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I would call this a controversy, since it is a question/statement that is all-encompassing of both points of view. A debate could follow, to help define which side of the controversy is more pertinent in the defined context. If unresolved, it would remain controversial (as seems to be the case more often than not). This is from ...


1

Since is never used with then. Since has two meanings: "for the reason that" and "happening at a time subsequent to a reference time". For the situation you describe, which uses the first meaning, think about rearranging the sentence: The Pythagorean theorem holds, since it's a right triangle. In the second case, it's very obvious no "then" belongs: ...


0

I don't think the usage is correct. Not citing any sources. Haven't done any research either. Yet, all I have to say is that instead of Since . . . , then . . . it should be Since . . . , therefore . . . In a sentence, the word since implies beginning of a cause / reason / argument. When you have stated your argument / the cause / a reason, you ...


4

The word paradoxical can describe an argument which conflicts with itself in this way. A paradox is an idea that might sound reasonable but is logically impossible or fundamentally beyond comprehension, often due to contradiction of truths it depends on.


2

One might call the argument orthogonal, irrelevant, or not pertinent (all discussed in this article), as it does not indicate a direction in position taking. Another possible construction is not germane: germane (adj.) : relating to a subject in an appropriate way [M-W]


2

Contradictory Argument The question is: A person states an argument to support a position, but that argument could equally support the opposite position. This would be a contradictory argument because the argument gives support to a position, while at the same time nullifying that support.


3

If the argument supports both sides equally and the two sides are contradictory, then neither side logically follows from the premises. That would make the argument a non-sequitur. http://www.theskepticsguide.org/resources/logical-fallacies Non-Sequitur In Latin this term translates to “doesn’t follow”. This refers to an argument in which the ...


26

I would use the idiom cuts both ways. http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/cut+both+ways cut both ways to affect both sides of an issue equally.


1

The construction 'since A , then B' seems fine to me. 'Since' is being used as a shorthand for a modens ponens type argument. Premise 1. The Pythagorean relationship holds for all triangles. Premise 2. (since) this is a right triangle. Conclusion: the Pythagorean relationship holds (for this triangle) Premise 1 is not explicitly stated , it is implicitly ...


7

I agree with @oerkelens's answer, except that I would make an allowance for since...then... in cases where there is a lot of verbiage between the two words. such as a list of reasons, a list of steps in the reasoning, or parenthetical statements. So if St. Paul had followed his usual style, this sentence: Therefore, since we have so great a cloud of ...


2

As has been remarked "Since p, then q" is a corruption of "if p, then q". The latter is a hypothetical sentence (i.e. it expresses a hypothetical relationship between two states of affairs). "Since", however, is a premise indicator; you'd use it in an argument that is based in the actual state of affairs. You can see both at work here: "We agreed two weeks ...


20

Since is synonymous to because in this case. Your sentence is therefore equivalent to *Because it's a right triangle, then the Pythagorean theorem holds. There are two words indicating a causal relationship, because and then. That's one too many. You can use either of these two: Since it's a right triangle, the Pythagorean theorem holds. If it's ...


1

One can write with "damaged" eyesight, or even no eyesight, as others have mentioned. But I would agree that whether he starts with poor or healthy eyesight is unclear: he could be looking through damaged eyes getting better, or damaged eyes getting worse. The answer here is simply that "Decline" and "Deteriorate" both suggest a similar starting point of ...



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