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Six times as many As are shot by Bs than the reverse.


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Six times as many As are shot by Bs than vice versa.


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Setting aside any other biases of interpretation, in this case, the distinction is between the active and passive voice: A bird is eaten by a cat. vs. A bird eats a cat. The comparison is likelihood by a multiple of 6: A bird is six times times more likely to be eaten by a cat than to eat a cat. Passive is the opposite of ...


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[Setting aside all questions of the truth of the statment, or the authors original intent] A cop is six times more likely to be shot by someone black than vice-versa. Seems less ambiguous, vice-versa implying a transposition of roles. I much prefer your precise elaboration of the meaning Events in which a cop is shot by someone black are six times ...


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Very similar to what you describe for written text is the use of air quotes when speaking. In my opinion, as air quotes mimic the typographic symbol of quotation marks, the ironic or discrediting use of quotation marks has to have come into play before air quotes did. This site is able to date back the use of air quotes to 1927. Of course one could argue ...


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If she said, "Neither can live while the other lives," then it would be false because, obviously, they are both alive at the same time for most of the series. She says, "neither can live while the other survives," implying that their final showdown has happened and in order to survive, one must vanquish the other, no matter which of the two it is. I think ...


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Yes, it is grammatically correct - but don't ever use it unless it is very clear that it's meant to be a pun - otherwise everyone will just assume you don't know how to spell.


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As for whether it's grammatically correct, I can't say it better than StoneyB did yesterday: "There's nothing wrong with it grammatically; it's very odd semantically, unless you competed in peeling bananas." As for whether something can be grammatically correct even though it doesn't make logical sense, there is plenty of grammatically-correct nonsense out ...


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Scare quotes are often used in the same contexts where you might use the phrase so-called to indicate skepticism or sarcasm. It seems likely to me that this notation is a form of abbreviation of this, they both refer to the literal name that someone or something is called by. For more about so-called, see Does "so called" have a negative ...


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Inconsistent ADJECTIVE 1.0 Not staying the same throughout: ... 2 (inconsistent with) Not compatible or in keeping with: Applying this term to the two examples: "humans consume a high rate of energy" Since humans don't consume rates, their is an inconsistency in the expression. This is likely a poor construction of the more ...



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