your shower hose ... A: I think they call it [shower hose] a wand This is a picture of a shower "wand"


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As explained, it refers metaphorically to a gold merit star as a reward for having done something as good or better nah expected. It is a symbolic way to reward pupils at primary schools: When I taught in a primary school, I received regular advertising from companies selling ‘motivational’ stickers in many shapes and sizes, together with personal ...


0

Based on the reference to looking a day over 12, she seems to be referring to most women there showing shaved nether regions and her being out of place. Saying she was "almost busted" means she is unshaven and felt out of place comparatively and wants to match with whatever is "in style".


4

"Just expected a gold star for doing your job" is an accusation that a person has an exaggerated sense of entitlement. The accused expected special recognition (a gold star) for merely doing something required (his or her job).


0

Like all that pertains to crime, it seemed never to have known a youthful era. This sentence says a couple things. It says that everything that pertains to crime seems to have never known a youthful era. It also says that 'it' (a wooden jail, apparently?) is a member of this class of things, and that therefore 'it' also seemed to have never known a ...


8

Because of certain humorous cultural stereotypes associated with the ancient Greeks and Very Young Men, it might be best that I dispel any inchoate notions forming in your head. The Very Young Man muses on all the wonderful opportunities such a Time Machine could afford him. He could learn Classical Greek from Classic Greeks! However, if he did that, The ...


0

If the relevant context in which the person you intend to refer to is uniquely singled out by the description "friend of mine", you use the definite "my friend", otherwise you use "a friend of mine". (At least, that's my best understanding of how a definite would be distinguished from an indefinite.) Here, you invoke a past conversation in which a friend ...


2

I won't say anything more about vestal than you've read in the link that Little Eva provides in a comment above, except to note that one specific meaning of vestal (in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary) is "chaste," which in turn refers (in its simpler form) to celibacy and modesty—in the sense of purity of thought—or (in its more dedicated or ...


1

But if I lose the highs, at least I'm spared the lows This means that even if they don't get to experience the great parts, they won't feel the hurt and pain of the bad times. Never having heard the song but glancing at the lyrics, he's likely referring to the ups and downs in a relationship. Though he won't get to experience the joy of being with ...


4

A maintenance order according to Court Service Ireland: Maintenance is financial support (money) paid by a person for the benefit of a dependent spouse/civil partner and/or dependent children. Spouses/civil partners are required to maintain each other according to their means and needs. Parents, whether married or not, are responsible for the ...


6

Grumpy is saying that, to him, "I found you!" seems to be the sort of phrase he would expect to hear from someone who has been trying to track him down to demand money from him (specifically, a divorced spouse -- an ex-spouse, or "ex" -- complaining that child support payments have not been made). It's just a throw-away, slightly humorous comment about how ...


-2

Best understood by being there and is somewhat subjective. From a biological standpoint, I'm guessing it may be the brain's way of avoiding emotional pain. It jumps from emotion to emotion, trying to side-step the painful one. Normally, I think we flow more congruently through our emotions. The "pieces" experience leaves one having disconnected emotional ...


2

Normally, the term last meeting says to me "most recent meeting," not "final meeting." That would be the default interpretation, even though people realize the other one is possible. Compare: At our last meeting, we discussed the budget. (most recent; there will be others). However, last meeting can unambiguously mean "final meeting" in certain ...


0

I think she means that her greatest gift to her loved one was bearing the heavy burden of such a huge loss; something she wouldn't want someone she loved so much to have to go through.


2

Last can mean final or latest (i.e. most recent). There is no perfect foolproof way to disambiguate which meaning is intended if a written sentence is analyzed out of context. In speech, they could be spoken slightly differently, though it's difficult to describe the nuanced differences fully, and it's almost impossible to document this behavior because it ...


1

To tank meaning : (Informal) To suffer a sudden decline or failure: The stock market tanked yesterday. (The Free Dictionary) is a quite recent usage: to tank ( Etynonline) Meaning "to lose or fail" attested from 1976, originally in tennis jargon, specifically in an interview with Billie Jean King in "Life" magazine, Sept. 22, 1967: ...


1

For a stock to tank, or the economy to tank, means that it drops in price or strength. It is financial market slang, maybe more accurately, jargon. Here is one of many examples of "tank" on Money SE, Why do put option prices go higher when the underlying stock tanks (drops)? "Tanking" has been in use as trading jargon since the 1980's or perhaps earlier. ...



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