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3

It sounds like the author is indeed using delinquent to mean an offender of a minor crime. While it is typically used in reference to teenagers, it isn't limited to that age group. The text here is using shepherd to refer to the priests, who are supposed to be shepherds of the flock. The priests are committing an offense and the author is placing part of ...


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This is a famous short story about a woman suffering from a "nervous" condition, which today we would probably call depression. Her husband forces her to maintain a regimen of inactivity that slowly makes her condition worse. In the lines you quote, she talks about those things that she's still able to do -- dress, entertain, and order things from shops. ...


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I believe this refers to taking precautions in case you lose your gamble. In context, if a god does exist, you "win" your bet and enjoy the afterlife. Since believing doesn't adversely affect your life, it appears to be the superior option, allowing you to avoid losing (since you either "win" or "not lose"). On the other hand, if you were to actively ...


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The phrase "to turn on" means to activate or make the state of something different than it was before in such a way that it did not have a certain property before the action, but once turned on it does. IT can also mean that a certain property is made to be no longer dormant. For a light being turned on, this means that the property of light coming out of ...


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C. is not really about the point the author is discussing the French are very fond of ‘junk food’ does not imply where French tourists eat in NY since it is a situation of eating during lunch break not during holidays. Moreover the author says that [they] are not too proud to eat it. So, it is going in the same author's way. They are not proud ...


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It is a term used in gambling. If a bookmaker accepts a large bet, let's say on a horse, he may want to cover himself against the possibility of paying out a large sum. So he 'lays it off' with another bookmaker, by placing an amount on the same horse. So if the horse wins he collects money as well as pays out. This is known as bet-covering. The same ...


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"To cover a bet" means have the money to pay if you lose. The bet here is the fallacy called "Pascal's Wager" after the philosopher who wrote about it. It says that you might as well bet that God exists because if He does, then you win, and winners don't have to pay anything. They get paid. And if God doesn't exist, then there's nobody to pay. In other ...


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In the most general case, delinquent is used to mean 'one who breaks rules or laws.' Basically, a troublemaker. That fits with the tone here, I think.


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The word delinquent has connotations of criminal negligence, from the latin "away leave". When applied to a teenager it typically means one who commits petty crimes out of boredom. A delinquent shepherd would be one who was negligent in his responsibilities to his flock, who indulges in immoral behaviour which leads the flock astray, and who fails to teach ...


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Telling someone "Good Luck in all your" sounds like you are telling the person good luck. Telling someone "Good Luck to all your" sounds like you are telling the endeavors' good luck, not the person. To make the latter correct, you could say "Good Luck to you in all your endeavors'".


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Answer "C" is in fact the correct answer. The words you've highlighted give you your answer. The writer's argument can be summarized as follows: The teaching of science may have succeeded somewhat in familiarizing today's students with the universe in which they are living and acquainting them with great scientific discoveries, BUT the teaching of ...


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Without context, this is almost impossible to determine for sure. However, since "Drinkle" is capitalized, this suggests the sentence means "This is one of the daughters in the Drinkle family."


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This is a passage from Christopher Hitchens' book God Is Not Great in which he disparages the idea that Christ died for our sins. He notes that "our everyday idiom is sound" to contemn the term "scapegoat." I think "parlance" is a better term than "idiom," in that we consider someone who has been scapegoated to be someone wrongly blamed for the trespass of ...


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I would liken the use of the word Sound in this context to follow Oxford's definition 1.1 under the adj form. Based on reason, sense, or judgment Ex: the scientific content is sound So considering that the idiom 'scapegoating' is generally used with a negative connotation the sentence is saying. because "We cannot, like fear-ridden peasants of ...



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