New answers tagged

1

I have always wanted to use the 'top echelon' in a sentence. It sounds a little bit high class, but that's what happens when you are at the top (rung) of the ladder :D Other suggestions include 'top-notch', 'cream of the crop' and 'pick of the litter'. But if you want the best of the best, then maybe paragon should be your word of choice.


1

You could use certain ... in place of some of .... ie. "Certain businessmen prefer Blackberry". It does seem to indicate more knowledge, which may or may not be appropriate. While some of ... only suggests that you know the number, instead certain ... suggests that the individuals' identities are known. It also does not appear to me to combine nicely ...


1

You could try A collection of the... or A group of the... (best)?


3

I'd use prime and first-rate or similar. [Edit] Can be combined with 'several' or 'various' if you like. prime [ATTRIBUTIVE] Of the best possible quality; excellent: 'prime cuts of meat' first-rate Of the best class or quality; excellent: 'first-rate musicians' several More than two but not many various More than one; individual ...


3

Plenty of options... Amongst the elite, ... Market leaders ... There are premium quality XX that...


4

Try bending the words to fit the description. For example: Some of the most agile minds Some of the fittest teams Some of the richest companies This way you can tailor the sentence and avoid repetition.


-1

Let it bleed I believe also means that you are not going to do anything about the Present situation


2

It means what the words say.  If you read all the way down the page (and expand the collapsed comments), you'll see Paddywhacker Airport security took a jar honey off him, he tweeted about it. and ymmurri227 He also commented that the guy that took a clock to school and they thought it was a bomb was doing it for attention or to cause ...


1

The speaker is Old Major, the highly-respected boar, around whom the animals of the farm have gathered to hear advice on taking over the farm from humans. Orwell sets the scene thus: At one end of the big barn, on a sort of raised platform, Major was already ensconced on his bed of straw, under a lantern which hung from a beam. So when Major says ...


2

Written clearly and correctly and think he's just trying to say: "No one has made book-length surveys of the continent because it would be an enormous task." The sentence as given is much more awkward, and uses the work "enormity" incorrectly, so it's no surprise you find it difficult.


3

It's the tobacco pipe mentioned here. — TFD noun a tube with a small bowl at one end; used for smoking tobacco Twist, refers to tobacco. — M-W 1.d. tobacco leaves twisted into a thick roll


1

The meaning seems to be Merriam-Webster's 2a1: "up to now: so far." "Yet" here is indeed an adverb. Adverbs can also modify adjectives, and in this case, it seems to be modifying "best," as in, "best yet."


5

Lick can mean, among many other things, "a quick pace; speed" (sense 7, here). Thus to keep up one's lick means to keep up one's speed. Twain is saying that the watch does not keep correct time when out at sea. As for the use of "her" when referring to the watch, feminine pronouns are often used when referring to inanimate objects, especially artifacts ...


0

The word highly is important here. The sentence is discussing what highly influences global warming. Do many scientists believe human activities highly influence global warming? Yes. Do those many scientists believe natural fluctuations highly influence global warming? No. The word 'highly' leaves open the possibility that those scientists believe ...


1

It means that the debt relief will not be decided right now, and will only be decided in 2018.


0

Could be an awkward translation of The king is dead, long live the king! The original phrase was translated from the French Le roi est mort, vive le roi !, which was first declared upon the accession to the French throne of Charles VII after the death of his father Charles VI in 1422. In France, the declaration was traditionally made by the duc d'Uzès, ...


1

Live on To persist; endure: Although The Beatles broke up decades ago, their music lives on. thefreedictionary.com They are saying that although the person may be dead, his legacy is still persisting.


1

There seems to be some debate as to whether 'I could crush a grape' was used to mean 'I'm genuinely excited' or 'I'm supposed to be excited about this but I'm underwhelmed'. As it was used in a children's show watched also by adults, I would suggest that the children would assume the former but the real meaning for the adults was the latter. For the ...


3

Theodotus points out to Caesar that Lucius Septimius' murder of Pompey has provided Caesar vengeance against his enemy while preserving Caesar's reputation for clemency. Theodotus assumes that Caesar is motivated by a desire for revenge, and that Caesar's clemency is merely a political pose. But Shaw's Caesar is genuinely merciful and in fact detests ...


1

You asked specifically for a paraphrase, so I'll give you that - the other answers ably cover the use of "not" and the subsequent rhetorical device. Oh, if I could stoop to vengeance, what would I not exact from you as the price of this murdered man's blood? Overall means: If I could bring myself to avenging this act, I would stop at nothing, and ...


3

My understanding is that the first clause 'Oh if I could stoop to vengeance' indicates that vengeance is not a worthy thing for him to indulge in, it is beneath him. The second part is a Rhetorical Question used to indicate that the murdered man's blood is beyond price. As to whether there is a contradiction, I would say there isn't: although he seems to ...


1

The phrase "what would I not" means "what limits would I place on myself". In other words, is there anything I would not do to exact revenge? But here the question is rhetorical. What he is really saying is, I would place no limits on myself. In other words, there is nothing I would not do to exact revenge.


2

"what would I not exact from you" could be rephrased as "I cannot think of anything that i would not exact from you", "exact" in this context being the verb form, which means to take something from someone. The original question is of course rhetorical. So you could further rephrase "What would I not exact from you" as "I cannot think of anything that I ...


1

I believe this is referring to definition 2 in that dictionary link: "things that cause you problems", although that definition needs to be expanded to include potential problems, ie "risks" (this definition of liability is synonymous with (or very close to) the noun form of "risk"). The panelist is referring to the gaming (ie careful exploitation of the ...


2

Refrain in the sense of: a phrase that is often repeated: "Every vote counts" is a familiar refrain in politics. From: repeated line or number of lines in a poem or song, typically at the end of each verse. (Cambridge Dictionary)


0

I was looking for the wrong combination of words. There's something called a summer hit: In the entertainment industry, a summer hit is a song that is released and peaks in its popularity during summer and often later quickly fades away.2 In some years, a single pop song will gain widespread international popularity during the summer holiday ...


3

If Arjun wasn't so greedy he would be alive today is an example of a syntactic construction that is often called the second conditional or conditional 2. The verb in the if-clause (the protasis) is in the simple past tense, while the main clause (the apodosis) contains the modal would plus a bare infinitive (in this case be). One use of the second ...


-1

From EduFind.com: The given sentence is an example of TYPE 2 CONDITIONAL sentence. The type 2 conditional is used to refer to a time that is now or any time, and a situation that is unreal. These sentences are not based on fact. The type 2 conditional is used to refer to a hypothetical condition and its probable result. In type 2 conditional ...


0

When this survey asks are there ways....you [will] engage with other male members of your community the surveyers are hoping (perhaps naively) for more than the Macmillan Dictionary meaning: to make an effort to understand and deal with someone... The survey is asking if respondent will become a missionary among other males for non-gender based ...


0

It is indeed possible that a physical injury causes an illness. Quite common when the physical assault triggers a mental problem. (For example, if someone was attacked, all injuries heal, and now that person is ill and incapable of leaving their home without panic attacks). Another obvious way is getting ill after being stabbed with an infected knife, or ...


0

As regards the incident, mentioned by the OP, the report in today's Guardian starts: A woman was critically ill in hospital after a man stabbed shoppers in the car park of a supermarket... One advantage of using ill is that it is a more flexible word than injured when describing an ongoing condition. Injured does not lend itself to expressions like ...


0

It means "live and let live", pronounced with a sort of Elmer Fudd accent (an accent in which L sounds are replaced with W sounds and which is presumably supposed to be typical of Toledoans). As described in the Urban Dictionary, "live and let live" is an idiom which expresses the idea that all should be able to live their lives in the manner they want to, ...


2

"To compete for the control of a corporation" This reads well when it's a person within the company competing in a legal context. Where the competition is about having legal standing to lead the company. "To compete for the control over a corporation" This reads well when it's corporations competing to control another corporation. This would ...


0

Trailed there is figurative, and means in context "To be slower than another in reaching a position or opinion, or in drawing a conclusion." The market's behavior showed that it believed such a hike in interest rates was not yet called for and was therefore unlikely to happen.


3

One of the meanings of ill is simply the antonym of well. In this case the word does apply in your example. An injured person isn't well. You are right however, in that it is more common for ill to refer to an illness. The BBC does frequently in its reports state "One woman is in a critical condition...". This is often a direct quote from a hospital ...


2

Macmillan defines it as not healthy, because of a medical condition or an injury (emphasis added) Other online dictionaries talk about poor health, not precluding injury as a cause. Also, the term terminally ill seems to be used for patients near death, regardless of the cause. [The above relates to AmE. Can't speak for BrE]


1

Enrollment is The Act Of Been Enrolled.enrolled is to be registered with an institution once tii you get off or to be signed up. While Registration is mainly a form fill system to provide a details for an institution.


4

Trail: (when: intr, often foll by behind) to lag or linger behind (a person or thing). (Collins) The sentence suggests that markets expectations in the past have followed and are still following what the FED is doing, or is expected to do, in terms of monetary policy.


1

'TRON' is an early BASIC programming language debugging command, short for 'TRACE ON', which tells the computer to trace the programs run-time execution and report various variables back to the programmer. To turn the feature off, use 'TROFF'. See TRON command on Wikipedia


4

Here, engage with means: 2.1 (engage with) Establish a meaningful contact or connection with: "the teams needed to engage with local communities" — ODO


2

They are saying: "Are there ways you will use what you learned through our academy to engage with (i.e. understand and deal with) other male members of your community?" engage with: (Macmillan Dictionary) engage with someone/something to make an effort to understand and deal with someone or something


2

Simplify the sentence: We can terminate this Agreement upon 90 days notice "Upon" in this sentence is used to say that something has arrived. So, when 90 days notice has been given, the agreement can be terminated. You are correct in your understanding that the termination will happen 90 days after you give notice.


4

Longfellow is alluding to an original line from Hippocrates, the father of medicine. The Greek is literally, "the art is long, life is brief". The art in question is medicine, and the sentiment of the original quote is that you never really live long enough to master your craft. The phrase is more popular in Latin translation ars longa, vita brevis.


1

The comments from Phil Sweet and sumelic match my intuitive sense of the words and the definitions in my dictionary (Summary: impair = to weaken; impede = to obstruct). It's a clean distinction in theory. A car that is blocked by a boulder in the road is clearly impeded and not impaired. But in practice, I think it can be muddy, esp. as you get more ...


1

When a help desk or support center marks a request "resolved", it means it is finished: Any questions have been answered, tasks or work items have been completed, the issue you reported has been satisfactorily addressed, etc.


1

Increase your rating as you develop your coding skills while you evaluate the skills of other developers. The syntax you've chosen is similar to an imperative construction, although it is a shorthand way (similar to caption-style) of stating a fact, in the indicative. To eliminate the overtones of command you can do this: As you develop your coding ...


0

"Improve your coding skills by collaborating with other developers." I've not explicitly mentioned "ratings" in any way, nor have I mentioned peer reviews but both are implied. Working collaboratively means that you'd be looking at other people's work and they'd be looking at yours. The logical (and most common) outcome of this is that everyone gets ...


1

He died at a time when the singular purpose of the organization had been separated into opposing factions.


2

I think it means that there was some movement, as in some organization with certain ideas. His death came at a time when the organization split up into two or more opposing factions. Movement, from ODO A group of people working together to advance their shared political, social, or artistic ideas Split, from ODO (With reference to a group of ...


3

Sick is not typically a verb. It is sometime used in vernacular with "up" as a synonym (or perhaps a euphemism) for vomit. In "He has been sick", sick is an ordinary adjective. Compare "he has been poor" or "he has been dizzy". "He has been sicking" is not English. Edit: Professor Yaffle reminds me that sicken is certainly a verb, meaning "to become ...



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