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11

Mush is the traditional cry for encouraging sled dogs—“Mush, you huskies!” Etymonline conjectures first recorded 1862, as mouche, perhaps altered from French marchons! "advance!" (imperative of marcher "to march)"


11

A phoenix is a mythological bird that dies as it reaches old age (literally by burning up, or, if you want, spontaneously combusting) and is reborn (young and beautiful once again) of its own ashes. It is a creature associated with a whole slew of related concepts: long life, rebirth, resurrection, regeneration... In the context of the sentence you quoted, ...


10

Most native English speakers would find nothing strange about an “empty box of matches” or an “empty bottle of beer.” They would readily interpret these phrases as a “box [for] matches” or perhaps a “bottle [previously full] of beer.” If you pointed out that “empty matchbox” or “empty beer bottle” is preferable, a fluent English speaker might agree, or ...


7

Mrs. Mummery is tired. Why is she tired, Mr. Mummery might wonder. "Mrs. Mummery is tired because she works too hard. I warned her, but she insisted on turning out the dining room today" says the help, Mrs. Sutton. "That's what did it. That's why she's resting." (As I am an American, I have never turned out a dining room, but I have cleaned it and ...


6

There's quite a few idioms in there, very suggestive of Mrs Sutton being uneducated / lower class. "Turning out the dining room" - cleaning / tidying the dining room "It was X done it" - incorrect conjugation of "It was X that did it". So Mrs Sutton is (with some incorrect English) saying that the act of cleaning the dining room was what caused something ...


5

These are examples of what are called Phrasal Verbs. A phrasal verb consists of two parts: a verb, practically any verb, like beat, set, run, burn, or take. and a particle, generally the same shape as a preposition, but without an object, like up, out, off, over, and down. There are about 17 particles in English. Phrasal verbs usually mean something ...


5

Depending on the context, it could mean either. It looked like Tom finally had his clumsiness under control, but no. Tom broke another lamp. Here it’s implied that Tom has broken lamps before (and perhaps other things too). Dick and Harriet ran through the corridors, smashing light fixtures. Tom broke another lamp. Here it’s clear that Tom is ...


5

"Where's Waldo" is a game where you have to scan a sketch of a crowd, looking for a particular person. By using where's-waldo as a verb, I think the writer means the student is not going to read the passage, but just scan over it, looking for a few words that resemble the question.


4

I think he means that he likes to give liberty to other people or nations and envies little the act of doing so. But why he envies little is explained in the subsequent paragraphs of this letter. ... I should therefore suspend my congratulations on the new liberty of France, until I was informed how it had been combined with government; with public ...


4

A phoenix is a mythological creature: a bird which is reborn after dying. It's usually associated with fire and the sun and its death often involves burning down to ashes. The usage is a metaphor suggesting that Japan was burned down to nothing, and then reborn as strong as ever in the same way as a phoenix. The sun association was probably not invoked ...


4

No, it means they misunderstood each other. It probably comes from a telephone switchboard analogy. Once, operators had to manually connect two parties with wires. If they put the wires into the wrong plugs, people would think they were talking one party (person) but actually be talking to another. This would cause misunderstandings, as they would be ...


3

All it does is to emphasise that someone has gone about something in a very businesslike way, with determination. It is neither polite nor impolite. And it is not a radical expression. But it is often spoken with irony e.g. emphasising a business-like way of dealing with something that is not normally a business matter, in order to get over the idea of a ...


3

These are examples of idiomatic language. There is no rule guiding idiomatic use; people use it because they've heard it in their region, their home, their peer group. How it starts, I can only guess. Somewhere along the line, someone thought the extra word helped the verb to express more clearly what they wanted to express. Use of idiomatic language can ...


3

If you read the sentence closely a few times, you will understand that 'peer assistance and evaluation' are strategies that are used to 'identify, improve and as necessary, dismiss teachers'. It looks to me that the strategies listed above are used to evaluate teachers and if needed 'dismiss' them if these strategies are not followed. So the word 'dismiss' ...


3

Since 2011 they've added The First Four. The four lowest-seeded teams will play "First Four" games, with the winners advancing as sixteen seeds to play two of the top-seeded teams. The other two first four games will match up the last four teams to receive at-large bids. This is the first round of the tournament according to the NCAA's official bracket. ...


3

To make [a task] one's business is to devote oneself to the task, and treat it as a priority. There is often an implication that the person is taking on a task that no one else is willing or able to do: When I saw what state the club's books were in, I made it my business to ensure that all of the accounts balanced correctly. Depending on the context, ...


3

This is about as silly an argument as I have ever encountered in Shakespearean scholarship — even sillier than the celebrated Impediment of Adipose. Jonson's compliment is a fairly pretty one: “Despite your lack of a Classical Education (like Mine), your work commands the admiration of the Classical Masters.” But the reading Ingleby urges makes no sense at ...


3

I would understand it in the following way: What was the cause of her being unwell? It was (her) turning out the dining room, (that was what has) done it (read: her not being well for "it"). Or: (that has) done it. I would not use the term incorrect English. Sayers renders the way simple uneducated people speak and that is interesting and attractive. If ...


2

"has made it his business to..." means to take on a cause and be an advocate for something. It means the person is applying himself to a challenging course of activity and has made it an important part of his work. In other words, the person has decided it is up to him to do something that others are not doing, and that he deems worthy. When someone has made ...


2

By the age: At the time of reaching the age he was already performing this function. At the age: He began in the same year as reaching the age. Neither implies stopping in any manner. That would be up until the age, meaning he was performing the function and stopped upon reaching that age.


2

Another suggestion... Compare with Through the trees I saw a house. I saw through the trees. I saw a house through the trees. The idea here is the speaker can, using a visual metaphor, 'see through' the sleek talk to something the talk doesn't quite 'obscure' - duplicity.


2

When used as an adjective, compelling is related to compel, has a slightly different meaning. From Merriam-Webster: compelling - adjective \kəm-ˈpe-liŋ\ very interesting : able to capture and hold your attention capable of causing someone to believe or agree strong and forceful : causing you to feel that you must do something In the ...


2

Please note that we have implemented a 1 post approval process for new users. Meaning, a newly registered user with no posts under their belt can post, but will have to wait until a moderator approves it before it shows up. expands to: Please note that we have implemented a 1 post approval process for new users. This means, a newly ...


2

Not necessarily came to blows, but rather they couldn't agree on what they were discussing. English definition of “get your wires crossed” get your wires crossed When people get their wires crossed, they have a different understanding of the same situation: e.g. Somehow we got our wires crossed because I'd got the 23rd written down in my diary ...


2

Travel validation, in this case is basically referring to that very sheet of paper, which will validate your travel. This form is being used to validate whether or not the person in question (you?) is able to travel as an exchange student. The "good standing" portion is going to be subjective and up to the educational institution to decide what that ...


2

"Outer space," or just "space," is the more general term, and usually refers to anything outside the earth's atmosphere. It can even refer to places that are inside the atmospheres of other planets. For example, the obscure Robert Heinlein short story "Tenderfoot in Space" is set on the surface of Venus. I think the current usage of "deep space" is roughly ...


2

I think the answer lies in semantics and logic. Outer space is everywhere outside of an atmosphere. It is simply the space between celestial bodies. You can say anything is outer space. Deep space is in relation to something - meaning far away (how far, I don't know). Our Moon is not in deep space compared to us. However our Moon would be ...


2

There, shepherds play their pipes Pan pipes, an early flute. (Example) and sigh with longing for flirtatious nymphs and goat-footed nature gods Pan was a nature god. He had goat's feet. play in the fields and woods.


1

Fibo, the presentation of your question as a logical argument makes the answer easier if you follow the line of reasoning. You can't have two premises in one of your lines, only one. If "A believes B" is true, and if "B equals C." is true, then (not B equals C, but also, if "D") "A believes C." is true. Adverb placement doesn't matter. John believes ...


1

Because English gets around. The simple verb on it's own is normal in English but when the language was exported to other countries some speakers adopted grammar from their own language into English. So in parts of the US where the inhabitants had spoken Spanish or French they kept their own grammar when speaking English. There are some cases where formal ...



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