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To "give someone five" is to slap hands together in a congratulatory gesture. Most often it is heard in the context of "gimme five" or "high five" (the act of slapping the palms together over the heads of the two participants). In this case, to "slap yourself five" would mean to congratulate yourself. Cf. "give yourself a pat on the back." Edit: See also: ...


5

Romantic in literary studies refers to Romanticism, a term applied retrospectively to a movement which in a wide variety of forms dominated European literature and arts from the late 18th to the late 19th century. The term had been around since at least the early seventeenth century to refer to mediaeval romance and the quality of fancy unrestrained by ...


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The humor in the line is like the joke my brother, who died of AIDS, told me. Q: "What is the most difficult part of having AIDS?" A: Trying to convince your mother that you're Haitian. At that time AIDS was strongly associated with Haiti, and somewhat less so with homesexuality. The gist of the joke was that the mother did not know the AIDS sufferer was ...


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Are you all kidding? Kissing the boss' hand was a sycophantic display. "...I chap easily," means: "If you kiss my hand too much, the skin will become chapped from the excess moisture - and it will be irritating to me - which will not be good for you." It's the boss' way of saying: "If you kiss my butt too much, it'll backfire on you." Get it?


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"Lone wolf" means being solitary and not socializing much. "Skated by" means that the individual "just got by" or was "on autopilot" or otherwise didn't really work at whatever the task was but simply did the minimum. "Doing the bare minimum thing" means the same as "skated by". (And of course "Shut the front door!" is simply an exclamation, similar to ...


1

Well, Etymology Online says "romance" comes from: c.1300, "a story, written or recited, of the adventures of a knight, hero, etc.," often one designed principally for entertainment," from Old French romanz "verse narrative" (Modern French roman), originally an adverb, "in the vernacular language," from Vulgar Latin *romanice scribere "to write in ...


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It says that he was a Romantic poet, the capital R is a first hint that it's not just the word romantic. The reason why Romantic is linked to a page about the Romantic era is because that's exactly what they are referring to. Ie, by Romantic poet they are referring to a poet of the Romantic era (writing in the style associated with that time period).


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Authorship The byline to Jacula Prudentum reads "Selected by Mr. George Herbert, Late Orator of the University of Cambridge," and a note attached to an 1881 edition of the collected works of George Herbert says this: It has been objected that there is no absolute proof that the proverbs [in Jacula Prudentum] were translated by Herbert (see “Notes & ...


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Just to confirm Nancy-Joe Foster's correct answer by quoting from a reliable reference work on U.S. slang, I offer the entries for the relevant senses of nose and bull in Robert Chapman & Barbara Kipfer, Dictionary of American Slang, third edition (1995): nose n underworld by 1830 A police informer = STOOL PIGEON and: bull 1 n by 1850s A peace ...



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