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17

"The former" refers to "his limitations", "the latter" to "his gifts". The writer is saying that a poet's good qualities, well applied, may enable him to produce delightful work in spite of his limitations.


12

To answer your second question first, one method for tackling difficult sentences is to deconstruct and, if necessary, then reconstruct them in shorter, bite-sized sentences so that the meaning can be teased out. The text you've provided is challenging even for a native English speaker. Part of the difficulty lies with former and latter, expressions that ...


5

This is an old-fashioned use of the word but to mean something like "without". [with negative] archaic Without its being the case that: 'it never rains but it pours' Oxford Dictionary Online So the second half of the quote could be restated as ...so that almost every time two people meet, one of them will be offended by the ostentation ...


4

The stratosphere is the layer above the troposphere but below the mesosphere and the thermosphere. So while the stratosphere is only the 3rd highest atmospheric level for our planet, it is used in the word Stratospheric to describe something extremely high. So something that is a stratospheric success is an amazing success. Tropospheric, Mesospheric and ...


4

This usage of "but" is a bit archaic. When an expression of impossibility or unlikelihood combined with "but", but phrase or clause introduced by the "but" describes an exception to the previously stated rule. As Macmillan puts it: used after negative statements for saying that something does not happen without something else happening or being true ...


3

In this context takes means viewpoints about / on the city. The author's (author of Seven Walks) opinion / point of view / perspective is the meaning of takes in this context. One meaning of take is (as defined in google): a particular version of or approach to something - "his own whimsical take on life". Synonyms include: view of, version of, ...


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


2

Nuance, meaning a subtle difference in shade of meaning, expression or sound exists as both a noun and a verb. An example of its use as a noun would be: He was familiar with the nuances of the local dialect And as a verb: The effect of the music is nuanced by the social situation of listeners. Meaning and examples taken from Oxford Dictionaries Online.


2

WS2's answer provides the definition and offers appropriate examples, but perhaps some further explanation might give some insight into how "nuance" is used. Two singers might sing exactly the same words to exactly the same tune using exactly the same tempo. But if one singer adds some extra depth - perhaps by a slight hesitation before a critical word, or ...


2

to the rhythms of the song mentioned. Much like dancing to but with a slightly advanced take on the predicate as a prefix.


2

In a Biblical context, the word ponder was used to describe the process of clearing a path of obstacles such as large rocks so that a royal procession could proceed without breakdown. Verses that refer to this process are in Proverbs 4:26 "Ponder the path of your feet, then all your ways will be sure". Also in Isaiah 40:3 describes the process: "In the ...


2

There are two meanings of ‘times’ in your example sentences: 'Times’ meaning ‘occasions’ and ‘Times’ expressing multiplication. You tell us that in ‘He can jump rope 3 times more than Judy does’, ‘times’ it is intended an expression of multiplication. In ‘He can jump rope 100 times(150-50) more than Judy does’ it denotes occasions of the action. However, ...


2

"Make it into" means "make its way into." For example, if you were waiting at the end of a very long line of people to get into a concert, I might ask you the next day: "Did you make it into the concert?" Similarly, if you are trying to get to the post office before it closes, you might say, "I'm afraid I'm not going to make it." So you've looked up the ...


2

Peer refers to its original meaning of "status", the other connotations developed later: c. 1300, "an equal in rank or status" (early 13c. in Anglo-Latin), from Anglo-French peir, Old French per (10c.), from Latin par "equal" (see par (n.)). Sense of "a noble" (late 14c.) is from Charlemagne's Twelve Peers in the old romances, who, like the ...


1

Black's Law Dictionary (1968) gives two relevant meanings of peers, just as the Oxford English Dictionary cited by Yoichi Oishi does: PEERS. In feudal law. The vassals of a lord who sat in his court as judges of their co-vassals, and were called "peers," as being each other's equals, or of the same condition. The nobility of Great Britain, being the ...


1

I think you mean inspect (to introspect, like you said, can only mean to examine the thoughts in your own head — to "look into" yourself): Definition & Example (via dictionary.com): to look carefully at or over; view closely and critically: to inspect every part of the motor.


1

Deliberate implies alertness, time limits, some definite decision to be made, perhaps using rules or formula, and a situation that calls for it, as with juries. Ponder lacks those things, and is unscheduled, not routine, perhaps even involuntary (though seldom unwanted), a mind facing nature or the consequences of some natural event, appreciating the ...


1

Discharged would normally carry the meaning of "carried out, performed, executed", as in "he discharged his duties with honour". From there, it slides into "his duties were complete and he could stand down", as in discharge from the military. dictionary.com In your example, his observations were thus simply carried out - made, performed, executed - with ...


1

They all mean the same, which is "I have no pending commits to provide". In part, your confusion comes from the fact that the question is asked of multiple parties simultaneously, none of whom can immediately answer it. The question is "are there any pending commits?" - well, I don't know, because I can only speak for myself unless I've already checked with ...



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