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I think your example only works with the word circle, because it is contextually known that a circle is drawn around something. So it is perhaps not illogical when the thing you're centring around a point is itself round (and around a centre). It could be considered a contamination of revolve around / drawn around with centred on, though. But I don't think ...


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I believe what you are looking for is called the Dunning–Kruger effect. I would quote the Wikipedia page but I think Theodoros Chatzigiannakis puts it better: the Dunning–Kruger effect (...) is a cognitive bias that seems to apply to any activity, ranging from (e.g.) understanding a piece of text to being a doctor. The bias is that people who are ...


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The term "armchair quarterback" is defined by oxforddictionaries.com as A person who advises or offers an opinion on something (especially a sporting event) in which he or she is not actively involved, or about which he or she lacks first-hand or specialist knowledge. The term is related to the sport of American football, in which the player in the ...


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Sometimes even 'and' is used in natural language as logical OR: "You can have coffee and cake" may not mean that you can only have both and not one of them. Or "you can have chocolate spread and Gouda cheese on your sandwich". Often, in natural language writing (especially in a formal setting, such as technical or business documentation) "and/or" is used to ...


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I signed up for this site and answered questions to gain reputation so I could specifically answer this question as it is closed for answers without spending reputation. Before answering the question though, I want to address the ambiguous pronoun of Him as I do not believe it refers to Harry Potter. There is no reason for it to be an ambiguous pronoun as ...



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