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I believe the fallacy is called Affirming the Consequent http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affirming_the_consequent also called the converse fallacy. As for an adjective that applies to X and Y's relationship, I would say they are not mutually implicative , because one implies the other, but the other does not imply the first. But this is not saying much. ...


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partial implication or better potential implication/inference ("venomous [spider]" might mean "deadly [for the man]") come to mind in terms of the logical relationship.


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In mathematical terms, "any object in A and B" expresses x in A and B at the same time. So definitely 3 -- intersection of A and B. With respect to: any object in A and any object in B ... think any x in A and any y in B. any object in A or any object in B ... think any x in A or any y in B. any object in A or B ... think any x in A or B. ...


2

Beaches are dangerous because 95% of shark attacks happen at the beach. (Of course, because humans usually don't spend their time in mid-ocean) Statistically, you're most likely to die within 5 miles of your house, so that is the most dangerous place to be. (Of course, because that where most people spend most of their time) The majority of ...


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The most well known context in which I think #1 occurs is the stereotypical Chinese menu, where diners could create a fixed-price, family-style meal by choosing items from different categories (appetizers, entrees, etc.). This was typically expressed as Choose 1 from Column A, 2 from Column B, .... Conjunctions like and and or were avoided to prevent ...


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I found some good phrases in wikipedia's article on "misuse of statistics," and a book called Sense and Nonsense of Statistical Inference: Controversy: Misuse, and Subtlety, which I found by googling my first idea, lousy statistics. Here are a few possibilities: cherry picking, bad statistics, nonsense disguised as "statistics," sensationalism disguised as ...


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I don't think you can apply one word in this case. Misinterpretation is not malicious in any way. It is a lack of understanding or unwittingly coming to the wrong conclusion by using data badly. Misrepresentation, on the other hand, is malicious. There is an intent to deceive and control a situation through half truths and outright falsehoods. I cannot ...


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This is the Texas Sharpshooter Fallacy. From Wikipedia: The Texas sharpshooter fallacy is an informal fallacy which is committed when differences in data are ignored, but similarities are stressed. From this reasoning a false conclusion is inferred.... The name comes from a joke about a Texan who fires some gunshots at the side of a barn, ...


1

There are logical fallacies implicit in the examples that you cite. Logical fallacies don't necessarily rely on use of numbers but they are the true issue with your examples. Nevertheless, the phenomenon of deliberately misrepresenting statistics has been called lying with numbers. There is a well known quote, with popular, but apocryphal attribution to ...


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Perhaps: "skewed statistics" About 914 results Also: predisposed, distorted, slanted. biased, prejudiced, partial, partisan, one-sided, bigoted, discriminatory, distorted, warped, twisted, skewed skew transitive verb : to give a bias or disproportionate weight to : distort the list is badly skewed in favor of the subjects with which I ...


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You are probably referring to faulty statistics: While statistics are extremely valuable, they are also notorious for being a means that people use to make false and misleading arguments. An obvious problem with statistics is that they can be simply be fabricated. Of course this could be true with any claim, but because statistics use specific ...



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