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5

Your example is a deontic command, an instruction that something be done. It is equivalent to using the imperative mode directly: Stop the process to investigate the issue. For modals, English has: Exactly nine verbs that get full-time use: can, could, shall, should, may, might, will, would, must. A couple verbs that get part-time use as ...


3

"We on" -- with the verb dropped -- is not standard English. And for me, the dialects which use that kind of formulation are not the ones I'd pick to impress your market. If that's what you're trying to communicate, On Task (or OnTask, perhaps) would be a better name. Though it may already be in use.


3

Two areas where grammar tends to have less importance than others are in naming enterprises, and in marketing products. And as the name of an enterprise, there is nothing wrong with "WE ON". There is a bit wrong with this in your tag sentence, however, as in the form you propose the tag sentence, it lacks a verb, and is therefore not a sentence, (Although ...


2

"To him who" is not a phrase, and therefore hasn't a definition. "Who is concerned" is a relative clause, modifying "him". Having said that, I can't imagine a native English speaker saying or writing this: it is quite unnatural. It sounds to me like somebody half-remembering the formulaic salutation (at the top of a letter or notice): To whom it may ...


2

Neither is a common phrase, but we can make a good guess from context. By implication, cracking his thumb (I'm guessing in the same sense as "cracking your fingers") is an insulting gesture in the speaker's culture. "Black be its fall" is an idiomatic version of "may its fall be black", and again by implication is intended as a wish that the House of Shaws ...


1

(It's not grammatically meaningful.) WeOn or We On is a terrific company name - great work! For any English speaker, phrases like "right on" or "you're on!" or "we're on it" immediately come to mind. (You can google all these.) On top of that it has a cool, badass, japanese-or-chinese-or-korean vibe. There was once a famous ad agency, "Omon" (eg), it ...



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