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A reference in this kind of context is a fixed standard that is used to calibrate a piece of equipment or define a parameter. For instance, Pantone colours, the pitch of the musical note A, the Celsius temperature scale, the length of a second and the speed of light are all defined in terms of their relationship to a fixed value of some kind. The sentence ...


0

"look" of a particular programming language refers to snapshot of the structure, basic constructs and syntax. Usually "hello world" program is used for every language to illustrate the same.


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Americans certainly use back-to-back in reference to simple physical arrangements such as back-to-back seats in a railway car.


1

I see and use the phrase often as an American, and this cursory search of a UK news source shows it's common there too: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/search/?queryText=back-to-back&sort=recent It's common in both dialects and I've never thought of it as anatomical.


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There is an expectation of others to be 'fault tolerant', when one says 'so what?'. It goes in the line of X: XYZ lost the match Y: So what? There is also an air of 'downplaying' (not necessarily 'dismissive').


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"So-what-ishness" (though not an established word--hyphenated or not) means displaying an attitude of, "so what!" (notice this is not a question but a statement), and "so what" means: "I don't care!" This attitude conveys indifference, apathy, and a terminally hip posture. INDIFFERENCE 1: the quality, state, or fact of being indifferent 2 a: ...


3

"So what?" is a response that (with the right intonation) conveys a sense of being unimpressed by, of not seeing anything special in what what just said or indicated. So here, "so-what-ishness" might reasonably be replaced by "unimpressive nature". I don't mind coinages - like "so-what-ishness" - but "rather brandnew" seemed a very odd coupling to me.


-1

It is about the shape of the instruments. The format of a double bass (acoustic bass or upright bass) is reminiscent of a woman's silhouette. Contrast it with a treble refers to the treble flute, i.e. only as treble. The most common flute in conscert orchestra.


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According to Trainor herself, it's a reference to the difference between the shape of a bass and treble guitar. A treble guitar is about the same width on the bottom and the top, while a bass guitar is much bigger on the bottom. Thus it's about having a big booty.


1

"Look out for" is usually used in junction with a negative concept, such as "Look out for the incoming missile!". Support is something you don't look out for, it is what you seek, or embrace. "Looks in" does not fit well in your sentence, as it is unclear where the person is looking in, and also because you use the word "inner" (repetition). He seeks ...


-1

Well done, and completely grammatical. The "look out for" is idiomatic (to beware of, to be on the lookout for, to take care of), which works, and the "look in for" is not idiomatic, just a perfectly sensible construction, in parallel form but with a semantic contrast. A fine piece of paronomasia, even if inadvertent. (In other words, as my mother-in-law ...


1

The "surface area limitations" refer to considerations that somehow constrain performance in ways that I do not have the knowledge base to completely understand. If you can accomplish your task within these constraints, then the technology being discussed will give performance improvements. The meaning of "to put things into prospective" is that the writer ...


4

Before the tragedy, people's willingness was low. The tragedy raised their willingness. Since the tragedy, what has changed? Their willingness. Their willingness is the the thing that has changed. If you replace "What has changed" with "The thing that has changed" in the sentence, it might be clearer.


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There are a few metaphors in this paragraph. What "small strips" really stands for largely depends on what "what was left of the night" really means. Discarded outfits? Maybe. Papers? Perhaps if one reads the novel and gets used to the writer's style, these will be easier to understand. As for "somebody had delirium tremens", I believe there is an ...


3

This seems to be a metaphorical use of the word strip using a common definition: strip2 NOUN A long, narrow piece of cloth, paper, plastic, or some other material: This is confirmed by reading the larger context on pages 22-23 of the PDF version of Red Wind: The night was being ruined by several means, and tearing it into small ...


0

In music composition typically the bass cleft line is used to write music for the tuba, baritone, trombone, etc. and the treble cleft line is use to write music for the clarinet, flute, etc. and hence this song appears to be looking at body type not necessarily a part of the body. A person versed in only treble would not only have to overcome the ...


6

Fatten here is a literary usage in the sense of broadening or increasing (1 and 3 in AHD): To make plump or fat. To fertilize (land). To increase the amount or substance of: fatten one's bank account. Earlier, the speaker describes the breaking of dawn: …the sky had shucked the last of its evening gray to take on an intense purplish ...


0

Here you are using "given" as an adjective and not the past simple of "give". Basically it has two different meanings: specified; fixed, particular: "They will meet you at a given time and place." granted as a supposition, assumed: "Given that we are all equal before the law..." "Given the weather conditions, we chose to stay home." there is also, ...


1

One place where "greater extreme" appears to serve as an indisputably legitimate comparative is in mathematical texts. One early example involving this usage is from Alexander Malcolm, A New Treatise of Arithmetick and Book-Keeping (1718): You may find the Estate, by finding the eldest Son's Portion, and then the Sum, agreeable to the Rule ; and you may ...


4

Extreme has been used in a non-absolute sense, hence allowing greater, greatest, more or most for a long time. (And likewise, lesser, etc.) Indeed, the earliest example I see of it cited, in English, in any sense uses it with most: Lyvyn in the most extreme Povertie. — Sir John Fortescue, The governance of England: otherwise called The difference ...


1

Start in this sense means an initial advantage. I have an advantage over you at doing something quicker if I start earlier or start further along in the task, and this can apply figuratively to anything that gives someone an initial advantage. (Compare "head start"). The saloons would have been a competitor for the attentions of the clergyman's potential ...


1

I generally agree with @user105936, but where I disagree is the interpretation that "those who have the merit to be patient will receive insults from the unworthy." Hamlet is a prince, and he will receive spurns from th' unworthy. If he has the merit of patience, then he will take the spurns [with grace]. Sparknotes interprets the passage as: the ...


0

Sorry this isn't in verse form, but I'm on my phone, and copy/paste doesn't copy format. For who would bear the whips and scorns of time, Th' oppressor's wrong, the proud man's contumely The pangs of despised love, the law's delay, The insolence of office, and the spurns That patient merit of th' unworthy takes, When he himself might his ...


3

In the story, the immediately preceding line is "I ain't told Dravec yet." This gives a hint about the meaning of "It's under the fedora." A fedora is a kind of hat, so this is a reference to the common expression keeping something under one's hat, that is, keeping it a secret. The Free Dictionary has some examples of usage of this expression. Under the ...


1

I thought that she was meaning: All about that bass (I care what men find attactive) No treble (I don't care what women think of my body). Clearly she beleives that men like curves. I have not seen the video, my opinion was formed strictly on hearing the song.


0

This is a pet hate of mine. I am a woman and I have a BSC hons and I work in science. I have taken part in gender equality studies so if you are doing research at the moment, it is really good that you are getting the opinion of a female here - one of you readers could potentially be annoyed here. If it is being judged by female academics, they may not ...


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Barmar's answer rightly emphasizes the point that the author's use of agree in the quoted sentence would be most appropriate if, prior to that sentence, the text cited a person making the same general argument that the "some people" in the quoted sentence agree with. In journalistic English, however, it is not terribly unusual to encounter a sentence like ...


1

As a figure of speech it means something close to "make an effort", similar to the colloquial "give it all you've got" or "get into it". In this specific context it has this meaning as well as the more direct one - Hong Bo must physically get out "there" - the real world - and make the effort to market his product, as Dan says in his comment.


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In 'broken English' I think 'broken' means 'imperfect'. And that could also be the meaning in Leonard Cohen's 'broken hallelujah'. Although, as has been pointed out, that context is poetry where there may be layers of meaning for the reader to interpret.


1

I would phrase it as, The lectures on Big data have received positive responses not only from MIS students, but also from students of other majors, even sparking an interest in technology learning.


2

I am glad others find this passage rather incomprehensible. My tangling with it was to rearrange the syntax: "the spurns that patient merit takes of the unworthy." If we can understand "of" to be "from" then I think the meaning would fit into the context of the whole, that those who have the merit to be patient will receive insults from the unworthy (the ...


0

Giddy: (M-W) feeling or showing great happiness and joy to feel extremely excited. The news made him positively giddy. He was giddy with delight. the expression refers to their overexcitement to the prospect of getting married.


0

Or, perhaps, she has to accommodate herself, or accept the fact of ("sit down to") the slicing pain ("score" , in the sense of cutting a groove) of misfortune, much as Hamlet considers resigning himself to suffering the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune"


1

See the Usage Note at https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=between&submit.x=0&submit.y=0 While there is a "traditional rule" restricting between to talk about two things, actual "practice is mixed."


0

Between refers to two countries, while among is better for three or more countries. As for N-gram results, "peace between countries" referring to two nations might be more common than peace among three or more countries.


1

No, "trend" would be better than tendency in this context. This is how I would phrase it: The lectures on big data have been received positively by MIS students, as well as by students of other majors, starting a trend of technology learning.


0

There's nothing really wrong with tendency there, except that it would be a tendency for (or toward) something, not of it. But there's not much right about it either. Personally, I would prefer an affinity for or simply just "an interest in technology learning."


2

"my Heart denies the justice of the acqusation" = "my heart refuses to accept the validity of the accusation". "nor does it believe your affection in the least diminished by distance or absence" = "nor does it believe your affection has been diminished at all by distance or absence".


2

It's an intensifying device that Abigail Adams uses to emphasise the cumulative effect on her state of mind of all the travails and obstacles she imagines her husband being exposed to. Nowadays, someone employing the same device would probably insert a comma between the two instances of 'all'.


1

The rules of capitalization in the 18th century were much more permissive; you'll note that she also capitalized Heart, Dearest Friend, Friendship, Letters, and Hands. Many nouns were capitalized, and even some of the adjectives attached to them. This practice died out over the next century or so, leaving us with only a few things to capitalize regularly. ...


2

It's not in plural form because it has an added s which is only done with verbs in the 3rd person singular: I treat, you treat, he/she/it treats, we treat, you treat, they treat. And from there it reduces down a general reference as we just have to look up treat: To discourse on; to represent or deal with in a particular way, in writing or speaking ...


3

'Treats of' means 'explains' or 'describes'. It's archaic now. treat VERB [with object] 1.2 Present or discuss (a subject) Oxford Dictionaries. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 09 January 2015.


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It worked for me in high school, and it's been a reflex ever since. It refers to being an asshole. It worked for me in high school means that the speaker profited from acting in that way. Presumably, being rude and behaving badly can under certain circumstances have positive effects: you create “street cred”, people think you are tough, cool, or ...


2

The sense of this depends on the fact that this comes as a pause in the narrator character speaking to another character. So "I sipped my drink. I like an effect as well as the next fellow" means that he's deliberately pausing to drink for the effect it has on her. "Her eyes ate me" mean they are looking at him with widely and intently, the image being that ...


1

Yes, "might have been poured concrete" does mean that he was immobile like a poured-concrete cast. The sentence could use a comma: After he hit it, he might ... Also the part “been poured concrete” seems odd. I was half expecting it to end “... he might have been poured out and shaken up for all he could remember.” In other words, coming after been, ...


0

Chandler's style works to describe the scene and actions but grammatically there are several redundancies such as "fall (down)", "after he hit (it) (he)", "for all the fuss (he) made". All of these point to possible improvements. Also the floor-hitting face should be reversed to "then his face hit the floor". So, in my opinion, there are no missing words but ...


1

Britain's broad money-supply growth edged up to 3.6% in the year to December IMO, the phrase year to december has been used in the sense of year to date. YTD (Year-to-date) is often provided in financial statements detailing the performance of a business entity Year-to-date is a period, starting from the beginning of the current year, and ...


1

They are referring to a calendar year not including the end date mentioned. The calendar year starts on January 1, and the end point for the period being considered is what the "year to" is talking about. Therefore, the "year to December" refers only to the first 11 months of the year. If they had wanted to include December they would have said something ...


8

To charge someone = to give someone an order that they have to obey and execute. On pain of xyz = if they fail, they will be punished in way xyz. On pain of their lives means indeed that if they fail, they will be killed. To suffer = to allow something (to happen). This is archaic, or at least old-fashioned. It is still used occasionally in this sense, and ...


3

"At home" is an idiom meaning feeling comfortable and at ease somewhere or in a situation. It comes from the assumption that people will hopefully feel at ease in their own home, and so if I say "he is at home on the football pitch" it means "he is as much at ease on the football pitch as he would be in his own home". Hence "he wasn't quite at home being ...



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