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14

Camphor is used (among other applications) as a repellent against moths and other insect pests. So I take the mention of 'retirement in camphor' in the extract you cited as a somewhat laboured reference to the fact that for nine months of the year, the author's foster-motherhood was 'in mothball storage'. Her comment that during the three months of the ...


10

The word 'catch' is used figuratively. It implicitly compares the person to a (good) fish that one has caught. A related use: He | she is 'a keeper', that is, not a fish that one would toss back into the water. A fish worth keeping. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/keeper?show=0&t=1419169461 When words are used figuratively, over time the ...


9

She is just saying that, from your description, the girl sounds like a perfect find, for dating or marrying. catch - (noun) one worth catching especially as a spouse. Merriam-Webster


5

This hip means cool or trendy. Ramu wore a T-shirt with a logo of his newspaper and old pair of jeans. He looked unusually cool for someone in a crisis. The preceding sentence describes Ramu's clothes. That would rule out hip1 and hip2, since we're talking about neither a pelvic bone nor part of a rose; however hip3 is related to fashion, "especially ...


4

In general, an injunction stops somebody from doing something, a mandate requires somebody to do something, and a verdict is the final decision handed down by the bench. In light of the edit: Black's definition of mandate. Note that a mandate is directed at the official responsible for enforcement, and it's a mandate to enforce the will of the court. An ...


3

These verbs both mean to put someone or something in the place of another. To replace is to be or to furnish an equivalent or substitute, especially for one that has been lost, depleted, worn out, or discharged: To replace: to provide a substitute for (something broken or unsatisfactory, for example) - AHDEL To substitute: To put or use (a person ...


3

He is referring to slavery; bondsman - a male slave President Lincoln’s Second inaugural Address , 1865: Just 701 words long, Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address took only six or seven minutes to deliver, yet contains many of the most memorable phrases in American political oratory. The speech contained neither gloating nor rejoicing. Rather, it ...


3

It means worry or apprehension, in this case caused or inspired by the narrator's traveling companion (the governess Madame de la Rougierre, who later turns out to be a sinister character). In the first paragraph, the narrator refers to the sibyl sitting next to her; it is this self-same sibyl which she later names "black Care". Both terms are cases of ...


2

The usage is dialectic, and would be incorrect in standard Englishes. The Beasts of the Southern Wild is set in an impoverished and isolated area of southern Louisiana, and filmed in Terrebonne Parish— deep in Acadiana, where many people speak Cajun English, and some still speak Cajun French. While inconsistent number agreement itself isn't distinctively ...


2

Dan's answer is entirely correct, but I think it's worth adding that Le Fanu was alluding to a famous Latin quotation Post equitem sedet atra cura, usually translated "Behind the horseman sits black Care", though worry or foreboding would do as well. When this was written, a good knowledge of Latin and Greek were indispensable for an educated person (in the ...


2

In this context, "make it" means "succeed". So, if you can't take criticism, you'll never succeed as a writer. Consider: We only have ten minutes to finish the climb. We'll never make it. So, yes, your understanding was correct.


2

It seems to me to be merely a humorous and friendly twist on the conventional formula "Nice to meet you". It sounds quite harmless to me. However, I don't think you could use it in face-to-face conversation, because it depends on email communication for a context that gives it relevance.


2

Once again it depends upon context. There is not much negative implications for the two examples you cite, but in other cases, such as "control freak", there might be. And it's a descriptor which is probably best used in less formal contexts.


2

OP's citation is a mash-up of two well-established usages... 1a: "it worked a treat" (5230 hits in Google Books, primarily BrE) and 1b: "it worked like a charm" (86300 hits) For comparison, these are the "non-standard" versions... 2a: "it worked like a treat" (57 hits) and 2b: "it worked a charm" (145 hits) The meaning is given by ...


2

It's another way of saying "mothballed"


2

It means equally, indicating that each distribution or category has (roughly) the same number of users.


2

According to the dictionary, comprehend simply means understand, but to me the connotations are slightly different. Comprehend seems more "comprehensive" --I would describe it as a deeper and more complete level of understanding. I also see comprehend as dealing more with ability, the mental capacity to grasp something. For instance, I would say "I ...


1

I have never encountered the word submit used with "money"; it is sometimes used with "payment" - but that would mean paying for something, which is different from what you usually do in a bank. COCA (the corpus of Contemporary American English) does not have a single instance of "submit money" (or of "submit the money" or "submit some money").


1

You can..... Comprehend is a verb that originates from the Latin word comprehendere, which means “catch or seize.” When an idea is clear to you and you understand it completely, you comprehend it. to take in or embrace; include; comprise. .....Education is to help students understand the how's and why's. All complicated subjects need you to ...


1

The word "charge" here refers to a piece of persuasive writing by Judge Alexander Adison (of the court of common please for Pennsylvania's fifth circuit) which he presented as grand jury instructions in September 1798. In this charge he defended the constitutionality of the alien and sedition act. In the Life of John Marshall, volume two, page 46: These ...


1

Let's say you did a survey asking 50 users to rate the usability of a website. If there were 40 men and 10 women who took your survey, then the respondents were not evenly distributed according to gender. If 35 people were under the age of 25, and only 5 were over the age of 50, then your sample was not evenly distributed by age. To get a more evenly ...


1

It is simply a mistake (typographical error or otherwise). It should be perspective instead of perceptive.


1

The cited text appears to be about the best way to handle a marketing campaign. 'Lead gen' must be an abbreviation for 'lead generation'. "Twice as many campaigns are for lead gen as customer retention" means that for every one campaign which is designed to keep hold of existing customers ('customer retention'), there are two campaigns which are intended ...


1

"I work it like a treat," is equivalent to, "I do it well"


1

You're thinking of it wrong. Your grouping: They were | laughing out | there when it should be They were | laughing | out there "out there" is a phrase meaning basically something outside or away.


1

Technically, the correct grammar would be "My daddy and I stay right here. The earth is for us" No starting a sentence with "But"; first person nominative singular following another noun for the compound subject of a sentence; plural subject matches plural verb; and no ending a sentence with a preposition, BUT all through the movie, Hushpuppy and many other ...



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