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31

The noun is usually "effect" -- unless in more formal or literary contexts in which case "affect" as a noun can mean feeling or emotion. The verb is generally "affect", although "effect" is possible if the meaning is "put into place" or "carry out". Here are some example sentences: "His plans had no effect on me." "His disconsolate eyes brought on a sad ...


16

The "common errors" site mentions 3 different meanings for affect (verb): When “affect” is accented on the final syllable (a-FECT), it is usually a verb meaning “have an influence on”: “The million-dollar donation from the industrialist did not affect my vote against the Clean Air Act.” “to make a display of or deliberately cultivate.” ...


15

No. "All together" is used to refer to a collection of people or things that are in the same place; for example, "The spoons are all together in the left drawer." "Altogether" means "in sum" or "in total"; for example, "Altogether, the repairs to my car cost $4000."


11

"Corps" and "corpse" both have the same ultimate origin in Latin "corpus" (body). The former derives from the Latin via Medieval French, as far as I know. The French pronunciation "korr" (or slightly Anglicised to "kohr" or even "kore") is thus the historically correct pronunciation. Pronouncing it in any way ending with an "s" is not advisable. It ...


10

I think I would use: I do know I can just click on that person's profile once every week or day, but I think an automated inbox-like feature would be better. Changes: Avoid the slash Use the indefinite article 'an' Use the hyphen instead of quotes


10

Generally speaking, the two words have the same ultimate etymology, from Latin regimin, meaning “position of authority, direction, set of rules”. In many cases, either word can be used, and their meanings have substantial overlap: regime 1 a : regimen1 b : a regular pattern of occurrence or action (as of seasonal rainfall) c : the characteristic ...


4

If I'm not mistaken, another is a contraction of an other, but since an/a mean singular, saying many another would seem incorrect.


3

"All together" means everyone or everything together. Where "altogether" is an adverb and means "all in all," "all told," or "completely." Examples: It's time to sing. All together now! That was altogether too difficult. Source: e Learn English Language References: e Learn English Language Education Bug LEO Network


3

Corps, which is pronounced like "core," and corpse are two entirely different words, and I have never heard anyone pronounce them the same way. I've never heard anyone say Army "corpse" for example.


3

A noose could be loose, I guess. Bonus if you think of "Gallow's Pole". Suggested poem: "If the noose is loose you win. Otherwise, you lose".


2

In the word loose, the Os have gotten loose, they have run loose! there are Os everywhere!!! Makes sense? That's how you remember the difference. Another rather more vulgar, well at any rate sexual, mnemonic: Think of "a loose woman" ... ... the two OO letters are reminiscent of, well, large breasts!


1

Look into is more appropriate as it means, investigating or inquiring into the matter.


1

Alas, I don't know of any quick mnemonics. I think most people are either just very good at these words, and don't need any special tricks; or they are perennially having trouble. I assume you know the difference when you hear them, right? So you somehow have to remember that loose both looks like and rhymes with goose, moose, and noose. Interestingly ...


1

loose is loose and hence has two o's. lose has lost an o and hence is just lose!


1

As verb, loose means set free, release untie, unfasten relax one's grip If the verb you are using doesn't have one of those meaning, then you are probably using lose. I am losing the game. (It's not I am loosing the game.) I have lost appetite. (It's not I have loosen appetite.) The ropes were loosed. (Differently, it would mean you had some ...


1

You're describing homographs, words which are spelled the same way but which mean different things and may be pronounced differently (fore example moped,) and homophones, words which sound alike but mean different things and may or may not be spelled the same way (for example away and aweigh.) There's no search engine for those that I am aware of or could ...


1

Undeniably the construction is less common than it was, but it's still perfectly standard English... ...which includes 8300 written instances in Google Books from the 21st century. Note that it's the equivalent of "Like many others", not "Like many other", unless followed by a plural noun (where "Like many other children" equates to "Like many another ...


1

"Many a" is an idiom, a fossilised remnant of a construction which is no longer productive in English. I would say it has a rather archaic flavour itself, and would not be used in formal contexts. "Many another" is an extension of this, and feels odd to me.


1

Compare 1M and 135M, I don't think "like many another" is a standard phrase. I haven't seen it before until now in this question, and I don't think it's correct either.


1

'Regimen' is all but unheard of in Australian English either. We use 'regime', whether it's exercise, diet, military or government contexts.


1

In US English, 'a regime change' is, for example, a coup/junta/putsch in a government 'a regimen change' is, for example, eating more yogurt.


1

A regime usually refers to a system of government. A regimen is a plan that one adheres to (i.e. regimented). People misuse regime a lot of the time when they mean regimen, especially relating to diets.


1

The rule that mostly works it this: affect = verb, think "a" for action, wheras effect = noun, the result of the action to remember: "a" comes before "e" in the alphabet, and you must affect something to cause an effect



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