New answers tagged

2

Yes: "a man well to the left of Mr Sanders" pretty much means "a man who is to the left of Mr Sanders to a great degree or extent." "Well to the left" is a shorter way of saying this, and it sounds better. Using the adverb "well" here lets the writer avoid modifying one prepositional phrase with another; in this case, "to the left to a great extent" would ...


0

"I've been feeling down since you've been gone" is odd; you shouldn't really link two present perfect clauses. I think it would be better to say: "Since you left, I've been feeling down." or "I've felt sad ever since you left." or: "Ever since I started working here, I've felt suicidal." I think it's more elegant to pinpoint an event after which another ...


1

Line is a line of descendents, and "run high" is an idiom based on a river "running high," meaning with more water than usual (i.e. a higher, and probably more dangerous water line). It's much more typically used for intense emotions (as in the phrase "tempers were running high at the Iowa caucus") but in this case it means an overabundance of daughters ...


0

There are two types of lawyers: (1) the type who tells you why you can't do what you want to do; (2) the type who tells you how you can do what you want to do. The first sees all the problems but no solutions. The second sees how to get around the problems and implement the solutions. She is the kind of lawyer most skilled at finding reasons not to do ...


1

You could say, items include but are not limited to [list]. Or, at some point before or after the list, you could simply say, this list is not comprehensive. EDIT: I realise that I haven't really answered your question, sorry! I think the phrase this list is short of being exhaustive conveys that almost all the items are included, or at least ...


1

According to Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003), the verb prorate has two meanings in English—one transitive and one intransitive: prorate vt (1860) : to divide, distribute, or assess proportionately ~ vi : to make a pro rata distribution [where pro rata means "proportionately according to an exactly calculable figure (as share or ...


2

Pro-rate means they calculate a price discount pro rata, i.e. in proportion to the total cost. So yes, they will reduce the price if you enroll after the start - the discount will be proportional to the amount of session that you've missed. Pro rata adj.: proportional. "as the pound has fallen costs have risen on a pro rata basis" adv.: ...


5

The word triggeronomy is the father's impression of the word trigonometry. He has fused the first half of the word with an ending that's commonly heard in other scientific contexts, probably from the word astronomy. The father is showing off here about his daughter, but the speaker is mainly noticing the fact that, ironically, the father doesn't know what ...


0

I found the wording of your question hard to parse, but here's my understanding of it: you're starting with one of the two bullet points, then using either in addition or however as a "linker" to the options. (I'm not sure how the issue of "trust" comes into this, so I won't be addressing it.) The real question is not about the linker itself, but the ...


1

The proposed recipient of the data is "deposed Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister Nabam Tuki". Here, Arunachal Pradesh is a state in India. The Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister is the Chief Minister of Arunachal Pradesh. He happens to have been deposed, so he is referred to as deposed Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister. This phrase appears before the man's name ...


1

The indirect object, introduced by "to" is "deposed ArunachalPradesh Chief Minister NabamTuki". "Deposed ArunachalPradesh Chief Minister" is a modifier within that NP (noun phrase).


0

"Will" is hardly ever used in antecedents of conditionals in English, even when the possibility is conceived as in the far future. It's not clear whether it is ungrammatical, but it is certainly unidiomatic. The usual way of expressing the distant possibility that you want is "If I ever have the chance ... "


1

In a competitive context, you might call it one-upmanship. If you're referring to the person doing it for social acceptance just because his friend(s) did it, it's peer pressure. Without the social acceptance aspect, we simply have the neutral term peer influence. Here's a paper on it from a web search.


3

Sense 3 of the OED's adjective - swinging begins by relating it first to rhythmic movement, then to music (a and b). Sense 3c follows on from there and it is the one that you want: c. Uninhibited, ignoring conventions; lively and up to date: applied to persons, places ( swinging London), etc., and spec. to the 1960s ( swinging Sixties). Also, as a ...


1

To swing: [I] informal - to be ​exciting and ​enjoyable: You need ​music to make a ​party swing. (Cambridge Dictionary)


2

In the context you're using, the term means "overpowered". It gained a lot of exposure with the rise in popularity of MMORPG-style video games (though I don't think it originated there) as a way to describe some combination of characters or character abilities that were not "balanced" properly. Using an OP character or move gave you a major advantage over ...


0

I think in your example to "play off" is to act in response to or benefit from, like using the popularity of the X-Files to promote one's own show or opinion. See also piggyback as in "Piggybacking on the popularity of the X-Files, the CIA..." In another context it might mean to discount, or distract from, like when someone is accused of something and ...


3

To plug can be defined as: 9 a recommendation or other favourable mention of a product, show, etc, as on television, on radio, or in newspapers (Collins Dictionary Online) So this means that Branum encourages self promotion by recommending one's own projects. Show-plugging, film-plugging, book-plugging, church-plugging, recipe-plugging, and many more ...


1

The to in the idiom "to be prone to" could be both a preposition and the to in to-infinitive. Only way to tell is to see whether a noun or bare-infinitive follows it, e.g., two plural nouns follow the to in your example sentence and we can tell the to is a preposition. To be prone to means: (prone to a noun/to do something) Likely or liable to suffer ...


1

"Staking his position" essentially means he's stating his position or view on this particular issue. The author is apparently linking "exchange value" to "capitalist speculators," which means "use value" is linked to "users" (presumably residents). Capitalist speculators could include residents or outside entities that want to make money off someone else's ...


0

"Science doesn't think", Heidegger said. Here "phantasmagorical" looks like a kind of thought expériment which could be qualified of surrealistic. surrealistic - characterized by fantastic imagery and incongruous juxtapositions; "a great concourse of phantasmagoric shadows"--J.C.Powys; "the incongruous imagery in surreal art and literature" ...


2

Phantasmagoria is the noun form and important word literarily speaking. It conjures up worlds of Gothic horror and so forth, and the works of writers like Edgard Allan Poe (The Pit and the Pendulum) and Mervyn Peake (Gormanghast) are full of it. Indeed, with the idea of spooky, specterish, scary places their works would not even exist. Think of a poem like ...


2

This is a play on two senses of cunning. The first, referring to "brain" means ingenuity, particularly of a deceitful type. This particularly true of John Clay, who, although a felon ("murderer, thief, smasher") has managed to escape detection, even going so far as to disguise himself as a philanthropist, a benefactor of orphanages. The second sense, ...


1

I prefer your first sentence; it's simple, short, idiomatic, and grammatical. The “even though” adds a stoic note. It is a prepositional phrase that introduces a fact that is surprising and/or new to the listener or reader. The phrase connects the two clauses together very naturally. I continued teaching even though I was sick. But if the OP is ...


0

A true statement is (to put it simplistically) a statement that you can look at and say, "Yes, that's correct." So if you have a true statement, what it says must (by definition) be true. The phrase "is the case" just means "is true". Putting this all together, your quote means that if you have a true statement, then whatever it says must (by definition) ...


1

The Rate refers to the natural unemployment rate. The second and third clauses of the sentence could be written more clearly like this, at the cost of added wordiness: America's jobless rate has fallen below most estimates of the natural rate of unemployment. The natural rate of unempoyment is the rate below which inflation has taken off in the past. ...


1

Whoever wrote that column: Parameter Measured Refractive index measuring Mass Measuring Optical rotation Measuring probably wishes that they had written: Parameter Measured Refractive index Mass Optical rotation Those instances of "measuring" look like side-effects of inaccurate translation and/or, more likely, remnants from ...


1

Old habits die hard: used for saying that it is difficult to change a way of behaving that someone has had for many years - Macmillan Dictionary Old habits hardly die means that they don't often die. That is, old habits tend to survive. The first is idiomatic as @Ricky mentioned. The second is perhaps a humorous reply or excuse to say that the first ...


2

It may be that "God in boots" is a way of saying "God in human form," since to be in boots is to be in the trappings of a human being. A Google Books search for "God in boots" turns up multiple instances of Russell's exclamation—and one earlier instance, from a periodical published in Chicago, Illinois, called The Flaming Sword, mouthpiece of "Koresh, the ...


1

He saying something akin to "despite my best efforts to keep the gloom from affecting me". above all perpetual gloom which hangs like a fate over Pembroke Lodge, and which, despite my best efforts to keep the gloom from affecting me, invades my inmost soul whenever I go there, ...


2

To cry out loud would, in normal conversational English, mean to scream. The act of breaking down in tears is not necessarily accompanied by audible sobbing. But you have to remember that song lyrics can mean completely different things to different listeners, and the lyricist or poet very often deliberately employs vagueness to avoid a single unambiguous ...


3

I think (but cannot prove) that the boots are a status symbol. Russell reports, in his autobiography, to have uttered this exclamation in connection with an ontological argument: Bertrand Russell, during his early Hegelian phase, accepted the argument; once exclaiming: "Great God in Boots!—the ontological argument is sound!" However, he later ...


0

The questioner states I want to say that I continued teaching even though I was sick. Having a passion for teaching doesn't necessarily mean that the person actually continued to teach, only that they were passionate about the job. I would suggest that a better way of expressing this would be to say My illness did not prevent my continuing to teach.


2

It is just an exclamation, in this case expressing possibly surprise and delight, similar to (but possibly more forcibly than) saying My word! or My Goodness! It has no intrinsic meaning of its own.


3

It's certainly fine to say this, as it correctly conveys that your passion to teach wasn't affected by getting sick, but using "affect" is somewhat neutral as it could mean positively or negatively. If you wanted to make it clearer that your passion to teach was just as strong, I would perhaps say something more like Getting sick did not diminish my ...


0

If you have time, you are available to do something now. If you don't have time now, you'll probably find time to do it later. If you are sure that your schedule will not allow you to find time, you'll need to make time to do that particularly important thing. For this, you will need to make changes to your schedule.


0

What about 'at each point of the supply chain' or even 'at different (or many) points of the supply chain', as you wrote in your explanation? 'Across' sounds somewhat vague to me.


0

When I was a math grad student the term used was "small values". I think "low" would have been acceptable as well.


1

This sentence phrase is agrammatical in standard English: [your] right to be paid for work done on this contract is irrespective if [agency] is paid by the [client] I bang this stuff out all the time (as a translator), and I daresay it is not work done "on this contract", which would mean doing work writing the contract, but "work done or performed under ...


0

Well I'm no lawyer but with only the context you've presented I see ambiguity. Your right to be paid is irrespective when [agency] is paid by the client" That's another way to take it. Take it this way and it leaves you wondering where irrespective is qualified and what happens to your right to be paid when the agency isn't paid by the client. That ...


1

I have never seen the phrase used that way, nor does it make sense when used in that fashion. Googling the phrase "irrespective if" doesn't yield any meaningful results. As such, I think that your interpretation is likely correct, e.g., that you have a right to be paid for your work whether the agency is paid by the client or not. Mistakes sometimes make it ...


1

The quote itself looks pretty simple to me. The author is saying that there are certain people who want to establish authoritarian governments (i.e. governments where a handful of power brokers have control over the regimented masses). The people in favor of these authoritarian governments praise their idea as a "new order" in their propaganda. The author ...


2

It's rare that we get a chance to provide such a definitive answer here at EL&U... but the translation is WRONG! and your first impression was right But it's understandable why they made that mistake. The casual, wandering, way of adding to what was just said reflects a way of talking that is very realistic for that character. But it's "colloquial" in ...


0

If one called something "a plug for the Reagent Guide," we would understand it as saying it's PROMOTING the Reagent Guide. Blatant simply means obvious or perhaps exaggerated. So if something is described as a "blatant plug," when we know we aren't imagining things - they really are promoting something.


1

Plugging (informal) refers to the act promoting one's own work/ another person's work in Social media or over the Internet. Informal. the favorable mention of something, as in a lecture, radio show, etc.; advertisement; recommendation [Merriam-Webster, sense 8] In this particular case, the author seems to be doing different chemical experiments on ...


1

URL encoding is a way of encoding arbitrary data in such a way that it can be included in a web address (a.k.a. "URL"). "Encoding", in turn, here means changing the representation of but not the content of some piece of data. Technically, URL encoding is done by replacing all but a small set of known-safe characters with one or more repetitions of %xx, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included