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3

The lyric is saying "who can stand her schemes and plans" So I think the appropriate definition of this is from the OED: 4.1 [With modal and usually negative] informal - Be able to endure or tolerate:


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Entropy is the gradual decline into disorder, it is the likelihood that a system will descend into chaos. Full definition here.


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Cooling relations generally refer to relationships that are somehow deteriorating from a previous, probably, more positive state. It may imply also the opposite if the starting point is a negative one. Cooling off is generally used to express the concept of losing intensity, which can be both positive or negative according to the context. In you first ...


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As John Lawler says, this is conversational English with some parts missing, because that's what people do - we don't always speak in fully grammatical, perfectly formed sentences. It's a little clearer with some punctuation: "Sad, sometimes, what happens when kids stop being kids, and grow up to become the kind of adults we simply detest." It can ...


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Based on LDOCE, the pronunciation of the word is: /hı'leəriəs -'ler-/ and that /h/ is actually pronounced, and is NOT silent like the h in the word "hour". So you must use the indefinite article a, rather than an, because what you hear at the beginning of the word, is a consonant sound, rather than a vowel one. a hilarious story Note: This is ...


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The narrator has an ambivalent feeling about love (the 'evils' he refers to in his parenthetical remark). A contemporary writer would most likely include the word 'like' in that description (it is only implied in Shelley's text), and might also change the order of its elements to make the intended meaning better apparent: solitary and joyless remedy ...


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Will has two distinct meanings as a transitive (non-modal, non-auxiliary) verb. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary lists one, but not the other. I found the other in the British version of Cambridge Dictionaries Online (http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/will_10), although from my experience the meaning is as common in American English as in ...


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Merriam-Webster has it as the first-mentioned use: transitive verb : desire, wish That said, it is obviously most often used as an auxiliary verb.


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It is an expression, which means to 'set out on a voyage' (the fishermen were unable to go to sea in such storms) go to sea could also mean to become a sailor. go to sea - to become a sailor. (I went to sea at an early age. When I get older, I'm going to go to sea too). I think here is a related question on this site: Going to the seaside and ...



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