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4

I think the chipmunk is mostly referring to the rhythm of the poem - the length of each line: long, short, long, short, ..., short, long, short, long. It certainly looks that way written down: each line alternating in and out. The chipmunk only heard it read however so it would depend on how the bat voiced it but I find myself reading it in an 'in and out' ...


2

In the most general case, delinquent is used to mean 'one who breaks rules or laws.' Basically, a troublemaker. That fits with the tone here, I think.


1

The word delinquent has connotations of criminal negligence, from the latin "away leave". When applied to a teenager it typically means one who commits petty crimes out of boredom. A delinquent shepherd would be one who was negligent in his responsibilities to his flock, who indulges in immoral behaviour which leads the flock astray, and who fails to teach ...


3

It sounds like the author is indeed using delinquent to mean an offender of a minor crime. While it is typically used in reference to teenagers, it isn't limited to that age group. The text here is using shepherd to refer to the priests, who are supposed to be shepherds of the flock. The priests are committing an offense and the author is placing part of ...


0

Definitions of irony (and there are quite a few) emphasize the notion of incongruity—between something expected and something that comes to pass, for example, or between something said or done in a dramatic situation and how the action is understood by the audience. Here is the entry for irony in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): ...


0

The sentiments are so similar that it's really just a matter of style. Since you care about the subtleties, I think the gist of the matter is this: In usually designates encasement by the limits by or actual presence. It means you hope or believe the endeavors somehow possesses the quality of luck that will make them successful. To usually designates a ...


0

Wishing luck to your endeavors... ? I'd rather wish you luck in all your endeavors. Here's why: The endeavors are yours, directly dependent upon yourself, your state of being, circumstances, etc. If I wished you luck (better circumstances in your favour), you could win or become more successful. Note: A google hit may bring up all that in current usage ...


1

Telling someone "Good Luck in all your" sounds like you are telling the person good luck. Telling someone "Good Luck to all your" sounds like you are telling the endeavors' good luck, not the person. To make the latter correct, you could say "Good Luck to you in all your endeavors'".


1

Answer "C" is in fact the correct answer. The words you've highlighted give you your answer. The writer's argument can be summarized as follows: The teaching of science may have succeeded somewhat in familiarizing today's students with the universe in which they are living and acquainting them with great scientific discoveries, BUT the teaching of ...


0

Whatever:relative pronoun meaning ANYTHING THAT What: relative pronoun meaning THAT WHICh All that:(noun) meaning that, and everything similar. In the light of the foregoings,it appears that all the sentences are correct with the exception that (THAT) in the sentence__Like whatever that pertains to crime......___is redundant.


3

This is a famous short story about a woman suffering from a "nervous" condition, which today we would probably call depression. Her husband forces her to maintain a regimen of inactivity that slowly makes her condition worse. In the lines you quote, she talks about those things that she's still able to do -- dress, entertain, and order things from shops. ...


0

In this context, "a good scrap" means "a good fight." Other synonyms would be: "A good ____ " brawl row spar Source: google word definition #2


1

Without context, this is almost impossible to determine for sure. However, since "Drinkle" is capitalized, this suggests the sentence means "This is one of the daughters in the Drinkle family."


2

It is a term used in gambling. If a bookmaker accepts a large bet, let's say on a horse, he may want to cover himself against the possibility of paying out a large sum. So he 'lays it off' with another bookmaker, by placing an amount on the same horse. So if the horse wins he collects money as well as pays out. This is known as bet-covering. The same ...


2

"To cover a bet" means have the money to pay if you lose. The bet here is the fallacy called "Pascal's Wager" after the philosopher who wrote about it. It says that you might as well bet that God exists because if He does, then you win, and winners don't have to pay anything. They get paid. And if God doesn't exist, then there's nobody to pay. In other ...


3

I believe this refers to taking precautions in case you lose your gamble. In context, if a god does exist, you "win" your bet and enjoy the afterlife. Since believing doesn't adversely affect your life, it appears to be the superior option, allowing you to avoid losing (since you either "win" or "not lose"). On the other hand, if you were to actively ...


1

This is a passage from Christopher Hitchens' book God Is Not Great in which he disparages the idea that Christ died for our sins. He notes that "our everyday idiom is sound" to contemn the term "scapegoat." I think "parlance" is a better term than "idiom," in that we consider someone who has been scapegoated to be someone wrongly blamed for the trespass of ...


1

I would liken the use of the word Sound in this context to follow Oxford's definition 1.1 under the adj form. Based on reason, sense, or judgment Ex: the scientific content is sound So considering that the idiom 'scapegoating' is generally used with a negative connotation the sentence is saying. because "We cannot, like fear-ridden peasants of ...


2

The phrase "to turn on" means to activate or make the state of something different than it was before in such a way that it did not have a certain property before the action, but once turned on it does. IT can also mean that a certain property is made to be no longer dormant. For a light being turned on, this means that the property of light coming out of ...


0

The answer of E is correct because it contradicts the original argument, and C isn't a good answer because it is too specific. It says that there are few French tourists eating in NY burger joints. This would be a better answer if it said: French tourists eating junk food, but it does not. The OP is treating this question as if the NY burger joints are ...


2

C. is not really about the point the author is discussing the French are very fond of ‘junk food’ does not imply where French tourists eat in NY since it is a situation of eating during lunch break not during holidays. Moreover the author says that [they] are not too proud to eat it. So, it is going in the same author's way. They are not proud ...


-1

I think it's short for docket, which Noah Websters' 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language defines several ways. In this context it probably means: An alphabetical list of cases in a court, or a catalogue of the names of the parties who have suits depending in a court. In some of the states, this is the principal or only use of the word. ...


0

Well, Noah Webster's 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language actually has a very different definition of the word Cynic that's quite different from any other dictionary: CYNIC, CYNICAL, a. [Gr., canine, a dog.] Having the qualities of a surly dog; snarling; captious; surly; currish; austere. Cynic spasm, a kind of convulsion, in which the ...


0

Maybe the offended cynic does not have any imagination, and views products of the imagination with suspicion. Like so many modern people, the offended cynic refuses be reminded of the missing portion of their humanity, but prefers to accuse others of ignoble motives.


0

The origin of macabre is unclear and the meaning is vague. Sometimes it means connected somehow with death, sometimes it simply means horrible as in your phrase. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/macabre


16

There are three definitions of cynic, according to the American Heritage Dictionary:- A person who believes all people are motivated by selfishness. A person whose outlook is scornfully and habitually negative. A member of a sect of ancient Greek philosophers who believed virtue to be the only good and self-control to be the only means of ...


0

I'll go with the dildo explanation, but it may help to keep in mind traditional European beliefs about the unicorn. For much of medieval Europe, the iconic story was that of the Physiologus, in which a unicorn is uncatchable by ordinary means. Instead, if it is presented with a virgin maiden, "As soon as the unicorn sees her, it lays its head on her lap". ...


0

By way of corroborating the answers that have already been submitted, I note that John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009), has this entry for "play a blinder": play a blinder perform very well informal Dating from the 1950s, blinder is a colloquial term for 'dazzlingly good piece of play' in sport, especially in rugby or ...


0

The line "Lipstick coated, long gold-rolled Cigarette-holder pipped" is clearly the description of the voice. Smokers have a raspy voice because of thick phlegm and irritation in the voice box. MW defines pip as an irritation or human ailment. The origin of the word is loosely based on the the Latin term pituita meaning phlegm. Smokers are prone to suffer ...


2

Having watched the episode carefully for any 'in' jokes and finding none referring to a unicorn, I think it must have meant to mean a dildo. It doesn't really work as that (as a joke in my opinion) and I think the line was probably changed from an original more graphic 'item' to appease the censors.


6

Wikipedia delicately says of the unicorn reference that its "true nature ... is not revealed." Imdb warns parents that it's a reference to a vibrator. Given the date the episode claims to portray, November 1487, they probably mean a dildo


1

In every example it has the meaning of something been done/happening/occurring not for the first time. Maybe even as the summary of a longer statement, as mentioned in a comment above. 1., 2. and 3. Here something happened that did occur once or more often before. It is just a repeated behavior or thought or practice or event. Like it happened ...


0

the word innocuous means not harmful or offensive


2

I was thinking of anodyne in the sense of "inoffensive", but it has the implication of being dull.


3

A phrase that has been poured over so all improper implications, offensive ideas, implications of blame, and challenging statements have been removed has been sanitized.


2

A answer that is politically correct usually implies it won't offend most people. It does not imply anything abut politics.


0

Diplomatic would fit the bill (as answered above). But I'd say, in a following discussion of your response at the bar among your critics, the word "equivocate" would arise.


3

Diplomatic would be a suitable word. Another appropriate term would be tactful. careful not to offend or upset other people : having or showing tact mirriam-webster.com


6

I would call it diplomatic Diplomatic: Of or concerning diplomacy: Diplomacy: The art of dealing with people in a sensitive and tactful way (Definitions from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/ and not the only definitions of those words) Please +1 Josh61's answer below. He did say it first.


4

A neutral answer is generally given not to take sides with any of the party involved: belonging to neither side in a controversy: on neutral ground. belonging to neither kind; not one thing or the other. The Free Dictionary or a diplomatic answer may refer an answer which tries to avoid possible conflicts: Using or marked by tact and ...


0

I think it means he/she will, in return for being given some clothes (gear), wear those clothes (promote them) in the other photo-shoots (the enough work they already have) and let it be known what clothes they are. I don't think it means being paid for doing photo-shoots with clothing, however expensive it may be.


1

It probably means that the model already has enough stuff to do for a living, but she would not mind doing more (helping the advertiser promote their clothes by doing another photo shoot) if she got gear (those clothes) in return.


1

In this case it means that those who are involved in the Biodiesel Industry cannot understand either the policy which motivates the Government/ Ministry/ Department to make changes in the standard, or is calculating unpredictable effects on cost and sales. . http://www.thefreedictionary.com/puzzled puzzled (adjective) - - filled with bewilderment; at ...


0

The words “per head” took on a macabre ring. The horrific and well-known Rwandan Genocide of Tutsi by their Hutu neighbours involved beheading among other maiming actions. A common tool to kill was the machete. In retrospect this event now ties the words “per head” to these killings instead of just a count. Per head now sounds like death. macabre ring: a ...


1

It's like that famous epigram, or if you prefer, philosophical reflection: If a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, does it make a sound? Likewise a question on a Stack Exchange website, if it has been asked but never answered, and never commented, was it ever seen? The badge offers a small consolation, it tells the OP that at ...


0

Self-explanatory: Image source: genius.com


3

The notion of the loneliness of the tumbleweed in the U.S. West is captured by the song "Tumbleweed," by Douglas Van Arsdale (made famous by Joan Baez): I feel like a lonesome tumbleweed/rolling across an open plain,/I feel like something nobody needs/I feel my life drifting away,/drifting away - I feel like a broken wagon wheel/when I can't hop a ...


0

In sum, it more important to the author to rely on the collocation the bed to describe Toto's action than it is to make sure you know which bed he is referring to. Otherwise: Use of the definite article usually means that the author assumes you can readily identify which bed he is talking about. That is what definite references such as the bed mean. Whether ...


3

The task of persuading ordinary Muslims to leave Congress was made much easier by the long ostentatious hours he spent in tending his spinning wheel. The implied (negative) meaning is that Gandhi's talk of Hinduism, his cultish practices and his giving a lot of attention to his spinning wheel lead to the departure of Muslims from Congress to join ...


4

The spinning wheel, or 'charkha', was used by Mahatma Gandhi to weave his own fabric. Any resemblence of the expression to any idiom in your native language is sheer coincidence. PS - His aim wasn't to promote Hinduism, but to boycott foreign clothes; which was in the interest of the poor people working in the Indian clothing industry. From wikipedia: ...



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