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6

That’s of course eye dialect for just and hayfield: the use of misspellings that are based on standard pronunciations (as sez for says or kow for cow) but are usually intended to suggest a speaker's illiteracy or his use of generally nonstandard pronunciations. (M-W)


5

"State of the art" is used to describe the best in the specified field. "Cutting edge" is the newest, and mostly likely still has problems to be worked out.


4

In answer to question 1, you can't crash 'into' a bend unless there is something to crash into... If there wasn't, one might say: 'came off (the road) at the bend and (then) crashed into a ___ (tree/house/giant grand piano)' As for your examples: 7) Reading the rest of the post, the person is not very literate, example can be discounted as poor ...


3

If any is being used as an ellipsis of If there are any. It's saying the Registrar must make variations if there are any variations, but it's entirely possible that there are not any variations to make.


3

Actually this is not a bad question. When you make a statement and the reply comes back "Noted," you can assume that you have been over-sharing, discussing topics the other person finds objectionable or uncomfortable, or violating some other social taboo. It is a one-word way of saying, "I don't wish to discuss this and I wish you would stop talking about ...


2

Today (as WS2 observes in a comment above) rift is not an especially obscure word in its original geological sense of "fissure, crevasse, or fault"—but perhaps we owe some of our familiarity with the term in that sense to the significance of the Great Rift Valley in eastern Africa as a source of early hominid fossils. Certainly in 1946, when Orwell wrote ...


2

Let's start with etymology. The Pantheon was a physical place where the Gods ( specifically the ones from Ancient Rome) were worshipped. Pantheon (n.): c. 1300, from Pantheon, name of a temple for all the gods built in Rome c. 25 B.C. E. by Agrippa (since 609 C.E. made into the Christian church of Santa Maria Rotonda), from Greek Pantheion (hieron) ...


2

Proxy is a formal expression with the following meanings: the agency, function, or power of a person authorized to act as the deputy or substitute for another. the person so authorized; substitute; agent. a written authorization empowering another person to vote or act for the signer, as at a meeting of stockholders. (Random House Kernerman ...


2

To give a further sense of how claptrap was used in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, I offer these instances as supplements to those given in choster's excellent answer. From a review of "Othello acted by gentlemen and ladies, &C." in The Scots Magazine (March 1751): The gentlemen and ladies who acted, were sumptuously dressed and with great ...


2

The Online Etymology Dictionary gives for claptrap: c.1730, "trick to 'catch' applause," a stage term; from clap (v.) + trap (n.). Extended sense of "cheap, showy language" is from 1819; hence "nonsense, rubbish." The later meaning refers to a device for generating applause, analogous to canned laughter. There is not much distance from there, ...


2

In early 18th century England a clap trap was a cheap, showy line guaranteed to 'trap a clap' from the audience. Finally, it came to mean any kind of nonsense or rubbish. (alpha dictionary)


1

First of all you should have mentioned this is Walt Whitman who is being quoted. Then, you should provided a link (based on a search at Google Books; do you have access to it?): Newlyweds on Tour: Honeymooning in Nineteenth-century America Barbara Penner - 2009 Echoing her three years later, Walt Whitman decried boardinghouses as "fertile ...


1

In the original (which is actually Volume 5, despite what Google Books says it is), line 2 is in parentheses and will is not capitalised: I have also assigned you, and every two or more of you (of whom any one of you[,] the aforesaid A, B, C, D &c. we will shall be one), our justices [...]. The basic structure is obviously this: I ...


1

No. You're assuming that the count noun exception can have the sense exceptionality. Collins lists more senses than most dictionaries freely available online: exception n the act of excepting or fact of being excepted; omission anything excluded from or not in conformance with a general rule, principle, class, etc criticism, esp when it is ...


1

Responses to negated questions like this are difficult for English speakers because we only have the two words "yes" and "no". Thinking about this, if I extended Rachel's responses into longer sentences, I would make them something like "No, it's not that" = "No, that's not the problem." This is responding to the sense of the questions Monica is asking, ...


1

In its most popular sense: A word or phrase used to describe a thing or to express a concept, especially in a particular kind of language or branch of study, Your sentence is describing what the word complication means in the given context. There's no such thing as term complication, in case that was causing the confusion for you


1

Noted is slang for, "I have taken note." Its meaning in context would depend on the speaker's tone of voice.


1

That passage is from the flash fiction story Note To Self by Tracy Guzeman. The protagonist makes a brief list of life memories, those she would chose to forget and those she would chose to remember. She would chose to forget the memory of the look on her son's face, presumably this is one of the most painful memories in her life - she has chosen to accuse ...


1

This is what I thought originally 'Nah' is a distorted 'no'. The whole phrase is a vulgar version of saying 'Are you ill?' or 'Are you crazy?', used to start a conflict. But this is totally wrong, see Janus Bahs Jacquet's comment for the answer. According to his comment that I totally agree with the meaning is: It's cool, isn't it? or Is it cool or not? ...


1

As a speaker of AusEng I would understand all of these quotes as referring to a crash into an object at a bend, most commonly a guardrail. This would be the same for the bicycles. For example 10, where the car crashed into the tree, I would expect that there would be more than a single solitary tree marking the bend in the road - maybe there would be a ...


1

I don't know if this is exclusive to BrEng but you can say: crashed on a bend crashed [on + a bend] See Google Books link for more examples After a long time, he admitted to having stolen it. He said that he had been driving too fast, and had crashed on a bend. A Tragedy Waiting to Happen – The Chaotic Life of Brendan O’Donnell. By Tony Muggivan, ...


1

In the short story in which this sentence appears, we learn that "the Woman" is in fact Conradin's cousin and guardian and that she spends much of her time forbidding Conradin to do various things (on account of his poor health), and that the "he" in the excerpted sentence is Sredni Vashtar, a ferret that Conradin has secretly purchased and hidden in a tool ...



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